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Rework Business Intelligent Und Einfach

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Most business books give you the same old advice: Write a business plan, study the competition, seek investors, yadda yadda. If you're looking for a book like that, put this one back on the shelf. Rework shows you a better, faster, easier way to succeed in business. Read it and you'll know why plans are actually harmful, why you don't need outside investors, and why you're Most business books give you the same old advice: Write a business plan, study the competition, seek investors, yadda yadda. If you're looking for a book like that, put this one back on the shelf. Rework shows you a better, faster, easier way to succeed in business. Read it and you'll know why plans are actually harmful, why you don't need outside investors, and why you're better off ignoring the competition. The truth is, you need less than you think. You don't need to be a workaholic. You don't need to staff up. You don't need to waste time on paperwork or meetings. You don't even need an office. Those are all just excuses.  What you really need to do is stop talking and start working. This book shows you the way. You'll learn how to be more productive, how to get exposure without breaking the bank, and tons more counterintuitive ideas that will inspire and provoke you. With its straightforward language and easy-is-better approach, Rework is the perfect playbook for anyone who’s ever dreamed of doing it on their own. Hardcore entrepreneurs, small-business owners, people stuck in day jobs they hate, victims of "downsizing," and artists who don’t want to starve anymore will all find valuable guidance in these pages.


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Most business books give you the same old advice: Write a business plan, study the competition, seek investors, yadda yadda. If you're looking for a book like that, put this one back on the shelf. Rework shows you a better, faster, easier way to succeed in business. Read it and you'll know why plans are actually harmful, why you don't need outside investors, and why you're Most business books give you the same old advice: Write a business plan, study the competition, seek investors, yadda yadda. If you're looking for a book like that, put this one back on the shelf. Rework shows you a better, faster, easier way to succeed in business. Read it and you'll know why plans are actually harmful, why you don't need outside investors, and why you're better off ignoring the competition. The truth is, you need less than you think. You don't need to be a workaholic. You don't need to staff up. You don't need to waste time on paperwork or meetings. You don't even need an office. Those are all just excuses.  What you really need to do is stop talking and start working. This book shows you the way. You'll learn how to be more productive, how to get exposure without breaking the bank, and tons more counterintuitive ideas that will inspire and provoke you. With its straightforward language and easy-is-better approach, Rework is the perfect playbook for anyone who’s ever dreamed of doing it on their own. Hardcore entrepreneurs, small-business owners, people stuck in day jobs they hate, victims of "downsizing," and artists who don’t want to starve anymore will all find valuable guidance in these pages.

30 review for Rework Business Intelligent Und Einfach

  1. 4 out of 5

    Peyton Stafford

    Good standard small business advice. Notes: Prioritize visually. Make tiny decisions. Do less. One downing not one updoing. Don't be a whore to our customers. build anaudeience Hold meetings at site of problem, not in meeting room. Invite as few as possible. Divide problems and projects into pieces small enough to easily estimate time and effort required. Make short lists to avoid feeling overwhelmed. Prioritize visually, with next task at top of list. Make attainable goals. Use tiny decisions to work Good standard small business advice. Notes: Prioritize visually. Make tiny decisions. Do less. One downing not one updoing. Don't be a whore to our customers. build anaudeience Hold meetings at site of problem, not in meeting room. Invite as few as possible. Divide problems and projects into pieces small enough to easily estimate time and effort required. Make short lists to avoid feeling overwhelmed. Prioritize visually, with next task at top of list. Make attainable goals. Use tiny decisions to work through even large projects. Don't copy competitors. Decomodify your product. Pick a fight. Do less and be easier to use. Don't watch competitors. Create something new. Say no by default. Use the power of no to get your priorities straight. Be true to a type of customer rather than to specific customers. Don't confuse enthusiasm with priorities. Build an audience by teaching customers rather than paying for advertising. Be open about your processes, flaws and opinions. This will create more credibility than trying to appear perfect. Press releases are spam. Phone reporters. Cultivate bloggers and writers for trades rather than general publications. Use Freemium model. Everything is marketing. Hiring -- don't hire someone until you've tried to do the work yourself. Hire only as a last resort. Ignore resumes. Check cover letter. Look for 6 months+ experience, but after that the learning curve flattens. Hire managers of 1 -- self-directed people who can set their own goals and reach them without help. Hire great writers. Give applicants a brief assignment to see if they are a good fit. Damage control -- tell your customers when there's a problem. They will respect you more than if you try to hide it. Get back to people quickly. Value their time. Expect them to object to change. Good work environments result from trust, autonomy, privacy. Don't require approval. Send people home at five. Don't create policies because one person did something wrong once. Sound like you. Speak and write simply. Avoid jargon and buzz words. Don't imply ultimatums or demands by using words like need, must, can't, etc.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Janet Richards

    This is another book I can't put down. Nothing in this book is earth-shattering or amazing. It's the little things you have suspected to be true - but someone who makes more money than you tells you is not true. It's what you say to your friends over lunch. It's support for being feisty in work and in life. I'm highlighting a sentence in almost every chapter that I want to remember. Again - not because I don't know it - but because I don't want to forget it. And I don't want to fool myself that This is another book I can't put down. Nothing in this book is earth-shattering or amazing. It's the little things you have suspected to be true - but someone who makes more money than you tells you is not true. It's what you say to your friends over lunch. It's support for being feisty in work and in life. I'm highlighting a sentence in almost every chapter that I want to remember. Again - not because I don't know it - but because I don't want to forget it. And I don't want to fool myself that it's not true just because another business book says the opposite.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amr

    The feeling I got when I read the praise of the book in the first few pages was "This book is over-praised". When I finished it, I still have the same feeling. Maybe it's just me, but I think that if you're gonna challenge the foundations of doing business, you gotta back it up with something more that "That's how we did it, and it worked for us". The book makes a great case against all the elements of doing business (planning, raising capital, meeting, communication, workplace, organizing, etc.) The feeling I got when I read the praise of the book in the first few pages was "This book is over-praised". When I finished it, I still have the same feeling. Maybe it's just me, but I think that if you're gonna challenge the foundations of doing business, you gotta back it up with something more that "That's how we did it, and it worked for us". The book makes a great case against all the elements of doing business (planning, raising capital, meeting, communication, workplace, organizing, etc.) but it doesn't offer strong alternative and it certainly doesn't make a strong case for the alternative that it's offering. Some of the criticism is just ridicules like Don't make long term plan and Stop calling yourself an entrepreneur, call yourself a starter. Who cares? A lot of the criticism is filled with ".. that doesn't mean you should do away with this item, because it's still important..". If it's still important then why come out against it like it's some kind of a disease. Other criticism falls under the category of a clever argument rather than a logical one, like "Learning from mistakes is overrated", you should instead learn from your successes. Well, what if I'm just starting and all I have is my first failure?? Some ideas are just confusing. On page 159: "And of course, you want all that right away. So you drop everything else you're working on and begin pursuing your latest, greatest idea. Bad move." And on the same page "So let your latest grand ideas cool off for a while first." On page 271: "Inspiration is like fresh fruit or milk: It has an expiration date. If you want to do something, you've got to do it now. You can't put it on a shelf and wait two months to get around it." (eyes wide open of amazement) The book offer some good idea when it comes to marketing and hiring and more importantly it offers you a chance to break out of business traditions that has been built over decades and now accepted as a given. The point you should be taken from the book is that you should break free from all these rules and follow only the ones you feel that they make sense but it doesn't make it that clear. One very important thing is the book audience. This book is NOT for people working in any industry. Most of the ideas of this book are more suited for digital industries (especially software) rather than more transitional industries. What is worse is that the book doesn't offer that distinction, it actually states very clearly that this book is for anyone who started a business, wants to start a business, or even working in a job they hate. To sum up, "Follow your heart" is good motivation to jump off the cliff of career security into the uncharted territories of starting a business, it might be helpful from time to time when making decisions but it's not a business strategy.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Arjen

    Don't read this book. It is full of obvious stuff that I basically agree with but the writing style and argumentation are beyond annoying. The pattern is as follows: "Lot's of people say you can't do X. But look at us! We did X, so it is possible". For me that reads as: "Lot's of people say you shouldn't base your life's path on winning the lottery. But look at me! I won the lottery, so it is possible". Spend your 10 euros on drugs or hookers or alcohol and have some fun in life.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    This is one of those books where I agree with the general message but don't necessarily like the delivery. Rework is a very slight read. It feels more like a series of blog posts than anything as formal as a novel. The tone is that of a manifesto, and evidence is basically anecdotal. The overall argument is that we should redo how we do work (hence, "rework"); Fried et al make an argument for leaner, more flexible organizations, with few of the obvious structures of the average US company This is one of those books where I agree with the general message but don't necessarily like the delivery. Rework is a very slight read. It feels more like a series of blog posts than anything as formal as a novel. The tone is that of a manifesto, and evidence is basically anecdotal. The overall argument is that we should redo how we do work (hence, "rework"); Fried et al make an argument for leaner, more flexible organizations, with few of the obvious structures of the average US company (meetings, strategic plans, etc). However, all of the content is highly skewed toward certain types of workplaces. While Fried convinces me that all this stuff works for 37signals (a small software company), he doesn't make any sort of real case for this being applicable to different types of organizations, especially those that have an in-person element (you can't open a retail building if you let everyone telecommute, for example) or those that necessarily work on a larger scale. Overall: a lot of preaching to the choir.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Darth J

    Review also posted on My Bookshelf is Ready. Is "Rework" worth it? Let me work it I put my thing down Flip it and reverse it - Maya Angelou

  7. 5 out of 5

    Amir Tesla

    I deeply like such books. A compilation of wisdom that are earned through years of direct experience. The results of numerous try and error and what really works and what doesn't.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Louise

    Rework is quick and easy to read, which speaks to the philosophy the book is shilling: get things done -- which coincidentally speaks to me. Nothing in this book can be learned that can't be learned from the Signal vs. Noise blog from 37signals. That doesn't mean this book is unnecessary. On the contrary, it's handy to have a collection of business tips and anecdotes bound in one neat little volume. This was my first business book and I think I got off pretty easy. There was a minimum of douchery Rework is quick and easy to read, which speaks to the philosophy the book is shilling: get things done -- which coincidentally speaks to me. Nothing in this book can be learned that can't be learned from the Signal vs. Noise blog from 37signals. That doesn't mean this book is unnecessary. On the contrary, it's handy to have a collection of business tips and anecdotes bound in one neat little volume. This was my first business book and I think I got off pretty easy. There was a minimum of douchery in each page and a lot of tidbits that inspired me to get going on my side-project, which had been sitting around for months. The book's not just for aspiring CEOs and business owners. It's also for developers, marketing people, accountants, pretty much anyone who wants to get things done in an efficient manner. Best white elephant steal ever!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Keyo Çalî

    I had heard of this book before, I told myself it is like that kind of books full of motivational, encouraging, inspirational, sweet and nice words but all useless. a few days ago I was busy searching for a good book to help me work better. anyway, I had lots of choices, I was comparing them review by review here in Goodreads, then suddenly I saw this book. and Wow one glimpse of the description was enough to persuade me to read the book. I told myself undoubtedly it is what I need the most, later I had heard of this book before, I told myself it is like that kind of books full of motivational, encouraging, inspirational, sweet and nice words but all useless. a few days ago I was busy searching for a good book to help me work better. anyway, I had lots of choices, I was comparing them review by review here in Goodreads, then suddenly I saw this book. and Wow one glimpse of the description was enough to persuade me to read the book. I told myself undoubtedly it is what I need the most, later when I started reading the book, from the very first page it was obvious how effective and impactful the book is. a book full of truths, full of necessary and logical pieces of advice, with a clear and simple language. I recommend the book to everyone who is working now especially to those who like me are new to working and need to manage and run a business. I love the book I highlighted on almost every page read it if you want to work better and be more successful

  10. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    I give this book 3.5 stars. The audience for this book is young tech entrepreneurs with no work experience to guide them. The suggestions are based on the author's experience and may not apply to other people nor to other industries. For example, the author disagrees with the old adage of 'learn from your mistakes.' You only learn what not to do; there's no value in that. Instead, the author suggests that you learn from your successes. If you're starting a business, you haven't succeeded in I give this book 3.5 stars. The audience for this book is young tech entrepreneurs with no work experience to guide them. The suggestions are based on the author's experience and may not apply to other people nor to other industries. For example, the author disagrees with the old adage of 'learn from your mistakes.' You only learn what not to do; there's no value in that. Instead, the author suggests that you learn from your successes. If you're starting a business, you haven't succeeded in anything yet. You can learn from others' successes, but the authors admonish against copying from competitors.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shalmalee

    A very succinct summary of basic principles that should never be forgotten when aiming to succeed in business. Very well written. I am a fan of anecdotes, though and personally found that flavour wanting.

  12. 5 out of 5

    John Cooper

    Rework is an example of the business-inspirational genre by the founders of 37Signals, a software company. I like 37Signals because theyre straightforward, even pithy, and because founder Jason Fried has some right-on things to say about business culture, such as the stupidity of insisting that all workers come to an office and stay for eight hours, whether they are productive there or not. Rework follows the format of a lot of these books, which alternates extremely short chapters with crude Rework is an example of the business-inspirational genre by the founders of 37Signals, a software company. I like 37Signals because they’re straightforward, even pithy, and because founder Jason Fried has some right-on things to say about business culture, such as the stupidity of insisting that all workers come to an office and stay for eight hours, whether they are productive there or not. Rework follows the format of a lot of these books, which alternates extremely short chapters with crude page-sized art. Usually this format follows naturally when the author is reworking his blog into a book, which is the case here. A lot of the little chapters pretend to upend the common wisdom. There are chapters titled “Welcome Obscurity,” “Good Enough is Fine” and “Drug Dealers Get It Right.” This gives even completely passive readers the feeling of boldly thinking outside the box. There is a chance, I suppose, that some readers really will be jolted into changing their way of thinking, and I think that’s what the authors are aiming for. But I’m skeptical. You’re either ready to be bold, or you’re not, and if you are ready, you’ll quickly find your own path and won’t need this book. Ultimately, Rework is not a lot different from a traditional book of business wisdom (say, Winning by Jack Welch of GE). People are hungry for advice and seek it from those they consider brilliant, and what higher proof of brilliance is there than success in the market? But consider: 37Signals began as a Web-design company just as the Web was becoming a truly mass phenomenon. The company then switched to developing Web apps just as the iPhone came out and apps became a very big commercial thing. These guys are very smart, no doubt, but they’re also lucky; like the rock musicians of the ‘50s and ‘60s, they were there just as the market demanded their particular skills for the very first time. If they’d been born ten years earlier or later, they would have found much less rewarding outlets or would have faced much stiffer competition. If you’ve already begun a startup company, this book may be the encouragement you need and may even give you a few good ideas. If you’re looking for a book to inspire you to action, look within yourself instead.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin

    A super quick read that basically throws a bunch of (maybe minor) tips and words of advice to people who are looking to start or have already started their own businesses. 70% is comprised of useful advice that is definitely relevant to everyone, not just entrepreneurs and business owners. 20% are concepts conveniently backed by pieces of "evidence" in 37signals' history that seemingly suggest all businesses can and should be run like 37signals. 10% is what I would consider to be somewhat A super quick read that basically throws a bunch of (maybe minor) tips and words of advice to people who are looking to start or have already started their own businesses. 70% is comprised of useful advice that is definitely relevant to everyone, not just entrepreneurs and business owners. 20% are concepts conveniently backed by pieces of "evidence" in 37signals' history that seemingly suggest all businesses can and should be run like 37signals. 10% is what I would consider to be somewhat contradictory and maybe even slightly counter-productive mentalities. I found this to be an interesting albeit quick read. Even though I did learn a lot, every time the book moved on to a new topic or bit of advice, I got the distinct feeling that I'd previously heard similar or the exact same things from other books or blogs or anything that has previously been one of the top pages on Hacker News.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bon Tom

    This book is one continuous bookmark from start to end. As others have said, nothing new here, or maybe it's effect of its thesis being so logical and easily acceptable. Anyway, it's about stuff that pretty much everybody ignores for the sake of personal and business grandeur, at the price of decreased functionality. To me, it's about axiomatic truths, so solid and face punching that you don't (or shouldn't) even need further proofs for accepting them as practical, natural laws in unnatural world This book is one continuous bookmark from start to end. As others have said, nothing new here, or maybe it's effect of its thesis being so logical and easily acceptable. Anyway, it's about stuff that pretty much everybody ignores for the sake of personal and business grandeur, at the price of decreased functionality. To me, it's about axiomatic truths, so solid and face punching that you don't (or shouldn't) even need further proofs for accepting them as practical, natural laws in unnatural world of business. Also translates to personal life and self management. Your life is organization of one employee anyway.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Specifics Quite often a dilemma in business is whether to follow what you consider tried and tested approaches or do you do it your own way. Rework resets your traditional thinking and asks key questions about your business, for example, do you even need an office? Quite rightly he proposes that there is NO value in meetings and business plans and we consume large amounts of irrecoverable time dealing with them. The lifeblood of the book is, make it easy, make it fun and make money. Cut the ego Specifics Quite often a dilemma in business is whether to follow what you consider tried and tested approaches or do you do it your own way. Rework resets your traditional thinking and asks key questions about your business, for example, do you even need an office? Quite rightly he proposes that there is NO value in meetings and business plans and we consume large amounts of irrecoverable time dealing with them. The lifeblood of the book is, make it easy, make it fun and make money. Cut the ego and furnishings out of your business and deal with simple reality. Hansson and Fried obviously hate waste, including words, so the style of the book is short and snappy with real gems of advice on every page. They are very generous with their advice which makes them worth listening to. My only contention is the time we spend on our businesses. I absolutely believe that if we’re unproductive, working long hours, hating life, and have no time for socialising or family then that’s a major problem. But, I love my business and while I don’t need to do it for more than 8 hours per day, I love to do it for more than 8 hours per day. I’m probably more in the mould of Gary V. Reminds me of the quote “I’ll do today what you won’t, so I can do tomorrow what you can’t.” I would highly recommend this book - a few gems and a relook at your priorities.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed

    I read it in a two-hour flight. Don't let the nearly 300 pages fool you. It's a quick read. Really good and insightful. It's broken into chapters, each chapter has many tips. Each tip has a one page sketch for the tip which makes it super fun to read. Recommended if you're operating a business or aspiring to.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Krishna

    This book all about How to do business or work?, and it's gives more inspiration to the entrepreneurs and employees. --some great words : 1.U need less than U think-if u need a big office,how to share office space?..work from home for while. 2.Inspiration is a fresh fruit on a milk, doesn't have expiration date.and ideas are model, its lost forever,doesn't lost forever is inspiration. 3.Interruption is the enemy of the productivity.

  18. 4 out of 5

    George Jensen

    Over all this book is a bunch of simple proverbs relating exactly the problems I will face my entire career as long as I stay in the field I'm in. I gave it 3 stars cause I expect to savor deeper phrases. But I still like his matter-of-fact ways. Here are a few take aways I have kept: Great businesses have a point of view, not just a product or service. You have to believe in something. You need to have a backbone. You need to know what youre willing to fight for. And then you need to show the Over all this book is a bunch of simple proverbs relating exactly the problems I will face my entire career as long as I stay in the field I'm in. I gave it 3 stars cause I expect to savor deeper phrases. But I still like his matter-of-fact ways. Here are a few take aways I have kept: Great businesses have a point of view, not just a product or service. You have to believe in something. You need to have a backbone. You need to know what you’re willing to fight for. And then you need to show the world. When you don’t know what you believe, everything becomes an argument. Everything is debatable. But when you stand for something, decisions are obvious. And we always keep features to a minimum. Boxing ourselves in this way prevents us from creating bloated products. Remember, fashion fades away. When you focus on permanent features, you’re in bed with things that never go out of style The business world is littered with dead documents that do nothing but waste people’s time. Reports no one reads, diagrams no one looks at, and specs that never resemble the finished product. These things take forever to make but only seconds to forget. The problem with abstractions (like reports and documents) is that they create illusions of agreement. A hundred people can read the same words, but in their heads, they’re imagining a hundred different things That’s why you want to get to something real right away. That’s when you get true understanding. It’s like when we read about characters in a book—we each picture them differently in our heads. But when we actually see people, we all know exactly what they look like. Is this actually useful? Are you making something useful or just making something? It’s easy to confuse enthusiasm with usefulness. You don’t need to make it a formal process, but don’t let it slide, either. Also, don’t be timid about your conclusions. Sometimes abandoning what you’re working on is the right move, even if you’ve already put in a lot of effort. Don’t throw good time after bad work. And just as REM is when the real sleep magic happens, the alone zone is where the real productivity magic happens. Your alone zone doesn’t have to be in the wee hours, though. You can set up a rule at work that half the day is set aside for alone time. Or instead of casual Fridays, try no-talk Thursdays. Just make sure this period is unbroken in order to avoid productivity-zapping interruptions. And go all the way with it. A successful alone-time period means letting go of communication addiction. During alone time, give up instant messages, phone calls, e-mail, and meetings. Just shut up and get to work. You’ll be surprised how much more you get done. Your day is under siege by interruptions. It’s on you to fight back. Momentum fuels motivation. A lot of times it’s better to be a quitter than a hero. Yet some people still develop a masochistic sense of honor about sleep deprivation. They even brag about how tired they are. Don’t be impressed. It’ll come back to bite them in the ass. Start making smaller to-do lists too. Long lists collect dust. When’s the last time you finished a long list of things? You might have knocked off the first few, but chances are you eventually abandoned it (or blindly checked off items that weren’t really done properly). Long lists are guilt trips. And a quick suggestion about prioritization: Don’t prioritize with numbers or labels Do that and you’ll almost always end up with a ton of really high-priority things. That’s not really prioritizing. Sometimes copying can be part of the learning process, this sort of imitation can be a helpful tool on the path to discovering your own voice Unfortunately, copying in the business arena is usually more nefarious. And that means it’s tempting to try to build a business by being a copycat. That’s a formula for failure, though. The problem with this sort of copying is it skips understanding—and understanding is how you The copy is a faux finish. It delivers no substance, no understanding, and nothing to base future decisions on. Plus, if you’re a copycat, you can never keep up. You’re always in a passive position. You never lead; you always follow. You give birth to something that’s already behind the times—just a knockoff, an inferior version of the original. That’s no way to live. Be influenced, but don’t steal. If you’re successful, people will try to copy what you do. It’s just a fact of life. But there’s a great way to protect yourself from copycats: Make you part of your product or service. Pour yourself into your product and everything around your product too: how you sell it, how you support it, how you explain it, and how you deliver it. Competitors can never copy the you in your product. Don’t confuse enthusiasm with priority Welcome obscurity Obscurity helps protect your ego and preserve your confidence. Now’s the time to take risks without worrying about embarrassing yourself. But you can afford to teach, and that’s something they’ll never do, because big companies are obsessed with secrecy. Everything at those places has to get filtered through a lawyer and go through layers of red tape. Teaching is your chance to outmaneuver them. There’s a beauty to imperfection. This is the essence of the Japanese principle of wabi-sabi. Wabi-sabi values character and uniqueness over a shiny facade. It teaches that cracks and scratches in things should be embraced. Do it yourself first Never hire anyone to do a job until you’ve tried to do it yourself first. That way, you’ll understand the nature of the work. You’ll know what a job well done looks like. You may feel out of your element at times. You might even feel like you suck. That’s all right. You can hire your way out of that feeling or you can learn your way out of it. Try learning first. What you give up in initial execution will be repaid many times over by the wisdom you gain. Plus, you should want to be intimately involved in all aspects of your business. Hire when it hurts Don’t hire for pleasure; hire to kill pain. Always ask yourself: What if we don’t hire anyone? Is that extra work that’s burdening us really necessary? Forget about formal education I have never let my schooling interfere with my education. —MARK TWAIN Hire great writers If you are trying to decide among a few people to fill a position, hire the best writer. It doesn’t matter if that person is a marketer, salesperson, designer, programmer, or whatever; their writing skills will pay off. That’s because being a good writer is about more than writing. Clear writing is a sign of clear thinking. Great writers know how to communicate. They make things easy to understand. They can put themselves in someone else’s shoes. They know what to omit. And those are qualities you want in any candidate. Own your bad news When something goes wrong, someone is going to tell the story. You’ll be better off if it’s you. Otherwise, you create an opportunity for rumors, hearsay, and false information to spread. People will respect you more if you are open, honest, public, and responsive during a crisis. Don’t hide behind spin or try to keep your bad news on the down low. Here are some tips on how you can own the story: The message should come from the top. The highest-ranking person available should take control in a forceful way. Also, remember that negative reactions are almost always louder and more passionate than positive ones. In fact, you may hear only negative voices even when the majority of your customers are happy about a change. Make sure you don’t foolishly backpedal on a necessary but controversial decision. So when people complain, let things simmer for a while. Let them know you’re listening. Show them you’re aware of what they’re saying. Let them know you understand their discontent. But explain that you’re going to let it go for a while and see what happens. You’ll probably find that people will adjust eventually. They may even wind up liking the change more than the old way, once they get used to it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    I generally like books like this, but often times it is hit or miss. I don't own my own business and I'm not sure I'd want to, but this one worked for me. I enjoyed the narrator of the audio. I don't think there is just one road to success. This book points that out, but then on the other hand, they were leading the charge down their chosen road. It felt like opposing views, but I liked that they pointed that out. Some of this sounded like common sense, and some of it was cautionary. So 4 stars. I generally like books like this, but often times it is hit or miss. I don't own my own business and I'm not sure I'd want to, but this one worked for me. I enjoyed the narrator of the audio. I don't think there is just one road to success. This book points that out, but then on the other hand, they were leading the charge down their chosen road. It felt like opposing views, but I liked that they pointed that out. Some of this sounded like common sense, and some of it was cautionary. So 4 stars.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Book Calendar

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Rework by Jason Fried and David Hansson Jason Fried and David Hansson are the founders of 37 Signals which is a software development company. They have produced a number of different products including Ruby on Rails. They are contributors to the blog Signal Vs. Noise. 37 Signals was not founded on venture capital. The approach which is described in this book is contrary to many current business practices. The authors are describing a bootstrapping and self motivated style of business practice. Rework by Jason Fried and David Hansson Jason Fried and David Hansson are the founders of 37 Signals which is a software development company. They have produced a number of different products including Ruby on Rails. They are contributors to the blog Signal Vs. Noise. 37 Signals was not founded on venture capital. The approach which is described in this book is contrary to many current business practices. The authors are describing a bootstrapping and self motivated style of business practice. They write against fast growth, venture capital, and forecasting. For them financial projections are just guesses. This does not mean that they are backward. The authors describe how it is possible with a laptop and very little money to start your own company. They describe how their company hires and works with people remotely on many software projects. They tell you that to start a company you do not need an office or fancy quaters. Your house or a garage will do. I like the ideas in this book. It fits well with my own personal style. I agree that working all night, having lots of meetings, and creating giant lists do not lead to being more productive. I also like the philosophy of doing it yourself as much as possible, and breaking large projects into small pieces. The layout of this book is very well done. Each section has a large black and white drawing with a saying next to it to begin the chapter. Some of the sayings are; "good enough is fine", "long lists don't get done," and "say no by default." The writing is plain language. There are very few business terms in the book. Jason Fried and David Hansson ask a lot of questions in the text. They also use short bulleted lists. Most of the paragraphs are fairly short. This makes for very fast easy to absorb reading. It is more of a book on a philosophy of business than a book of practice or case studies. The book does not have an index. There are not a lot of other companies cited. If you read this book, you might stop talking, roll up your sleeves, and start working.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Algirdas Raščius

    This book is a great collection of ideas that will help you to succeed in business. Although presented ideas are based on common sense, some of them strongly disagree with current usual business practices. Still problem is with current business practices and not with presented ideas. Reading "Rework" can be great motivator for starting work smarter (rather than harder), seeking long-term sustainable business (rather than achieving better financial results for the current quarter) and really This book is a great collection of ideas that will help you to succeed in business. Although presented ideas are based on common sense, some of them strongly disagree with current usual business practices. Still problem is with current business practices and not with presented ideas. Reading "Rework" can be great motivator for starting work smarter (rather than harder), seeking long-term sustainable business (rather than achieving better financial results for the current quarter) and really serving customer needs (rather then trying to trick him into buying irrelevant product). There are two shortcomings of this book. First, a lot of ideas presented here are taken from another book by the same authors - "Getting Real". Therefore, if you have already read "Getting Real", reading some chapters in "Rework" will be deja vu experience. Second, if you work in "usual" company with no sufficient influence to change its business practices, reading this book can be a serious morale-killer. Anyway, I highly recommend reading this book to everybody (and especially to everybody running some business or thinking about starting one).

  22. 4 out of 5

    Emma Sea

    A very quick read in which I did find a few good takeaways.

  23. 4 out of 5

    imane

    "You need less than you think to get a business started Instead of over planning, get your hand dirty, use that time to solve your problem build a product and sell it to at least 10 people. "You need less than you think to get a business started” Instead of over planning, get your hand dirty, use that time to solve your problem build a product and sell it to at least 10 people.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Reem Mukbel

    I enjoyed every moment of reading this book, it teaches you how to simplify things to make results better.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cathie

    Wished I had read his January 2nd as it would have saved me bouts of anxiety. But glad I read this now - that's why ASAP isn't working effectively. Rework is a fitting title not only for starting a business, but cultivating your role in a business.

  26. 5 out of 5

    John Mark

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Takeaways Takedowns 1. Don't make assumptions about how big your company should be ahead of time. Grow slow and see what feels right. Small is not just a stepping-stone. Small is a great destination itself. 2. Workaholics aren't heroes. They don't save the day, they just use it up. The real heroes are already home because they have figured out a faster way to get things done. Go 1. Create a meaningful dent in the universe. Do something that will make your customers' lives matter. Make a disruption Takeaways Takedowns 1. Don't make assumptions about how big your company should be ahead of time. Grow slow and see what feels right. Small is not just a stepping-stone. Small is a great destination itself. 2. Workaholics aren't heroes. They don't save the day, they just use it up. The real heroes are already home because they have figured out a faster way to get things done. Go 1. Create a meaningful dent in the universe. Do something that will make your customers' lives matter. Make a disruption that will shake things up and destroy decade-old models.  2. Scratch your own itch. Create a great product or service that you want to use. When you build what you need, you can also assess the quality of what you make quickly and directly, instead of by proxy. And the most important, this lets you fall in love with what you are making. 3. Start making something. Until you actually start making something, your brilliant idea is just that, an idea. And everyone's got one of those. What you do is what matters, not what you think, say, or plan. 4. No time is no excuse. There's always enough time if you spend it right. Squeezing out a few extra hours a week is enough. When you want something bad enough, you make the time, regardless of your other obligations. 5. The perfect time never arrives. You are always too young or too old or busy or broke or something else. If you constantly fret about timing things perfectly, they'll never happen. 6. Strong opinions aren't free. For everyone who loves you, there will be others who hate you. If no one's upset by what you're saying, you're probably not pushing hard enough. 7. When you don't know what you believe, everything becomes debatable. But when you stand for something, decisions are obvious. 8. No matter what kind of business you're starting, take on as little outside cash as you can. You have to answer to your investors and take orders from them. You wind up building what the investors want instead of what customers want. You eventually give up control. 9. Do not build a company with the intention of being acquired. Focus on getting customers to love you and do not worry who's going to buy you. Progress 1. Constraints are advantages in disguise. Limited resources forces you to make do with what you've got. There is no room for waste. And that forces you to be creative. 2. Sacrifice some of your darlings. You have limited time, resources, ability, and focus. Getting great starts by cutting out stuff that's merely good. 3. It doesn't matter how much you plan, you'll still get some stuff wrong anyway. Don't make things worse by overanalyzing and delaying before you even get going. 4. The core of your business should be built around things that people are going to want today and ten years from now. Do not focus on the next big thing which constantly changes. 5. Make a productive meeting. Invite a few key people and meet at the site of the problem instead of a conference room. Point to real things and suggest real changes. 6. Find a judo solution when solving problems. Use solutions that have maximum efficiency with minimum effort. 7. Good enough is fine in situations where timeliness is more important. When good enough gets the job done, go for it. 8. Get in the habit of accomplishing small victories along the way to keep your momentum and motivation up. Even a tiny improvement can give a jolt of momentum. 9. We lose creativity when we lack sleep. What distinguishes people who are ten times more effective than the norm is not that they work ten times as hard; it's that they use their creativity to come up with solutions that require one-tenth of the effort.  10. We all suck as estimators because we see everything going according to a best-case scenario, without the delays that inevitably pop up. Solution: break the big thing into smaller things. The smaller it is, the easier it is to estimate. Competitors 1. Focusing on competitors too much dilutes your vision. Your chances of coming up with something fresh go away down when you keep feeding your brain other people's ideas. Focus on yourself instead. When you spend time worrying about someone else, you can't spend the time improving yourself. Evolution 1. Start getting into the habit of saying no by default - even to many of your best ideas. Use the power of no to get your priorities straight. You rarely regret saying no but you often wind up regretting saying yes. If you're not willing to say yes, be polite and explain why. People are suprisingly understanding when you take the time to explain your POV. You may win them over to your way of thinking. 2. The enthusiasm you have for a new idea is not an accurate indicator of its true worth. Let your latest grand ideas cool off first. Have as many great ideas as you can but just don't act in the heat of the moment. Promotion  1. Being obscure is a great position to be in. Be happy you're in the shadows. Use this time to make mistakes without the whole world hearing about them. No one knows you, so it's no big deal if you mess up. Obscurity helps protect your ego and preserve your confidence.  2. Build an audience. Speak, write, blog, tweet, make videos. Share information that's valuable and you'll slowly but surely build a loyal audience. Then when you need to get the word out, the right people will already be listening. 3. Share what you know. Teach and you'll form a bond you don't get from traditional marketing tactics. Earning people's loyalty by teaching them forms a whole different connection. 4. Marketing is not a department. It is something everyone in the company is doing 24/7/365. Hiring 1. Never hire anyone to do a job until you've tried to do it yourself first. That way, you'll understand the nature of the work. You'll be a much better manager because you'll be supervising people who are doing a job you've done before. You'll know when to criticize and when to support. 2. If you lose an employee, don't replace him immediately. See how long you can get by without that person and that position. You'll often discover you don't need as many people as you think. 3. Pass on hiring people you don't need, even if you think that person's a great catch. You'll be doing your company more harm than good if you bring in talented people who have nothing important to do. 4. Do not hire a ton of people rapidly. There are always new faces around, so everyone is unfailingly polite. Everyone tries to avoid any conflict or drama. No one says, "This idea sucks." People appease instead of challenge. 5. Check your applicant's cover letter to see if he specifically cares about your company, your products, your customers, and your job. In a cover letter, you get actual communication instead of a list of skills, verbs, and years of experience that are usually in a resume. There's no way an applicant can churn out hundreds of personalized letters. That's why a cover letter is a much better test than a resume. 6. How long someone's been doing something is overrated. What matters is how well they've been doing it. There's suprisingly little difference between a candidate with six months of experience and one with six years. It takes six months to a year to internalize idioms and learn how things work in a job. But after that, the curve flattens out. The real difference comes from the individual's dedication, personality, and intelligence. 7. Hire great writers, regardless of their position or role. Being a good writer is about more than writing. Clear writing is a sign of clear thinking. Great writers know how to communicate. They make things easy to understand. They can put themselves in someone else's shoes. They know what to omit. And these are qualities you want in any candidate. Damage Control 1. A good apology accepts responsibility. It has no conditional if phrase attached. An "I" apology is a lot stronger than a "we" apology. Culture 1. You don't create company culture. It happens. Culture is the by-product of consistent behavior. You've got to give it a time to develop. If you encourage people to share, then sharing will be built into your culture. Culture is not a slogan nor a mission statement. Culture is actions. 2. The environment has a lot more to do with great work than most people realize. There's a ton of untapped potential trapper under lame policies, poor direction, and stifling bureaucracies. Cut the crap and you'll find that people are waiting to do great work. Build a work environment out of trust, autonomy, and responsibility. 3. When everything constantly needs approval, you create a culture of nonthinkers. You create a boss-versus-worker relationship that screams, "I don't trust you." 4. Sound like you. Talk to customers the way you would talk to friends. Explain things as if you were sitting next to them. Avoid jargon or any sort of corporate-speak. Stay away from buzzwords when normal words will do just fine. Write concisely. 5. ASAP is poison. When you add ASAP to the end of every request, you are saying everything is high priority. When everything is high priority, nothing is.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    In the last few months Ive learned that spending hours on the internet looking for ways to be better is bullshit. Reading countless blogs. Staying on top of every tweet. And never missing a single word uttered. All bullshit. Ive been lucky in finding a few great people on the web who have said this is bullshit. And Ive been lucky enough to sit back and look at what Ive been doing and tell myself its all bullshit. I have everything I need to make something TODAY. Unless, I happened to be on twitter In the last few months I’ve learned that spending hours on the internet looking for ways to “be better” is bullshit. Reading countless blogs. Staying on top of every tweet. And never missing a single word uttered. All bullshit. I’ve been lucky in finding a few great people on the web who have said this is bullshit. And I’ve been lucky enough to sit back and look at what I’ve been doing and tell myself it’s all bullshit. I have everything I need to make something TODAY. Unless, I happened to be on twitter when Skwerl says “i think this book is about how i work.” Upon clicking the link I then see a quote from Seth Godin saying “Ignore this book at your own peril.” Okay…so I can’t be WORSE off for looking into this book called REWORK. Written by the two founders of a company I was previously unaware of called 37Signals. Step 1: I Ordered the book from Amazon 30 seconds after becoming aware of it’s existence. Step 2: Upon coming home from work I find the book in my mailbox. I run upstairs and rip it open. Step 3: I read the entire book without moving. Step 4: I’m here, writing. Now you want my thought out fucking review right? Okay…um…READ IT. I’ve got shit I need to go do. Not because this book told me to. But because this book made me understand WHY I need to. It made me understand certain gut instincts that I couldn’t quite interpret. There’s some problems I have with the way things are done and it can’t fucking wait. One problem is long ass reviews from people you don’t know. I’d rather get a “READ IT” or “LISTEN TO IT” or “WATCH IT” from someone I completely know or at the very least trust their opinions 100%. In fact, this book discusses that concept of “audience” as people who trust YOU and your opinions, and who seek you out. When I visited the book’s webpage, the first thing I saw were the claims of “Best Seller in US and UK” and the mention of a bunch of major newspapers that I could give a fuck about. And it turns out, upon reading the book, neither of the writers of this book could give a fuck about the major publications. They state they get more traffic from smaller unknown sources than from mentions in papers and magazines. By far, the most important part of the book that really drilled into my head was that “Inspiration is Perishable”. I knew the second I read this book, I had a LOT to say. I don’t know if it would make any sense but if I waited until the next day I probably wouldn’t be as pumped to do it. And now that I HAVE done it (I’m now editing this the next morning), the energy hasn’t gone away and I’m pumped for having DONE this. Thank you Skwerl. Thank you Seth Godin. And most of all, thank you Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson of 37Signals. GOODNIGHT! (Morning?)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mario Tomic

    Rework contradicts many of the standard business lessons found in other books, the book itself is written in a format of short powerful lessons and messages. I personally love the style of this writing and the overall structure with very high density of content. It can be a bit too much to digest for a reader but don't worry you can always re-read it as it's not such a long book. I found it particularly inspiring and would without doubt recommend this book if you wanna know some of the less Rework contradicts many of the standard business lessons found in other books, the book itself is written in a format of short powerful lessons and messages. I personally love the style of this writing and the overall structure with very high density of content. It can be a bit too much to digest for a reader but don't worry you can always re-read it as it's not such a long book. I found it particularly inspiring and would without doubt recommend this book if you wanna know some of the less common ways on how to create a successful modern company.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ananya Ghosh

    "The myth of the overnight sensation: You will not be a big hit right away. You will not get rich quick. You are not so special that everyone will instantly pay attention. No one cares about you. At least not yet. Get used to it...Trade the dream of overnight success for slow, measured growth. It's hard, but you have to be patient. You have to grind it out. " Full of sassy and cut-the-crap-&-do-real-work advises , Rework is a must read for entrepreneurs (or as the book says, starters ).

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tomasz Kraus

    Quite SaaSish point of view. Faster read than Lean Startup. Pretty motivating. 1-day read.

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