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Indian Conquistadors: Indigenous Allies in the Conquest of Mesoamerica

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The conquest of the New World would hardly have been possible if the invading Spaniards had not allied themselves with the indigenous population. This book takes into account the role of native peoples as active agents in the Conquest through a review of new sources and more careful analysis of known but under-studied materials that demonstrate the overwhelming importance The conquest of the New World would hardly have been possible if the invading Spaniards had not allied themselves with the indigenous population. This book takes into account the role of native peoples as active agents in the Conquest through a review of new sources and more careful analysis of known but under-studied materials that demonstrate the overwhelming importance of native allies in both conquest and colonial control. In Indian Conquistadors, leading scholars offer the most comprehensive look to date at native participation in the conquest of Mesoamerica. The contributors examine pictorial, archaeological, and documentary evidence spanning three centuries, including little-known eyewitness accounts from both Spanish and native documents, paintings (lienzos) and maps (mapas) from the colonial period, and a new assessment of imperialism in the region before the Spanish arrival. This new research shows that the Tlaxcalans, the most famous allies of the Spanish, were far from alone. Not only did native lords throughout Mesoamerica supply arms, troops, and tactical guidance, but tens of thousands of warriors—Nahuas, Mixtecs, Zapotecs, Mayas, and others—spread throughout the region to participate with the Spanish in a common cause. By offering a more balanced account of this dramatic period, this book calls into question traditional narratives that emphasize indigenous peoples’ roles as auxiliaries rather than as conquistadors in their own right. Enhanced with twelve maps and more than forty illustrations, Indian Conquistadors opens a vital new line of research and challenges our understanding of this important era.


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The conquest of the New World would hardly have been possible if the invading Spaniards had not allied themselves with the indigenous population. This book takes into account the role of native peoples as active agents in the Conquest through a review of new sources and more careful analysis of known but under-studied materials that demonstrate the overwhelming importance The conquest of the New World would hardly have been possible if the invading Spaniards had not allied themselves with the indigenous population. This book takes into account the role of native peoples as active agents in the Conquest through a review of new sources and more careful analysis of known but under-studied materials that demonstrate the overwhelming importance of native allies in both conquest and colonial control. In Indian Conquistadors, leading scholars offer the most comprehensive look to date at native participation in the conquest of Mesoamerica. The contributors examine pictorial, archaeological, and documentary evidence spanning three centuries, including little-known eyewitness accounts from both Spanish and native documents, paintings (lienzos) and maps (mapas) from the colonial period, and a new assessment of imperialism in the region before the Spanish arrival. This new research shows that the Tlaxcalans, the most famous allies of the Spanish, were far from alone. Not only did native lords throughout Mesoamerica supply arms, troops, and tactical guidance, but tens of thousands of warriors—Nahuas, Mixtecs, Zapotecs, Mayas, and others—spread throughout the region to participate with the Spanish in a common cause. By offering a more balanced account of this dramatic period, this book calls into question traditional narratives that emphasize indigenous peoples’ roles as auxiliaries rather than as conquistadors in their own right. Enhanced with twelve maps and more than forty illustrations, Indian Conquistadors opens a vital new line of research and challenges our understanding of this important era.

36 review for Indian Conquistadors: Indigenous Allies in the Conquest of Mesoamerica

  1. 5 out of 5

    Luke DL Monahan

    The Collection of essays found within this book range in quality from good to excellent. For me, there were Four reviews stood out as excellent and they are; 'Whose Conquest?' by Laura E. Matthew, 'Concubines and Wives' by Robinson A. Herrara, 'Conquest, Coercion, and Collaboration' by Ida Altman, and 'By the Force of their Lives and the spilling of Blood' by Bret Blosser. It is within these chapters the book shows its worth. These chapters in conjunction with the well-written introduction and c The Collection of essays found within this book range in quality from good to excellent. For me, there were Four reviews stood out as excellent and they are; 'Whose Conquest?' by Laura E. Matthew, 'Concubines and Wives' by Robinson A. Herrara, 'Conquest, Coercion, and Collaboration' by Ida Altman, and 'By the Force of their Lives and the spilling of Blood' by Bret Blosser. It is within these chapters the book shows its worth. These chapters in conjunction with the well-written introduction and conclusion prevented the book from being a dry historical textbook. It is great to see a history that displays the agency of the indigenous peoples of Central and South America, but the declaration of their agency also demonstrates that the brutal subjection of Central and South America is dependant upon the indigenous themselves. This left me with a dichotomous feeling that the indigenous peoples are depending on the time both victims and perpetrators of Spanish colonialism.

  2. 4 out of 5

    José Flores

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Summers

  4. 4 out of 5

    Will

  5. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Shapiro

  6. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Cooper

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    Jeff

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rob C

  9. 4 out of 5

    John Locke

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lora Kile

  11. 4 out of 5

    Paul Schwennesen

  12. 5 out of 5

    John

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jeb Card

  14. 4 out of 5

    Foppe

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ignacio Gallup-Diaz

  16. 4 out of 5

    Wikimedia Italia

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  18. 5 out of 5

    P. Es

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mike Mitchell

  20. 5 out of 5

    Remington Krueger

  21. 5 out of 5

    jessie lou

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alice Diorio

  23. 4 out of 5

    Fernando

  24. 4 out of 5

    DomovoiReader

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Bartelli

  26. 5 out of 5

    Briseida

  27. 5 out of 5

    Patchy

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jakob Myers

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dani Rose

  30. 4 out of 5

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  31. 4 out of 5

    Orlando Perez

  32. 5 out of 5

    Carlos

  33. 5 out of 5

    Travis Meyer

  34. 4 out of 5

    Arnie

  35. 4 out of 5

    Nathaniel

  36. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

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