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Frugavore: How to Grow Organic, Buy Local, Waste Nothing, and Eat Well

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More and more people are interested in eating well and in un-derstanding where their food comes from. But where do you start? Organic, free-range, local, or sustainable: the choices can be overwhelmingnot to mention expensive. In Frugavore, Arabella Forge shows that developing a better relationship with food is not as difficult as it may appear. She provides hands-on, More and more people are interested in eating well and in un-derstanding where their food comes from. But where do you start? Organic, free-range, local, or sustainable: the choices can be overwhelming—not to mention expensive. In Frugavore, Arabella Forge shows that developing a better relationship with food is not as difficult as it may appear. She provides hands-on, practical advice for a new way of living—eating frugally. Learn how to access quality produce straight from the source, re-discover forgotten cooking techniques, create your own kitchen garden (complete with compost and a chicken coop), learn how to stock your pantry well, shop for and cook the most economical cuts of meat and fish, discover local farmers’ markets, community gardens and co-ops, and more! Packed with over 100 recipes for delicious dishes, such as heirloom roasted vegetables, chicken and leek pie, chickpea and rosemary soup, meatloaf with red sauce, minced fish cakes, and minty lemonade, plus resources, tips, and tricks to living and eating well, this is the book for every healthy, modern kitchen.


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More and more people are interested in eating well and in un-derstanding where their food comes from. But where do you start? Organic, free-range, local, or sustainable: the choices can be overwhelmingnot to mention expensive. In Frugavore, Arabella Forge shows that developing a better relationship with food is not as difficult as it may appear. She provides hands-on, More and more people are interested in eating well and in un-derstanding where their food comes from. But where do you start? Organic, free-range, local, or sustainable: the choices can be overwhelming—not to mention expensive. In Frugavore, Arabella Forge shows that developing a better relationship with food is not as difficult as it may appear. She provides hands-on, practical advice for a new way of living—eating frugally. Learn how to access quality produce straight from the source, re-discover forgotten cooking techniques, create your own kitchen garden (complete with compost and a chicken coop), learn how to stock your pantry well, shop for and cook the most economical cuts of meat and fish, discover local farmers’ markets, community gardens and co-ops, and more! Packed with over 100 recipes for delicious dishes, such as heirloom roasted vegetables, chicken and leek pie, chickpea and rosemary soup, meatloaf with red sauce, minced fish cakes, and minty lemonade, plus resources, tips, and tricks to living and eating well, this is the book for every healthy, modern kitchen.

59 review for Frugavore: How to Grow Organic, Buy Local, Waste Nothing, and Eat Well

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kent

    DNF at 14%. I lost more and more confidence on every page as the author, despite her master's degree and nutritionist training, propagated lies, myths, and anti-science paranoia. The naturalistic fallacy is all over this book. The author pedestalises mediaeval peasants and farmers, while scorning the modern day working poor for not putting in enough effort! Not to mention the lack of Indigenous perspective. I tried to press on but when she mentioned notorious quack Weston Price I had to quit.

  2. 4 out of 5

    BookBec

    A cute book with enthusiasm about eating well for less. Lots of encouragement and ideology, with some recipes too. Written by an Australian, and slightly adapted for the U.S. market -- the months of the seasons match the Northern Hemisphere, but some Down Under-isms remain, like "treacle" and "silverbeet" (molasses and chard, I believe).

  3. 4 out of 5

    Meltintalle

    I was disappointed by the author not reinforcing the phrase "doesn't take an arugula scientist" by telling wacky stories about lettuce hi-jinks but other than that this is a solid read. The author is fonder of chickens than I am but the French and other Euro-centric cuisine recipes look tasty and time efficient

  4. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

    I do not like the phrase " nutrient Dense food". The tips are good*)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Annette McIntyre

    Some nice recipes here and other information on living a similar lifestyle to the author's.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mallory

    Forge provides some great ideas for how to live a more sustainable life, including DIY gardening projects, recipes, shopping tips, etc. I found parts of the book hard to relate to, as some of the recipes call for ingredients hard to find in the US (the author is Australian), and she uses a lot of meat products, and I am a vegetarian. Neither of those factors are really the author's fault though, just my two cents. Still very much worth the read!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Emily Joyce

    The sustainable, traditional homesteading information was useful, but the recipes were underwhelming.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kristina

    I got a few recipes to try. Some of her ideas are above my personal comfort zone.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    This book inspired me to start a worm-farm!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amy Sjoquist

    Very informative, though I only read half. A lot of recipes I would never use because of my family's tastes. Also, not as easy to find the things she speaks of where I currently live.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Raelene

    Had a couple of cracker recipes.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Josie

    Hm...I don't feel like I got anything new on how to be both frugal and eat well...but still some good information.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lorna Jenkins

  14. 5 out of 5

    Robert Pearson

  15. 5 out of 5

    Leandra Ford

  16. 5 out of 5

    Marie E

  17. 5 out of 5

    Maya

  18. 4 out of 5

    Beth

  19. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Sharan

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bronwyn

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  23. 4 out of 5

    Middlethought

  24. 5 out of 5

    Meredith Buddin

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  27. 5 out of 5

    Maura Edmond

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

  29. 4 out of 5

    Beth

  30. 5 out of 5

    eden

  31. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  32. 5 out of 5

    Yvette

  33. 5 out of 5

    Rhi1981

  34. 5 out of 5

    Cass

  35. 4 out of 5

    Becky

  36. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  37. 4 out of 5

    Miss Maggie

  38. 5 out of 5

    Annaliduina

  39. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

  40. 4 out of 5

    Leah Page

  41. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

  42. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

  43. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

  44. 4 out of 5

    Brindi Johnstone

  45. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  46. 5 out of 5

    Rikki-Lea

  47. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

  48. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Hunt

  49. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  50. 5 out of 5

    Pip

    Basic, back to basics.

  51. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Mitchell

    great ideas and recipes to save $$ and still eat healthy food. and entertaining / easy to read

  52. 4 out of 5

    Libby

  53. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  54. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

  55. 5 out of 5

    Karakol

  56. 5 out of 5

    Penelope

  57. 5 out of 5

    Susanna

  58. 4 out of 5

    Jane

  59. 4 out of 5

    Anna Matilda

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