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The Art and Craft of Poetry

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Poets will build their poetry-writing skills with help from past and contemporary masters - everything from generating ideas to examining the finished poem. They'll learn how to: Use journals to develop their observational skills and turn life experiences into ideas for poems; Master the tools of the trade - voice, line, stanza, title, meter and rhyme; Acquire fluency in a Poets will build their poetry-writing skills with help from past and contemporary masters - everything from generating ideas to examining the finished poem. They'll learn how to: Use journals to develop their observational skills and turn life experiences into ideas for poems; Master the tools of the trade - voice, line, stanza, title, meter and rhyme; Acquire fluency in a variety of poetry formats and forms, everything from narrative, lyric and dramatic verse (traditional formats) to fixed, free and sequence styles (traditional forms) Fine tune their work; Exercises, assignments and sample work from more than 100 standout poets - everyone from Louise Gluck to Walt Whitman - ensure that every reader, whether poet, student or bibliophile, discovers just how extraordinary poetry can be.


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Poets will build their poetry-writing skills with help from past and contemporary masters - everything from generating ideas to examining the finished poem. They'll learn how to: Use journals to develop their observational skills and turn life experiences into ideas for poems; Master the tools of the trade - voice, line, stanza, title, meter and rhyme; Acquire fluency in a Poets will build their poetry-writing skills with help from past and contemporary masters - everything from generating ideas to examining the finished poem. They'll learn how to: Use journals to develop their observational skills and turn life experiences into ideas for poems; Master the tools of the trade - voice, line, stanza, title, meter and rhyme; Acquire fluency in a variety of poetry formats and forms, everything from narrative, lyric and dramatic verse (traditional formats) to fixed, free and sequence styles (traditional forms) Fine tune their work; Exercises, assignments and sample work from more than 100 standout poets - everyone from Louise Gluck to Walt Whitman - ensure that every reader, whether poet, student or bibliophile, discovers just how extraordinary poetry can be.

30 review for The Art and Craft of Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Landers

    Scriptwriters should also use this workbook since movie outlines can be thought of as long, free verse poetry. Readers can use the book three times through, since the exercises are different with every pass. Not a minor point, since reading books about writing is its own form of writer's block. I would recommend it for songwriters too, since it helps the writer focus on key turning points in life.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Robert Beveridge

    Michael J. Bugeja, The Art and Craft of Poetry (Writer's Digest, 1994) Bugeja gets the first Gentleman's C I have ever given a book. I didn't even make the fifty-page mark with this turkey, quitting twenty-seven pages in, because Bugeja broke the cardinal rule of poetry in a flagrant and offensive way; while discussing a poem he uses as an example, he writes, "...but none of this is important; the only thing that is is what was in [the author]'s head at the time." This is, as any poet half worth Michael J. Bugeja, The Art and Craft of Poetry (Writer's Digest, 1994) Bugeja gets the first Gentleman's C I have ever given a book. I didn't even make the fifty-page mark with this turkey, quitting twenty-seven pages in, because Bugeja broke the cardinal rule of poetry in a flagrant and offensive way; while discussing a poem he uses as an example, he writes, "...but none of this is important; the only thing that is is what was in [the author]'s head at the time." This is, as any poet half worth his salt knows, not only untrue, but offensive in the extreme. If this is the kind of thing which poetry 101 classes are being fed today, it's no wonder the world is so crammed with people who write bad poetry (one rejects the idea of calling them poets). So why am I giving it the Gentleman's C? Well, because judging from the earlier writings here, when Bugeja isn't flaunting the idea that reader interpretation is meaningless and unimportant, he does have a few things to say worth reading. Also, the book can double as an anthology of poetry stretching from Shakespeare to modern times, and it has some value in that regard. As a teaching tool, though, readers are advised to stay far away until they fully understand that reader interpretation is not only valid, but as valid as author interpretation, of any poem, so as not to be poisoned by such irresponsible statements on the author's part. ** ½

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ferree

    I'm using this book as a daily writing discipline. Each chapter gives a series of assignments for 3 levels of poets. I'm starting out with level one. Completing the assignments will produce 10-15 poems. Then I can go through it again, do level 2, and then again with level 3, and I'll have two more sets of poems. Maybe. My goal isn't to be a poet, I just think the discipline of writing poetry will make me a better writer. In any case, this is a thorough, well-executed and organized volume by a gr I'm using this book as a daily writing discipline. Each chapter gives a series of assignments for 3 levels of poets. I'm starting out with level one. Completing the assignments will produce 10-15 poems. Then I can go through it again, do level 2, and then again with level 3, and I'll have two more sets of poems. Maybe. My goal isn't to be a poet, I just think the discipline of writing poetry will make me a better writer. In any case, this is a thorough, well-executed and organized volume by a great prof.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I did find this book useful - especially because I like to write poetry, but have not had a formal class on it. This book does have three levels of exercises at the end of each chapter and the chapters themselves have some useful information for novice poets like me... although poets with more formal poetry educations may get bored with it... which I didn't.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nabil

    This book probably has something for everyone. His highly analytical, journalistic approach is understandable as Bugeja has a background in journalism. Making endless classifications and lists of my own experiences, so as to have things to write about, isn't really my style. In a chapter on love poetry, he goes through nearly a dozen types of love poetry that are in themselves good starting points or ideas for poems, but what he wants you to do is make lists of the high and low points in all you This book probably has something for everyone. His highly analytical, journalistic approach is understandable as Bugeja has a background in journalism. Making endless classifications and lists of my own experiences, so as to have things to write about, isn't really my style. In a chapter on love poetry, he goes through nearly a dozen types of love poetry that are in themselves good starting points or ideas for poems, but what he wants you to do is make lists of the high and low points in all your relationships first so that you'll have material. I actually got a lot of ideas out of this book, but not by following his exercises.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Frank Edwards

    I put this book down after several chapters, feeling a little angry (and half tempted to toss it in the wood stove). For me it was far too prescriptive and self-referential (i.e., the poet talking much about his own journey). I found the example poems Mr. Bugeja used not at all inspiring. I have an MFA in writing (fiction) and have published poetry. I would not recommend this book to anyone with a similar background. I'm giving it three stars because I can imagine it being useful to some beginne I put this book down after several chapters, feeling a little angry (and half tempted to toss it in the wood stove). For me it was far too prescriptive and self-referential (i.e., the poet talking much about his own journey). I found the example poems Mr. Bugeja used not at all inspiring. I have an MFA in writing (fiction) and have published poetry. I would not recommend this book to anyone with a similar background. I'm giving it three stars because I can imagine it being useful to some beginners, and I did appreciate Mr. Bugeja's discussion of finding subjects for poems.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sofia

    Good book for those interested in analyzing the structure and process of crafting a poem. I found it too regimented for me, but Bugeja does provide great examples and techniques that may helpful for beginning poets. The structured approach is a great place to start (you need to learn the rules before you can break them).

  8. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Hill

    It was okay. It has a lot of good information but it didn't feel like it taught me anything I didn't particularly know.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jbmcgraw

    Excellent book for getting started. Everything is explained well and lots of examples are given. Very educational but not overly academic.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Katheryn

    Good resource to get you started in poetry, but exercises were a bit much.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    I may have to purchase this as a reference. It is a great intro to poetry without getting stuck in the ancient origins and Italian sonnet schemes. I think I may finally be getting the idea of modern poetry, even if I do not enjoy it. My goal is to craft prose with the beautiful rhythms of poetry. Poets often write the best prose sentences! Examples: Ursula Le Guin, writer of my childhood, and Margaret Atwood, a new favorite. Their sentences blow me away! Even if one doesn't participate in their I may have to purchase this as a reference. It is a great intro to poetry without getting stuck in the ancient origins and Italian sonnet schemes. I think I may finally be getting the idea of modern poetry, even if I do not enjoy it. My goal is to craft prose with the beautiful rhythms of poetry. Poets often write the best prose sentences! Examples: Ursula Le Guin, writer of my childhood, and Margaret Atwood, a new favorite. Their sentences blow me away! Even if one doesn't participate in their politics, one can admire the beautiful simplicity of their work.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Except for some interesting remarks in his chapter on lines, I would have given this book the dreaded one star. I'm not sure this book would even be good for a beginning poet, as limited as Bugeja's presentation of "types" is, but it certainly isn't for anyone who has any sustained interest in writing poetry.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sara Kearns

    'Didn't find it helpful, but it's an okay introduction to some aspects of the craft of poetry, albeit a bit boring.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Anoma

    Really enjoyed this as an overview of the spectrum of poetry. Broadened my ability to appreciate a lot more poetry. I may or may not have attempted to write some after reading this book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Vashti

    It changed my life.

  16. 4 out of 5

    M C. Watson

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Gray

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amos

    Excellent book for anyone interested in learning how to write poetry

  20. 5 out of 5

    Diane

  21. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Edwards

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gregory

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kat

  25. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gil Rosado

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lin Anderson

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rowan

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brian

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