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Yukiya Ayase est un doux, généreux, innocents et les étudiants de l'université. La seule relative il a gauche, son cousin Tetsuo, trahit Ayase en lui vendant au plus offrant dans le cadre d'une vente aux enchères avec les espoirs de faire un bénéfice énorme pour être en mesure de payer ses dettes. Somuku Kanou, un mauvais-tempérée (quoique très riche) requins, vient à Ayas Yukiya Ayase est un doux, généreux, innocents et les étudiants de l'université. La seule relative il a gauche, son cousin Tetsuo, trahit Ayase en lui vendant au plus offrant dans le cadre d'une vente aux enchères avec les espoirs de faire un bénéfice énorme pour être en mesure de payer ses dettes. Somuku Kanou, un mauvais-tempérée (quoique très riche) requins, vient à Ayase de sauvetage et achète Ayase pour un impressionnant 1.2 milliards de dollars.


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Yukiya Ayase est un doux, généreux, innocents et les étudiants de l'université. La seule relative il a gauche, son cousin Tetsuo, trahit Ayase en lui vendant au plus offrant dans le cadre d'une vente aux enchères avec les espoirs de faire un bénéfice énorme pour être en mesure de payer ses dettes. Somuku Kanou, un mauvais-tempérée (quoique très riche) requins, vient à Ayas Yukiya Ayase est un doux, généreux, innocents et les étudiants de l'université. La seule relative il a gauche, son cousin Tetsuo, trahit Ayase en lui vendant au plus offrant dans le cadre d'une vente aux enchères avec les espoirs de faire un bénéfice énorme pour être en mesure de payer ses dettes. Somuku Kanou, un mauvais-tempérée (quoique très riche) requins, vient à Ayase de sauvetage et achète Ayase pour un impressionnant 1.2 milliards de dollars.

30 review for No money 2

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nocturnalux

    The second volume of Okane is more traditional in its interaction with BL tropes and establishes the narrative pattern as such by literally spelling out the necessary distinction between 'good rape' and 'bad rape'. On top of all this it may be even crazier as it takes a few more steps toward blaming the victim and in presenting Kanou as an utter moral monster who will even get complete innocents involved. It also goes beyond implied misogyny into very real misogyny. From the cover alone one can The second volume of Okane is more traditional in its interaction with BL tropes and establishes the narrative pattern as such by literally spelling out the necessary distinction between 'good rape' and 'bad rape'. On top of all this it may be even crazier as it takes a few more steps toward blaming the victim and in presenting Kanou as an utter moral monster who will even get complete innocents involved. It also goes beyond implied misogyny into very real misogyny. From the cover alone one can see that the artwork has not improved. If anything, it has become worse as bodily proportions are warped to an even great extent, something that hardly seemed possible. For some reason, the anime adaptation took some of the most extreme examples of this distortion and rendered them most faithfully. The change in medium projected some panels across a whole screen, thus blowing up what were already odd moments into a nightmarish experience. What makes volume two less unique is that the point of view is firmly anchored in Ayase. The switch is significant as the entire point of this volume is precisely figuring out what is in Kanou's mind: will he sell off Ayase to a brothel as a means of paying off the debt? In a less messed up manga, even a BL manga, this premise would be the result of a misunderstanding but this being Okane ga nai it all plays out with great distress for Ayase. The conflict is, in fact, introduced very much like a misunderstanding plot device that is so productive in comedy: Ayase overhears Kanou on the phone talking about selling a woman into sex slavery in order to pay her husband's debts and being very nonchalant about it as it seems being forced into prostitution is just something women get used to after a while. This is a world in which men incur debts that women or male playing a female role will have to pay with sex. The horror of it all is that this actually happens and the manga posits someone deeply involved in this exploitation as the de facto hero. To some extent, Okane is more honest in his representation of mobsters than other manga that often go out of their way to frame their criminals as fundamentally good people with some quirks. Okane presents the reader with a yakuza whose contempt for his fellow humans is overwhelming. When Ayase begs Kanou to work out his debt some other way that does not include being systematically raped, Kanou decides to agree only to then trap him into 'starring' in a sex video, the profits of which will then pay the debt. The arrangement includes hiring a bit of Osaka comic relief as cameraman and herding Ayase into a hotel room. It is at this point that Kanou's manipulation goes more into the psychological domain. Already he had been trying to convince Ayase that down deep he loves being raped, a tactic that is actually very common in BL and standard practice of your average seme, he now threatens Ayase with absolutely dire consequences that will befall once the footage gets leaked. These include being expelled from college, becoming a social pariah and having his entire life ruined as it will forever haunt him and basically ruin any chance he might have of rejoining society. Once again, the horror surfaces with redoubled force because this does happen and in an honor society such as a Japan it is even more devastating. The manga represents this scene via the very disconnected frantic inner dialogue as Ayase feels himself sinking into an even deeper morass, thus framing the episode in psychological terms. There is something profoundly distressing in the stark backgrounds that are either white or black with the characters running wildly down the page in the very image of unhinged thoughts while Kanou's calm voice resonates with explanations of how the profit increases as the risk- to Ayase, including his irrevocable destruction as a functional human being in a society- is so high. This is not the first time in this very volume that we are reminded of the stark imbalance in the power dynamics. In an early rape scene it is put in the most immediate of terms, namely, the physical dominance Kanou can and does employ to subdue Ayase and Ayase's very small body and resulting physical frailty. It is, of course, embedded in the aesthetics of the genre as a whole and it this extreme version Okane makes its very hallmark to fame but in this particular case the text itself reinforces it. Ayase's inner dialogue addresses how Kanou is scary, his hands so much stronger, even as the visual focus on said hand gripping Ayase's forearm hard enough to warrant a sound special effect. One feels that the manga delights in going out of its way to highlight the disparity between the all powerful Kanou and the utterly powerless Ayase. The following goes into details so first time readers may want to simply skip the spoilers altogether. (view spoiler)[After spending a few chapter establishing this plot, Okane then seems to remember its true calling and springs up a greater evil so as to balance out Kanou's sheer depravity. Kanou eventually relents, although it is not entirely clear if he has given up the idea of filming Ayase for good, and leaves the hotel. What happens next is what always happens: Ayase gets kidnapped. This time around, though, it happens as the direct result of Kanou's shady dealings, something that is not actually addressed as such. In a convoluted subplot that had been introduced earlier and that involves the Osaka comedy relief, Kanou came to possess a sex tape featuring an evil politician whose underling ran into Ayase and Kanou in the hotel lobby. Of course, the evil politician kidnaps Ayase and of course, he attempts to rape him. As this evil politician exposes Ayase's naked body, the shaky artwork presents what are meant as love bites- that would be disturbing in themselves when we consider the context of rape upon which the entire series is predicated- come across very much as wounds. What the reader sees amounts to a battered young man so that the full extent of the ongoing abuse piled upon Ayase comes alive with renewed strength. It is probably not incidental that it is at this very point that the manga has Ayase's inner dialogue compare the villain of the week with Kanou, with Kanou emerging as much better. This is an absolute necessity in terms of the narrative and Okane knows that the more firmly it draws the line between 'good' and bad' kinds of rape, the greater a legitimacy it has. The politician is in fact absolutely in the right when he claims that what he is doing to Ayase is precisely the same as what Kanou has been doing. But the manga has to contradict this with all it has because the moment all rape is perceived as the evil it is, the entire point of Okane and much of the BL genre must implode. So when Kanou finally arrives on the scene to yet again save Ayase, Ayase has to proclaim that the evil politician is not at all the same as Kanou. This one line is the actual climax of the entire volume, the tiny light in the darkness that bestows moral justification on Kanou even as he about to do something utterly horrible. Thus far minors had been thankfully absent from the world of Okane but this time around Kanou breaks that by kidnapping the politician's high school- if not middle school- aged daughter, stuffing her inside a suitcase, pulling her by the hair and putting a blade to her neck. Said daughter is drawn in the most expressive manner, her terrified eyes wide above her taped mouth, her body slumped at an awkward angle as she dangles above the suitcase. It is unclear how long she spent stuffed inside a suitcase but given that Kanou goes through quite a bit of back and forth before brusquely yanking her out, we can assume it was at least a while. She is wearing a school uniform which immediately clues us on to the fact that she is indeed a teen and there are bruises on her legs and arms. To make matters even worse, upon finding out that the evil politician hit Ayase, Kanou then proceeds to swing his arm at the girl. Fortunately Ayase holds him back, otherwise Kanou would have smacked a teenager in the face. This is the very first time we see Kanou dealing with victims that have done absolutely nothing to him or to anyone else, either. Apart from Ayase, that is, and he at least has a lease on life that is mandated per the story's continuity but this girl is entirely at the mercy of a monster who has no need whatsoever for her. Hearing Kanou sanctioning of a woman into sex slavery is bad enough but manga is a visual media per excellence and as such any scene that is depicted will have a greater impact almost by default. The fact that the two events, the casual selling of a female and the brutal kidnapping of another, are presented in the same volume add an implied layer of sexual violence to what is already utterly vile. More, this is reinforced in the fact that the barely averted beating of a child came about thanks to a warped notion of reciprocity, one wonders what Kanou would have done if Ayase had indeed been raped. In the larger economy of Okane this event is just part of the routine plot under the category of 'shenanigans Kanou will resort to in order to rescue Ayase from his many and sundry kidnappers and would-be rapists' but it is so chilling that it gives the reader pause. It also pushes Kanou into moral territory that is even, arguably, more vitiated than the appointed villain of the week. Not surprisingly Ayase reasserts a moral superiority in intervening in the girl's behalf but Kanou's true villainy is waved away. Someya is the only character capable of articulating what happened to the girl as monstrous but he is missing from this volume, having been replaced by Gion, the funny Osaka fellow. Ayase is dealing with far too much and is in a place of wretched vulnerability, so much so that almost as soon as he rightly states that she did no wrong, the chapter ends under the guise of a resolution. As far as Okane is concerned, a narrative cycle has come to a close and Ayase is safe so the girl can drop from the story altogether, her role being done. Ayase is constantly being drugged as well as kidnapped and he loses consciousness at an alarming rate. This is exploited for emotional purposes for all it's worth as it gives Kanou the chance of showing kindness. He will carry Ayase, fuss about him, delicately place him in bed. All this is suppose to undo the damage of all the rape but if anything it does more to give another dimension to the abuse: it pushes it straight into Stockholm's syndrome, an attempt of beguiling the victim into accepting and even appreciating the cage in which they are irrevocably trapped. (hide spoiler)] The omakes are funny as usual and still very telling. Two revolve around Kanou and Ayase's respective ideals of life together. Kanou imagines Ayase as a traditional wife, welcoming the husband back after a long day's work while Ayase's is a crazy family retelling in which the cast become his relatives: Someya is a the mother, the twins and Gion are older brothers, the Lolita guy is the grandfather and Kanou is the father. It is both amusing in that messed Okane way but at the same moment quite sad at it shows that all that Ayase wants is a warm family that will love him. I doubt this volume will make fans of the franchise drop it and it is very much more of the same. I personally found it less interesting as much of what made this particular manga so unique is not as visible.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Honey

    The second volume in Okane ga Nai continues Ayase and Kanou's story. In the first volume, Kanou was the highest bidder at Ayase's auction and as such demanded of Ayase to pay him back by sleeping with him. In this new volume, Ayase, ashamed by selling his body to Kanou, tells him that he wishes to find another job in order to pay off his debt. Kanou coldly retaliates by finding him a new job, one that would push Ayase to his limits. I enjoyed seeing how Ayase slowly begins to come out of his shel The second volume in Okane ga Nai continues Ayase and Kanou's story. In the first volume, Kanou was the highest bidder at Ayase's auction and as such demanded of Ayase to pay him back by sleeping with him. In this new volume, Ayase, ashamed by selling his body to Kanou, tells him that he wishes to find another job in order to pay off his debt. Kanou coldly retaliates by finding him a new job, one that would push Ayase to his limits. I enjoyed seeing how Ayase slowly begins to come out of his shell and starts to let his feelings known to Kanou, even if he has a long road ahead of himself. We are also introduced to Gion, a friend of Kanou's and to one of his enemies. I enjoyed seeing the protective side to Kanou and was very happy with the decisions he made, he is definitely drool worthy ^^

  3. 4 out of 5

    Artanya

    yeah!!!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Azusa

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sumintra

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dria

  7. 5 out of 5

    Marina

  8. 5 out of 5

    Blackrei

  9. 4 out of 5

    MEIXI

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rain

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ellyce

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mistress ~ ♠ Mistral's Kiss ♠ ~ (Mist)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  14. 4 out of 5

    Martu (ノ◕ヮ◕)ノ*:・゚✧

  15. 4 out of 5

    Conii

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Bellingar

  17. 4 out of 5

    Serina galindo

  18. 4 out of 5

    Christine Xie

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rosemarie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ana Pujols

  21. 5 out of 5

    Willow

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ann

  23. 5 out of 5

    Anna C

  24. 4 out of 5

    Monika

  25. 4 out of 5

    Yolanda

  26. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ani

  28. 4 out of 5

    L.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sicharia

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

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