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Beyond Outrage: What has gone wrong with our economy and our democracy, and how to fix it

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In this eBook exclusive, Robert B. Reich urges Americans to get beyond mere outrage about the nation’s increasingly concentrated wealth and corrupt politics in order to mobilize and to take back our economy and democracy. Americans can’t rely only on getting good people elected, Reich argues, because nothing positive happens in Washington unless good people outside Washingt In this eBook exclusive, Robert B. Reich urges Americans to get beyond mere outrage about the nation’s increasingly concentrated wealth and corrupt politics in order to mobilize and to take back our economy and democracy. Americans can’t rely only on getting good people elected, Reich argues, because nothing positive happens in Washington unless good people outside Washington are organized to help make those things happen after the election. But in order to be effectively mobilized, we need to see the big picture. Reich connects the dots for us, showing why the increasing share of income and wealth going to the top has hobbled jobs and growth for everyone else, while undermining our democracy; has caused Americans to become increasingly cynical about public life; and has turned many Americans against one another. He also explains why the proposals of the “regressive right” are dead wrong and provides a clear road map for what must be done instead. Here is a blueprint for action for everyone who cares about the future of America.


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In this eBook exclusive, Robert B. Reich urges Americans to get beyond mere outrage about the nation’s increasingly concentrated wealth and corrupt politics in order to mobilize and to take back our economy and democracy. Americans can’t rely only on getting good people elected, Reich argues, because nothing positive happens in Washington unless good people outside Washingt In this eBook exclusive, Robert B. Reich urges Americans to get beyond mere outrage about the nation’s increasingly concentrated wealth and corrupt politics in order to mobilize and to take back our economy and democracy. Americans can’t rely only on getting good people elected, Reich argues, because nothing positive happens in Washington unless good people outside Washington are organized to help make those things happen after the election. But in order to be effectively mobilized, we need to see the big picture. Reich connects the dots for us, showing why the increasing share of income and wealth going to the top has hobbled jobs and growth for everyone else, while undermining our democracy; has caused Americans to become increasingly cynical about public life; and has turned many Americans against one another. He also explains why the proposals of the “regressive right” are dead wrong and provides a clear road map for what must be done instead. Here is a blueprint for action for everyone who cares about the future of America.

30 review for Beyond Outrage: What has gone wrong with our economy and our democracy, and how to fix it

  1. 4 out of 5

    Book

    Beyond Outrage: What has gone wrong with our economy and our democracy, and how to fix it by Robert B. Reich “Beyond Outrage” is a plea for action for those who care about the Future of America. Accomplished author of twelve books and current Professor of Public Policy, Robert Reich provides insight to what happened to our economy and how to fix it. In a lucid and persuasive manner, Reich provides compelling arguments in support of his main thesis: that our economy and democracy has been manipula Beyond Outrage: What has gone wrong with our economy and our democracy, and how to fix it by Robert B. Reich “Beyond Outrage” is a plea for action for those who care about the Future of America. Accomplished author of twelve books and current Professor of Public Policy, Robert Reich provides insight to what happened to our economy and how to fix it. In a lucid and persuasive manner, Reich provides compelling arguments in support of his main thesis: that our economy and democracy has been manipulated against average working people and what can be done about it. This Kindle Single is an intellectual appetizer. This 1744 KB book is broken out into three parts: Part One. The Rigged Game, Part Two. The Rise of the Regressive Right, and Part Three. Beyond Outrage: What You Need to Do. Positives: 1. Well written, accessible book that gets to the points. 2. Robert Reich is an excellent author with a mastery of the subject. 3. Establishes upfront the main thesis of this Kindle Single and what the reader should expect from the main body of the book. 4. Provides seven dots that when connected show why our economic system is out of whack. 5. Thought-provoking comments, “Republicans want us to believe that the central issue is the size of government, but the real issue is whom government is for.” 6. The gist of the problem; the super-rich have rigged our economy in their favor and at the expense of the average American. Reich provides an overwhelming amount of data in support of his argument. Outrage indeed. 7. The issue of revolving doors with regards to regulators and the corporations they were supposed to regulate. 8. The relation between the super-rich and their political influence. The political influence that money can buy. 9. The best definition for regulation…”regulations make sense where the benefits to the public exceed the costs, and regulations should be designed to maximize those benefits and minimize those costs.” Will Dodd-Frank legislation be effective? 10. What economic history has taught us. A look at presidential policies from the past. 11. The conservative agenda. The rise of the Regressive Right and their strategy. 12. A look at the Tea Partiers, their political views. 13. The ten biggest economic lies. Interesting. 14. How to make a movement. 15. An agenda with specific points. Sound policies. 16. Links to further information. Negatives: 1. If you have read some of the author’s previous books this Kindle Single may come across as déjà vu. 2. No formal bibliography or links to notes. 3. I’m never happy when a term like “Social Darwinism” is used. It’s a bastardized term. Oh well… 4. Tax Reform , that is, tax simplification is needed. In summary, if you have read previous books or have followed Professor Reich’s videos this book will feel like déjà vu but if you haven’t or just like the idea of having this specific thesis as a refresher or aren’t familiar at all, by all means get it. Reich writes in a lucid and direct manner, and always provides thought-provoking insight into the economy. His arguments are sound and it will take you a short time to go through it. I recommend it. Further recommendations: “Aftershock” by Robert B. Reich, “Age of Greed” by Jeff Madrick, “Perfectly Legal” by David Cay Johnston, “Winner-Take-All Politics” by Jacob S. Hacker and Paul Pierson, “The Benefit and The Burden” by Bruce Bartlett, “The Great American Stickup” by Robert Scheer, “The Fifteen Biggest Lies about the Economy” by Joshua Holland, “That Used to be Us”, by Thomas L. Friedman, “Screwed” by Thom Hartmann, and “War on the Middle Class” by Lou Dobbs.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    This was an excellent read. Reich was able to explain a lot about the financial mess the country is in today without being financially technical. Anyone who can balance a checkbook will understand this book. Easy to read, easy to understand. But explosive! If 'we the people' continue to go from one day to the next only worrying about our own lives and not the bigger picture, the powers that be - the top 5% of income earners, will continue to erode our economy. What good does the medium to large b This was an excellent read. Reich was able to explain a lot about the financial mess the country is in today without being financially technical. Anyone who can balance a checkbook will understand this book. Easy to read, easy to understand. But explosive! If 'we the people' continue to go from one day to the next only worrying about our own lives and not the bigger picture, the powers that be - the top 5% of income earners, will continue to erode our economy. What good does the medium to large business sector do if they continue to hoard their profits rather than giving an effort to providing more jobs and being a responsible community partner? A few key points for me: 1) Big corporation/super-rich gifts to charity. Contrary to what we may think, the philanthropic activity of the super-rich is NOT to the poor or underprivileged, but rather to culture palaces (operas, art museums, symphonies, and theaters), places the poor cannot utilize, but the wealthy spend a lot of their time. Or the giving will be to their alma-maters, so their children can attend the college with a wing named after their parent or grandparent. But again, nothing helping those who need it most. 2) The truth behind the S&P downgrade of the country's credit rating. S&P had no authority to make such claims. In addition, part of the economic meltdown was due to failure on the part of S&P, Moody's, and Fitch, to do their jobs. I could go on but it's more important that you read the book. There is so much information but Reich provides it in easily digestible text. He also provides ways that 'we the people' can help; how our voices can be heard over Big Money. Please, pick it up. It's only $2.99, available only in eBook form.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Huma Rashid

    God this was so depressing and upsetting.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    If you follow Reich's blog, what he says here is pretty familiar. I liked it, because it was all in one place and presented as an overall policy position. I've read The Work of Nations as well, and I really liked that. This was a Kindle edition and included some online resources. The only part that seemed weak to me was a sort of cheerleading prescription about what to do to oppose the reactionary forces in politics and finance that are taking the country back into some sort of Gilded Age of no If you follow Reich's blog, what he says here is pretty familiar. I liked it, because it was all in one place and presented as an overall policy position. I've read The Work of Nations as well, and I really liked that. This was a Kindle edition and included some online resources. The only part that seemed weak to me was a sort of cheerleading prescription about what to do to oppose the reactionary forces in politics and finance that are taking the country back into some sort of Gilded Age of no regulations, incredible income disparity, and no social safety net. Reich is correct that many Obama supporters have succumbed to cynicism, and he faults those supporters for not continuing to argue, write legislators, demonstrate, and participate in the fray. My argument here is that the general is leadoing from behind. If I am cynical, I think I have good reason, and I'd like to see more convincing evidence of sustained leadership rather than sustained caving in. I'll pull the lever for the Democrats in November, but not because Reich has convinced me to do so. His policy is great, well explained, and well developed as is his analysis of what the reactionary Republican opposition is trying to accomplish. His prescription for what I should do now seemed pretty lame in the face of what seems like such a tepid fight on the part of the President.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Billie Pritchett

    I give Robert Reich's book Beyond Outrage three stars because there are maybe two portions of the book that I think are excellent whereas I think the rest of the book is just okay. One portion I enjoyed quite a bit is Reich's explanation of the condition we would have to return to in order to have the rich country we once had, and this would have to be America, post-World War II. In Reich's view, this would be possible to do, and it would involve creating a strong enough middle class that has bu I give Robert Reich's book Beyond Outrage three stars because there are maybe two portions of the book that I think are excellent whereas I think the rest of the book is just okay. One portion I enjoyed quite a bit is Reich's explanation of the condition we would have to return to in order to have the rich country we once had, and this would have to be America, post-World War II. In Reich's view, this would be possible to do, and it would involve creating a strong enough middle class that has buying power, which continues to feed the economy. Not having a strong enough middle class is what he thinks is the problem right now. Right now the country is extremely lopsided in terms of poverty and income inequality: a lot of people poor, a few people very wealthy. The second part I liked about the book is the final chapter, where he makes a call to practical political action and gives some advice on not getting discouraged along the way. In this portion of the book, Reich writes that the struggle to make political and economic changes can be heard, and can't be done just sitting behind a computer. Real change comes with direct political participation. And not only does it involve appealing to Washington or local government but to large businesses who may support positions that you think fundamentally undemocratic. As for the rest of the book, it is a political screed, frankly, and not a genre I am too interested in. This is because these sorts of works too often speak to the choir, oversimplify complicated social phenomena, and name-call. I don't like this when anybody does this. The book could have benefited from being more even-handed.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Randy Lander

    As always with Reich, this is well-written, passionate, makes a lot of sense and... all seems very common sense to me. The problem I have with it is not anything about the book, it's that I didn't really learn anything new here. The economic disparities Reich points out are obvious to anyone paying attention, unfortunately the people who need this wake-up call won't believe it because: A) They don't want to think about it B) They think Reich is a liberal propagandist and thus will think all he's d As always with Reich, this is well-written, passionate, makes a lot of sense and... all seems very common sense to me. The problem I have with it is not anything about the book, it's that I didn't really learn anything new here. The economic disparities Reich points out are obvious to anyone paying attention, unfortunately the people who need this wake-up call won't believe it because: A) They don't want to think about it B) They think Reich is a liberal propagandist and thus will think all he's doing is "spinning" and not relaying a fact-based argument C) They know damn well he's right, but to change things would be inconvenient for them, so they'll pretend they don't. But Republican, Democrat or independent, if you want a really strong analysis of the economic disparity that is causing a lot of our current problems and could cause much bigger ones in the future, if you want to see the real issues we should be dealing with instead of the wedge issues that will inevitably drive the election cycle instead, you should read this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Acuna

    If it were possible to give a book 10 stars, I would give this one the full 10. Robert Reich, former Clinton economic advisor, clearly, concisely and with irrefutable facts, lays out how tightly intertwined the political and financial systems have become. He begins the book with seven key points regarding the economy (some points dating back to the 1970's), then moves on to how the Right has moved farther right and now wants to move America back to a less open, tolerant, healthy nation, back to If it were possible to give a book 10 stars, I would give this one the full 10. Robert Reich, former Clinton economic advisor, clearly, concisely and with irrefutable facts, lays out how tightly intertwined the political and financial systems have become. He begins the book with seven key points regarding the economy (some points dating back to the 1970's), then moves on to how the Right has moved farther right and now wants to move America back to a less open, tolerant, healthy nation, back to the 1920's. The middle part of the book is highly political and contains some very "tough talk" but I found that I agreed and understood all of his point. The final section outlines what we each can do to change this. Reich contests that the only way to change the country is for each of us to get personally involved. I am going to try to convince every one of my family (conservative Republicans) and all of my friends to read this book before the November elections. What's at stake in this election couldn't be more clearly laid out than it is in this book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Britt Bowman

    He makes some interesting points in regards to wage stagnation. He's absolutely right - the long term problem isn't how many jobs are being created, it's how little they pay, particularly in a consumption based economy. I don't agree with his idea that charity donations to cultural endeavors are by and for the rich alone. Any poor college student who has purchased symphony/ theatre tickets for practically nothing has donors to thank. Art museums are affordable because of contributions from donor He makes some interesting points in regards to wage stagnation. He's absolutely right - the long term problem isn't how many jobs are being created, it's how little they pay, particularly in a consumption based economy. I don't agree with his idea that charity donations to cultural endeavors are by and for the rich alone. Any poor college student who has purchased symphony/ theatre tickets for practically nothing has donors to thank. Art museums are affordable because of contributions from donors. It's not just the rich that benefit from cultural enrichment. He says that only 10% of charitable giving goes to the poor. He doesn't include donations to religious organizations, and assumes that donations to universities never support education for the poor. So that gives you an idea how he gets to the 10%. That being said, he's exceptionally intelligent, and all my liberal/tea party friends would find alot to like about what he says.

  9. 5 out of 5

    John

    A VIB -- Very Important Book -- that advocates going beyond the self-defeated feeling that most of us have which tells us the world is so stacked against us that we can never win. We can. This book is the beginning of a manifesto on how to make it happen. Reading this book will raise your anger levels through the roof as Reich sets up the facts of what happened to this country and how a powerful few have come close to ruining everything for the rest of us, but get beyond that outrage and encoura A VIB -- Very Important Book -- that advocates going beyond the self-defeated feeling that most of us have which tells us the world is so stacked against us that we can never win. We can. This book is the beginning of a manifesto on how to make it happen. Reading this book will raise your anger levels through the roof as Reich sets up the facts of what happened to this country and how a powerful few have come close to ruining everything for the rest of us, but get beyond that outrage and encourage your elected officials to fix things for everyone, not just put in the fix for the richest of the rich. I do wish there were a few more action items in the book for us. It's a good blueprint for government action, but I'd like to be able to take a few actions myself right now.

  10. 5 out of 5

    James

    A quick read and an important one. Robert Reich's treatise succinctly details the threat to America's democracy and economy from the Regressive Right and provides easily implementable solutions we can all take to set America on a progressive path.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    Robert Reich is an important leader of the Resistance. This book is a key to understanding how we got here.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    A brief and well written left-wing jeremiad about what's wrong with the American economy and what should be done to fix it. I admit, I like Robert Reich and I always have. He is a smart, funny, passionate man who--so far as I can tell--is a happy Progressive warrior. It's hard to disagree with much of what he says is ailing us: too much money at the top, too much money in Washington, too much bitterness and cynicism and scorched earth politics in America. The good professor does a bang-up job de A brief and well written left-wing jeremiad about what's wrong with the American economy and what should be done to fix it. I admit, I like Robert Reich and I always have. He is a smart, funny, passionate man who--so far as I can tell--is a happy Progressive warrior. It's hard to disagree with much of what he says is ailing us: too much money at the top, too much money in Washington, too much bitterness and cynicism and scorched earth politics in America. The good professor does a bang-up job describing (from his point of view) the history of the last thirty years or so, which is when most Progressives think history began. Professor Reich excoriates Wall Street, the Republican Party, Newt Gingrich, Ronald Reagan, credit default swaps, the end of Glass-Stegal, and the Tea Party. None of this came as a surprise, and I found the author's embedded videos to be very helpful and fun for illustrating his main points. If you are interested in reading about how our economy got to be the way it is, beginning in about 1982, this is the book for you. Mr. Reich writes clearly and well...again, from his point of view. Like many good liberals, though, he left just a few things out of his analysis. The 1970s, for example, don't make much of an appearance. Nor do the 1960s. We skip from Roosevelt to Reagan (with a brief tap dance on Ike's high top marginal tax rates) as though nothing really at all happened in between. For Professor Reich, everything that's wrong with America can be squarely blamed on too little regulation, not enough taxes, and far too few government programs (federal ones, of course. States? Really? Who needs those?) I wonder, when looking at falling family incomes, if Mr. Reich has factored in divorce, or single parent households? When he bemoans middle class debt, does he consider how much of that debt is on non-essential consumer goods? According to NPR, nearly 30% of all Medicare spending in the state of Florida is fraudulent. Nothing to see there, Rob? Not everything that's gone wrong in America is because of tax policies and Grover Norquist. Not everyone is a victim of the globalized economy, and considering that it was HIS boss who ushered in the Age of Globalization (that would be one William Jefferson Clinton), you'd think the good professor would have a bit more to say about the mote in his own party's eye. Not so much. This book was written in 2011, when the comical Occupy Wall Street rodeo was in town, so it's interesting to read about the author's hopes for the movement (all of which were horribly dashed by the human mic check and the leaderless structure. "What do we want? WE DON'T Know! When do we want it? NOW!") My disagreement with Professor Reich isn't so much with his prognosis of what the disease is, but with his remedy. More centralized bureaucracy, more federal programs, more regulation and control--not just on Wall Street, where I agree that it's necessary--but on Main St.--is the exact wrong direction for us to go in. We are either going to get really, really big like the Western Europeans, or we are going to get really, really small like we used to be. I prefer the later, but I have great respect for those who, like Professor Reich, argue for the former. I hate the plutocracy that we've allowed to develop in this country, as I hate corporate lobbyists, billionaires who buy elections and meddle in our civic institutions, and the useless, day to day grind of political warfare and stalemate that so defines our nation in 2013. For me, though, I think the answer comes less from Washington and more from us (and: I'm sorry, President Obama, but Washington isn 't us anymore. It's you guys and a lot of frigging money). Renewal and change need to come from our state and local civic institutions, from our voluntary associations, from our families and friends, and from our communities. Not from Washington. Not from the federal government. From We the People, where it's always supposed to come from. Democracy and freedom are hard. They take time and effort and attention. We have all be guilty of putting American on auto-pilot for far too long. Time to tune back in, kids. As I read this book, I was put in mind of (soon to be President) Hillary Clinton's It Takes a Village, which I read many years ago. She, too, was masterful at describing the problems we faced with regard to children and families, And, she too had one answer over and over again as a solution: more federal government. No thanks.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chungsoo J. Lee

    I just finished hearing this book: Beyond Outrage, well read passionately by the author. A wonderful and convincing book laying out the arguments for lies of the Republican establishment and their ideologies promoted ever since President Herbert Hubert--the ideology of Social Darwinism in turn promoted by Prof. Summner in early 20 century. The truth about deficit, tax codes, role of the government, etc. must be told and spread over and against the lies. The super rich cannot continue to gather m I just finished hearing this book: Beyond Outrage, well read passionately by the author. A wonderful and convincing book laying out the arguments for lies of the Republican establishment and their ideologies promoted ever since President Herbert Hubert--the ideology of Social Darwinism in turn promoted by Prof. Summner in early 20 century. The truth about deficit, tax codes, role of the government, etc. must be told and spread over and against the lies. The super rich cannot continue to gather more power and influence in Washington; while the average citizens lose political engagement and power. The super rich cannot continue to pay less taxes so that the rest of us would pay more for education, infrastructure, social welfare. Tell the nation that the Medicare is more effective than any other private health insurance company, that there must be a ceiling on the growth and power of the large banks, that the economy does not rest on the Wall Street indexes, that the big banks got the bailout without assuming any responsibility for their risky loans and financial hedge fund dealings that brought the crisis in the first place and without any return to the tax payers for their rapid recovery and unprecedented profit (right after the bail out), that the CEO's get millions of bonuses when the companies they manage go bankrupt and lay off hundreds of employees, that the tax increase for the super rich will create more jobs or grow economy (as proven by 50's and 60's when they were paying up to 70% of income taxes under Eisenhower), that the flat tax is flatly unfair, that the rage against tax hikes is basically a ruse to protect and to increase wealth of the super rich, etc, etc, etc. These truths are all laid out in the book. In short, the game is rigged and will continue to be rigged -- unless we, the people, rise up and hold the politicians to our platforms, not to Wall Street agenda, and accountable (and reward) for their actions. The book lays out the common sense and workable platforms for political actions, supported by enormous arsenal of facts and historical data, analyses, and arguments. We cannot let the lies to perpetuate and dominate the country. As George Orwell says, the lies repeated and disseminated continually will become accepted and unquestionable truths. That has happened already. One third of recipients of the unemployment or medicare benefits believes that they don't depend on the government. Sad story. Truth and common intelligence must rise up against the false and lies, if we are to create the "American Dream."

  14. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I'm a follower of Dr. Robert Reich, so I expected to like and relate well to this book. I was not expecting many huge or overwhelmingly outrageous ideas because I know fairly well how he thinks (because I think along the same lines). Setting aside ideals and common values - his writing is simple. A kind of a 'bonk me on the head, yeah, I get it' kind of style. A lot of the ideas are repeated throughout the book, just in different ways and from different angles. This book is (I think) dedicated t I'm a follower of Dr. Robert Reich, so I expected to like and relate well to this book. I was not expecting many huge or overwhelmingly outrageous ideas because I know fairly well how he thinks (because I think along the same lines). Setting aside ideals and common values - his writing is simple. A kind of a 'bonk me on the head, yeah, I get it' kind of style. A lot of the ideas are repeated throughout the book, just in different ways and from different angles. This book is (I think) dedicated to the Occupy Wall Street movement. If anyone is curious about the Occupy Wall Street movement and what they stand for, read this book, and you will understand what they are all about. You will find yourself relating to a lot of the ideas no matter what side of the so-called aisle you fall. There is one part of the book that struck me as particularly unique and simply wonderful! His idea stems from the recent Supreme Court decision that American Corporations are people and that "money" equates to "speech" according to the first amendment of the constitution. This means corporations should be treated as citizens...meaning they should be expected to show some loyalty to this country. Have Corporations PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE TO THE USA. He goes on to describe the pledge - create more jobs IN the US than outside the US, pledge that no more than 20% of our total labor costs will be outsourced abroad, pledge to keep a lid on executive pay - pay including salary, bonuses, health benefits, etc., and pledge NOT to use their money to influence elections.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sam Dye

    We all should make a choice to get a little more involved in politics is the subject of the third section "Beyond Outrage: What you need to do." The first section "The Rigged Game" deals with some facts such as from WWII to 1981 the top marginal tax rate never fell below 70%. President Eisenhower built the interstate highway system and the tax rate during his presidency was 91%! Part two "The Rise of the Regressive Right" he reveals that Clarence Thomas and Antonin Scalia in 2010 had participate We all should make a choice to get a little more involved in politics is the subject of the third section "Beyond Outrage: What you need to do." The first section "The Rigged Game" deals with some facts such as from WWII to 1981 the top marginal tax rate never fell below 70%. President Eisenhower built the interstate highway system and the tax rate during his presidency was 91%! Part two "The Rise of the Regressive Right" he reveals that Clarence Thomas and Antonin Scalia in 2010 had participated in a political retreat hosted by the billionaire financiers Charles and David Koch, driving forces behind loosening restrictions on big money in politics. It was after this that the court handed down the Citizens United decision. Also before Justice Thomas was appointed the Koch Brother had spent $100,000 to support his nomination. Conservative, Progressive, Libertarian, Tea Party whatever your persuasion you will benefit from reading this excellent quickly readable book. Professor Reich will give you facts in this book that you can accept. Those that may be against your natural bent should be read and then try to figure out why they are not correct. We seriously need a new dirction to decrease the budget deficit and reform health care. Incidentally he doesn't believe "Obamacare" is the way to go. This is clearly a 5 star book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    I found this book to be amazingly insightful. That sounds like hyperbole, but I was actually amazed at how my perspective on the subject matter changed with a bit of clarity on the situation. For me, the key message of this short book was: worsening income inequality (shrinking middle class) ==> increasing sensitivity to losing income to taxes by the masses ==> increasing vulnerability to political messaging related to: "govt is the problem" & "lower taxes will lead to smaller govt" ==> lower ta I found this book to be amazingly insightful. That sounds like hyperbole, but I was actually amazed at how my perspective on the subject matter changed with a bit of clarity on the situation. For me, the key message of this short book was: worsening income inequality (shrinking middle class) ==> increasing sensitivity to losing income to taxes by the masses ==> increasing vulnerability to political messaging related to: "govt is the problem" & "lower taxes will lead to smaller govt" ==> lower tax rates & smaller govt ==> fewer services and less protection for individuals against the market power of larger organizations ==> worsening income inequality. I recommend this book to all political conservatives. Do not allow yourself to be insulated from opposing points of view. It's a quick read and cheap to buy. It will cost you almost nothing to understand the point-of-view in this book. Don't take anyone's word for it. See for yourself. And, look to history for previous outcomes of American shifts toward greater income equality. Decide for yourself what is best for your family and for our country.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    I admit to being a fan of Robert Reich, the outspoken U.C. Berkeley professor. He's knowledgeable, he's on my side (a progressive) and, maybe most important of all, I can understand him. I confess that to read his works is me listening to him singing to the choir. Having said all that, I heartily recommend this "single" book, published only as an e-book. The material is brief and as easy an explanation of U.S. economic matters as is possible. It's also scary. Dr. Reich intends that to be so as h I admit to being a fan of Robert Reich, the outspoken U.C. Berkeley professor. He's knowledgeable, he's on my side (a progressive) and, maybe most important of all, I can understand him. I confess that to read his works is me listening to him singing to the choir. Having said all that, I heartily recommend this "single" book, published only as an e-book. The material is brief and as easy an explanation of U.S. economic matters as is possible. It's also scary. Dr. Reich intends that to be so as he educates the reader and tries to spur us to action. He is not shy about where his political beliefs lead him and is convinced that he is correct. I am too though it is frightening for me to say so because I feel like my side is losing these days. Whatever one's political persuasion, this short treatise is worth the read. Readers will love it or hate it depending on their point of view. No matter your response, readers will not feel their hours considering this material are wasted.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Beyond Outrage is a book which deals with the growing gap between rich and poor. Reich explains the frustration which has led to the Occupy movement. Quoting Reich, "Yet when real people without money assemble to express their dissatisfaction with all this, they're told the First Amendment doesn't apply. Instead, they're clubbed, pepper sprayed, thrown out of public parks, and evicted from public spaces. Across America, public officials have said Occupiers have to go." This is a timely book as we Beyond Outrage is a book which deals with the growing gap between rich and poor. Reich explains the frustration which has led to the Occupy movement. Quoting Reich, "Yet when real people without money assemble to express their dissatisfaction with all this, they're told the First Amendment doesn't apply. Instead, they're clubbed, pepper sprayed, thrown out of public parks, and evicted from public spaces. Across America, public officials have said Occupiers have to go." This is a timely book as we are approaching a Presidential election. Reich does his best to rally the oppressed. "So many people have been hit by job losses, sagging incomes, and declining home values that Americans will eventually become mobilized. The question is not whether, but when." I am giving this book a five-star rating. It is a must read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Brantley

    I liked what Robert Reich has to say about the lopsided influence that very wealthy people enjoy and I liked his idea about a corporate pledge of allegiance. I think capitalism is the best system to motivate people, but there must be a hierarchy of allegiance where corporations put their countries above sheer profits. As it stands now, corporations only care about themselves and do not really care about any country they do business in. Americans feel it, but politicians would be called every pej I liked what Robert Reich has to say about the lopsided influence that very wealthy people enjoy and I liked his idea about a corporate pledge of allegiance. I think capitalism is the best system to motivate people, but there must be a hierarchy of allegiance where corporations put their countries above sheer profits. As it stands now, corporations only care about themselves and do not really care about any country they do business in. Americans feel it, but politicians would be called every pejorative under the sun if they actually asked that corporations had patriotism to America. This book really helps explain how American capitalism uses the political system to their advantage and to the disadvantage of the average American.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jeb

    This is a polemic. So, if you're a conservative, you're probably not going to like this book. Reich believes, essentially, that you are destroying whatever is good about the United States and he's pretty clear on how you're doing it and how you have to be stopped. Reich provides some evidence behind his claims, but, it's pretty inconsistent. So, the discussion about the increasing poverty of people in the US since Reagan, is compelling. But, there are other assertions that are really just asserti This is a polemic. So, if you're a conservative, you're probably not going to like this book. Reich believes, essentially, that you are destroying whatever is good about the United States and he's pretty clear on how you're doing it and how you have to be stopped. Reich provides some evidence behind his claims, but, it's pretty inconsistent. So, the discussion about the increasing poverty of people in the US since Reagan, is compelling. But, there are other assertions that are really just assertions. It's a short book, so, if you're a liberal, it's probably worth reading because it will crystalize some of your thoughts (probably).

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jake

    This was written in 2012 when the US economy was just slowly beginning to recover from the recession. The situation has changed a lot which dates this book, however many of the problems pointed out haven't gotten better. Capitalism requires risk, but for the mega-banks and ultra-wealthy, much of that risk has been assumed by those at the lower rungs of the economic ladder. For example, bankruptcy laws allow a "risk-taking" real estate mogul to balk on his bills and keep his millions, but remain This was written in 2012 when the US economy was just slowly beginning to recover from the recession. The situation has changed a lot which dates this book, however many of the problems pointed out haven't gotten better. Capitalism requires risk, but for the mega-banks and ultra-wealthy, much of that risk has been assumed by those at the lower rungs of the economic ladder. For example, bankruptcy laws allow a "risk-taking" real estate mogul to balk on his bills and keep his millions, but remain prohibitive for many day to day expenses for the poor and middle class. The book has some decent points, but was pointed too clearly at the 2012 election to be very relevant now.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    The title of this book is well chosen. Outrage - both authentic outrage and faux-outrage manufactured by paid marketing strategists in partisan think tanks - is something we're all too familiar with these days. It's time to move beyond that, because real change is going to require more than pressing a button in the voting booth in November. It is going to require active, adult citizens demanding a basic social contract that says that anyone who works hard ought to be able to create a better life The title of this book is well chosen. Outrage - both authentic outrage and faux-outrage manufactured by paid marketing strategists in partisan think tanks - is something we're all too familiar with these days. It's time to move beyond that, because real change is going to require more than pressing a button in the voting booth in November. It is going to require active, adult citizens demanding a basic social contract that says that anyone who works hard ought to be able to create a better life for himself or herself.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bryan

    This was a quick fun read. Only a few hours will get you through it. Many statements could provide conservatives with some heavy fodder. It's a Left book no doubt, but his main arguments would be difficult to challenge. The main points made are well-put, and are convincing. He does an excellent job of painting the current political picture in a stinky way, which is probably pretty accurate. Because of the quick flow, and the fun topic, I like this e-book, well worth the few-buck price tag.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    It's pretty good. The summary of our larger macro economic problems seems spot on. But the bigger problem is it feels very similar to other works--such as Dean Baker's latest. That makes some sense as the underlying narrative is consistent, but does make the book feel a bit like less of a stand out.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Bragg

    Robert isn't just a smart guy who has worked for THREE administrations in the White House. The man is BRILLIANT, and we should listen to him! My favorite thing about the book is that there isn't just a description of the problem & its history, but Reich includes a section about HOW TO FIX THE ISSUES. An excellent read! Robert isn't just a smart guy who has worked for THREE administrations in the White House. The man is BRILLIANT, and we should listen to him! My favorite thing about the book is that there isn't just a description of the problem & its history, but Reich includes a section about HOW TO FIX THE ISSUES. An excellent read!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lori Scheffler

    Whiny and just plain silly. The main thesis is that some people have more money than others and it's not fair. One of the statistics he uses is that the average middle class income today is only $200 more than it was in 1980...adjusted for inflation! Oh horrors, people are making the same amount of money!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    This is a really interesting book and helped me define my outrage. The bad thing is that it is only available as an ebook and I only have an iphone which is not my favorite way to read a book. The great thing about this book is the last third where he has ideas of what we can do to make changes. The letter he wrote to the president is amazing.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kristina Franken

    America's Economy And Democracy are working for the benefit of ever-fewer privileged and powerful people. But rather than just complain about it or give up on the system we must join together and make it work for all of us. I highly recomend this book to anyone. FTC: I have recieved this book free of charge and am in no way bound to give a good review.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    While I agreed with much (but not all) that was said, it was terribly one sided and the "how to fix it" chpater short on substance (unless you want to enter policitics full time!) Read it on the kindle as a discounted ebook.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Don

    I don't disagree with Reich's general perspective, but he's a little hyperbolic on some of the issues. He's angry, for sure. Still, the book is a quick distillation of many of our current social problems from the liberal perspective, if you're looking for that sort of thing.

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