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Work. For some this word represents drudgery and the mundane. For others work is an idol to be served. If you find yourself anywhere on the spectrum from workaholic to weekend warrior, it's time to bridge the gap between Sunday worship and Monday work. Striking a balance between theological depth and practical counsel, Tom Nelson outlines God's purposes for work in a way th Work. For some this word represents drudgery and the mundane. For others work is an idol to be served. If you find yourself anywhere on the spectrum from workaholic to weekend warrior, it's time to bridge the gap between Sunday worship and Monday work. Striking a balance between theological depth and practical counsel, Tom Nelson outlines God's purposes for work in a way that helps us to make the most of our vocation and to join God in his work in the world. Discover a new perspective on work that will transform your workday and make the majority of your waking hours matter, not only now, but for eternity.


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Work. For some this word represents drudgery and the mundane. For others work is an idol to be served. If you find yourself anywhere on the spectrum from workaholic to weekend warrior, it's time to bridge the gap between Sunday worship and Monday work. Striking a balance between theological depth and practical counsel, Tom Nelson outlines God's purposes for work in a way th Work. For some this word represents drudgery and the mundane. For others work is an idol to be served. If you find yourself anywhere on the spectrum from workaholic to weekend warrior, it's time to bridge the gap between Sunday worship and Monday work. Striking a balance between theological depth and practical counsel, Tom Nelson outlines God's purposes for work in a way that helps us to make the most of our vocation and to join God in his work in the world. Discover a new perspective on work that will transform your workday and make the majority of your waking hours matter, not only now, but for eternity.

30 review for Work Matters: Connecting Sunday Worship to Monday Work

  1. 4 out of 5

    Beau Stanley

    Nelson's book provides a good overview of Faith and Work theology. He writes with a pastor's heart and is transparent about his own journey in understanding a theology of vocation more fully. The testimonials featured throughout the book were a welcome addition. Though Nelson presents the major theological categories and biblical themes at play, the book does not add much unique thought to the discussion and less biblical content than one might hope. Good choice for someone becoming acquainted w Nelson's book provides a good overview of Faith and Work theology. He writes with a pastor's heart and is transparent about his own journey in understanding a theology of vocation more fully. The testimonials featured throughout the book were a welcome addition. Though Nelson presents the major theological categories and biblical themes at play, the book does not add much unique thought to the discussion and less biblical content than one might hope. Good choice for someone becoming acquainted with issues of faith and work but not as appropriate for those who have already read other titles in the field.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jerrod Griebel

    Bridging the gap between Sunday worship and Monday work, Tom Nelson walks the reader through ten chapters of scriptural theology to support the importance of vocation as God-created and God-honoring. In doing so, he wonderfully unpacks why the notion that one must be in “full time ministry” to be an active agent for Christ’s Kingdom is a fallacy. While this was an easy read, at times it was a bit garrulous and could’ve been condensed (hence, only 3 stars), but for those believers who struggle th Bridging the gap between Sunday worship and Monday work, Tom Nelson walks the reader through ten chapters of scriptural theology to support the importance of vocation as God-created and God-honoring. In doing so, he wonderfully unpacks why the notion that one must be in “full time ministry” to be an active agent for Christ’s Kingdom is a fallacy. While this was an easy read, at times it was a bit garrulous and could’ve been condensed (hence, only 3 stars), but for those believers who struggle through their job every day, Nelson offers both hope and insight to encourage workers and to develop their view of how God places us in vocations throughout our lives.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Will Mckenna

    Good introductory read for the reader who is beginning to broach the subject of faith and work. More robust works exist, but the book is still relatively helpful for the inquiring reader. I would recommend to a certain subset of readers, depending on their familiarity with the subject/topic. Chapters 1, 5, and 6 were most helpful.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Laurie Reyes

    This was a really practical book about work. The author reminds and proves that all work is sacred, not just ministry work. As I read it I kept thinking of my boys and hope to have them read it as well. The last few chapters of the book were less helpful for me than the first half of the book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Elisha Lawrence

    I really appreciate Made to Flourish for resourcing pastors with this book and a number of others. I signed up for a pastoral kit and was sent this, about 4 other books and some brochures for free. Very grateful for their investment in pastors. This book was helpful. I can tell that Nelson lives out what he believes in this area. He has put a lot of thought into the dignity of work and redeeming it. His church is really helping their members think about their work as a place of ministry. A lot of I really appreciate Made to Flourish for resourcing pastors with this book and a number of others. I signed up for a pastoral kit and was sent this, about 4 other books and some brochures for free. Very grateful for their investment in pastors. This book was helpful. I can tell that Nelson lives out what he believes in this area. He has put a lot of thought into the dignity of work and redeeming it. His church is really helping their members think about their work as a place of ministry. A lot of this book emphasizes similar points to Keller's Every Good Endeavor. He and Keller are different people so they don't address each thing in the same way, but I was encouraged to see some of their similarities and Nelson's acknowledgement that his church learned a lot from Redeemer in their process. I am grateful for these points that Nelson drew out: -Jesus was known as a carpenter's son. When he preached in his hometown, they were surprised to hear him preaching because they were so familiar with him as being a carpenter. Jesus was so focused on his work of carpentry that people knew him for it. He was pursuing the Lord and honoring him all that time leading up to his move into preaching the gospel itinerantly. Jesus glorified the Lord in the way he was a good carpenter. Carpenters should be known for making good tables. That in and of itself is glorifying to God. So often we analyze work outside of gospel proclamation or mercy ministry (preaching, Christian non-profits, parachurch ministry) based on whether we are getting to talk about Christ with someone. Vocations with less opportunity for proclamation are considered lower callings. Apparently Jesus didn't feel this way. Yes we should articulate the gospel, but that's not to say that all other work is pointless or a lesser calling. -Jesus is the smartest man in my field. No matter the field of work that someone is in, Jesus as the creator and designer of the world, is the best in that field. Certainly engineers learn from engineers and get schooling. He is just making the point that what Scripture says is applicable for you regardless of your vocation. Scripture is meant for teachers, doctors, engineers, insurance salesman, and businessmen. We are all meant to be conformed into the image of Christ and have an intimate relationship with the Lord regardless of where we work. -Remain in the position in which you were called. It's so interesting that Paul says this. This goes against the grain of modern culture and Christian culture. Modern culture says you deserve better and creates a sense of discontentment in truly developing skills by staying in one job and cultivating a better understanding and appreciation for that work. Christian culture minimizes calling to full-time Christian ministry jobs so that those who aren't pastors or para-church workers think their job isn't really a calling from the Lord. If God calls someone, it's always out of the workforce into the pastorate or work as a missionary. We don't think of the workplace as a mission field. We don't think of ALL jobs as a calling from God. I hear this all the time in conversations with people in our church. And I don't blame them, I blame myself for the language I have used and the way I've thought about calling that has contributed to this problem. His final chapter gets really practical on steps that churches can take to emphasize vocation. He talked about avoiding language like "secular job", "full-time ministry", and "frontlines ministry", because it communicates a gap between Sunday worship and Monday work. Their church has a two year discipleship pathway specifically focused on helping people understand their vocation as a calling connected to their faith. They have group networks centered around specific types of jobs to provide support and encouragement. They celebrate not just when missions teams go out but when teachers go back to school to emphasize that they're on a mission too. They have a system of workplace mentoring where the older or wiser walk alongside young people entering the workforce. It's not perfect, but it's something and I appreciate him sharing some of the practicals that they are doing. My lower rating is mainly about his writing style. His illustrations to start chapters were basically throwaways to me, but I'm spoiled with Trevor Atwood's style of preaching and writers like Skye Jethani and Mark Sayers who weave illustrations seamlessly into their points. If I wrote a book, I'd probably give it 1 star for the same issue LOL. Overall, the book was helpful. Vocation is something I think all churches should be taking some time to talk through and emphasize. This is such a massive chunk of every person in the church's week. If they don't see it as a place where God is with them and where God cares very much about how they're doing it, then a sense of purposelessness drifts in.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cherry Goh

    The quote “God does not need your good works, but your neighbor does.” By Martin Luther was a key take-home message for me after reading this book. I read this book at my point in my life where I had been at my current office job for almost 4 years, and I had started to feel like a cog in a wheel. The book reminded me that my workplace is the very place that God wants to use to refine, and shape me, to make me more Christ-like. That it is important to do a GOOD job. It has helped me to start thi The quote “God does not need your good works, but your neighbor does.” By Martin Luther was a key take-home message for me after reading this book. I read this book at my point in my life where I had been at my current office job for almost 4 years, and I had started to feel like a cog in a wheel. The book reminded me that my workplace is the very place that God wants to use to refine, and shape me, to make me more Christ-like. That it is important to do a GOOD job. It has helped me to start thinking about how I can live a more integrated Sunday to Monday life, and healing the sacred-secular divide. I am trying to see how the projects I am working on are contributing to God’s world and making a positive impact on people’s lives. I can see my church starting to make a conscious effort to value the diverse Monday-to-Friday jobs of the congregation and not just what people do on a Sunday, by having short testimonials during service and people sharing how they bring their faith to work. This book wasn’t the most engaging to read and at times reading it felt like ‘work’ ironically! However, I persevered and I am glad that I have read it. I enjoyed the exploration of biblical characters in work such as Daniel, Joseph, and Bezalel, I would have liked a more in depth look at those characters. Also, while there are helpful questions at the end of each chapter to guide the readers thinking to work out their own application points, what I would have liked to see more of was deeper case studies of the mental shift that has happened as people grasped the integrated theology of work and how that has impacted them. Overall a helpful quick read on having a biblical perspective of work.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Lee

    The primary thrust of the book is this - full-time ministry work is as important as secular vocational work. Unfortunately, he spent too many pages of text harping on the same point. And at the end of everything, I was not convinced. Tom Nelson’s writing style does not resonate with me; I struggled to remain interested in the unfolding narrative. While he uses a mix of personal accounts, real-world examples and Scripture, his use of the biblical text is problematically eisegetical (meaning he hig The primary thrust of the book is this - full-time ministry work is as important as secular vocational work. Unfortunately, he spent too many pages of text harping on the same point. And at the end of everything, I was not convinced. Tom Nelson’s writing style does not resonate with me; I struggled to remain interested in the unfolding narrative. While he uses a mix of personal accounts, real-world examples and Scripture, his use of the biblical text is problematically eisegetical (meaning he highlights many passages and isolates the biblical text out of its context to fit what he wants it to say along the lines of the topic he is on, often missing the main theological principle of the passage and instead engaging in a works-righteousness application of "be like Boaz" or "be like Joseph"). Perhaps the only part of the book that was of a better quality would be chapter 9's "Facing challenges at work." A quick glance at the other helpful Goodreads reviewers' takes would yield the advice to avoid this book if you have read another on this topic. For better reads on the topic of work, look at Timothy Keller’s Every Good Endeavour or William Taylor’s Revolutionary Work.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    I am trying decide why this book has such a low rating. Maybe people pick it up and don't understand this is a book to put perspective about our daily walk with Jesus in a secular world? Or maybe Christians are hoping this leads to a calling in the church? This book is great for Christians looking for perspective in how all work matters and is equal in the eyes of God. In fact, it shows us that all work matters and not only is work a place to practice our daily walk in the following the way of J I am trying decide why this book has such a low rating. Maybe people pick it up and don't understand this is a book to put perspective about our daily walk with Jesus in a secular world? Or maybe Christians are hoping this leads to a calling in the church? This book is great for Christians looking for perspective in how all work matters and is equal in the eyes of God. In fact, it shows us that all work matters and not only is work a place to practice our daily walk in the following the way of Jesus but actually puts us in a place of being the salt and light everyday in places that might not get a lot of salt and light. Loving your job is so important but being a model of love is the most important thing regardless of where you work. God gave us work and we should honor that gift with being the best example of Jesus' love each and every day.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Karie

    I liked most of this book – especially the way it took actual people (business people & business owners) and cited the way that they took the words they heard on Sundays and put those words into action in their work lives. They did more that recite the teachings they heard in church – they lived by those words in their dealings with employees and customers. The message of the book was a good one – as I am not a regular churchgoer, I was impressed with the common sense examples. At times, the them I liked most of this book – especially the way it took actual people (business people & business owners) and cited the way that they took the words they heard on Sundays and put those words into action in their work lives. They did more that recite the teachings they heard in church – they lived by those words in their dealings with employees and customers. The message of the book was a good one – as I am not a regular churchgoer, I was impressed with the common sense examples. At times, the themes got a bit repetitive, but in general, I agreed with the message that many people are hypocrites when it comes to their religious lives and work lives. What they do and say in their work lives do not reflect what they say they believe. I, for one, will try to do an even better job bringing these good words and good works into my daily life.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bert van der Vaart

    A perfectly fine if relatively unstartling disquisition on how one's work is part and parcel of a Christian's life--that everything we do should be as unto the Lord. Nelson leavens the book with a few decent anecdotes, but on the whole I think the book could have been 9 pages long and made the same points instead of 209. One important point is that how we work is a good advertisement of our belief, and ultimately where our mission field should be. However, with restrictions and hostility to shar A perfectly fine if relatively unstartling disquisition on how one's work is part and parcel of a Christian's life--that everything we do should be as unto the Lord. Nelson leavens the book with a few decent anecdotes, but on the whole I think the book could have been 9 pages long and made the same points instead of 209. One important point is that how we work is a good advertisement of our belief, and ultimately where our mission field should be. However, with restrictions and hostility to sharing our beliefs, perhaps it is not surprising how the rate of attracting new believers in the US is less than formerly. OK for small groups but there are surely more challenging and more important books out there.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jeremiah Moore

    In Work Matters, I think Nelson brought up some great points throughout the book. I enjoyed his writing style. each chapter was broken up into smaller sections. It gave me time to pause and reflect after the sections rather than taking in a whole chapter. I think I got the most out of this book by talking with friends about how to apply principles mentioned. To be honest, Nelson got pretty repetitive with some of his main points. Although they were good points, it could have been condensed some. In Work Matters, I think Nelson brought up some great points throughout the book. I enjoyed his writing style. each chapter was broken up into smaller sections. It gave me time to pause and reflect after the sections rather than taking in a whole chapter. I think I got the most out of this book by talking with friends about how to apply principles mentioned. To be honest, Nelson got pretty repetitive with some of his main points. Although they were good points, it could have been condensed some. If you read this book, be sure to have discussions with friends!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Will Pareja

    A very good book for pastors and congregants alike. A modern call to holistic Christian living. It keeps moving. The stories are real and helpful. Have a stack ready, church leader, to pass out to hungry workers.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Paulette Shilling

    Excellent book! Life changing. Tom Nelson is an excellent writer!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    3.4/5 great in places and dreadful in places.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Katrin V

    Ok, but not as good as others on this topic.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Schlabs

    Useful as a cursory introduction to faith and work ideas, but there are much better resources out there.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Russell Gehrlein

    I highly recommend this book by Tom Nelson. He is concise, compassionate, and biblical. He provided a quote which I have used in my own teaching on the effects of the Fall on our work, also known as 'the curse'. Nelson states, 'Work can make us want to curse.' His best chapter is on 'Work Now and Later', which aligned well with Darrell Cosden's book, 'The Heavenly Good of Earthly Work'. He explains: 'Your work in the new creation will be even better than it was in the old creation. God has a gre I highly recommend this book by Tom Nelson. He is concise, compassionate, and biblical. He provided a quote which I have used in my own teaching on the effects of the Fall on our work, also known as 'the curse'. Nelson states, 'Work can make us want to curse.' His best chapter is on 'Work Now and Later', which aligned well with Darrell Cosden's book, 'The Heavenly Good of Earthly Work'. He explains: 'Your work in the new creation will be even better than it was in the old creation. God has a great future in store for his image-bearing workers.' There was so much of value in this book. I think that it is in the top three books I read during my independent study on this topic in 2015. I used many of his quotes in my seminar and in my book Immanuel Labor. He did an excellent job explaining the doctrine of common grace, which I had seen mentioned in several other books I read earlier, and on how giftedness, life experiences, economic circumstances, and other things that we can see indicate our calling to certain jobs. In his last chapter, he also referred to Mr. Holland’s Opus, as a good illustration of vocational faithfulness. I appreciated this, as I use a clip from this movie in the first part of my seminar.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    There is a tendency for Christianity in some circles to be a leisure activity. We are encouraged to pray, evangelise, worship, study our Bibles in our spare time. Sadly, the 40 hours per week, for forty or so years don't seem to matter - or at least if you looked at the content of most Sunday sermons from the pulpit. It has long been my contention that pastors should every seven years or so take a sabbatical and work in an office, educational establishment, retail outlet or such like. This will There is a tendency for Christianity in some circles to be a leisure activity. We are encouraged to pray, evangelise, worship, study our Bibles in our spare time. Sadly, the 40 hours per week, for forty or so years don't seem to matter - or at least if you looked at the content of most Sunday sermons from the pulpit. It has long been my contention that pastors should every seven years or so take a sabbatical and work in an office, educational establishment, retail outlet or such like. This will help them connect with the everyday pressure those in full-time work experience. Hopefully, it will help them in their discipleship programmes and in what they preach. Christianity is a whole life activity, despite the implicit denial of this from many pulpits. This book, however, provides a refreshing look at whole life Christianity. It's key message is that work does matter. Nelson uses many everyday experiences - including discussions in coffee shops and vignettes from those who have considered how Christianity impacts their work life. Illustrations come from films such as Narnia, WALL-E and Mr Holland's Opus. He also draws upon a wide range of sources Paul Marshall, Os Guinness, Tim Keller, Tom Wright, Miroslav Volf, Luther and Gideon Strauss are all mentioned. He utilises the neo-Calvinist/ Kuyperian framework of creation, fall and redemption to good effect. At the end of each chapter is a short prayer and then several questions for reflection and discussion which makes this book ideal for church small groups. The final chapter 'The church at work' is particularly good. Here he draws upon Lesslie Newbigin's notion that 'the congregation has to be the place where its members are trained, supported, and nourished in the exercise of their parts of the priestly ministry in the world'. he offers some excellent ideas and suggestions how this can be developed. The role of church leaders is to 'prepare the saints for work of service' (Eph 4:12) Too often this gets narrowed down to church-related activities, here Nelson shows with examples that it doesn't have to be that way. Ideas include 'embracing a new vocational paradigm' as he puts it: A primary work of the church is the church at work. Our work not only forms us spiritually; in and through our work, Christ's gospel mission is advanced in the world. (p. 190) Many churches employ youth workers and ministers - maybe one day we'll also see work and vocation ministers too. That will certainly need a paradigm shift. Nelson's eminently readable and accessible book may well help towards that.

  19. 4 out of 5

    George P.

    Tom Nelson, Work Matters: Connecting Sunday Worship to Monday Work (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2011). $15.99, 224 pages. In the late 1990s, I took a two-year hiatus from pastoral ministry to work in corporate America. My experience there shaped the way I think about Christian vocation. It taught me that the pastoral vocation was but one of many Christian vocations. Its purpose was to help people respond to both their primary vocation (faith in Jesus Christ for salvation) and their secondary vocation Tom Nelson, Work Matters: Connecting Sunday Worship to Monday Work (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2011). $15.99, 224 pages. In the late 1990s, I took a two-year hiatus from pastoral ministry to work in corporate America. My experience there shaped the way I think about Christian vocation. It taught me that the pastoral vocation was but one of many Christian vocations. Its purpose was to help people respond to both their primary vocation (faith in Jesus Christ for salvation) and their secondary vocation (faithful presence in the workaday world). Tom Nelson’s Work Matters is an insightful treatment of how Christians’ primary vocation affects their secondary vocation. The book grounds its treatment of the subject in the biblical categories of creation, fall, redemption, and glorification (chapters 1–4). Based on that foundation, it then examines practical issues such as dealing with the ordinariness of work, how work shapes us, working for the common good, vocational giftedness, workplace integrity, and the church’s role in shaping good workers (chapters 5–10). In each chapter of this well-written book, Nelson moves seamlessly between biblical exposition, culturally relevant illustration, and practical application. Each chapter concludes with a personal testimony from a Christian worker explaining how their faith shapes what they do. Nelson is pastor of Christ Community Church in Leawood, Kansas, and author of Five Smooth Stones and Ekklesia . In Work Matters, he writes for Christian laypeople, not pastors, and each chapter includes discussion questions. I would recommend this book to adult Sunday school classes, small groups, and book clubs. Pastors might also consider using it as a resource for a preaching or teaching series on work. P.S. If you found this review helpful, please vote “Yes” on my Amazon.com review page.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joe Haack

    As a pastor I am always trying to communicate theological principles in ways that connect and click with others. I admired throughout the pages Nelson's heart for communication, even if his style is a bit different than mine. I also admired how he managed to cram an entire theology of work into a slim volume. I would recommend this book to anyone wanting a primer on God's vision for work.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    Theology of vocation is as important of a topic today as it was during the Protestant reformation. Our compartmentalization of work and faith is not scriptural or viable on a long-term basis. This book is a good primer for those beginning to explore "calling" from a more holistic perspective. For me, the most important chapters were the last two o "Facing Challenges in Our Work" and "The Church at Work". I know that I'm called to the marketplace as a business leader and to vocational ministry. T Theology of vocation is as important of a topic today as it was during the Protestant reformation. Our compartmentalization of work and faith is not scriptural or viable on a long-term basis. This book is a good primer for those beginning to explore "calling" from a more holistic perspective. For me, the most important chapters were the last two o "Facing Challenges in Our Work" and "The Church at Work". I know that I'm called to the marketplace as a business leader and to vocational ministry. These last two chapters have challenged me as to how I might better equip others as they also live out their calling in both pastoral ministry and the marketplace. Within just a few days after finishing this book, I noticed a subtle shift in how I responded to what I observed in the world. I had already placed even the most mundane of jobs fit within a larger ecosystem of civil order. However, I hadn't always questioned how I could tangibly recognize and appreciate the individuals who often labor behind the scenes so my life could have order. I'm talking about more than smiling and saying thank you (both of which are important and which I do), but I'm talking about actually engaging with individuals in a way that shows them that you see them as individuals. I believe this challenge is what lies at the heart of "Work Matters". How do we as Christians affirm people as they go about their work?

  22. 5 out of 5

    Steve Watson

    I met Tom Nelson in Kansas recently, and he seems like a super-nice guy and gifted pastor who's done great work in his church's context on faith/work integration. His book has some cool stuff too - vignettes from real-life working people after each chapter, and a picture of doing church and life as a pastor that's real and relevant to most of the people in the church. Much of the book isn't a great cultural fit for me or for my context, but I appreciate his model in being insistent that work mat I met Tom Nelson in Kansas recently, and he seems like a super-nice guy and gifted pastor who's done great work in his church's context on faith/work integration. His book has some cool stuff too - vignettes from real-life working people after each chapter, and a picture of doing church and life as a pastor that's real and relevant to most of the people in the church. Much of the book isn't a great cultural fit for me or for my context, but I appreciate his model in being insistent that work matters to people and it matters to God, so it should matter to churches and pastors too! Two favorite lines: From Matt, a college professor, "To be honest, on some points of theology at this point in my life, I may have more of an agnostic bent. But seeking the common good is one things that my conscience allows me to endorse and seek without hesitation. Over the past decade or more in our faith community, we have discussed things such as integral and seamless living, wholeness of soul, wariness of sacred.secular dichotomies, and the intrinsic value of work." (140-141) Quoting sociologist James Hunter - we live in an age of dissolution and difference. Dissolution meaning radical skepticism/deconstruction, and difference meaning radical diversity. Will these work for or against our spiritual formation? Nelson assumes against, I think we can learn to have them work FOR us!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nate LaClaire

    In Work Matters: Connecting Sunday Worship to Monday Work, pastor Tom Nelson offers a new perspective on work, providing a look at God’s purposes for work in a way that is both practical and theologically based. He helps readers to make the most of their God-given vocations and to treat their work as God intended, as acts of worship. I really enjoyed this book and was truly blessed by it. Nelson gives a look at this important topic that is both refreshing and convicting. He is not afraid to debun In Work Matters: Connecting Sunday Worship to Monday Work, pastor Tom Nelson offers a new perspective on work, providing a look at God’s purposes for work in a way that is both practical and theologically based. He helps readers to make the most of their God-given vocations and to treat their work as God intended, as acts of worship. I really enjoyed this book and was truly blessed by it. Nelson gives a look at this important topic that is both refreshing and convicting. He is not afraid to debunk common myths nor to reveal his own shortcomings and he uses biblical accounts as well as modern-day stories to deliver his message. He covers topics such as why work is more important than we commonly believe and how to make the most of our “mundane” work and many, many more. If you would like a fresh perspective on a healthy work ethic for Christians, I highly recommend this book. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received an advance reading copy of this book free from Crossway via netGalley. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  24. 4 out of 5

    Malin Friess

    Many of us spend the majority of our waking moments at our place of work. If this is the case: work must matter to God. How do we connect our faith and our jobs without compromising either? Tom Nelson was invited to preach at our church last summer and give a brief conference on this topic. I think the old paradigm was that evangelism (starting prayer groups or Bible Studies) at work was the best way to be faithful. This may be ineffective or inappropriate in many work situations. The new paradigm Many of us spend the majority of our waking moments at our place of work. If this is the case: work must matter to God. How do we connect our faith and our jobs without compromising either? Tom Nelson was invited to preach at our church last summer and give a brief conference on this topic. I think the old paradigm was that evangelism (starting prayer groups or Bible Studies) at work was the best way to be faithful. This may be ineffective or inappropriate in many work situations. The new paradigm discussed by Nelson is this: 1) Your Work should be meaningful 2) Your Work should be done with excellence 3) Your Work should be done in integrity If three of these criteria are met--GOd will be glorified. 3 stars for Work Matters. For more in depth read on this topic look to Tim Keller's "Every Good Endeavor."

  25. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    The Sunday-to-Monday Gap. If you are a faith seeker, feeling a sense of loss and jarring sobriety on Mondays after being invigorated on a Sunday is at times, unbearable. Tom Nelson does an impeccable job of interweaving Biblical insights and real-world accounts of individuals applying their dreams, aspirations, and hopes for a better world to their seemingly mundane work lives. The reader will come away feeling emboldened to pursue a more holistic view of their "work-life" and their "real-life." The Sunday-to-Monday Gap. If you are a faith seeker, feeling a sense of loss and jarring sobriety on Mondays after being invigorated on a Sunday is at times, unbearable. Tom Nelson does an impeccable job of interweaving Biblical insights and real-world accounts of individuals applying their dreams, aspirations, and hopes for a better world to their seemingly mundane work lives. The reader will come away feeling emboldened to pursue a more holistic view of their "work-life" and their "real-life." Nelson helps to connect a reader's belief in a loving God to the apparent unimportant tasks of a modern work environment. Nelson seeks to take away the illusion of secular and sacred work and replace it with a perspective that our work can shape our awareness of God and allow for God's love for our world to be seen in our actions in the workplace.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Josh L

    You can find my full review at Quieted Waters. The majority of your waking life will be spent at your job. That’s astounding, when you stop to think about it. If you’re like most Americans, you will work more than eight hours a day, every weekday. Tom Nelson wrote this book with that context in mind. He opens the book saying, “As a pastor, I regret that I have often given minority attention to what most of us do the majority of our time.” Nelson was convicted of how few of his sermons assisted his You can find my full review at Quieted Waters. The majority of your waking life will be spent at your job. That’s astounding, when you stop to think about it. If you’re like most Americans, you will work more than eight hours a day, every weekday. Tom Nelson wrote this book with that context in mind. He opens the book saying, “As a pastor, I regret that I have often given minority attention to what most of us do the majority of our time.” Nelson was convicted of how few of his sermons assisted his listeners in glorifying God at work, and this book flows out of his determination to connect more of his sermons to the workplace.

  27. 4 out of 5

    David

    Too many Christians live divided lives, separating Sunday worship from the work they do the rest of the week. This book, directed at just those Christians, seeks to connect the two. Nelson does this by talking on vocation, the idea that all Christians are called to serve in a particular place in the world, for the common good and purpose of God. This book manages to give biblical teaching in an easy-to-read manner. Nelson draws on the breadth of scripture, from creation to new creation. In doing Too many Christians live divided lives, separating Sunday worship from the work they do the rest of the week. This book, directed at just those Christians, seeks to connect the two. Nelson does this by talking on vocation, the idea that all Christians are called to serve in a particular place in the world, for the common good and purpose of God. This book manages to give biblical teaching in an easy-to-read manner. Nelson draws on the breadth of scripture, from creation to new creation. In doing so, Nelson shows the good and worth of work. Check it out.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joaquin Hernandez

    recomendado por TGC http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/t... If you're new to the faith and work conversation, this is a great place to start. Nelson builds on the biblical narrative of creation and the imago Dei to show why work is central to Christian life. He also gets bonus points in my book for pointing to specific ways pastors can make space for this critically important topic in the life of the local church. recomendado por TGC http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/t... If you're new to the faith and work conversation, this is a great place to start. Nelson builds on the biblical narrative of creation and the imago Dei to show why work is central to Christian life. He also gets bonus points in my book for pointing to specific ways pastors can make space for this critically important topic in the life of the local church.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Laura Lynch

    I've read this book three times as our church went through this as a Sunday school class and the Faith and vocation undergraduate seminar tracks at the Christian Study Center use this for their resource reading for the students. Great basic practical guide for developing an"robust theology of vocation"

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cassy

    I appreciate his many references to and backing by scripture, and the fact that he brought into context several scriptures regarding work I had not considered before. He includes reflection questions at the end that were helpful for journaling and could even be used for a small group study I think. I might need to read it again in the future.

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