counter create hit The Navy SEAL's Bride - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Navy SEAL's Bride

Availability: Ready to download

Ex-navy SEAL Tom Cartwright is struggling to return to civilian life. His little niece is his only ray of sunshine and he agrees to be the "show" in her school show-and-tell.Teacher Caitlin Rose knows all about past disappointments—once, she danced in the spotlight but now she shows others how to. She's learned the hard way to rely only on herself. Yet as soon as Tom looks Ex-navy SEAL Tom Cartwright is struggling to return to civilian life. His little niece is his only ray of sunshine and he agrees to be the "show" in her school show-and-tell.Teacher Caitlin Rose knows all about past disappointments—once, she danced in the spotlight but now she shows others how to. She's learned the hard way to rely only on herself. Yet as soon as Tom looks at her with those big brown eyes, she's done for…. Can Caitlin crack the walls around this soldier's battle-worn heart?


Compare
Ads Banner

Ex-navy SEAL Tom Cartwright is struggling to return to civilian life. His little niece is his only ray of sunshine and he agrees to be the "show" in her school show-and-tell.Teacher Caitlin Rose knows all about past disappointments—once, she danced in the spotlight but now she shows others how to. She's learned the hard way to rely only on herself. Yet as soon as Tom looks Ex-navy SEAL Tom Cartwright is struggling to return to civilian life. His little niece is his only ray of sunshine and he agrees to be the "show" in her school show-and-tell.Teacher Caitlin Rose knows all about past disappointments—once, she danced in the spotlight but now she shows others how to. She's learned the hard way to rely only on herself. Yet as soon as Tom looks at her with those big brown eyes, she's done for…. Can Caitlin crack the walls around this soldier's battle-worn heart?

30 review for The Navy SEAL's Bride

  1. 4 out of 5

    Taria Reed

    this is a light "meh" read. The intimacy was glossed over and there were odd time jumps I didn't like. Story - 2 narrator 2 the narrator got me through the story but her voices were ugh. our guys didn't sound like cheerleaders but they didn't sound like guys. they sounded like a girl trying to sound like a guy, almost comedic

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    This book just didn't resonate with me. I wouldn't quite say that it's a bad book because I'm sure some people would think it was great, but I couldn't connect with it. The characters didn't feel real and their actions rarely made sense. And I must say that this is the first romance novel I've ever read where I was screaming "please don't describe the sex scene, please don't describe the sex scene" over and over in my head. Despite the fact that Tom was an uber in-shape ex-Navy SEAL and Caitlin This book just didn't resonate with me. I wouldn't quite say that it's a bad book because I'm sure some people would think it was great, but I couldn't connect with it. The characters didn't feel real and their actions rarely made sense. And I must say that this is the first romance novel I've ever read where I was screaming "please don't describe the sex scene, please don't describe the sex scene" over and over in my head. Despite the fact that Tom was an uber in-shape ex-Navy SEAL and Caitlin was an allegedly drop-dead gorgeous ex-ballerina, the pair of them had about as much sex appeal and sizzle factor as a couple of rocks. And for me, the idea of listening to the audiobook narrator describe their lovemaking ranked right up there with watching my grandparents get it on. As a general rule, if I'm that skeeved out by the idea of my hero and heroine hooking up, then we're not talking about a good reading experience. (view spoiler)[ Okay so we've got Tom who is dealing with some issues resulting from an explosion that occurred on his last mission. His hearing was damaged in such a way that he'd never be able to pass the physical required by the SEALs so now he trains recruits for a living. He also lost a man on this mission and is allegedly haunted by the knowledge that he and his team broke one of their sacred covenants to never leave a man behind. This part of Tom's past was never adequately explained. Did they fail to recover the dead man's body? Is that what he means by "leaving a man behind?" And if so, why? The description we get of the mission is that everything was going like clockwork when a bomb suddenly exploded. There's no talk of them having to evacuate under heavy enemy fire afterward, etc. So how and why did they "leave a man behind?" And what exactly was Tom's role in this? Was he unconscious at the time from his own injury? Did he give the order to leave the man behind? I just wasn't clear on what this part of the backstory meant. And quite frankly, Tom was WAY more upset about the fact that he couldn't be a SEAL anymore than he was about his dead buddy. He mentioned once that he would always wonder if there was something he should have done differently or some detail he should have noticed that would have prevented the explosion and subsequently the man's death, but 90% of his angsting throughout the whole book was about his forcible change in professions. Heck, he never even thought of the dead guy by name!!! It was always "a man" or "his man," never "Johnson" or whatever. It made the whole dead soldier aspect of this backstory feel very superficial to the point where I thought it should have been cut out altogether. It didn't really affect the story and it felt down right disrespectful to real military personnel who actually HAVE lost fellow soldiers in battle. When the story opens Tom is allowing himself to be his 6-year-old niece's show-and-tell for her class. He walks into the classroom and is basically bowled over by how gorgeous the teacher, Caitlin Rose is. Caitlin's behavior in this scene felt kind of off to me. She seemed to go out of her way to touch Tom an awful lot which felt contradictory to her inner monologue claims of being terrified of ultra-muscular military men. One thing leads to another and soon Tom and his niece are over at Caitlin's house having dinner. The munchkin helpfully falls asleep so the grown ups can talk and Caitlin presses Tom to tell her about his time in the Navy. Tom opens up about his last mission and Caitlin tries to tell him that she knows exactly what he's going through. Tom gets pissed and tells her she doesn't and could never understand and then leaves. This is the central conflict of the story, Caitlin insisting that she knows just how he feels and Tom insisting that she doesn't. I kind of felt like both of them had a point but instead of this making me like and understand them both, it actually made me dislike them both for being such pompous jerks. First, Tom was way over-the-top with his "no one can understand my pain" routine, considering that his fellow soldier had actually DIED on that mission and he himself still had all his limbs and so forth. He of all people should have recognized how much worse his situation could have been and how many other soldiers come home with far more debilitating injuries. There are, in point of fact, thousands of people who can "understand his pain." So it made him seem kind of whiny and full of himself that he insisted that he alone had gotten such a raw deal in life. However, on the flip side, I thought Caitlin was equally full of herself for insisting that she knew exactly what Tom was going through. No, she doesn't. Being a soldier in combat is NOT the same as being in a car accident. I understand the parallel that the author was trying to draw between Caitlin's dancing career and Tom's driving need to be a SEAL but it's just not the same. Particularly the part about him losing a fellow soldier in the explosion. Caitlin's "do you think you're the only one who's ever lost anyone?" shot was out of line, particularly when the only person she'd ever lost was her mother to natural causes. And again, it felt disrespectful that the author kept downplaying the military life and the risks real soldiers take when they go on missions. MAYBE it would have worked if Caitlin's backstory had been a bit different. If she'd lost her ability to dance, not to a car accident, but to one of her abusive father's beatings and her mother had been killed in the same incident. Surviving a life of abuse and losing your fellow abuse victim, whom you feel you failed to protect, would be more similar to the life-and-death situations faced and the bonds formed by soldiers in combat. But that's not Caitlin's backstory so her insistence that she'd experienced the exact same pain as Tom was pompous crap. Caitlin's very pissed at Tom for shouting at her and refusing to listen to her explanation of how she knows just how he feels. She was also terrified by his sudden display of anger because it reminds her of the way her abusive father and ex-boyfriend would erupt into uncontrollable rages just before lashing out to hit her. So she adopts a "good riddance" attitude about it and vows to never see him again. There's a really bizarre couple of scenes in this part of the book that made it feel like some of the pages got switched around because the timeline didn't work. Caitlin is talking to some friend about how Tom's such a jerk and the friend says what Caitlin needs is a night out on the town. She agrees and then heads off to teach her ballet class, thinking about how she hopes Tom just drops his niece at the door rather than coming inside so she won't have to see him. Then in the very next scene Tom is at home with the niece and the ballet class is never mentioned. Did she skip ballet that day? It was weird that the author called attention to the class and then didn't pay it off. Next thing we know it's the following day and Caitlin is back in her classroom teaching the kids. What about her planned trip to the bar with the friend? Then a whole bunch of stuff happens that leads you to think the next scene will be Tom and Caitlin hiking together and instead suddenly we're with Tom at a bar and he see's Caitlin there. The timeline was just all messed up and poorly explained. Getting back to the romance, Tom, still feels like he's 100% right that Caitlin could never understand his pain but is so attracted to her gorgeous self that he decides to apologize and try to make amends. So he sends an apology note to school with his niece, who passes it to Caitlin. I think this was supposed to be cute but I thought it was a cop-out that he apologized via a note and a third party instead of in person. Caitlin, however, goes from "I'll never speak to him again" to "all is forgiven" in the space of about 15 seconds and agrees to join him for a hike the following day. This didn't make sense to me. She basically talked herself into forgiving him with the very weak justification that she always tells her 6-year-old students to give people second chances so she'd be hypocritical if she refused to give Tom one, but it just doesn't jive with her backstory. If she'd really been afraid of him and his propensity to explode in anger, why on Earth would she agree to go to a secluded place in the wilderness with him? Why would she ever agree to see him again, period? She of all people should be suspicious of men who lash out in anger but then apologize after the fact. That's the classic cycle for abusers and as a survivor of just such abuse, she should have looked at this behavior and at least considered the possibility that the cycle was starting all over again, but she doesn't. Then, as already mentioned, the scene shifts and we're at the bar and Caitlin is completely trashed. Again, this whole scene made no sense and really bothered me. For starters, nothing about Caitlin's personality that we've seen so far suggests that she'd EVER get so drunk at a public bar that she'd lose complete control of herself. She's been shown to be a sweet, sensitive, level-headed person who fears attacks by men above all else. Her character would never get so drunk that she'd be ripe for some strange man to assault her. For another thing, the whole reason she and the friend were going to the bar was so Caitlin could drown her sorrows over Tom. But she's already forgiven Tom and agreed to go on the hike with him the following day. So why the heck does she need to get trashed now if everything is fine? Third, when Tom sees her making a fool of herself in public and attracting the attention of every lecherous man in the bar, he goes all caveman and stalks over to grab her by the arm. He grabs her "harder than he'd meant to" to the point where, even as drunk as she is, she cries out in pain. Here again we have Tom behaving in a way that makes it seem like he really might be an abuser. He's so jealous that other men are looking at "his woman" and so angry with her for "putting on such a show" that he physically hurts her. Again, classic abusive boyfriend behavior here. And yet, the book keeps bashing us over the head with the notion that he just wants to "protect" her and he'd never, ever hurt her....even after he's just done so. And finally, it really, really bugged me that Caitlin's friend let her get taken home by this guy. She's supposed to be looking out for her drunk friend. Protecting her from being abused by some man in her inebriated state. She also knows all about how badly Tom behaved the last time he and Caitlin were together, and just witnessed him physically hurting her. And she lets him take Caitlin home by himself just because he's cute and she'd rather to flirt with his military buddies? Are you kidding me?! And the next morning she calls Caitlin and wants to know all the juicy details about whether she and Tom had sex the night before. WHAT?!?! She knows Caitlin was too drunk to give consent and yet she's hoping Tom took advantage of the situation to bang her anyway??? This woman is a monster! The next morning Caitlin is hung over but feels she "owes" it to Tom to still go hiking because he so nicely brought her home the night before and did not take the opportunity to molest her. She's barely functioning when Tom shows up and he can't resist rubbing her nose in the fact that he's fit as a fiddle and has already had a 2-hour run and done other assorted tasks. His behavior in this whole scene was kind of jerky and leaned heavily toward "paternal" rather than romantic. He lectured her on her behavior and the proper way to get rid of a hangover, even refusing to hand over her breakfast until she'd drunk the vegetable drink he'd brought for her. It didn't do anything to make me view them as a couple. They finally go on their hike and barely a mile in Caitlin manages to sprain her ankle so Tom has to carry her back to the car. On the way they sing a military marching song (or "cadence" as the author rather heavy-handedly points out is the correct term). This went on way longer than was necessary, especially considering it was the second time in the book we'd had to listen to such a cadence. This seemed like a case of the author yelling "I DID THE RESEARCH" by proving that she knew some of these marching tunes. Tom takes Caitlin to his family's house for dinner, then they head back to her place and finally have sex which, as I've already said, was thankfully not described. The next morning, everything is great until they get in the car for a picnic at the beach. Just before they arrive, Caitlin starts in again on Tom's injury and it sparks another fight. He again becomes so enraged that he shouts at her grabs her by the arm without even realizing he's doing it. She panics and starts clawing as his hand and demanding to be let go. Once her screams manage to break through his rage, he releases her and again insists that he'd never, ever hurt her or any woman. Again, this just seems like classic abuser behavior. This is now the third time in just a few days that he's lost control of himself and lashed out at her in anger. Then he insists he'd never hurt her, just like an abuser would. Yet Caitlin doesn't recognize this as a pattern and instead focuses on the fact that he still won't listen to her insistence that she knows just how he feels. So she tells him her tale of woe and, because this is a fiction book, Tom has a great epiphany about how totally right she's been that she understands. That he's been a fool for not seeing how great he's got it, what with his loving family to support him and all. It didn't feel like a real reaction because her story only proves that she DOESN'T know how he feels. Not really, and that's exactly what he'd say to her in reality. Be here in fiction world he's overcome with how wrong he's been and apologizes to her but she says that they're through and can never be together. Then she literally walks away, even though she's miles from home and Tom drove. I didn't really understand why Caitlin broke off the relationship at this point. Or why in the ensuing week she kept insisting in her inner monologue that they could never be together. She'd finally told him her story and he'd apologized and said she'd been right all along so...what's the problem here? She kept going on about how she'd finally opened up and let a man into her world but he'd betrayed that trust but, how exactly did he do that? By just not listening to her? He finally did listen and admitted he'd been wrong so what more is she waiting for? It felt like she was just punishing him for no reason other than for its own sake. Or rather, because the book needed a climax and this was the best the author could come up with. Tom spends a few days wallowing in how badly he'd "stuffed up" the situation, which really yanked me out of the narrative. When I hear the term "stuffed up" I think of a blocked nose. I realize this is a cozy and the author wanted to avoid curse words but she could have said "messed up" or "screwed up" or something like that. The fact that she had multiple people in the book say this in just a couple of pages was really distracting. But anyway, he learns that Caitlin has a ballet class that day and rushes over to ask her to hear him out....without having even a shadow of a plan in mind for what he'll say to her. Is this the kind of planning that he used as a SEAL? Caitlin immediately agrees to hear him out after her class, which didn't jive with her "we can never be together" chant from the preceding week. She again justifies this with talk about how she tells her kids to give people second chances, apparently forgetting that she's ALREADY given Tom his second chance and he blew it, at least, according to her. I just didn't understand her thought process at all. This feeling was reinforced when hear Tom's "apology." It was lame and didn't really do anything to change their situation. First he told her about how his parents had divorced when his dad cheated on his mom, which didn't have anything to do with anything in the book. It didn't make him want to become a SEAL or in any way influence Tom's behavior up to this point so it was totally gratuitous. Then he takes Caitlin to the Naval base so she can watch some recruits training. By the time she's done watching a "how long can you hold your breath" challenge, she's totally forgiven Tom. I'm sorry, what did that exercise have to do with his behavior?? Nothing. I didn't understand why she was still mad at him to begin with, but since she kept insisting that she was, how does this little show-and-tell session impact anything? She already understood how important being a SEAL was to him, at least, she kept insisting that she did, so how does seeing it in person change anything? I didn't get it. Pretty much the only thing I DID understand and agree with was Caitlin's refusal of Tom's proposal. After the trip to the Naval base, he gets down on on knee and proposes. After they've only known each other for a week and a half, most of which they spent apart and/or mad at each other. Yeah, it was way too soon to pop the question. (hide spoiler)] So in summary, I didn't understand the characters' behavior or motivations, there was zero sexual tension between the hero and heroine, and they both acted like self-important jerks with regards to the hero's trauma. I think it's fair to say nothing about this story worked for me.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brie

    Originally posted at Romance Around the Corner Earlier this year I discovered Ms. Lane’s books when I read Back in the Soldiers’ Arms. It even inspired my post about cheating heroes, and overall I thought it was a great story. It takes a good author to make me enjoy a Romance with a cheating hero and I really enjoyed that book. I was anxiously anticipating The Navy SEAL’s Bride, not only because I like Ms. Lane’s books, but also because the hero played a minor role in Back in the Soldier’s Arms. U Originally posted at Romance Around the Corner Earlier this year I discovered Ms. Lane’s books when I read Back in the Soldiers’ Arms. It even inspired my post about cheating heroes, and overall I thought it was a great story. It takes a good author to make me enjoy a Romance with a cheating hero and I really enjoyed that book. I was anxiously anticipating The Navy SEAL’s Bride, not only because I like Ms. Lane’s books, but also because the hero played a minor role in Back in the Soldier’s Arms. Unfortunately, instead of the great, emotional story I was expecting, I got a mess of a heroine and an even worse hero. I wanted to write a post about why this book didn’t work for me because fragile and breakable aren’t “qualities” I want my heroine to have. A post about how a hero that finds weakness sexy and appealing is huge turnoff. I wanted to give a detailed account of why I thought the book was so wrong, but instead, I decided to add some of the quotes that perfectly illustrate what I wanted to convey. Of course you can always read the book and judge by yourself. In the meantime I’ll let the quotes speak for themselves: Harsh words are heavy: "Caitlin looked fragile enough to snap beneath the weight of harsh words" *Sigh* (emphasis mine): "Because she was like a fragile bird, Caitlin was. There was something scared within her, something he couldn’t put his finger on, that told him she’d be too easy to break. And he wanted to be the one to make her strong." The hero’s alpha senses are tingling: "Caitlin looked at him shyly, as if she didn’t know what she wanted. 'I need you to be gentle with me,' she said. Tom didn’t need to be told twice. He’d already sensed she was fragile and it was time he trusted his instincts again." Here I started counting the times the word “fragile” appeared in the book (surprisingly, only five times): "'Do I?' she questioned, looking so fragile it physically pained him." Is she a woman or a nervous horse?: "Caitlin shut her eyes as he gently guided her shoe and then her sock off, his hands touching her as if she were a breakable doll that needed the most careful of attention. His touch was soft enough that it almost calmed her." If you think the heroine is bad, wait until you see how creepy the hero is!: "Caitlin was gorgeous, a knockout, in the sweetest, most appealing of ways. Not overconfident or brazenly attractive, but soft and gentle-looking, beautiful like a perfectly proportioned doll. And she was tiny. His little ballerina was tiny and breakable-looking…" The Cobra and the Wilting Flower would be an awesome title: "'Um, having fun, dancing, you know,' she said, voice slightly slurred. 'But my head’s starting to hurt.' She let her forehead fall into her hands, suddenly looking as weak as a wilting flower in the sun. 'Tom, you’re not going to hurt me, are you?' She was watching his hand where he was resting it, clenched on the table, as if it were a cobra ready to bite. Tom shook his head. Was she actually scared of him? He was used to being the protector, was used to his role being so clearly defined." Too little, too late (emphasis mine): Tears sprang into Caitlin’s eyes, but she fought them, tried hard not to show it, because she didn’t want him to think she was weak . This book was equal parts disappointing and infuriating. Damsels in distress are not my thing. I don’t have anything against fragile heroines that find their inner strength and overcome their own emotional obstacles throughout the story. But if a heroine has to grow and find strength, I want her to do it because of herself, not because of a man.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Soraya Lane excels at writing heart-wrenchingly emotional stories that resonate with readers everywhere and linger in the mind long after the last page is turned. Her last book for Harlequin Romance, The Navy SEAL’s Bride, is a spellbinding tale of redemption, renewal, second chances and the power of love readers will simply adore! Former Navy SEAL Tom Cartwright is looking forward to spending the next couple of weeks looking after his gorgeous niece. Tom hopes that dedicating his time to taking Soraya Lane excels at writing heart-wrenchingly emotional stories that resonate with readers everywhere and linger in the mind long after the last page is turned. Her last book for Harlequin Romance, The Navy SEAL’s Bride, is a spellbinding tale of redemption, renewal, second chances and the power of love readers will simply adore! Former Navy SEAL Tom Cartwright is looking forward to spending the next couple of weeks looking after his gorgeous niece. Tom hopes that dedicating his time to taking care of his brother’s adorable child will stop him from brooding about memories he would rather forget. Tom’s life used to revolve around his career. He was an excellent Navy SEAL and his courage, integrity and dedication was admired and respected by his peers and his superiors. However, Tom’s illustrious career had been halted by a cruel twist of fate that had forced him to do something he’s regretted ever since. Tom is unable to forget about the moment that had changed his life forever and he is unable to forgive himself for not saving the lives of those he was meant to protect. Telling a bunch of kids about his job in the Navy is the last thing Tom feels like doing, but there is nothing that he wouldn’t do for his niece, so he reluctantly finds himself being dragged to her classroom for show-and-tell. Revisiting the glory of his career wasn’t something Tom was looking forward to doing. However, he quickly changes his mind when he meets his niece’s teacher, Caitlin Rose… Relationships are strictly not on the agenda for Caitlin. Although her best friend is desperate to find her a man, Caitlin is adamant that she will never let anyone get close to her ever again. She had learned the hard way that men are not to be trusted and she is adamant that she will never allow another man to hurt her ever again. Caitlin loves her job and she is perfectly happy with her life. She doesn’t need a man and she certainly does not want all the angst and heartache that are part and parcel of any relationship. However, when Tom Cartwright strides into her classroom, Caitlin cannot help but be attracted to the former Navy SEAL! Caitlin vows to stay strong and not to let Tom breach the impenetrable defenses which she has built around herself. However, his kindness, sensitivity and understanding soon have her wondering whether she is ready to put her heart on the line again. Will Caitlin trust Tom with her heart? Or will she continue to be held hostage by her past? Soraya Lane strikes gold once again with The Navy SEAL’s Bride! This outstanding writer of emotional contemporary romance has penned a powerfully dramatic, wholly compelling and wonderfully uplifting story that readers will not be able to put down. Soraya Lane creates believable characters readers take immediately to their hearts. She writes effectively about their dilemmas and their predicaments by abandoning hackneyed cliches and trivial sentimentality and writing with warmth, compassion and emotional veracity. Nobody tugs at the heartstrings like Soraya Lane and with The Navy SEAL’s Bride, this talented storyteller continues to affirm her position as one of the genre’s boldest and most talented writers.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Very good book. Tom was injured in an explosion and lost the hearing in one ear. This brought an end to his career as an active SEAL. Now he is working as an instructor, training new recruits. He is having a hard time adjusting to the loss, as he felt that being a SEAL was what and who he was. His niece Gabby is about the only thing that cheers him up. When he visits her school, he meets her teacher and finds something else that makes him happy. Caitlin knows how he feels, since she lost her own Very good book. Tom was injured in an explosion and lost the hearing in one ear. This brought an end to his career as an active SEAL. Now he is working as an instructor, training new recruits. He is having a hard time adjusting to the loss, as he felt that being a SEAL was what and who he was. His niece Gabby is about the only thing that cheers him up. When he visits her school, he meets her teacher and finds something else that makes him happy. Caitlin knows how he feels, since she lost her own dreams several years earlier. She is also very cautious around Tom, having been abused by her military father and military ex-boyfriend. She finds pretty quickly that she actually feels safe with him, but also knows that he needs to deal with his problems before they can go on. I liked Tom and how gentle he was with Gabby. It showed Caitlin that he was a man who could be trusted. I could also see how the loss of his SEAL status was eating at him, and how he wasn't allowing himself to move on. Gabby's strength of character and the way she was able to stand up to Tom and make him listen to her was great. I also liked the way she made him see that teaching was just as important as what he had done before. The conclusion was fun, when he took her on the tour of the training. I loved the reactions they got. This has been a terrific series, and I hope there will be more.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Natasza Waters

    As I began this novel, I really liked the author's voice and the plot. The brave, rippling SEAL who had a soft spot for his niece....oooh make my heart bleed. I've had a close connection with military forces all my life, so I understand the environment, the hardship and the mental anguish associated with injury and loss of direction. The Navy SEAL's Bride had the potential to be outstanding, but I think it slipped my radar with too much "inner voice talk" and the weakness portrayed in the hero. As I began this novel, I really liked the author's voice and the plot. The brave, rippling SEAL who had a soft spot for his niece....oooh make my heart bleed. I've had a close connection with military forces all my life, so I understand the environment, the hardship and the mental anguish associated with injury and loss of direction. The Navy SEAL's Bride had the potential to be outstanding, but I think it slipped my radar with too much "inner voice talk" and the weakness portrayed in the hero. This was added by the heroine being too weak as well and then expecting the hero to prove himself if she was going to let him be in her life... The swing from "not trusting knee-shaking scared to you better get your sh*t together" was too drastic and too quick. It just didn't come across with a good taste. The worst part of the book was the repetitive thoughts, and they seemed to drag on and on, instead of saying it once and then maybe showing it in action after that. There were several instances of this and unfortunately, as a reader, I'm smart enough to figure things out without being told half a dozen times. I hate writing a poor review, it kills me, but this story just didn't give me sweet dreams. (sad sigh).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nas Dean

    THE NAVY SEAL’S BRIDE by author Soraya Lane is Harlequin Romance release for August 2012. Caitlin Rose has a whole suitcase of baggage. She couldn’t trust a man now, especially the strong military type. Then she meets ex- Navy Seal Tom Cartwright. Seeing him with his niece, she sees how gentle he is. Yet can she trust him and let him in her heart? Tom Cartwright is struggling to return to civilian life and his little niece is the only person grounding him for now. Meeting her teacher, Caitlin, he THE NAVY SEAL’S BRIDE by author Soraya Lane is Harlequin Romance release for August 2012. Caitlin Rose has a whole suitcase of baggage. She couldn’t trust a man now, especially the strong military type. Then she meets ex- Navy Seal Tom Cartwright. Seeing him with his niece, she sees how gentle he is. Yet can she trust him and let him in her heart? Tom Cartwright is struggling to return to civilian life and his little niece is the only person grounding him for now. Meeting her teacher, Caitlin, he feels the fierce urge to protect her as he discerns the hurt she is hiding. But will she allow him to protect her? THE NAVY SEAL’S BRIDE‘s premise is exciting and the story keeps you involved from first page. Just hold Tom’s hand and walk with him, whatever happens he won’t break your heart. He is a gorgeous Military hero. Caitlin is scared, but courageous heroine. It is as much a story about recovering from grief and self-discovery as it is about the unquenchable desire between Tom and Caitlin. Author Soraya Lane really packs an emotional punch with her Heroes Come Home Series.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    I thoroughly enjoyed The Navy SEAL's Bride. Ms. Lane has shared with us a beautiful story About 2 people who have been through their own personal war and come away scarred. Caitlin has been hurt by both her father and an abusive boyfriend. She doesn't trust men easily. Tom has been injured in battle and is coming to grips with his change in career. Neither is looking for love. I thought hat Tom and Caitlin were cute together. I was so rooting for both of them. I love stories where two troubled p I thoroughly enjoyed The Navy SEAL's Bride. Ms. Lane has shared with us a beautiful story About 2 people who have been through their own personal war and come away scarred. Caitlin has been hurt by both her father and an abusive boyfriend. She doesn't trust men easily. Tom has been injured in battle and is coming to grips with his change in career. Neither is looking for love. I thought hat Tom and Caitlin were cute together. I was so rooting for both of them. I love stories where two troubled people begin to heal as they fall in love. I applauded Caitlin for making the decision to walk away for a bit when she did. It was nice to see a heroine have the strength to do the right thing for herself, even if it didn't feel good. This book looks to be part of a series, but I didn't feel lost in the least. If anything, I will be seeking out the other books in the "Heroes Come Home" line.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    wasn't sure if I would be able to finish this book the same day I started it but I did. I Love Soraya's stories they are wonderful and they don't seem forced like some stories I have read, they are not based on sex but on the actual love

  10. 4 out of 5

    Loretta

    A sweet story of a Navy SEAL and a ballet dancer, both with their own PTSD issues.

  11. 4 out of 5

    PWRL

    SM

  12. 4 out of 5

    Harlequin Books

    Miniseries: Heroes Come Home Category: Classic Romance

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nath

    2/5 (D)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michael Lomont

  15. 5 out of 5

    Linda

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Thomas

  17. 4 out of 5

    Giovana Bonoto

  18. 4 out of 5

    Terri

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kirsty

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vickie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Eti Dror

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bibi

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jane Riley

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jamee Sooby

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tini Hansen

  27. 5 out of 5

    Henry

  28. 4 out of 5

    Myra Wardhana

  29. 4 out of 5

    Julie Leyrer Lewis

  30. 4 out of 5

    Min Li Li

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.