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This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

30 review for Pan Michael: An Historical Novel of Poland, the Ukraine, and Turkey

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lou

    One important note... if you read the trilogy in English, be sure to read the translation by Kuniczak. I started reading one by a different translator and the difference was night and day. It was like reading a wooden story by an author of adventure books for young adults instead of a well written story by a great author. If you read a poor review I wonder if the reviewer didn't read the other translation. The books in the trilogy read like a mix of "War and Peace" and "The Three Musketeers". Thi One important note... if you read the trilogy in English, be sure to read the translation by Kuniczak. I started reading one by a different translator and the difference was night and day. It was like reading a wooden story by an author of adventure books for young adults instead of a well written story by a great author. If you read a poor review I wonder if the reviewer didn't read the other translation. The books in the trilogy read like a mix of "War and Peace" and "The Three Musketeers". This last volume was my favorite of the three, but I wouldn't skip the others. Wonderful story, engaging characters, dramatic history and for Americans it has the added attraction of being about a place and time that many of us are not familiar with. When I finished these books I felt a big hole. In spite of the huge page count I didn't want the story to be over.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    Wonderful literature. The poles should be re-named The People of Job as they have suffered unawares for centuries while at the same time have defended western civilization with truly uncommon valor and integrity. The west owes a debt of thanks to these honorable people. It is crazy that they languished under the yoke communism after WWII and that we "blessed" it. Wonderful literature. The poles should be re-named The People of Job as they have suffered unawares for centuries while at the same time have defended western civilization with truly uncommon valor and integrity. The west owes a debt of thanks to these honorable people. It is crazy that they languished under the yoke communism after WWII and that we "blessed" it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Hiena Biblioteczna

    Two months ago I wrote that "Potop" is the best part of "Trylogia". I didn't change my mind... The reason why I love "Ogniem i mieczem" and "Potop" is because every reader can find something that pulls his attention. War, adventure, love, friendship, history, etc... The third part of "Trylogia" is mostly focused on love and this is the cause why "Pan Wołodyjowski" dissapointed me. It took 500 pages to describe the "love theme" so the "war and history theme" was describe superficially on the last Two months ago I wrote that "Potop" is the best part of "Trylogia". I didn't change my mind... The reason why I love "Ogniem i mieczem" and "Potop" is because every reader can find something that pulls his attention. War, adventure, love, friendship, history, etc... The third part of "Trylogia" is mostly focused on love and this is the cause why "Pan Wołodyjowski" dissapointed me. It took 500 pages to describe the "love theme" so the "war and history theme" was describe superficially on the last 100 pages. "Pan Wołodyjowski" didn't meet my expectations - I gave this book 4 stars because of my sentiment towards the characters ... and because the end of the story destroyed me emotionally. The best books are those ones which break your heart into pieces. Maybe I will go back to "Pan Wołodyjowski" one day and give this book a second chance ...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Phrodrick

    Bottom Line First: I did enjoy Pan Michael, but not as much as the earlier volumes in The Trilogy. Sienkiewicz is creative enough that you will rarely be that far ahead of the plot twists and never because you had no warning. Even if you do know what is coming, the details may not be what you expected. Having a warrior of a woman is a much needed relief from fainting, teary eyed motherly women that is every other female in the series. . The inclusion of a great warrior driven mad by the violence Bottom Line First: I did enjoy Pan Michael, but not as much as the earlier volumes in The Trilogy. Sienkiewicz is creative enough that you will rarely be that far ahead of the plot twists and never because you had no warning. Even if you do know what is coming, the details may not be what you expected. Having a warrior of a woman is a much needed relief from fainting, teary eyed motherly women that is every other female in the series. . The inclusion of a great warrior driven mad by the violence or war is another example of an unexpected, but rightly included plot point. This is a good book, but I was too often frustrated and urging the writer to move along. {){){){){){){){) Pan Michael is the last of Henryk Sienkiewicz's trilogy variously known as the The Trilogy or as I prefer the Zagloba Romances. Over all I enjoyed the trilogy and recommend them to those willing to take on a few thousand pages of reading, all in an antique style and seeded with words from at least 5 languages. Each book is a high romance of swords and knightly war. Pan Michael is far more about romance as in between the upper class ladies and warrior men of nobility. The entire first half of Pan Michael is about the maneuvers of the heart. The now aging Zagloba, sometimes Falstafian drinker and blow-hard and also the Polish Ulysses, master of schemes focuses on the love life of his favorite knights. Pan Michael is the title character of this novel, also known as the little knight and the finest swordsman of the Polish Common wealth. He is certainly the central male character. Much of the book centers on a rather modern young lady Pani Basia often referred to as the haiduk (Bridand) . She is established as very non-traditional, having killed a marauder with duck shot some time before the novel's beginning. She is a skilled swordswoman and will take lessons from the little knight . Of all the women in the three novels, she will be the one of the strongest and most able to take care of herself and her man. One of the key dramatic moments will come later when she escapes from the evil minded love of a once trusted officer turned dangerous enemy. Almost exactly ½ way into Pan Michale, the book will leave the drawing room and move to a remote, and hastily built military outpost. We will have been told that this winter will be the end of a recent and brief period of relative peace following the expulsion of the Swedes recounted in book II of the Trilogy. A new war is to come returning the reader to the wilds of the Ukrainian wastes. Many of the same remote burned out locations first destroyed in book I. This war will combine the Cossacks and the Trucks in a massive invasion. Despite consistent and accurate intelligence from the far reaches of the Polish Commonwealth, the frontier is not getting needed reinforcements. The reader is carefully warned that the most our band of Polish Brothers can hope to achieve is to buy time. As in the earlier novel, Sienkiewicz writes very rich and richly detailed stories. The enemy is bad , but true to their own beliefs and systems. Warfare is brutal, with both sides willing to burn and slaughter if only to keep an approaching enemy from the benefits of captured stores. There is a vast amount of hands kissed with great violence. Mustaches are alternately twisted and twitching, and pressing of heavily clothed breasts to heavily clothed bosoms as lovers and family member weep and swear their love. Expect expositions on the many layers of feudal titles between the many populations , citizenships, military and civil titles. Much of it can become too much. A major plot driver in the first third of the book is an impending election of the new King. Zabloba is drawn into one of the inner circles determined to elect a Polish king. We never here who gets elected, which also means we are not told that the new Polish King is, as a matter of history , not that great. Ultimately the narrative style can be too elaborate, too detailed, too courtly, too much High Romance and too filled with what will be unimportant asides. Reading The Trilogy can be like reading your way through a vast over frosted wedding cake. Pan Michael gave me too many of these moments. Much is made of the young haiduk studying sword play form the "best swordsman in all of Poland". She will never be seen using this skill in a fight. The three books of the Zabloba Romances can be read, stand alone, but if you can work your way through this overly rich style, try for all three. My let down in book three is not so much as the sense of reward that you have fully appreciated the achievement of Henryk Sienkiewicz

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ritiel

    Before read this book I had committed a mistake, to read in somewhere (and I do not remember where) that the best part of Sienkiewicz's Trilogy is the second. To get things worst, the initial chapters of Pan Wolodyjowski were boring, and not by the romantic plot, but for the choices Michal had made. And then, some years have gone, some things changes and the story turnabout. Thankfully for the best. With border skirmishes and battles, the old pan Michal returns and the war with the turks takes fo Before read this book I had committed a mistake, to read in somewhere (and I do not remember where) that the best part of Sienkiewicz's Trilogy is the second. To get things worst, the initial chapters of Pan Wolodyjowski were boring, and not by the romantic plot, but for the choices Michal had made. And then, some years have gone, some things changes and the story turnabout. Thankfully for the best. With border skirmishes and battles, the old pan Michal returns and the war with the turks takes form, resulting in a catchy story. I believe that the mix of little stuffs concerning the characters, with great historical events is what make a good historical novel. And that is what was presented in the book, the same case as The Deluge, making the decision of which is the best part of the series so difficult. Therefore, I can not agree that the second, is the best, or the first is not so good, as I had read through reviews and comments.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Viel Nast

    this is the third and almost final part of the history of poland that started in the Fire and Steel (fourth if you count the medieval " teutonic knights". the first half of the book is a boring romance with chivalric love and such stuff. after about two hundred pages the real story unfolds. the description again is magnificent original and very realistic we are now in the south-west borders where the commonwealth is expecting a great invasion from the ottoman empire. again there are epic battles sac this is the third and almost final part of the history of poland that started in the Fire and Steel (fourth if you count the medieval " teutonic knights". the first half of the book is a boring romance with chivalric love and such stuff. after about two hundred pages the real story unfolds. the description again is magnificent original and very realistic we are now in the south-west borders where the commonwealth is expecting a great invasion from the ottoman empire. again there are epic battles sacrifice bravery and loss but the end is unexpected and sad. there is no happy ending in the last part.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mela

    My review is the same as for Ogniem i mieczem - see here. My review is the same as for Ogniem i mieczem - see here.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mieczyslaw Kasprzyk

    Of the Trilogy this is my least favourite. It feels, to me, as though it is lacking a focus.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Adina

    2 stars ...because I cried my eyes out... Yes, I'm selfish. 2 stars ...because I cried my eyes out... Yes, I'm selfish.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Czarny Pies

    Since you have read the first two volumes of Sienkiewicz's Trilogy, (that is to say the 1200 page "With Fire and Sword" and the 1700 page "Deluge"), you might as well finish the job by reading the final instalment, "Fire in the Steppe" which is a mere 700 pages in length. Its relative brevity comes as quite a relief. By finishing it you will have the satisfaction of knowing that you did not leave the job undone. As a whole, the Trilogy has great value for its portrayal of Polish history during it Since you have read the first two volumes of Sienkiewicz's Trilogy, (that is to say the 1200 page "With Fire and Sword" and the 1700 page "Deluge"), you might as well finish the job by reading the final instalment, "Fire in the Steppe" which is a mere 700 pages in length. Its relative brevity comes as quite a relief. By finishing it you will have the satisfaction of knowing that you did not leave the job undone. As a whole, the Trilogy has great value for its portrayal of Polish history during its very troubled 17th Century. As the Trilogy begins in 1648, the Polish Commonwealth is largest state in Europe. During the next twenty-five years Poland will have to deal with a popular uprising in the Ukraine which will trigger invasions from Sweden, Russia and the Ottoman Turks. Poland will survive but will lose a significant amount of territory. Moreover, the loss in human life and destruction of property will be horrendous. The Trilogy masterfully exposes the political weaknesses off the Polish Commonwealth. Kings were elected by the Diet of Nobles and tended to support the interests of the factions that supported them rather than those of the nation. Every single noble had the right to veto any piece of legislation proposed in the Diet. Finally, the nobles had the right to pursue their own private wars typically with each other. Once the private war starts to go badly, the nobles tended to call in foreign allies. The first volume of the Trilogy ("With Fire and Sword") describes how one noble initiates a private war against Bohdan Chmielnicki a Cossack warlord. The Polish Commonwealth is unable to decide whether to support the noble warring against Chmielnicki or give in to Chmielnicki's demands. The private war then escalates. The peasant seeing the weakness of the Commonwealth rise up against the Polish nobles who are their landlords. In the course of the revolt, thousands of Jews and Poles living in the Ukraine will be massacred. When the Commonwealth finally decides to attack Chmielnicki, he recruits Tatar allies and fights the Commonwealth to a draw. At this point to end the conflict, the Commonwealth decides to recognize Chmielnicki as the de facto leader of the Ukraine which nominally remains part of the Commonwealth. Sienkiewicz makes it clear that Chmielnicki had never wished to set off peasant revolt nor did he initially intend to be become the head of a Ukrainian state within the Polish Commonwealth. Chmielnicki is never portrayed as a villain. The problem is shown to lie with the Poles who act indecisively and who put their personal interests against those of their country. The second volume ("The Deluge") deals with the opportunistic invasion of Poland by King Carl Gustav of Sweden who having noticed the difficulty that the Poles had had suppressing the Chmielnicki rebellion assumed he could easily make large territorial gains in Poland. In the North and East of Poland, the nobility rallies to the side of the invading Swedes who then proceed to drive deep into Poland. The tide turns when the Swedes fail to take the Monastery of the Pauline Fathers at Częstochowa in Southern Poland and eventually the Poles are able to expel Carl Gustav from their territory. Again in the second volume, Sienkiewicz stresses the disastrous consequences of the war on Polsnd's civilian population. The villains are not the Swedes but the Poles who collaborate with them, notably Janusz and Bogusław Radziwiłł. The series entertains because Sienkiewicz overlays the history with brilliant swashbuckler tales that remind one of Alexander Dumas in top form. "Fire in the Steppe" which is the third volume in the Trilogy differs from the first two in that it is much shorter, has relatively less criticism of the Poles and adopts a shrill anti-Muslim tone. The action is set in the borderlands of Poland where the hero Michał Wołodyjowski commands a regiment which has the mission to defend the settlers against the Cossack and Tatar marauders. In Sienkiewicz's view the Cossacks and Tatars are simply monsters. They pillage and kill without pity. The Tatars commit the indecent crimes of kidnapping and raping Polish women after which they sell them as slaves to the Ottoman Turks. Although Sienkiewicz is describing a well documented historical reality his tone is in places unpleasantly xenophobic. Unlike the villains of the first two volumes, there are no nuances presented with regard to the Tatars and Cossacks. As with the first two volumes of the Trilogy, there is a swashbuckling adventure tale overlaying the historical chronicle in "Fire in the Steppe." The hero is the dashing hero Pan (Sir) Michał Wołodyjowski who will after three volumes of unrivalled swordplay in the defence of Poland will die in the most heroic manner imaginable leaving behind an inconsolable, young widow of incomparable beauty. Early in the third volume, Sienkiewicz surprises the reader by killing of Pan Wolodyjowski's girlfriend from Volume II. In his introduction the translator explains that the poor girl had been too much of a wall-flower in distress. Sienkiewicz decided that for the final volume of his Trilogy he needed a more dynamic heroine worthy of an era when women were struggling for emancipation. Basia the new heroine is indeed a dynamo. She takes fencing lessons from Pan Wolodyjowski before marrying him. Once married she accompanies him to his frontier outpost where she will participate in cavalry charges against the Cossack and Tatar marauders. Most readers are likely to be charmed by this spunky girl who is doomed to early widowhood. Aside from her skills with a sabre, Basia is somewhat of a Bimbo. Her efforts at matchmaking go seriously wrong when she pushes a delicate young lady in to the arms of a handsome Tatar officer under her husband's command. The Tatar responds by kidnapping the girl and selling her into slavery in the Ottoman empire from which she will never return. The novel ends with Pan Michal dying while defending a Polish fort against a massive Turkish army. Basia shines a heartbroken widow. The effect on the reader is profoundly cathartic. One closes the final volume of the Trilogy firmly convinced that one has lived through Poland's darkest hour with the Poles and survived.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ghostholos

    One might think that after and there's no reason any sane reader would want to read yet another fairly long late 19th century adventure/war story set in a less well-known period of world history (17th century Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth). That would be a fair assumption if Henryk Sinkiewicz wasn't such a master of story-telling and character development. As this book's title suggests, the main character in the third and final installment of the Polish Trilogy is Michal Wolodyjowski, an endea One might think that after and there's no reason any sane reader would want to read yet another fairly long late 19th century adventure/war story set in a less well-known period of world history (17th century Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth). That would be a fair assumption if Henryk Sinkiewicz wasn't such a master of story-telling and character development. As this book's title suggests, the main character in the third and final installment of the Polish Trilogy is Michal Wolodyjowski, an endearing individual first introduced as a side character in . That said, the story takes on its own unique dimensions and does justice to the character the book is named after and the trilogy itself (as anyone who has read the first two parts can attest to!).

  12. 4 out of 5

    Andrii

    Pan Wolodyjowski is the las novel of great Polish trilogy of Henryk Sienkiewicz. It starts where the Potop has ended with Pan Jerzy Michal Wolodyjowski going to marry his longtime love Anusia Borzobohata-Krasińska. But the fate was preparing new challenges. But Pan Wolodyjowski never gives up thanks to his big heart and smartest man alive - Pan Jan Onufry Zagloba. New war is coming and once again our favourite heros will stand in front the Polish-Lithuanian Kingdom honour and independence. Wish Pan Wolodyjowski is the las novel of great Polish trilogy of Henryk Sienkiewicz. It starts where the Potop has ended with Pan Jerzy Michal Wolodyjowski going to marry his longtime love Anusia Borzobohata-Krasińska. But the fate was preparing new challenges. But Pan Wolodyjowski never gives up thanks to his big heart and smartest man alive - Pan Jan Onufry Zagloba. New war is coming and once again our favourite heros will stand in front the Polish-Lithuanian Kingdom honour and independence. Wish you an interesting read!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Eve Jankowicz

    This is the last book of the Nobel prize winning historical fiction trilogy by Henryk Sienkiewicz reviewed years ago as the Polish 'Gone With the Wind.' It contains one of the most unforgettable scenes that I have ever read. I loved these books, but it's entirely possible that men may love them more. (See my review of the first book of the series, 'With Fire and Sword,' for more info.) This is the last book of the Nobel prize winning historical fiction trilogy by Henryk Sienkiewicz reviewed years ago as the Polish 'Gone With the Wind.' It contains one of the most unforgettable scenes that I have ever read. I loved these books, but it's entirely possible that men may love them more. (See my review of the first book of the series, 'With Fire and Sword,' for more info.)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andre

    I read this book because my wife's grandpa is polish and he gave the trilogy to her uncle. It was a delight and amazing book about the history of one of the most important Christian countries in the world. This is the grand finale! I read this book because my wife's grandpa is polish and he gave the trilogy to her uncle. It was a delight and amazing book about the history of one of the most important Christian countries in the world. This is the grand finale!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Beggie S

    I was really sad to finish the trilogy. Sienkiewicz is for me one of the few authors whose characters seem to be like a part of the reader's real life. I was really sad to finish the trilogy. Sienkiewicz is for me one of the few authors whose characters seem to be like a part of the reader's real life.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dustin Pohlman

    The standard for which all epic adventure books should be measured.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Raigo Loide

    The best of the Trilogy but still nothing special. At least there are less absurdly exaggerated heroes and more humans in this story.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Paweł Zarzycki

    Lucky enough to read it in Polish ;)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tori

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I actually finished this book a week or so ago, but I haven't had the time to write out the thing, and I wanted to explain why I only gave it three stars before I just rated it and sent it on its way. I have several conflicting emotions as to this book. There were things that I liked, things I hated, things that brought tears to my eyes, things that I rolled said eyes at.... yes, very conflicting. Which is sad, since I was really looking forward to it. I was excited when I picked it up because I h I actually finished this book a week or so ago, but I haven't had the time to write out the thing, and I wanted to explain why I only gave it three stars before I just rated it and sent it on its way. I have several conflicting emotions as to this book. There were things that I liked, things I hated, things that brought tears to my eyes, things that I rolled said eyes at.... yes, very conflicting. Which is sad, since I was really looking forward to it. I was excited when I picked it up because I heard that it was about Volodyovski. It actually turned out to be more about his wife, Basia. This wasn't necissarily bad, though. It was a very different perspective than the other books, so it was interesting. Basia is probably my least favorite heroine of the trilogy. She didn't have the strength that Helen or Olenka had, and she was much to childish, in my opinion. I didn't mind that she liked to sword fight, but I did mind when Volodyovski let her fight in raids with him, because it just wasn't... natural. Also, the fact that he let her come with him to the siege! He would never, ever have done that. >.> The pacing of the book was much different. Instead of the instant war of the other two, the whole begining of this one was Volodyovski falling in love and getting over his grief of poor Anusia (who, I think, was a much better match for Volodyovski than Basia... but I'm ranting again). On one hand I liked how it was more relaxed in the beginging, but it might have been to relaxed. I wanted there to be more conflict, as it were. The second half is where the conflict came in. They move to the borderlands, and then there's the army of the khan comming to destroy them all. There was the enemy that fell inlove with Basia (I think that's the third time... double deja vu!) but when he attempted to carry her off it failed. Said bad guy also carries off Adam's fiancee and sister, butchers his father, and sells the two girls into slavery which they are never freed from. I felt sooo soo sorry for poor Adam :( But this brings us to that one chapter I absolutly hated, and if it wasn't in the book, there would have given it four stars, or maybe possibly five. Adam catches up to the bad guy, and there is a whole chapter filled with way way way to much discription on how they impale the bad guy, remove his one remaining eye and then burn him... it was way terribly disturbing and nasty XP When I read the book again I will skip that chapter it was just sooo terrible. So if you read it, I would say skip it. Due to this chapter I can't suggest the book to anyone without really strong advisery against the gore. But after that it went back to it's not so gory ways, and then came the siege (Wheich Basia would never have been allowed to be at but for some reason both she and Krisia were there) and the part of the book that almost made me cry. (When I say almost made me cry, you must realize I've never cried during a book, that I usually walk away without being shaken. But this time I was seriously upset, so much so that my cat came up and silently layed next to me. She only does that when I'm really upset.) My dear, favorite of all favorite fictional characters, Pan Michael Volodyovski, died. I was not expecting such a sad ending to not only the book but the trilogy, which had always had things end on happier notes. Soo soo sadning. So anyway there's my rant, and my opinions. Definately my least favorite of the trilogy, but it had it's high spots. (and it's low spots...)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Curtis Urness

    Pan Michael is the last segment of Henryk Sienkiewicz's trilogy about the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth during the 17th Century. The first book, With Fire and Sword, treated the Chmielnicki Rebellion in the Ukraine. The Deluge, the second novel, which is on my reading list, deals with wars with Sweden and Russia. Pan Michael, also called Fire in the Steppe, deals with the Polish-Turkish War. In this novel, we are reintroduced to knights Michael Wolodojski and Onufry Zagloba, heros of With Fire a Pan Michael is the last segment of Henryk Sienkiewicz's trilogy about the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth during the 17th Century. The first book, With Fire and Sword, treated the Chmielnicki Rebellion in the Ukraine. The Deluge, the second novel, which is on my reading list, deals with wars with Sweden and Russia. Pan Michael, also called Fire in the Steppe, deals with the Polish-Turkish War. In this novel, we are reintroduced to knights Michael Wolodojski and Onufry Zagloba, heros of With Fire and Sword. Michael is heart-broken over the death of his fiancée and has repaired to a monastery. Zagloba tricks him into leaving and renewing his vocation as a soldier. The first part of the novel deals with the romantic adventures of the main characters during the Polish Sejm and the election of King Wisniowiecki. The story line has numerous, humorous twists and is highlighted by the witticisms of Pan Zagloba. The second part depicts Michael's sojourn with his young wife at the outpost of Hreptyoff near the Dniester River. There he prepares for the upcoming war with the Turks and the Tartars. This part deals with his budding marriage, battle against Tartar bands, and betrayal. Finally, the novel culminates with the heroic defense of Kamieniec against the Ottoman army. What makes this novel stand out is Henryk's ability to evoke the whole panorama of 17th century Poland, especially the wild lands of the Ukraine. Sienkiewicz in particularly magnificent in his descriptions of the Ottoman forces, drawn from the entire Muslim world of that time. All of the major characters are forces with which to be dealt. Sienkiewicz creates strong characters motivated by faith, honor, love of country, and family. The fates of these characters are not all happy ones, and most endure great hardships and sacrifices. What the reader will find in Pan Michael is a world in which terror and sadism vie against the noble motivations noted above. Some readers might find such sentiments too old-fashioned in today's post-modernist mire of anti-heroes and relativism, but they struck a chord for me.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Al

    Interesting finale to the entire Trilogy. The last volume seemed to get away from making the history of the period the main focus. The characters and their beliefs were more focused. While saying that, the story shows how deeply people can feel about issues, such as religion, honor, patriotic pride and self serving selfishness. The trilogy is a microcosm of the world we live in today. Sadly, the human race has not found a way to live with each others beliefs and ideals. Rather amazing when you th Interesting finale to the entire Trilogy. The last volume seemed to get away from making the history of the period the main focus. The characters and their beliefs were more focused. While saying that, the story shows how deeply people can feel about issues, such as religion, honor, patriotic pride and self serving selfishness. The trilogy is a microcosm of the world we live in today. Sadly, the human race has not found a way to live with each others beliefs and ideals. Rather amazing when you think about it. History repeats itself, constantly. Political, geographic, personal greed and bias with most prevalent of all, religious bias, continue to shape and color our world. Henryk Sienkiewicz was aware of these things showing us how all the colors make up the world we live in. W.S. Kuniczak's translation is outstanding. The other translations do not do justice to Sienkewicz's work.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The last volume of Hneryk Sienkiewicz's trilogy. Action set in tears of 1668 - 1673 during Polish - Turkish wars. Michał Wołodyjoski, the central character, decides to become a monk after his fiancee's death. Onufry Zagłoba makes him leave monastery before final vows saying that Poland needs him more as a soldier. In a mansion of a friend, Scot Ketling, Michał meets Krystyna Drohojewska (at the beginning his fiancee, later Ketling's wife) and Barbara Jeziorkowska (who confesses to Michał that sh The last volume of Hneryk Sienkiewicz's trilogy. Action set in tears of 1668 - 1673 during Polish - Turkish wars. Michał Wołodyjoski, the central character, decides to become a monk after his fiancee's death. Onufry Zagłoba makes him leave monastery before final vows saying that Poland needs him more as a soldier. In a mansion of a friend, Scot Ketling, Michał meets Krystyna Drohojewska (at the beginning his fiancee, later Ketling's wife) and Barbara Jeziorkowska (who confesses to Michał that she loves him - they married later). The novel shows three major historical events: - election of Michał Korybut Wiśniowiecki for king of Poland, - defence of Kamieniec Podolski - victory battle of Chocim (Khotyn).

  23. 5 out of 5

    Carl R.

    This is considered one of the greatest Polski historical novels ever written, and it is. However, as other critics have commented, it is difficult to translate Polski to English. As I read it , the story line is the same as 'War and Peace' by Tolstoy. Their are a multitude of characters and place names with similar appearance to those of us who are English speakers/readers. Wikipedia is very helpful and will give a back round to the story. So, to state clearly the above the story is difficult to This is considered one of the greatest Polski historical novels ever written, and it is. However, as other critics have commented, it is difficult to translate Polski to English. As I read it , the story line is the same as 'War and Peace' by Tolstoy. Their are a multitude of characters and place names with similar appearance to those of us who are English speakers/readers. Wikipedia is very helpful and will give a back round to the story. So, to state clearly the above the story is difficult to follow for those of us from the United States that are not fluent in the Polski language. If one would like to appreciate this author, and those similar, I would suggest '67 Tales from Poland' ,'Stories of Poland'or 'Children of the Forest'.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Allen

    Outstanding tale of faith, loyality, and courage in the face of adversity. This translation by W. S. Kuniczak is extremely readable; I highly recommend it. In his last book of "The Trilogy", Henryk Sienkiewicz once agian provides characterers that I will long remember, including the heroine, Basia. Although I could go on about Fire in the Steppe, I think I will sit down to enjoy some warm mead and listen to the tales of Pan Zagloba. Outstanding tale of faith, loyality, and courage in the face of adversity. This translation by W. S. Kuniczak is extremely readable; I highly recommend it. In his last book of "The Trilogy", Henryk Sienkiewicz once agian provides characterers that I will long remember, including the heroine, Basia. Although I could go on about Fire in the Steppe, I think I will sit down to enjoy some warm mead and listen to the tales of Pan Zagloba.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Wiktoria

    This book is just as amazing as the rest of the trilogy. Its true that the begining is a litlle bit boring but as the story goes on it becomes very interesting. I can't really say which book is my favourite as all of them made me laugh, cry and scream as even though stories are different they are still definitelly very unique and worth reading. I honestly recommend Fire in the Steppe. This book is just as amazing as the rest of the trilogy. Its true that the begining is a litlle bit boring but as the story goes on it becomes very interesting. I can't really say which book is my favourite as all of them made me laugh, cry and scream as even though stories are different they are still definitelly very unique and worth reading. I honestly recommend Fire in the Steppe.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    In the tradition of Jane Eyre and Sense and Sensibility, this novel should have been made into a movie long ago. It has all the elements of those English classics, but the the setting is Eastern Europe.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chrissie

    Third Second in the series. Currently available free at Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/Michael-Histori... Third Second in the series. Currently available free at Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/Michael-Histori...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Szymon Szott

    It started quite slow but got more interesting towards the end. I still think the first book in the trilogy is my favorite. I listened to the audiobook version read by Janusz Gajos and he did a wonderful job.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I really wanted to love this book, but ultimately found it boring enough to not carry me through the whole thing. I don't say that about very many books. I really wanted to love this book, but ultimately found it boring enough to not carry me through the whole thing. I don't say that about very many books.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lee

    I can't remember how I found this, but Polish history has been a soft spot for me for decades. I really liked reading it, especially the "supporting" characters. I can't remember how I found this, but Polish history has been a soft spot for me for decades. I really liked reading it, especially the "supporting" characters.

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