counter create hit Evil Hour in Colombia - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Evil Hour in Colombia

Availability: Ready to download

Colombia is the least understood of Latin American countries. Its human tragedy, which features terrifying levels of kidnapping, homicide and extortion, is generally ignored or exploited. In this urgent new work Forrest Hylton, who has extensive first-hand experience of living and working in Colombia, explores its history of 150 years of political conflict, characterized b Colombia is the least understood of Latin American countries. Its human tragedy, which features terrifying levels of kidnapping, homicide and extortion, is generally ignored or exploited. In this urgent new work Forrest Hylton, who has extensive first-hand experience of living and working in Colombia, explores its history of 150 years of political conflict, characterized by radical-popular mobilization and reactionary repression. Evil Hour in Colombia shows how patterns of political conflict, from the mid-nineteenth century to today’s guerilla narco-traffickers and paramilitaries, explain the wear currently destroying Colombian lives, property, communities and territory. In doing so, it traces how Colombia’s “coffee capitalism” gave way to the cattle and cocaine republic of the 1980s, and how land, wealth and power have been steadily accumulated by the light-skinned top of the social pyramid through a brutal combination of terror, expropriation and economic depression.


Compare
Ads Banner

Colombia is the least understood of Latin American countries. Its human tragedy, which features terrifying levels of kidnapping, homicide and extortion, is generally ignored or exploited. In this urgent new work Forrest Hylton, who has extensive first-hand experience of living and working in Colombia, explores its history of 150 years of political conflict, characterized b Colombia is the least understood of Latin American countries. Its human tragedy, which features terrifying levels of kidnapping, homicide and extortion, is generally ignored or exploited. In this urgent new work Forrest Hylton, who has extensive first-hand experience of living and working in Colombia, explores its history of 150 years of political conflict, characterized by radical-popular mobilization and reactionary repression. Evil Hour in Colombia shows how patterns of political conflict, from the mid-nineteenth century to today’s guerilla narco-traffickers and paramilitaries, explain the wear currently destroying Colombian lives, property, communities and territory. In doing so, it traces how Colombia’s “coffee capitalism” gave way to the cattle and cocaine republic of the 1980s, and how land, wealth and power have been steadily accumulated by the light-skinned top of the social pyramid through a brutal combination of terror, expropriation and economic depression.

49 review for Evil Hour in Colombia

  1. 5 out of 5

    Neil P

    PRESIDENT OBAMA READ THIS BOOK BEFORE GIVING URIBE AND THE PARAMILITARIES ANYMORE MONEY! The US (and the coke-morons of london and greater europe) have actively turned Columbia into a mafia state - actively destroying the environment, actively funding political assassinations and knowingly allowing paramilitary rule by fear across the country. This is a comprehensive and fair book, well written (if, at times, assuming that the reader already has a knowledge of the region). After reading this, I PRESIDENT OBAMA READ THIS BOOK BEFORE GIVING URIBE AND THE PARAMILITARIES ANYMORE MONEY! The US (and the coke-morons of london and greater europe) have actively turned Columbia into a mafia state - actively destroying the environment, actively funding political assassinations and knowingly allowing paramilitary rule by fear across the country. This is a comprehensive and fair book, well written (if, at times, assuming that the reader already has a knowledge of the region). After reading this, I noticed that the US military is building a new air base in the country so they can put the rest of the continent under the kosch.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Austin Rose

    Very dry and academic, seems to be written for a PhD level audience. I was able to get some interesting insights out of it, but it was really tough and painful to get through.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Pablo Uribe

    Great! Check out his interview on the podcast "the dig" by Daniel denvir if you're wondering whether to read; that's how I got to this.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sebastien

    A must read for anyone even remotely interested in Colombia. It is admittedly a tough read at times (it was the first time I had encountered the term "parastate," for example), and as some other reviewers have pointed out, it almost reads as a Ph.D dissertation rather than as a book. Forrest Hylton is the real deal though. I spoke to a Colombian historian about him who was surprised at the level of research a non-Colombian would put up with in order to write this, and he's right. Hylton goes into A must read for anyone even remotely interested in Colombia. It is admittedly a tough read at times (it was the first time I had encountered the term "parastate," for example), and as some other reviewers have pointed out, it almost reads as a Ph.D dissertation rather than as a book. Forrest Hylton is the real deal though. I spoke to a Colombian historian about him who was surprised at the level of research a non-Colombian would put up with in order to write this, and he's right. Hylton goes into an enormous amount of detail in this book, and as a soon-to-be-nationalized Colombian, I can say that the bits on Alvaro Uribe were essential reading whether or not the reader is Uribista. The history of Colombian paramilitaries is often overlooked since FARC hogs up all the headlines. This book changes that. If you are Colombian or are interested in Colombia's changing socio-political climate, read this book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    I want to say that I really liked this book, but I'm not sure. If it said what I think it said, then I very much enjoyed it. Only thing is that I found myself getting lost in the academic approach -- long, convoluted sentences. It also seems more suited to people with a bit of a background knowledge of the country. But it did show the evils of both dominant sides in the violence.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tim Hankey

    Very detailed book but found the style of writing more akin to a PhD though. This is a shame as had it been more user friendly it could have much more impact and wider audience. Need the half star for ratings as this'd be 3.5 for me.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    I little heavy on academic and Marxist lingo, but very informative. Very good at giving a historical perspective and showing how, while everyone is worried about guerrilla violence, the power and violence of right-wing mafia-like "narco-paramilitaries" is more insidious and much scarier.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

  9. 5 out of 5

    Paul Hebron

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Fox

  13. 4 out of 5

    Geoff Burns

  14. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jaccuse

  16. 4 out of 5

    Helen

  17. 4 out of 5

    Espen Knutsen

  18. 4 out of 5

    Evan

  19. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joe

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jen

  22. 5 out of 5

    K. Kumar

    This is a thought provoking book, it details a Colombia that most people are probably not aware of. Though, it is not an easy book and I surely did not understand a lot of it. The basic idea is that Colombia has a very violent past driven my conflicts between the government and the poor (communists). The U.S. supported the government and eventually weakened the FARC, to now there is peace. Those caught in the middle (the Afro-Colombians and indigenous) were killed or displaced. That is the basic This is a thought provoking book, it details a Colombia that most people are probably not aware of. Though, it is not an easy book and I surely did not understand a lot of it. The basic idea is that Colombia has a very violent past driven my conflicts between the government and the poor (communists). The U.S. supported the government and eventually weakened the FARC, to now there is peace. Those caught in the middle (the Afro-Colombians and indigenous) were killed or displaced. That is the basic story.

  23. 5 out of 5

    JollyOliver

  24. 4 out of 5

    Juan Gonzalez

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  26. 4 out of 5

    history escapee

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ben Taylor

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nick Aurelius

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ian

  31. 4 out of 5

    Tuomas Toivonen

  32. 5 out of 5

    Tom

  33. 5 out of 5

    Han C.

  34. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  35. 5 out of 5

    Raven

  36. 4 out of 5

    Ollie G

  37. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  38. 4 out of 5

    Riley

  39. 5 out of 5

    Fatemah

  40. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  41. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda

  42. 5 out of 5

    Myles

  43. 5 out of 5

    Robert Weaver

  44. 5 out of 5

    John L

  45. 4 out of 5

    Noah Mckenna

  46. 5 out of 5

    Reinaldo Villabona

  47. 4 out of 5

    Verso Books

  48. 4 out of 5

    Andy Williams

  49. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.