counter create hit Boston Noir 2: The Classics - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Boston Noir 2: The Classics

Availability: Ready to download

Classic short fiction reprints from: George Harrar, George V. Higgins, Dennis Lehane, Joyce Carol Oates, Robert B. Parker, Hannah Tinti, Abraham Verghese, David Foster Wallace, and others. Dennis Lehane is the author of the Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro mystery series (A Drink Before the War; Darkness, Take My Hand; Sacred; Gone, Baby, Gone; Prayers for Rain; and Moonli Classic short fiction reprints from: George Harrar, George V. Higgins, Dennis Lehane, Joyce Carol Oates, Robert B. Parker, Hannah Tinti, Abraham Verghese, David Foster Wallace, and others. Dennis Lehane is the author of the Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro mystery series (A Drink Before the War; Darkness, Take My Hand; Sacred; Gone, Baby, Gone; Prayers for Rain; and Moonlight Mile), as well as Coronado (five stories and a play) and the award-winning novels Mystic River, Shutter Island, and The Given Day. Mystic River, Shutter Island, and Gone, Baby, Gone have been made into award-winning films. In 2009 he edited the best-selling anthology Boston Noir for Akashic Books. Mary Cotton is the pseudonymous author of nine novels for young adults, six of them New York Times bestsellers. She is also a fiction editor for the literary magazine Post Road, and is co-editor of No Near Exit: Writers Select Their Favorite Work from Post Road. She is co-owner of Newtonville Books in Boston, Massachusetts. Jaime Clarke is the author of the novel We're So Famous, editor of Don't You Forget About Me: Contemporary Writers on the Films of John Hughes, and Conversations with Jonathan Lethem, and co-editor of No Near Exit: Writers Select Their Favorite Work from Post Road. He is a founding editor of Post Road and has taught creative writing at University of Massachusetts, Boston, and Emerson College. He is co-owner of Newtonville Books in Boston, Massachusetts.


Compare
Ads Banner

Classic short fiction reprints from: George Harrar, George V. Higgins, Dennis Lehane, Joyce Carol Oates, Robert B. Parker, Hannah Tinti, Abraham Verghese, David Foster Wallace, and others. Dennis Lehane is the author of the Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro mystery series (A Drink Before the War; Darkness, Take My Hand; Sacred; Gone, Baby, Gone; Prayers for Rain; and Moonli Classic short fiction reprints from: George Harrar, George V. Higgins, Dennis Lehane, Joyce Carol Oates, Robert B. Parker, Hannah Tinti, Abraham Verghese, David Foster Wallace, and others. Dennis Lehane is the author of the Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro mystery series (A Drink Before the War; Darkness, Take My Hand; Sacred; Gone, Baby, Gone; Prayers for Rain; and Moonlight Mile), as well as Coronado (five stories and a play) and the award-winning novels Mystic River, Shutter Island, and The Given Day. Mystic River, Shutter Island, and Gone, Baby, Gone have been made into award-winning films. In 2009 he edited the best-selling anthology Boston Noir for Akashic Books. Mary Cotton is the pseudonymous author of nine novels for young adults, six of them New York Times bestsellers. She is also a fiction editor for the literary magazine Post Road, and is co-editor of No Near Exit: Writers Select Their Favorite Work from Post Road. She is co-owner of Newtonville Books in Boston, Massachusetts. Jaime Clarke is the author of the novel We're So Famous, editor of Don't You Forget About Me: Contemporary Writers on the Films of John Hughes, and Conversations with Jonathan Lethem, and co-editor of No Near Exit: Writers Select Their Favorite Work from Post Road. He is a founding editor of Post Road and has taught creative writing at University of Massachusetts, Boston, and Emerson College. He is co-owner of Newtonville Books in Boston, Massachusetts.

30 review for Boston Noir 2: The Classics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    A couple of well written short stories. I'd read the one: "Femme Sole" before and liked it. Most of the other material was awful to slog through. I was tempted to return it a few times before I'd read them all. I persevered because I didn't want to miss a good one. The worst were the "excerpts" with no beginning and no end.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cybercrone

    I didn't find this nearly as good reading as Boston Noir 1. First one seemed to collect familiar style writers with good short stories, while this one collected more oddball, "different" writers with a lot of excerpts from larger works rather than strictly shorts.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bill McFadyen

    Part of the Akashi Book series comprised of new noir tales located in a distinct location. This collection based in Boston contains some interesting crime fiction with a cast of outsiders , crooks and the slightly unhinged. A good way to while away an afternoon on the sun.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Reba

    Meh. Kind of uneven. Definitely not as good as Boston Noir 1.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    Some of the short stories were riveting, others boring and forgettable. A great Boston snapshot.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Emily Hooper

    Might try again at a later time. Not a huge fan of short stories & the second one was terrible. Might try again at a later time. Not a huge fan of short stories & the second one was terrible.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    I liked this book so much, I'm going to start looking for others in the series. I love short stories, to begin with, and I have discovered that I also love the "noir" genre of short stories. With the exception of the next to last story in this collection, every one of these left me hungry for more. The Marriage Privilege, by Chuck Hogan. A man guilty of a drunk driving killing shamelessly attempts to woo the paraplegic widow of the victim, so that she won't have to testify against him in court. Ni I liked this book so much, I'm going to start looking for others in the series. I love short stories, to begin with, and I have discovered that I also love the "noir" genre of short stories. With the exception of the next to last story in this collection, every one of these left me hungry for more. The Marriage Privilege, by Chuck Hogan. A man guilty of a drunk driving killing shamelessly attempts to woo the paraplegic widow of the victim, so that she won't have to testify against him in court. Night-Side, by Joyce Carol Oates. An intellectual becomes convinced of the reality of the spirit world. Home Sweet Home, by Hannah Tinti. A couple is mysteriously murdered in their home. Details unfold of an affair. One of my favorites. Surrogate, by Robert B. Parker. A woman takes vengeance after being raped twice by the same man. One of my favorites. Mushrooms, by Dennis Lehane. A complex story of how intertwined various events can be. Lucky Penny, by Linda Barnes. A cab driver is robbed. Or is she? Another favorite. Blanche Cleans Up, by Barbara Neely. This is an excerpt from a larger work. In this excerpt, a woman is helping a friend serve at a political party. She witnesses what she believes is someone stealing from the home owner. She has no clue what really happened. The Balance of the Day, by George V. Higgins. A group of guys are planning to take out an Irish mob boss. Bait, by Kenneth Abel, another excerpt. A detective is investigating a money laundering business that fronts as a pizza joint. Townies, by Andre Dubos. An elderly security guard discovers a female murder victim. The first half of the story is from the guard's perspective. The second half, from the murderer's. Driving the Heart, by Jason Brown. A couple of guys are driving a donated heart to an emergency transplant location, through a storm. The 5:22, by George Harrar. A charming story about chance encounters on the subway. Another favorite. Infinite Jest, by David Foster Wallace. Another excerpt. I have no idea what this story is about, or what happened. I think a dog was killed. Maybe. At Night, by David Ryan. A guy is stalking a waitress that he is infatuated with. One of those "He's going to do what??" moments at the end. I recommend this book for fans of Noir and short stories. I'm very glad I checked this one out. And to think I only got it because it had the word "Boston" in the title.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tom Spisak

    Although I have lived much of my adult life outside WBZ’s signal coverage, I still claim “Civis Bostoniensis sum” since the taxpayers thereof invested so much money and effort in my classical education on Avenue Louis Pasteur [for non-Bostonians: WBZ, Channel 4, was one of the three VHF stations during the 1950s and ‘60s; Boston Latin School -- the oldest public school in the country -- is housed on Avenue Louis Pasteur in the Fenway]. During an anti-Agnew demonstration I had my skull cracked ne Although I have lived much of my adult life outside WBZ’s signal coverage, I still claim “Civis Bostoniensis sum” since the taxpayers thereof invested so much money and effort in my classical education on Avenue Louis Pasteur [for non-Bostonians: WBZ, Channel 4, was one of the three VHF stations during the 1950s and ‘60s; Boston Latin School -- the oldest public school in the country -- is housed on Avenue Louis Pasteur in the Fenway]. During an anti-Agnew demonstration I had my skull cracked near the corner on which Robert Parker’s Spenser had his first office and grew up with people who could populate a Higgins novel. Tourist shots make me mimsy although the city of my raising was more cold, dark, and gritty than sunlight and swept. Thus I looked forward to the arrival of Boston Noir 2. Dennis Lehane, Mary Cotton, and Jaime Clarke have assembled a tasty sampler of crime and sudden death in Winthrop’s City upon a Hill during the third quarter of its fourth century. Chuck Hogan’s The Marriage Privilege started well but felt rushed at the end, as if the author noticed his word count and needed to wrap up in some arbitrary limit. I would not class Joyce Carol Oates’ Night-Side as noir. While a very good occult psychological, it however lacks the criminality of noir. Similarly, George Harrar’s The 5:22 and Jason Brown’s Driving the Heart are diverting but lack the requisite criminality. Hannah Tinti’s Home Sweet Home gives a nice twist on domestic tragedy. I imagine the Spenser novels happening sequentially (unless Parker specified otherwise); thus Surrogate would fall somewhere between A Savage Place and Ceremony. As ever, the situation and resolution are extreme, the characters well drawn and the telling masterful. George V Higgins initially meant that mystery fiction didn’t have to be set in New York, Los Angeles, or San Francisco; because of duende, I later fell in love with the precision of his diction. The Balance of the Day nails the tribalism underlying the granite. Dennis Lehane looks around his native Dorchester in Mushrooms and catches the numbing banality of urban violence. Other bon bons (notably Barbara Neely’s excerpt Blanche Cleans Up and Andre Dubus’ Townies) also divert.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tuxlie

    "Dennis Lehane advises us not to judge the genre by its Hollywood images of sharp men in fedoras lighting cigarettes for femmes fatales standing in the dark alleys... [Lehane] writes persuasively of the gentrification that has... left people feeling crushed." --New York Times, on Boston Noir "The contributor list is delightfully quirky...The collection's unifying element is a deep understanding of Boston's Byzantine worlds of race and class--as seen terrifyingly in Andre Dubus's tale of milltown "Dennis Lehane advises us not to judge the genre by its Hollywood images of sharp men in fedoras lighting cigarettes for femmes fatales standing in the dark alleys... [Lehane] writes persuasively of the gentrification that has... left people feeling crushed." --New York Times, on Boston Noir "The contributor list is delightfully quirky...The collection's unifying element is a deep understanding of Boston's Byzantine worlds of race and class--as seen terrifyingly in Andre Dubus's tale of milltown resentment and pampered preppies." --Boston Globe, on Boston Noir 2: The Classics Boston Noir & Boston Noir 2: The Complete Set combines all twenty-five stories from best seller Boston Noir, edited by Dennis Lehane, and its sequel, Boston Noir 2: The Classics, edited by Lehane, Mary Cotton, & Jaime Clarke; featuring Lehane's own "Animal Rescue," the basis for the motion picture The Drop, and twenty-four classic noir stories set throughout Boston.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jim C

    This book is a collection of short stories that take place in Boston. Even though the title implies that the writing style will be noir, I did not think it was overly done. In this collection authors like Dennis Lehane and Robert Parker contribute to this collection with well known characters like Spenser and Hawk. I thought the authors described the New England area perfectly and captured the essence of its people. Some of these stories are not recent and I enjoyed references to establishments t This book is a collection of short stories that take place in Boston. Even though the title implies that the writing style will be noir, I did not think it was overly done. In this collection authors like Dennis Lehane and Robert Parker contribute to this collection with well known characters like Spenser and Hawk. I thought the authors described the New England area perfectly and captured the essence of its people. Some of these stories are not recent and I enjoyed references to establishments that no longer exist. These references evoked memories of mine. The problem with this collection was the stories. Maybe two stories stood out and the rest fell flat. The first story by Chuck Hogan was excellent and the reason I bumped up this collection to two stars. The rest of the book went downhill afterwards. My biggest pet peeve with this collection was there were several excerpts from other books. To me, this is a total waste of my time and I would rather read a complete story. My recommendation is to stay away from this collection. The first collection was much better.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jon Frum

    I gave this anthology one star - here's why. The stories - or at least the ones I read before I put the book down in frustration - are NOT NOIR. This is a pet peeve of mine. The last 'Best Mysteries' collection I brought home from the library didn't have a single mystery in the first half of the book. When I realized that the editors of this anthology were following the same path - use a title that sells the most books, the hell with whether it's accurate - I put the book down and returned it to I gave this anthology one star - here's why. The stories - or at least the ones I read before I put the book down in frustration - are NOT NOIR. This is a pet peeve of mine. The last 'Best Mysteries' collection I brought home from the library didn't have a single mystery in the first half of the book. When I realized that the editors of this anthology were following the same path - use a title that sells the most books, the hell with whether it's accurate - I put the book down and returned it to the library. If it's Boston Crime Fiction, then call it Boston Crime fiction. Simple, no? And by the way, the first story began in Boston's West Roxbury residential district. It could have been set in Brooklyn, or Savannah Georgia, or Peoria. There was no 'Boston' to the story whatsoever. So what's the point? There may have been some good stories deeper in this book - I'll never know. Disappointed.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Dorneman

    Solid collection of Boston (and surrounding environs) noir "classics," by which they mean reprinted stories, i.e. not written specifically for this collection. Standouts include Andre Dubus's "Townies," Jason Brown's "Driving the Heart" (although I wouldn't call Brown's story 'noir' if I ran into it in a dark alley, and Joyce Carol Oates's supernatural historical story (again, not noir in execution, although Oates is always there in spirit), "Night-Side." Better than the original BOSTON NOIR col Solid collection of Boston (and surrounding environs) noir "classics," by which they mean reprinted stories, i.e. not written specifically for this collection. Standouts include Andre Dubus's "Townies," Jason Brown's "Driving the Heart" (although I wouldn't call Brown's story 'noir' if I ran into it in a dark alley, and Joyce Carol Oates's supernatural historical story (again, not noir in execution, although Oates is always there in spirit), "Night-Side." Better than the original BOSTON NOIR collection.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Randal

    A good bunch of noir stories. Actually, they might be even better than the first lot of Boston Noir stories. And….I've now been introduced to Hannah Tinti, whose story was one of the best short stories I've ever read! I've ordered her other books and can hardly wait to get a hold of them. Great collection Dennis!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

    Hannah Tinti's Home Sweet Home, Linda Barne's Lucky Penny, Andre Dubus's Townies, Jason Brown's Driving the Heart, and George Harrar's The 5:22 were the stand-outs from this collection. The others were mostly so-so, and the Infinite Jest excerpt was pretty hard to get through, and reaffirmed my desire to never read Infinite Jest.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michael crage

    I only read about half the stories, so I could have missed something worth reading, but I doubt it. I got the book to read basically one story (Surrogate by Robert Parker). It was the worse piece of any kind of writing by him I have every read. If it were the first thing I had read by him, it would also have been the last. And even worse, it was one of the best stories I read in the book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    I'm not usually a fan of the short story, but this collection was just up my alley, good quick reads by some of Boston's best authors.I particularly liked the selections by Robert Parker, Dennis Lehane, Linda Barnes, Barbara Neely and Andre Dubus( the father). Was also intrigued by Hannah Tinti's offering. I will have to read some of her other work. This was a worthy succcessor to Boston Noir 1.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This collection wasn't as good as the first one. Maybe because a lot of the stories were excerpts, so they felt unfinished. And I'm not sure that I want to search out most of the books they are from. Best of the lot was "Townies" by Andre Dubus

  18. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Awesome collection of previously published stories and novel excerpts. I ended up writing down several of the sources in order to read more. My favorite was the excerpt from David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest. I was planning to read that next and it definitely whetted my appetite for the book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Awesome collection of previously published stories and novel excerpts. I ended up writing down several of the sources in order to read more. My favorite was the excerpt from David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest. I was planning to read that next and it definitely whetted my appetite for the book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    Am enjoying the Noir series. Aside from some entertaining stories, the introduction to new authors is always appreciated. It will take years to plow through all the cities ... isn't that great? [email protected]

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Although I enjoyed this collection, I feel that it's predecessor was much better. I did discover several more mystery series I have yet to devour. But the two most disappointing stories were by Dennis Lehane and David Foster Wallace. Bu the good decidedly outweighs the bad.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    Enjoyed the Chuck Hogan, Parker, Joyce Carol Oates, Hannah Tinti, Lehane, Barnes, Harrar, most of the stories, actually. Gave me a couple leads to follow up on (hadn't read anything by Kenneth Abel before), and I think that's one of the main jobs of a short story collection.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Judy Frasca

    Some of the stories were excellent. Some were old and dull. It's an individual choice.

  24. 5 out of 5

    KC

    Enjoyed some of the selections, but found them not as noir as the first collection.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Henry

    A little too "noir" for my taste.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Have to find Boston Noir 1 now. Nearly every story is a gem.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael Stanton

    Solving problems. Even when the solution is up to the reader's imagination.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Donna Good

    Pretty fun but you truly have to love noir.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amy Elizabeth

    Excellent. Gritty, dark and just the right size to read after lunch or before bed for a story or two.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Frank Fritz

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.