counter create hit The Fantasy Worlds of Peter Beagle - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Fantasy Worlds of Peter Beagle

Availability: Ready to download

Four fantastical stories: Lila the Werewolf, The Last Unicorn, Come, Lady Death, A Fine and Private Place. Each story is illustrated with a single, but intricate, black-and-white drawing by Darrell K. Sweet.


Compare
Ads Banner

Four fantastical stories: Lila the Werewolf, The Last Unicorn, Come, Lady Death, A Fine and Private Place. Each story is illustrated with a single, but intricate, black-and-white drawing by Darrell K. Sweet.

30 review for The Fantasy Worlds of Peter Beagle

  1. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    I listened to this short story for free via the PodCastle podcast! It was an interesting enough story, but it never really managed to grab my full interest or attention. Still it was worth a read and the story got stronger towards the end. Lady Neville is an incredibly rich, but jaded, socialite of the London elite. Her parties are not ones to be missed even by the likes of the King of England. On a whim Lady Neville decides to invite Death himself to one of her parties. She is sure that such an I listened to this short story for free via the PodCastle podcast! It was an interesting enough story, but it never really managed to grab my full interest or attention. Still it was worth a read and the story got stronger towards the end. Lady Neville is an incredibly rich, but jaded, socialite of the London elite. Her parties are not ones to be missed even by the likes of the King of England. On a whim Lady Neville decides to invite Death himself to one of her parties. She is sure that such an exulted guest would only reinforce her standing as the leader of fashionable society. Plus she is old and feels like she does not have much to lose if the invite is accepted. Which it is. Death makes an appearance and is not what one might expect. Death's presence reveals a few things about Lady Neville and a number of her regular guests. Rating: 3 stars. Audio Note: The audio was narrated by Paul S. Jenkins and I thought he gave a decent performance.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chy

    I can explain myself, after my "reading it slowly" comment. It's a thing of beauty, A Fine and Private Place. It comes in and leads you along and finally it builds up on you to the point of pain and then you have to figure out what to do with it and yourself. And by "you" I mean "me." I found myself saying, "Okay, do it. Get it over with. Pile all the beauty on me until I'm crying." And it did, and I did. I swear, it's what the novel's about, and it's what it did to me at the same time. There are I can explain myself, after my "reading it slowly" comment. It's a thing of beauty, A Fine and Private Place. It comes in and leads you along and finally it builds up on you to the point of pain and then you have to figure out what to do with it and yourself. And by "you" I mean "me." I found myself saying, "Okay, do it. Get it over with. Pile all the beauty on me until I'm crying." And it did, and I did. I swear, it's what the novel's about, and it's what it did to me at the same time. There are other stories in here, too. The Last Unicorn, I've read before, and it does the same thing to me, in different ways, every time. Besides the two novels, there are two short stories. "Lila the Werewolf" and "Come, Lady Death" were both fantastic. I love the details in the telling, the acceptance of things like werewolves and Death as a person. There are so many dogears throughout now that the covers are warped. What's the point of dogearing every page, Chy? Because it makes me feel better, like I get to drag the beauty with me for a while, even after I'm beyond that page and stumbling over more beauty.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Serena W. Sorrell

    Just the sort of wonderful short story you'd expect from Peter S. Beagle. There was an exquisite emotional pull in these few pages, and the characters of Death and Lady Neville work as such fascinating foils and mirrors to one another it's just as much a dance between them as between the actual dancing couples. It lends itself well to Mommy Fortuna's portrayal of Death in Peter's defining work, The Last Unicorn. There is a tender melancholy that is sweet but relentless to this Death. Merged Just the sort of wonderful short story you'd expect from Peter S. Beagle. There was an exquisite emotional pull in these few pages, and the characters of Death and Lady Neville work as such fascinating foils and mirrors to one another it's just as much a dance between them as between the actual dancing couples. It lends itself well to Mommy Fortuna's portrayal of Death in Peter's defining work, The Last Unicorn. There is a tender melancholy that is sweet but relentless to this Death. Merged review: This is an amazing collection of what I believe to be some of Peter's best works (excepting that I don't much care for Lila the Werewolf). Both of the novels here are two of my most favorite Beagle novels, and it includes one of my three favorite short stories. So lucky to have found a beautiful used HC of this treasure.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I grew up watching The Last Unicorn and always adored it. So of course I made my kids watch it. And they were just as enamored as I had been. Then I saw this book available on paperbackswap.com and had to read it. Lila The Werewolf - Really odd but actually kinda cool. Not everyone would handle it as well as the narrator when discovering their girlfriend was a werewolf. The Last Unicorn - A beautiful, immortal creature leaves her protected forest to find others of her kind. Not only does she find I grew up watching The Last Unicorn and always adored it. So of course I made my kids watch it. And they were just as enamored as I had been. Then I saw this book available on paperbackswap.com and had to read it. Lila The Werewolf - Really odd but actually kinda cool. Not everyone would handle it as well as the narrator when discovering their girlfriend was a werewolf. The Last Unicorn - A beautiful, immortal creature leaves her protected forest to find others of her kind. Not only does she find a strange and changed world, but not a single person recognizes her as a true unicorn. Not until she is captured my Mommy Fortuna's traveling show and she meets to misfit wizard Schmendrick. He agrees to help her on her quest to find the other unicorns, even among the rumors of the fearsome Red Bull who has captured them. And all my favorite lines were right there in the original book! I loved that those parts weren't added by the screenwriters and were Mr. Beagle's genius. Come, Lady Death - If you were elderly, as rich as royalty, and at the height of London society, what would you do when you got bored with the extravagant parties and court functions? Why, throw a ball for Death! But getting Death the invitation could be tricky. And receiving the the reply is just as difficult. But what would you do if Death not only accepted the invite but actually shows up? A Fine and Private Place - Mr. Beagle's first book. An odd tale about a man unable to face the world who takes refuge in a cemetary…for 22 years. His only contact is with the ghosts of the deceased buried there, but even those don't last for long as their memories fade and they forget themselves. Kinda reminds me of Neil Gaiman's Graveyard Book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Come Lady Death was a surprisingly delightful short story by Peter S. Beagle, the author of The Last Unicorn, which I loved as a kid. In this entertaining tale, Lady Neville is an ancient, very rich, and extremely bored aristocrat. She has been obeyed all her life and now she must search out, nay, DEMAND a new entertainment. Her miniscule spark of originality comes up with a ball, one to which she will invite Death. Of course there ensues the questions of how to locate Death, how to address the Come Lady Death was a surprisingly delightful short story by Peter S. Beagle, the author of The Last Unicorn, which I loved as a kid. In this entertaining tale, Lady Neville is an ancient, very rich, and extremely bored aristocrat. She has been obeyed all her life and now she must search out, nay, DEMAND a new entertainment. Her miniscule spark of originality comes up with a ball, one to which she will invite Death. Of course there ensues the questions of how to locate Death, how to address the invitation, when to hold the ball, etc. Imagine how Death’s acceptance letter is pawed over and discussed ad nauseum. On the night of the ball, it looks like Death will not show; all the guests are disappointed and Lady Neville is embarrassed. Then Lady Death walks through the door. She is young and fair; soon the ladies are jealous and all the men wish to dance with her. But throughout the night only Lady Neville and one man have the courage to dance and talk with her. I won’t spoil the ending for you, which was an intriguing surprise for me, and there are many little tidbits I’ve left out. Enjoy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Wyntrnoire

    So far I have only read "A Fine and Private Place".

  7. 4 out of 5

    Andreas

    The Fantasy Worlds of Peter S. Beagle is a fun way of experiencing some of his stories, though not all of them are equal. I'd recommend picking up this edition just because 3/4 good stories isn't something one should scoff at.

  8. 5 out of 5

    NONATION

    I want this book is great

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    This book is awesome!!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    Last Unicorn was good. Come Lady Death was great. A Fine Quiet Place was like death, slow and depressing and kinda meaningless in the end.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    This omnibus has two short stories, and two full length stories in it - Lila the Werewolf and Come, Lady Death (short stories); and The Last Unicorn and A Fine and Private Place (full length). Overall I'm giving it a three, but that's based on taking each story individually. Lila the Werewolf (1 star): I just plain didn't like this one. I almost quit reading the omnibus right from the beginning, this was the first story in it and it did not make a good first impression. But I continued, and I'm This omnibus has two short stories, and two full length stories in it - Lila the Werewolf and Come, Lady Death (short stories); and The Last Unicorn and A Fine and Private Place (full length). Overall I'm giving it a three, but that's based on taking each story individually. Lila the Werewolf (1 star): I just plain didn't like this one. I almost quit reading the omnibus right from the beginning, this was the first story in it and it did not make a good first impression. But I continued, and I'm glad I did. The Last Unicorn (3 stars): I expected to love this story, as it seems that most people do, but I find myself just barely liking it. I think that if I had read it as a kid, I would have loved it. As an adult? It was just kind of bland. I didn't care much about the characters, overall was just unimpressed. But that said, it was still a well told story. Come, Lady Death (3 stars): This was much better than the first short story, which I was glad for. It was short and cute and i enjoyed reading it. A Fine and Private Place (4 stars): This is the one that surprised me, and that really saved the omnibus for me. I didn't expect to like it as much as I did. I read the omnibus mostly for The Last Unicorn, I had never even heard of this story before I read it. But it was really really sweet. It was humorous and touching, and an all around fun read. Of the four stories in the book, this is the only one I would really recommend.

  12. 5 out of 5

    melydia

    This volume contains two novels, a novella, and a short story, so I'll review them each separately. Lila the Werewolf: A strange and somewhat sad tale of a young woman who occasionally turns into a wolf, much to the dismay of her boyfriend. A good example of "just because it's fantasy doesn't mean it's for children". It's written well, just a little disturbing to read. The Last Unicorn: This is a marvelous book. I've read it before, and did not reread it this time around, but it remains one of my This volume contains two novels, a novella, and a short story, so I'll review them each separately. Lila the Werewolf: A strange and somewhat sad tale of a young woman who occasionally turns into a wolf, much to the dismay of her boyfriend. A good example of "just because it's fantasy doesn't mean it's for children". It's written well, just a little disturbing to read. The Last Unicorn: This is a marvelous book. I've read it before, and did not reread it this time around, but it remains one of my favorites. A Fine and Private Place: A tale of two ghosts, a raven, and a man who lives in a cemetery. It's decidedly bittersweet, with a little humor here and a little tragedy there. It was very introspective and atmospheric - a "quiet" book, if you will. I liked the snarky raven - and I thought it odd how, in a cemetery where people think talking to ghosts is a little weird, no one ever mentions how unusual it is for a raven to speak. I wish there had been just a little bit more about Laura and Michael, especially there at the end, but all in all it was good. Come Lady Death: An old woman decides to invite Death to her next party - and Death does indeed attend. The ending left me a little cold, but otherwise it was a decent story.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Misha

    Whether one is into fantasy or not, the 430-page collection is a fine edition to anyone's library. It contains the novels "The Last Unicorn", "A Fine and Private Place", and the short stories "Come, Lady Death" and "Lila, the Werewolf". Each is different from the others, showing Beagle's range in storytelling and writing styles. "A Fine and Private Place" centers around a mausoleum where a recluse who speaks with the dead is offered a chance at happiness. Its wit, charm, sadness, and beauty make Whether one is into fantasy or not, the 430-page collection is a fine edition to anyone's library. It contains the novels "The Last Unicorn", "A Fine and Private Place", and the short stories "Come, Lady Death" and "Lila, the Werewolf". Each is different from the others, showing Beagle's range in storytelling and writing styles. "A Fine and Private Place" centers around a mausoleum where a recluse who speaks with the dead is offered a chance at happiness. It’s wit, charm, sadness, and beauty make it a fine and memorable piece, and definitely worth revisiting. Impressively, it's Beagle's first novel, written when he was 19. "The Last Unicorn" follows the Unicorn who teams up with Schmendrick the Magician and a bandit leader’s wife to find out what happened to the other unicorns. It's a fantasy story that children and adults alike can enjoy. As usual the movie adaptation omitted some of the story, including the book’s end. "Lila the Werewolf" is self-explanatory and was okay. "Come, Lady Death" is a humorous, fantasy-spin about the superficial social politics of the 19th century. It was really amusing. I look forward to reading more by Beagle.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kressel Housman

    This collection contains the novels A Fine and Private Place and The Last Unicorn, both of which I've reviewed separately, but it also contains two short stories, "Lila the Werewolf" and "Come, Lady Death." "Lila" is probably the more famous, but I was turned off by all those descriptions of the she-wolf in heat. I'm reviewing this book specifically to recommend "Come, Lady Death," especially to all my friends who love Jane Austen and/or Regency history. It's like going to a ball at the Ton - This collection contains the novels A Fine and Private Place and The Last Unicorn, both of which I've reviewed separately, but it also contains two short stories, "Lila the Werewolf" and "Come, Lady Death." "Lila" is probably the more famous, but I was turned off by all those descriptions of the she-wolf in heat. I'm reviewing this book specifically to recommend "Come, Lady Death," especially to all my friends who love Jane Austen and/or Regency history. It's like going to a ball at the Ton - with superficiality and social politics galore - except with a fantasy angle. Even if you've read everything else in the collection, it's worth getting hold of the book for this story alone. Enjoy!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rel

    This story was rather formative for me. It is difficult to say quite what I learned from it, but it's stuck in me, scratched into me. I read it for the first time when I was approximately 10, and it was probably the first thing that I read that took a concept and made it flesh, gave it feelings and rationale -- Death, embodied and blazingly female. It's all there in the title. The story is simple and elegant and classically structured. The characters are familiar and archetypal, though not tired This story was rather formative for me. It is difficult to say quite what I learned from it, but it's stuck in me, scratched into me. I read it for the first time when I was approximately 10, and it was probably the first thing that I read that took a concept and made it flesh, gave it feelings and rationale -- Death, embodied and blazingly female. It's all there in the title. The story is simple and elegant and classically structured. The characters are familiar and archetypal, though not tired at all. It's Beagle doing a wonderful job of being Beagle, though I can't think of anything else he wrote quite like it. Mostly I remember the emotional response I had to it -- excitement, suspense, curiosity. It was a story that I felt like I already knew, or should have known. It holds up fabulously both in time and against other similar things.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Data

    This is right up there on my short list of all time favorite books. Beagle's writing defined the fantasy genre for me - a different view of the same ol' world. Fantasy is about the interface of humans with the unbelievable or the fantastic. Beagle imagines some amazing things, but it is his portrait of the human condition that sets his writing above. My favorite story might be 'Lila the Werewolf', if I could choose one. A little raw and definitely of the '70's, it's still a powerful exploration This is right up there on my short list of all time favorite books. Beagle's writing defined the fantasy genre for me - a different view of the same ol' world. Fantasy is about the interface of humans with the unbelievable or the fantastic. Beagle imagines some amazing things, but it is his portrait of the human condition that sets his writing above. My favorite story might be 'Lila the Werewolf', if I could choose one. A little raw and definitely of the '70's, it's still a powerful exploration of how humans accept and rationalize. Beagle and me, we both accept that it might not be the best, but we 're still willing to claim it as ours.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kristalia

    Final rating: 3/5 stars Interesting story, beautifully written and really short T_T... I just wish that it was longer. read in dec, 2012, this is also possibly the shortest review i have ever wrote.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Honestly I didn't even finish the book. I tried. Oh, how I tried. I loved "The Last Unicorn." I enjoyed "Lila the Werewolf." I just couldn't get through the rest of it. I think it's well-written, but it's just not for me, necessarily. Not all of it anyway. If it were just "The Last Unicorn" and "Lila the Werewolf" I would probably rate this 4 to 5 stars, depending on my mood. As it is, it gets three.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Elise

    I was really disapointed. I love the last unicorn the movie but Peter's writting is very simple and his story telling is underdeveloped. Lila's story was boring and lacked feeling of the main character. I didn't make it to the last story but the only one I did like was lady death. An interesting approach to telling the story about death, who is and how it's not something to fear.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chronographia

    In any anthology of Beagle's work, there are bound to be repeats. All the stories collected in this books are large enough to be sold as seperate books on their ownand they areexcept for Come, Lady Death, so, really, that's what you've gotten all 429 pages for. And it's totally worth it: his best, most concise storytelling. In any anthology of Beagle's work, there are bound to be repeats. All the stories collected in this books are large enough to be sold as seperate books on their own—and they are—except for Come, Lady Death, so, really, that's what you've gotten all 429 pages for. And it's totally worth it: his best, most concise storytelling.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Reynolds

    Six stars needed for this one. A masterful collection of perfect little gems. Lila the Werewolf, Lady Death, the last unicorn and her ragtag band of followers-led by a magician named Schmendrick. I first read this decades ago and every tale became deeply imprinted on me. Just wonderful. Maybe more than six stars.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    This has The Last Unicorn, A Fine and Private Place, Lila the Werewolf, and Come Lady Death. This is a magnificent collection. When it became available I gave it to both my kids. Hopefully they will read it to their kids. I love all these stories. They talk about the magic that exists around us which we usually fail to see. Open your eyes.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    A paperback copy of this collection was lent to me by my high school English and French teacher, Kara Killingsworth. I had already read "The Last Unicorn." And she was only recommending that I read "A Fine and Private Place," which remains to this day one of my most beloved stories.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Greg Kerestan

    Peter S. Beagle is one of the greatest fantasy authors of the twentieth century, and he, along with Neil Gaiman, can be claimed as one of the few truly solid magic realist authors in the English-speaking world. This short story is captivating, whimsical and threatening around the edges, and my only complaint is that it is as short as it is- I would gladly have read a novel based on this story.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    I had heard of The Last Unicorn and A Fine & Private Place from a couple female friends. Their recommendations got me to swallow the ususal aversion to fantasy and read this collection containing them. They were different in that they weren't, like so much fantasy, formulaic.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Larisa

    I read this in high school... mostly it contains "A Fine and Private Place" and "The Last Unicorn", both of which I'd already read, but was worth the price (at a used bookstore) to get the incredible stories "Lila the Werewolf" and "Come Lady Death"

  27. 4 out of 5

    Yj

    Borrowed the book to read 'The Last Unicorn' but enjoyed all 4 stories. All well written, all unique. Surprisingly 'Lila the Werewolf' was my least favorite band I enjoyed 'A Fine and Private Place' which takes place in cemetery, much more than I expected.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Wit

    I'm having a difficult time engaging with the writing style of these stories. Beagle's voice is at the same time overly simple yet wordy which can make it hard to relate to the characters. There was only one story that I didn't struggle through, Come, Lady Death.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Laurie Ann

    I read this a VERY long time ago when I was 17 or so. I love "Lila the Werewolf" and can't understand why so many people have a problem with it. I have cast and re-cast the movie in my head for years. Come on, someone develop that script!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Slytheringirl

    A wonderfully written little tale about the folly of the aristocracy. Such a shame it's so hard to track down these days. T_T I just love Mr. Beagle's whimsical style.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.