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George Monbiot is known to millions for his newspaper commentaries, which are widely circulated on the Internet. Now in paperback, Monbiot’s Manifesto for a New World Order offers a plan for transforming the world into a decent place for all. All over the planet, the rich get richer while the poor are overtaken by debt and disaster. The world is run by a handful of George Monbiot is known to millions for his newspaper commentaries, which are widely circulated on the Internet. Now in paperback, Monbiot’s Manifesto for a New World Order offers a plan for transforming the world into a decent place for all. All over the planet, the rich get richer while the poor are overtaken by debt and disaster. The world is run by a handful of executives who make the most important of decisions, concerning war, peace, debt, development, and the balance of trade. Without democracy at the global level, the rest of us are left in the dark. George Monbiot shows us how to turn on the light. Emphasizing not only that things ought to change but also revealing how to change them, Monbiot develops an interlocking set of proposals that mark him as the most realistic utopian of our time. With detailed discussions of what a world parliament might look like, how trade can be organized fairly, and how underdeveloped nations can leverage their debt to obtain real change, Manifesto for a New World Order offers a truly global perspective, a defense of democracy, and an understanding of power and how it might be captured from those unfit to retain it.


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George Monbiot is known to millions for his newspaper commentaries, which are widely circulated on the Internet. Now in paperback, Monbiot’s Manifesto for a New World Order offers a plan for transforming the world into a decent place for all. All over the planet, the rich get richer while the poor are overtaken by debt and disaster. The world is run by a handful of George Monbiot is known to millions for his newspaper commentaries, which are widely circulated on the Internet. Now in paperback, Monbiot’s Manifesto for a New World Order offers a plan for transforming the world into a decent place for all. All over the planet, the rich get richer while the poor are overtaken by debt and disaster. The world is run by a handful of executives who make the most important of decisions, concerning war, peace, debt, development, and the balance of trade. Without democracy at the global level, the rest of us are left in the dark. George Monbiot shows us how to turn on the light. Emphasizing not only that things ought to change but also revealing how to change them, Monbiot develops an interlocking set of proposals that mark him as the most realistic utopian of our time. With detailed discussions of what a world parliament might look like, how trade can be organized fairly, and how underdeveloped nations can leverage their debt to obtain real change, Manifesto for a New World Order offers a truly global perspective, a defense of democracy, and an understanding of power and how it might be captured from those unfit to retain it.

30 review for Manifesto for a New World Order

  1. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    This is one of those books that’ll change the way you think, if you thought you understood the current world order you may be in for a surprise. From the UN to the World Bank and the IMF to the WTO, I really didn’t understand how these organizations operated. This book has defenitely opened my eyes.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tony Fleming

    A lesson in not judging a book by its cover. What looks like a manual for anarchist or Marxist revolution turned out to be a very critical look at both the state of the world and the movements attempting to change it. Monbiot is clearly looking for pragmatic answers to global problems--he utterly refutes anarchy, Marxism and self-appointed world constitutionalists. Buy one for your protestor friend and help them understand how to make a real difference. For those who are looking for a bit of A lesson in not judging a book by its cover. What looks like a manual for anarchist or Marxist revolution turned out to be a very critical look at both the state of the world and the movements attempting to change it. Monbiot is clearly looking for pragmatic answers to global problems--he utterly refutes anarchy, Marxism and self-appointed world constitutionalists. Buy one for your protestor friend and help them understand how to make a real difference. For those who are looking for a bit of idealism mixed in with their practical politics, however, Monbiot satisfies as well. I was reminded of Emery Reves' Anatomy of Peace from the 1940s and thanked the powers that be for this "updated" version.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Abner Rosenweig

    With outstanding research, rationality, and compassion, Monbiot demonstrates unequivocally the rampant greed, flaws, and corruption in current global institutions such as the UN, the WTO, the IMF, and the World Bank. In parallel, he lays out a clear plan for optimal global governance. The problem is that Monbiot's thoughtful suggestions are nearly impossible to implement. The astronomical distance between the status quo and where we need to be offers little hope that genuine reform is possible With outstanding research, rationality, and compassion, Monbiot demonstrates unequivocally the rampant greed, flaws, and corruption in current global institutions such as the UN, the WTO, the IMF, and the World Bank. In parallel, he lays out a clear plan for optimal global governance. The problem is that Monbiot's thoughtful suggestions are nearly impossible to implement. The astronomical distance between the status quo and where we need to be offers little hope that genuine reform is possible in the near future. The mechanisms for transition that Monbiot suggests are probably the weakest part of the Manifesto. While Monbiot vehemently opposes the status quo, in his call for change he doesn't realistically asses the degree of tyranny that the 80-trillion-dollar neoliberal terror-machine known as the world economy imposes on the rest of the world. As unfeasible as his recommendations for transition may be, Monbiot gives us no excuses. If we don't like them, he says it's up to us to replace them with something better. The Manifesto is highly important as a moral compass for today's criminal global economy and as a call to action for conscientious citizens of the world.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Whyte

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/101774.html[return][return]It's a mixed bag, written really for people who already count themselves as sympathisers with the anti-globalisation movement (and I suspect Monbiot would classify me as on the inside pissing out, rather than like him on the outside pissing in). There are four substantive chapters each with a different proposal. The first of these I completely agreed with, a rousing defence of democracy against communism and anarchism, though I myself do not http://nhw.livejournal.com/101774.html[return][return]It's a mixed bag, written really for people who already count themselves as sympathisers with the anti-globalisation movement (and I suspect Monbiot would classify me as on the inside pissing out, rather than like him on the outside pissing in). There are four substantive chapters each with a different proposal. The first of these I completely agreed with, a rousing defence of democracy against communism and anarchism, though I myself do not move in circles where this is much debated.[return][return]The second is a proposal for a World Parliament of 600 single-member transnational constituencies of 10 million people. Hmm. I'd have liked to see some actual figures here, for what such a parliament would look like. By country, as of 2002, there would be 128 Chinese MPs, 105 Indian, 29 from the United States, 21 from Indonesia, 17 from Brazil, 14 from Pakistan, Russia and Bangladesh, 13 from Nigeria and Japan. Monbiot quite reasonably snarls at those who would object to thus empowering the poor, but there is also the matter of empowering dictatorships by giving them representation (and his idea of handicapping less democratic regimes in an upper chamber is ludicrously unrealistic even by the standards of his other proposals). It's not an evil idea, but the way he puts it forward indicates to me how unfamiliar he is with the range of democratic practices worldwide.[return][return]The third is an appeal to implement Keynes' rather than Dexter White's plans for the Bretton Woods institutions. I don't know enough about the history or economics of this to comment properly, but several aspects of Monbiot's presentation seemed to me dishonest. Lumping together the IMF, World Bank and currency speculators as if they were one evil mass signed up to the same agenda is simply not fair. My personal experience of the World Bank has been rather positive, of an organisation of able people who could be earning far more in the private sector but instead are trying to reduce poverty; he seems to be writing about some other institution entirely. Likewise, the only currency speculator Monbiot actually names is one whom I happen to know, George Soros, who indeed gets a duly positive write-up. That the IMF sometimes behaves with crass insensitivity is well known, but to say that it is also evil is a step further and I don't find the case convincing. My conclusion is that I must read Skidelsky's biography of Keynes, and decide for myself.[return][return]The fourth is about the international trade system. Here I found the presentation unsatisfactory because it has been overtaken by events. But it's unarguable to me at least that many poor countries need some trade barriers, and that rich countries tend to cheat on the arrangements. A crucial aspect that is omitted from Monbiot's calculation, but is more and more something I'm saying in private to my official contacts and increasingly also in public, is the question of the movement of people as well as goods, services and capital. "Fortress Europe" penalises the honest traveller and rewards the trafficker of human beings. So of the three policy-oriented chapters, this one came closest to my own views.[return][return]In the short concluding chapter, Monbiot wonders if he got it the wrong way round and should have started off with his thoughts on trade and then moved on to Bretton Woods and finished with the World Parliament. For me, it doesn't really matter. The book's big failing is its lack of engagement with what the "enemy" actually say about themselves. Its success is that at least it puts forward ideas.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Once again, a book with some interesting, practical ideas that, if more people read it, could facilitate some worthwhile changes in the world. Of course, only the true believers read such books and well, they are already convinced that the exaltation of money is a bad, bad thing. A world parliament with fair elections and representation, a fair trade group that monitors everyone not just who volunteer to be part of it and ensures that people are not slaves, that environments are not decimated Once again, a book with some interesting, practical ideas that, if more people read it, could facilitate some worthwhile changes in the world. Of course, only the true believers read such books and well, they are already convinced that the exaltation of money is a bad, bad thing. A world parliament with fair elections and representation, a fair trade group that monitors everyone not just who volunteer to be part of it and ensures that people are not slaves, that environments are not decimated for profit and that everyone gets fed. Simple things, but while the current corporations rule the world, very difficult things to put into motion.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lee Robbins

    Good book with great points to be made about how the problems of inequality and the corruption of the IMF, World Bank, and US hegemeny are basically keeping third world countries... third world countries. The third chapter on a world parliment is a little far fetched. Just like Marxism he calls for a stateless society but I'm not sure how many governments would conceed to this idea.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Read it! It will open your eyes to better policy thinking, and help you understand that as global citizens we are being compartmentalized from competing on a level playing field of globalization. Tom Friemann can go suck it!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    An interesting proposal for a global democratic government. I'll have to mull this one over for awhile.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Starr

    If only putting the world to rights was as easy as the writer's text...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Interesting theories on world governments, but the methods for organizing them don't seem viable right now...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shae

    metaphysical mutation may or may not have been better left out of the book however it's a must read for global social justice inquiries.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    Well researched and clear.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  14. 4 out of 5

    Wilson

  15. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  16. 4 out of 5

    Richard

  17. 4 out of 5

    Arief Wicaksono

  18. 5 out of 5

    daniel smith

  19. 5 out of 5

    christina

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  21. 4 out of 5

    Anette

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nunsexmonkrock

  23. 4 out of 5

    Steven

  24. 4 out of 5

    Adam

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ian

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hannes

  27. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Mcintyre

  28. 5 out of 5

    mark mendoza

  29. 4 out of 5

    Yahya Oz

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chris Hawk

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