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Our War on Ourselves: Rethinking Science, Technology, and Economic Growth

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Our approach to knowing and doing is based on delegating physical phenomena to physicists, biological phenomena to biologists, social phenomena to sociologists, economic phenomena to economists, and so on. This approach to knowledge and practice works very well when one category of phenomena dominates (as in mechanical and technical systems), but does not work when many ca Our approach to knowing and doing is based on delegating physical phenomena to physicists, biological phenomena to biologists, social phenomena to sociologists, economic phenomena to economists, and so on. This approach to knowledge and practice works very well when one category of phenomena dominates (as in mechanical and technical systems), but does not work when many categories of phenomena make significant contributions (as in the biological and cultural spheres). As a result, our civilization succeeds in its scientific and technical endeavours yet fails in dealing with communities and ecosystems. Following his groundbreaking Labyrinth of Technology and Living in the Labyrinth of Technology, Willem H. Vanderburg's Our War on Ourselves explores the type of war we have unleashed on our lives by emphasizing discipline-based processes. The work also illuminates how we can achieve a more balanced, livable, and sustainable future by combining technical and cultural perspectives in our educational and institutional settings.


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Our approach to knowing and doing is based on delegating physical phenomena to physicists, biological phenomena to biologists, social phenomena to sociologists, economic phenomena to economists, and so on. This approach to knowledge and practice works very well when one category of phenomena dominates (as in mechanical and technical systems), but does not work when many ca Our approach to knowing and doing is based on delegating physical phenomena to physicists, biological phenomena to biologists, social phenomena to sociologists, economic phenomena to economists, and so on. This approach to knowledge and practice works very well when one category of phenomena dominates (as in mechanical and technical systems), but does not work when many categories of phenomena make significant contributions (as in the biological and cultural spheres). As a result, our civilization succeeds in its scientific and technical endeavours yet fails in dealing with communities and ecosystems. Following his groundbreaking Labyrinth of Technology and Living in the Labyrinth of Technology, Willem H. Vanderburg's Our War on Ourselves explores the type of war we have unleashed on our lives by emphasizing discipline-based processes. The work also illuminates how we can achieve a more balanced, livable, and sustainable future by combining technical and cultural perspectives in our educational and institutional settings.

31 review for Our War on Ourselves: Rethinking Science, Technology, and Economic Growth

  1. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    This is a very thorough study, the most thorough I have come across, of the impact of technology on us as human persons. Starting with how we engage with the world and other people from infancy, how we learn to see, speak and recognise our place in the world, and how we develop a symbolic relation with people and place, so with the intervention of technology a process of what he calls de-symbolisation takes place, distancing us and fundamentally changing the way we relate to the world. If we assu This is a very thorough study, the most thorough I have come across, of the impact of technology on us as human persons. Starting with how we engage with the world and other people from infancy, how we learn to see, speak and recognise our place in the world, and how we develop a symbolic relation with people and place, so with the intervention of technology a process of what he calls de-symbolisation takes place, distancing us and fundamentally changing the way we relate to the world. If we assume that our technologies are "just tools" that we pick up, use and lay aside, we fail to see that our tools do change us, as, especially in their modern form, they mediate our experience of the world and each other.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Natasha Tolkunow

    Vanderburg is simply a genius. Incredible ideas in this book that you will find yourself going back to often. Very dense book, NOT for light reading, more for "fixing what's wrong with the world" type things

  3. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Smith

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alessandra

  5. 5 out of 5

    Poon Chak Man

  6. 5 out of 5

    Errol Thompson

  7. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Lang

  8. 4 out of 5

    Fernando Pasquini Santos

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jorell Mora

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  11. 5 out of 5

    Angri Chainese

  12. 4 out of 5

    John

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sharon M

  14. 4 out of 5

    Annie

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nat

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lenna

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bricoleur (David) Soul

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ian Ibbotson

  20. 5 out of 5

    Khalil Martin

  21. 4 out of 5

    Victor Vaz

  22. 4 out of 5

    Meagan Yanke

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jackson Childs

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ana Carolina

  25. 4 out of 5

    Hilen Ferreira Franzua

  26. 5 out of 5

    Purevtsengel Luvsandandar

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael Janes

  28. 5 out of 5

    Steve Walker

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dorian Cantu

  31. 5 out of 5

    Matt

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