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National Geographic Book of Animal Poetry: 200 Poems with Photographs That Squeak, Soar, and Roar!

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Named one of the Best Children's Books of 2012 byKirkus Reviews! "Add a little natural wonder to your poetry shelves. Because if we’re talking about the best possible compliment to your eyes and ears alike, few have as many perks and grand moments as this."—School Library Journalstarred review "Out of a windless August night/A luna moth in ghostly light Beat softly on my Named one of the Best Children's Books of 2012 by Kirkus Reviews! "Add a little natural wonder to your poetry shelves. Because if we’re talking about the best possible compliment to your eyes and ears alike, few have as many perks and grand moments as this." —School Library Journal starred review   "Out of a windless August night/A luna moth in ghostly light Beat softly on my window screen/Tick-tick-ticking-all silver green. She whispered secrets in my ear--/I am but a stranger here. The stars are scrawled across the sky/By ghostwriters, the Moon and I. You will not see me here tonight--/I have a thousand stars to write." What could be better than cuddling up with your child and this book on your lap and allowing your imaginations to soar with the words and images? Lovingly selected by U.S. Children's Poet Laureate J. Patrick Lewis and paired with vibrant animal photography, this collection of poems is an exuberant celebration of the animal kingdom and a beautiful introduction to this genre of literature. Designed for family sharing but targeted to ages 4-8, this dynamic, fresh, yet still classic collection of animal poems is a must-have for the family bookshelf. Featured poets include J. Patrick Lewis, Dorothy Aldis, Emily Dickinson, Benjamin Franklin, Robert Frost, Rudyard Kipling, Jack Prelutsky, Elizabeth Madox Roberts, Robert Louis Stevenson, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, and many more. Divided into chapters that group the poems by theme for extra resonance, the collection is a mix of old and new, classics, and never-before-published. A foreword from Lewis, sets the scene for helping children appreciate this gift of language and this visual feast for the eyes. Chapters include: Welcome to the World (birth of animal young) Big Ones (large animals--elephants, hippos, rhinos, bears) Little Ones (small animals--worms, insects) Winged Ones (birds and other flying creatures)  Water Ones (aquatic animals--fish, dolphins, crabs) Strange Ones (curious creatures--armadillos, centipedes) Noisy Ones (loud animals--lions, hyenas) Quiet Ones (silent or still animals--hens, rabbits, snakes) Last Thought (a reflection on the world we share with animals)


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Named one of the Best Children's Books of 2012 byKirkus Reviews! "Add a little natural wonder to your poetry shelves. Because if we’re talking about the best possible compliment to your eyes and ears alike, few have as many perks and grand moments as this."—School Library Journalstarred review "Out of a windless August night/A luna moth in ghostly light Beat softly on my Named one of the Best Children's Books of 2012 by Kirkus Reviews! "Add a little natural wonder to your poetry shelves. Because if we’re talking about the best possible compliment to your eyes and ears alike, few have as many perks and grand moments as this." —School Library Journal starred review   "Out of a windless August night/A luna moth in ghostly light Beat softly on my window screen/Tick-tick-ticking-all silver green. She whispered secrets in my ear--/I am but a stranger here. The stars are scrawled across the sky/By ghostwriters, the Moon and I. You will not see me here tonight--/I have a thousand stars to write." What could be better than cuddling up with your child and this book on your lap and allowing your imaginations to soar with the words and images? Lovingly selected by U.S. Children's Poet Laureate J. Patrick Lewis and paired with vibrant animal photography, this collection of poems is an exuberant celebration of the animal kingdom and a beautiful introduction to this genre of literature. Designed for family sharing but targeted to ages 4-8, this dynamic, fresh, yet still classic collection of animal poems is a must-have for the family bookshelf. Featured poets include J. Patrick Lewis, Dorothy Aldis, Emily Dickinson, Benjamin Franklin, Robert Frost, Rudyard Kipling, Jack Prelutsky, Elizabeth Madox Roberts, Robert Louis Stevenson, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, and many more. Divided into chapters that group the poems by theme for extra resonance, the collection is a mix of old and new, classics, and never-before-published. A foreword from Lewis, sets the scene for helping children appreciate this gift of language and this visual feast for the eyes. Chapters include: Welcome to the World (birth of animal young) Big Ones (large animals--elephants, hippos, rhinos, bears) Little Ones (small animals--worms, insects) Winged Ones (birds and other flying creatures)  Water Ones (aquatic animals--fish, dolphins, crabs) Strange Ones (curious creatures--armadillos, centipedes) Noisy Ones (loud animals--lions, hyenas) Quiet Ones (silent or still animals--hens, rabbits, snakes) Last Thought (a reflection on the world we share with animals)

30 review for National Geographic Book of Animal Poetry: 200 Poems with Photographs That Squeak, Soar, and Roar!

  1. 5 out of 5

    Laura (Book Scrounger)

    This was a fun book to read over the course of the school year, and includes some really amazing animal photography!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Suggested Grade Levels: 1st-5th grade. Genre: Themed Poetry Book Themes: Animals Awards: 2013 Claudia Lewis Award Calling all animal lovers, this book is for you! One of nature’s most powerful wonders is its wildlife in action. This themed anthology of poems captures this profound wonder of animals and explores it through poetry. It keeps the child’s heart in mind and organizes the poems by chapters such as “the strange ones,” or “the winged ones,” which are chapters that have poems all on strange Suggested Grade Levels: 1st-5th grade. Genre: Themed Poetry Book Themes: Animals Awards: 2013 Claudia Lewis Award Calling all animal lovers, this book is for you! One of nature’s most powerful wonders is its wildlife in action. This themed anthology of poems captures this profound wonder of animals and explores it through poetry. It keeps the child’s heart in mind and organizes the poems by chapters such as “the strange ones,” or “the winged ones,” which are chapters that have poems all on strange animals or ones that have wings. Its collection has a mix of poetry from classics authors such as Robert Frost and Emily Dickinson to new writers like Jack Prelutsky. It even has some never before published poems! Children will be able to laugh, explore and learn about animals while reading this book of animal packed poetry. National Geographic Society is one of the world’s largest nonprofit scientific and educational organizations. The society works to inspire people to care about the planet and one way they ignite curiosity is through their beautiful photography. This book contains 180 pages of stunning natural beauty through photographs with poetry weaved between. The photographs give the readers rare vantage points of some of the world’s most remarkable creatures from a close up of a caterpillar eating through a leaf, eye level to a humming bird landing on a flower and underwater with a sea anemone flowing on the deep sea floor. It would be an excellent book choice for bringing cross curricular studies in from science. Many grade levels study animals in one way or another. This book would allow the knowledge of animals from science to be used to read poetry in literacy. In first grade students study animals from the viewpoint of what do animals have to make them able to survive and adapt in their environments. I would suggest to first grade teachers tying this book into their study of animals and having students write a poem about an animal after they have studied it. This could lead to a lesson on how do informational text and poetry about animals differ and how are they the same.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Pegram

    With chapters such as the "big ones," "little ones," "strange ones," "winged ones," "water ones," "noisy ones," and "quiet ones," this anthology will not fail to draw the reader in and invite them to stay. As expected from a National Geographic offering, the photographs that grace the pages are stunning and awe inspiring. They are sure to hold the attention of little ones even if they cannot read the words. The 200 pieces of poetry in this book run the gamut of silly, serious, inspiring, and With chapters such as the "big ones," "little ones," "strange ones," "winged ones," "water ones," "noisy ones," and "quiet ones," this anthology will not fail to draw the reader in and invite them to stay. As expected from a National Geographic offering, the photographs that grace the pages are stunning and awe inspiring. They are sure to hold the attention of little ones even if they cannot read the words. The 200 pieces of poetry in this book run the gamut of silly, serious, inspiring, and informational and are brought to the book by authors including Emily Dickenson, Robert Frost, Jack Prelutsky, Carl Sandburg, and more. In addition to this, they don't focus solely on the beautiful creatures that so often grace the pages of poetry books like the butterfly or the eagle. These poems explore cockroaches, scorpions, sloths, armadillos and skunks, just to name a few. The only reason that I did not give this book 5 stars is the fact that there are a few poems that seem to glorify or make light of violence towards animals. I was not expecting to read about shooting a hippopotamus or hunting geese, and, though I do believe that these poems could open interesting discussions with older students, they did make me think twice about bringing this book to children. Ultimately, though, the beautiful and interesting aspects of this anthology outweighed these few poems. This book could be used in a multitude of ways in the classroom. Children could write their own poetry about animals they may be studying in class. They could play with shape poems based on animals - there are a couple of these in the book to build from. Teachers could even use this to build speaking skills by having students practice their favorite poem from the book to perform for their class.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Donalyn

    This poetry collection, assembled by J. Patrick Lewis, deserves a spot on every library and child's bookshelf. Exploring the humor, wonder, and beauty of the animal world, stunning photographs enhance each poem creating a visual encyclopedia. This is the sort of book children pore over-- looking at images, sharing poems, and rereading many times. I wish I could buy this book for every child I know. The perfect gift book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    A delightful collection of poems coupled with stunning photographs that you know will be awesome because it's, well, National Geographic. A wonderful anthology for classrooms, libraries and homes.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nichole Forest

    1. Category/Genre: Poetry 2. Copyright date: 2012, edited by J. Patrick Lewis, US Children's Poet Laureate 3. Age level of interest: K -5, estimate 4. Reading level: 3rd and up, estimate 5. Brief description: This is a lovely book of poems of famous writers such as Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson and Jack Prelutsky to name a few. The poems are all of animals from hundreds of different species. 6. Two Characteristics: 1. Poetry draws on many kinds of language magic. The imagery of a poem involves direct 1. Category/Genre: Poetry 2. Copyright date: 2012, edited by J. Patrick Lewis, US Children's Poet Laureate 3. Age level of interest: K -5, estimate 4. Reading level: 3rd and up, estimate 5. Brief description: This is a lovely book of poems of famous writers such as Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson and Jack Prelutsky to name a few. The poems are all of animals from hundreds of different species. 6. Two Characteristics: 1. Poetry draws on many kinds of language magic. The imagery of a poem involves direct sensory images of sight, sound, touch, smell or taste. One of the poems, Elephant by Ann Whitford Paul, gives the reader a sense of really hearing and seeing an elephant in all its glory. "A threatening cloud, plumped fat and gray, Snorts a thunder, rains a spray, And billows puffs of dust away, A weather maker every day." 2. Because children are visually minded, they respond readily to the picture-making quality of poetry. Again, in the poem referenced above, the picture gives you a visual of what the author has has written. If you read the poem first without showing the pictures, and then again showing the picture, I know younger students would really understand the poem better the second reading. 7. How well does book reach its intended audience. Early fluent readers would enjoy this book of poetry as there is more descriptive language and more pages in this book. There are many different kinds of animals represented in the poetry from the unusual, to African animals, to birds, to reptiles; all sure to reach the interest of any reader. 8. Awards/Reviews/Citations Kirkus Review Issue 8/15/12 School Library Journal 10/3/12

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay Leighton

    After reading this book, I can honestly say I think any child would enjoy it! National Geographic did a great job of explaining a wide variety of animals through short and sweet poems that will keep children alert and interested from the first page to the last! Each poem discusses fun facts about the animals, including what kinds of food they like to eat, where they live, and their features which make them so unique. The realistic images in the book also will allow students to observe these After reading this book, I can honestly say I think any child would enjoy it! National Geographic did a great job of explaining a wide variety of animals through short and sweet poems that will keep children alert and interested from the first page to the last! Each poem discusses fun facts about the animals, including what kinds of food they like to eat, where they live, and their features which make them so unique. The realistic images in the book also will allow students to observe these creatures up close and personal, allowing them to gain a better sense of understanding as to how these species live their day-to-day lives. Although I think any child would love this book, I think this text mostly targets boys and girls in the second grade or above, as the book uses some larger words that younger children might not be familiar with. However, this book could be used as a read aloud for even the youngest of children! Kids love learning about animals, so I think this poetry book would appeal to just about any child. This is a book that I definitely am going to have in my future classroom!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Grace Vezina

    National Geographic’s “Book of Animal Poetry” compiled by J. Patrick Lewis is a book filled with gorgeous and awe-inspiring pictures of various animals from National Geographic mingled with poems from a variety of authors. Using the beautiful pictures to draw them in, this book allows children to explore and learn about all different kinds of animals. It is divided into nine chapters like, Welcome to the World, Big Ones, Little Ones, Noisy ones etc. The collection has a mix of poetry from National Geographic’s “Book of Animal Poetry” compiled by J. Patrick Lewis is a book filled with gorgeous and awe-inspiring pictures of various animals from National Geographic mingled with poems from a variety of authors. Using the beautiful pictures to draw them in, this book allows children to explore and learn about all different kinds of animals. It is divided into nine chapters like, Welcome to the World, Big Ones, Little Ones, Noisy ones etc. The collection has a mix of poetry from different authors like Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost Benjamin Franklin and even some new writers. This book would make a great resource for any elementary teacher, especially those who teach science and or writing because it would support an integrated study across these disciplines. The only caution I have about this book is that some of the poems talk about the killing of some animals, which may be difficult for young children but would be educational to many others. This would be a wonderful book for the whole family but it probably most enjoyed by children ages 4-8.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Calhoun

    Book of Animal Poetry by J. Patrick Lewis was great poetry with lots of educational information. This book is filled with detailed and incredible photos. The photos of the animals in the book were beautiful and real. There was a poem in this book about a tiger and it went, "there was a young lady of Niger, who smiled as she rode on a tiger, they returned from the ride with the lady inside, and the smile on the face of the tiger." This is a little humorous, but also shows that tigers are Book of Animal Poetry by J. Patrick Lewis was great poetry with lots of educational information. This book is filled with detailed and incredible photos. The photos of the animals in the book were beautiful and real. There was a poem in this book about a tiger and it went, "there was a young lady of Niger, who smiled as she rode on a tiger, they returned from the ride with the lady inside, and the smile on the face of the tiger." This is a little humorous, but also shows that tigers are predators. The poems rhyme and this is helpful when young students are learning about rhyming words. I really think this book would be helpful in elementary classrooms because you could focus on a different animal each week and this could start of the week. There are so many poems in this book and so many different things to learn about animals. The poems are written by different authors and have different styles. They don't all rhyme. I would recommend this book to the ages 1st to 3rd grade.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Carrier

    Book of Animal Poetry by National Geographic This book has fantastic pictures that go very well with the poetry inside. The book is organized into 9 chapters that make it very easy to understand for children as young as preschool. The pictures along with the poetry give children a fantastic visual about many different types of animals. The poetry is a fun way to give facts of wildlife. Not to mention, the book includes two hundred poems. Each chapter covers different types of animals and mentions Book of Animal Poetry by National Geographic This book has fantastic pictures that go very well with the poetry inside. The book is organized into 9 chapters that make it very easy to understand for children as young as preschool. The pictures along with the poetry give children a fantastic visual about many different types of animals. The poetry is a fun way to give facts of wildlife. Not to mention, the book includes two hundred poems. Each chapter covers different types of animals and mentions their differences and similarities. I even learned something from this poem as I had not heard of some of the animals mentioned, therefore, I think children of all ages could benefit from this poetry book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I am surprised at how well these photographs work, because they could so easily overwhelm the poems. I love the categories, the consistency in the font, and many of the selections (especially the haiku, which feel nice paired with a photo). I wish it was noted when the poem was actually a portion of a poem. (They did it once with Charles Mackay's "from I Have Lived & and [sic] I have Loved." Why not for all the others? Also, every time I came to a Hilaire Belloc poem it felt like a sour note I am surprised at how well these photographs work, because they could so easily overwhelm the poems. I love the categories, the consistency in the font, and many of the selections (especially the haiku, which feel nice paired with a photo). I wish it was noted when the poem was actually a portion of a poem. (They did it once with Charles Mackay's "from I Have Lived & and [sic] I have Loved." Why not for all the others? Also, every time I came to a Hilaire Belloc poem it felt like a sour note (ditto for the limericks); and I don't know why the editors felt "The Hippopotamus" needed to be here. It's a silly rhyme and for some reason the casual violence isn't funny. (Maybe because> it is paired with a photograph.)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ellie VanLahr

    “Sea Turtle” Anonymous, found in National Geographic’s BOOK OF ANIMAL POETRY is about a female sea turtle and her life journey across the ocean. Her life work consists of helping to repopulate the sea with sea turtles to ensure her species lives on long past her time. This mother turtle does not have time to sit with her eggs and wait for them to hatch because she must keep moving throughout the sea laying more eggs so that more turtles will be born. This poem really intrigues the sea lovers and “Sea Turtle” Anonymous, found in National Geographic’s BOOK OF ANIMAL POETRY is about a female sea turtle and her life journey across the ocean. Her life work consists of helping to repopulate the sea with sea turtles to ensure her species lives on long past her time. This mother turtle does not have time to sit with her eggs and wait for them to hatch because she must keep moving throughout the sea laying more eggs so that more turtles will be born. This poem really intrigues the sea lovers and specifically the turtle lovers such as myself. It is a great way for children to understand how animals are different and the different journeys everyone and everything goes through.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Watson

    A fun collection of 200 animal poems, beautifully assembled with full-page photos of the animals being described. In terms of style, it holds to the high standard you'd expect from National Geographic. The poems are almost all accessible to younger readers, and some made me laugh out loud. I'd recommend this book to 8-12 year olds, though it's a good readaloud for younger ages. As the editor states in the intro, this isn't a book to be read in one go, but to be enjoyed here and there a few poems A fun collection of 200 animal poems, beautifully assembled with full-page photos of the animals being described. In terms of style, it holds to the high standard you'd expect from National Geographic. The poems are almost all accessible to younger readers, and some made me laugh out loud. I'd recommend this book to 8-12 year olds, though it's a good readaloud for younger ages. As the editor states in the intro, this isn't a book to be read in one go, but to be enjoyed here and there a few poems at a time.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Katelyn Ferry

    National Geographic Book of Animal Poetry: 200 Poems with Photographs that Squeak, Soar, and Roar! is a children’s picture book that is edited by J. Patrick Lewis. This poetry book is full of famous poems that are all about animals. There are images of animals on every single page and the reader will be completely engaged in this book as the pictures seem to come to life with up close and personal views of animals from all over the world (Lewis, 2012).

  15. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Jarman

    The amazing photographs that accompany the beautiful poems within this animal themed poetry book will blow your mind! There are a mixture of both classic and new poems about animals that are paired with stunning pictures of wildlife in action. This book simply cannot be beat, with it's colors, animals, pictures, writing, and scenery, it will make you feel like you are right there in the wild with them.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Strom

    The National Geographic Book of Animal Poetry: 200 Poems with Photographs That Squeak, Soar, and Roar! is a beautiful poetry picture book. The unique feature of this book is definitely the pictures. Each poem has a picture of the animal discussed arranged and photographed in different and unique ways. The pictures are creative and bring attention to each animal, adding to the poetry which is also written in varying format. I would recommend this book for Kindergarten through 3rd grade.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    Animals make for good poetry. That's just common sense. When humans get misty eyed and start thinking their great grand thoughts, they tend to be inspired by some form of nature. Naturally, some animals in particular are replete with awe-inspiring tendencies. Bald eagles, say. So where does that put your average hamster or flamingo? Not all animals are built to accompany great grand thoughts after all. Some of them are best suited to small, sly, clever verses instead. Taken as a whole, there are Animals make for good poetry. That's just common sense. When humans get misty eyed and start thinking their great grand thoughts, they tend to be inspired by some form of nature. Naturally, some animals in particular are replete with awe-inspiring tendencies. Bald eagles, say. So where does that put your average hamster or flamingo? Not all animals are built to accompany great grand thoughts after all. Some of them are best suited to small, sly, clever verses instead. Taken as a whole, there are probably more animal poems in the world than a person could imagine. That's why it's rather clever of J. Patrick Lewis to pair with National Geographic's talented photography department to bring us a gorgeously designed book of animal poems. You name the animal, the man has found (or perhaps solicited?) a poem to fit. Containing everything from limericks to haiku, this collection of two hundred poems and who knows how many photos is a visual feast for eye and ear alike. "If you listen very carefully, you'll hear the chicken hatching," reads the first poem in this book. It's "The Egg" by Jack Prelutsky and it starts off National Geographic Book of Animal Poetry's "Welcome to the World" section. Split into eight different sections, the book categorizes its contents not by genus or species but by only the grandest of terms. There are "the big ones", "the little ones", "the winged ones", "the water ones", "the strange ones", "the noisy ones", and "the quiet ones". Each poem is accompanied by a photograph, and sometimes the photograph is accompanied by more than one poem. There are verses poignant and funny, thought provoking and wild. Finally, at the end of the book, there is a section on "writing poems about animals" that aids kids by giving them a range of different forms to try. This is followed by a two-page spread of resources and four indexes at the end, one by title, one by poet, one by first line, and one by subject. What is unclear to me is the ratio of poems Lewis knew about and found verses the poems he went out and asked for. I noticed quite a few contemporary children's poets between these pages. Janet S. Wong, Jane Yolen, Tracie Vaughn Zimmer, Michael J. Rosen, Bobbi Katz, Betsy Franco, etc. And I could not help but notice that those contemporary poets tended to write for some of the more difficult animals. The anemone, the blue jay, or the raccoon, for example. Here's another question for you: Which came first, the photograph or the poem? Did Mr. Lewis plow through untold hundreds of National Geographic photos, old and new, cull the best and then find the poems, or did he find the poems first and then match the photos to fit? Certainly some of the National Geographic's better known images are in this book (the picture of the flamingoes standing in the shape of a flamingo, for example). Sadly no note exists in this book telling us what Mr. Lewis's process was. There is a form to the chapters of this book but not so much form within the chapters. You might wonder at this at first, but since it's easy enough to locate your favorite critter by using the subject index at the end of the book, it's understandable why you might want to take the advice Mr. J. Patrick Lewis proffers at the beginning of the collection and know that "This book is not for reading straight through." You dip in and find old favorites and new with ease. One librarian commented to me her surprise that the tiger poem in this book wasn't William Blake's "Tyger Tyger Burning Bright". True enough, but the anonymous poem with its classic limerick about the lady from Niger is rather well known within its own right. I was also amused in a very fifth grade boy kind of way by Michael J. Rosen's blue-footed booby poem. You'll have to see it for yourself to understand why. There are a couple times when the poem paired to the photo is a bit misleading or confusing. For example, for the picture of a butterfly still within its chrysalis, the poem is instead about a cocoon. I suppose cocoons are significantly less impressive photography-wise than chrysalises, but I've little doubt that kids will find the terms interchangeable now. Similarly there's a poem about a sea horse that is inexplicably paired with an impressive but very different image of a weedy sea dragon. Credit where credit is due, each photograph is accompanied by a very small written description of its subject matter, but nine times out of ten the child reader will be relying on the poem to explain what they're seeing. Probably because nine times out of ten that would be the right move. I can only imagine the sheer amounts of blood, sweat and tears that went into the collection and design of the book itself. It has its little quirks here and there, but if you're seeking a poetry book for kids that children would willingly pick up and flip through, even if they have hitherto professed to not like poetry in the slightest, this is your best bet. A gorgeous little number that has the occasional slip-up, it is nonetheless a magnificent collection and book that is well worth the space it takes up. Add a little natural wonder to your poetry shelves. Because if we're talking about the best possible compliment to your eyes and ears alike, few have as many perks and grand moments as this. For ages 7-12.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Grover

    Absolutely incredible compilation of poetry about animals. I love that it is arranged by type of animal and there are some pages that have multiple poems about the same animal. There is a great resource in the back to help kids write their own animal poetry, as well as resources for additional poems. Looking forward to ordering this one! Perfect for all K-12 collections.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Santina Galati

    This book divides up animals by what category that they fall in, for example, winged animals, water animals, BIG animals, etc. The book contains easy to read poems for youngsters to read to the point where they can go up to the classroom bookshelf and choose the book themselves! Great and fun book to read!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Whitney Pittsenbarger

    We are using this as part of our homeschool curriculum and am thrilled with it. Neither me or my girls are very interested in poetry. The pictures, cute and short poems and subjects of this book was a great introduction to poetry that held our interest. Plus, we learned a lot about animals along the way.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    This book is so nice. It's got a bunch of sections like big animals, little animals, flying ones, water animals, strange animals, noisy animals, and quiet ones. It's got 170 pages with many pages displaying multiple poems. It's quite a wealth of animal poetry. The photographs are all very nice as well.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Myriale

    The National Geographic Book of Animal Poetry consist of amazing illustrations of real life animals. The pictures are very clear and vivid. This book would grab the attention of any age group. The poems are silly and engaging. I chose this book because I know that it will engage my future students.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mely

    Stunning photographic illustrations. Very simple poems. Most very short. Includes some classic poems by famous poets. Uniquely categorized based on types of animals (big, little, winged, water, noisy, quiet, etc.)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    It's a large book, but the poems are short and fun. The photos are amazing, colorful and big. The poems/pictures are in sections of: big, little, winged, water, strange, noisy and quiet

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ami

    Really nice book of animal poetry. Lots of great pictures and a huge selection of different animals. Pretty cool!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Peggy Archer

    Great collection of poems about animals with wonderful photographs to go along.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    The National Graphic Book of Animal Poetry is one of the best and well organized children's books that I have ever read. The photography is beautiful and adds to the emotional quality of the poems. This book has nine well thought out chapters that begins with "Welcome to the World," and followed by; "The Big Ones," "The Little Ones," "The Winged Ones," "The Water Ones," " The Strange Ones," "The Noisy Ones," "The Quiet Ones," and "The Final Thought." The Book of Animal Poetry includes poems from The National Graphic Book of Animal Poetry is one of the best and well organized children's books that I have ever read. The photography is beautiful and adds to the emotional quality of the poems. This book has nine well thought out chapters that begins with "Welcome to the World," and followed by; "The Big Ones," "The Little Ones," "The Winged Ones," "The Water Ones," " The Strange Ones," "The Noisy Ones," "The Quiet Ones," and "The Final Thought." The Book of Animal Poetry includes poems from both classic and new poets such as: Emily Dickenson, Robert Frost, and Laura E. Richards. This book is not only educational but also very enjoyable for all ages! I highly recommend this book for any household or classroom!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brenna Erickson

    Poetry- Beautiful real life photographs that make reading poetry fun! Grades 1-4.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Julia Brickman

    Lots of cute animal poems. A fun book for early - mid elementary -

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rosie Gearhart

    An absolutely STUNNING book of photos of animals with poems from various authors to go along with them. 3+

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