counter create hit The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation

Availability: Ready to download

As in many postcommunist states, politics in Ukraine revolves around the issue of national identity. Ukrainian nationalists see themselves as one of the world's oldest and most civilized peoples, as "older brothers" to the younger Russian culture. Yet Ukraine became independent only in 1991, and Ukrainians often feel like a minority in their own country, where Russian is As in many postcommunist states, politics in Ukraine revolves around the issue of national identity. Ukrainian nationalists see themselves as one of the world's oldest and most civilized peoples, as "older brothers" to the younger Russian culture. Yet Ukraine became independent only in 1991, and Ukrainians often feel like a minority in their own country, where Russian is still the main language heard on the streets of the capital, Kiev. This book is a comprehensive guide to modern Ukraine and to the versions of its past propagated by both Russians and Ukrainians. Andrew Wilson provides the most acute, informed, and up-to-date account available of the Ukrainians and their country. Concentrating on the complex relation between Ukraine and Russia, the book begins with the myth of common origin in the early medieval era, then looks closely at the Ukrainian experience under the tsars and Soviets, the experience of minorities in the country, and the path to independence in 1991. Wilson also considers the history of Ukraine since 1991 and the continuing disputes over identity, culture, and religion. He examines the economic collapse under the first president, Leonid Kravchuk, and the attempts at recovery under his successor, Leonid Kuchma. Wilson explores the conflicts in Ukrainian society between the country's Eurasian roots and its Western aspirations, as well as the significance of the presidential election of November 1999. About the Author: Andrew Wilson is lecturer in Ukrainian studies at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College, London.


Compare
Ads Banner

As in many postcommunist states, politics in Ukraine revolves around the issue of national identity. Ukrainian nationalists see themselves as one of the world's oldest and most civilized peoples, as "older brothers" to the younger Russian culture. Yet Ukraine became independent only in 1991, and Ukrainians often feel like a minority in their own country, where Russian is As in many postcommunist states, politics in Ukraine revolves around the issue of national identity. Ukrainian nationalists see themselves as one of the world's oldest and most civilized peoples, as "older brothers" to the younger Russian culture. Yet Ukraine became independent only in 1991, and Ukrainians often feel like a minority in their own country, where Russian is still the main language heard on the streets of the capital, Kiev. This book is a comprehensive guide to modern Ukraine and to the versions of its past propagated by both Russians and Ukrainians. Andrew Wilson provides the most acute, informed, and up-to-date account available of the Ukrainians and their country. Concentrating on the complex relation between Ukraine and Russia, the book begins with the myth of common origin in the early medieval era, then looks closely at the Ukrainian experience under the tsars and Soviets, the experience of minorities in the country, and the path to independence in 1991. Wilson also considers the history of Ukraine since 1991 and the continuing disputes over identity, culture, and religion. He examines the economic collapse under the first president, Leonid Kravchuk, and the attempts at recovery under his successor, Leonid Kuchma. Wilson explores the conflicts in Ukrainian society between the country's Eurasian roots and its Western aspirations, as well as the significance of the presidential election of November 1999. About the Author: Andrew Wilson is lecturer in Ukrainian studies at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College, London.

30 review for The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Ok, I love history, I get all excited about history books, especially about this part of the world. But I even found myself counting the number of pages till the end of some of the chapters. Its a deep inspection of Ukraine, which is great, but its also at time boring for people who love this subject, which may make it hard for someone who is not as interested to start reading it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    James

    An interesting history of the Ukrainian people and nation, throughout all the turmoil and difficulties of not only the twentieth century but before that too. His scope (from antiquity to the present, post-Soviet Ukraine: one half of the book is dedicated to post 1991 Ukraine)is far-reaching and well-researched. One of its greatest merit lies in that it offers an "outsider's" perspective to the traditional approaches to Ukrainian history - either a strongly nationalistic one or a "Russocentric" An interesting history of the Ukrainian people and nation, throughout all the turmoil and difficulties of not only the twentieth century but before that too. His scope (from antiquity to the present, post-Soviet Ukraine: one half of the book is dedicated to post 1991 Ukraine)is far-reaching and well-researched. One of its greatest merit lies in that it offers an "outsider's" perspective to the traditional approaches to Ukrainian history - either a strongly nationalistic one or a "Russocentric" one. Much detail is also given on the possible futures of the Ukraine and its people; it is definitely a book to read to further one's knowledge about this long-misunderstood and little-known (despite its key roles in European history) country.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sjonni

    First let me gasp from joy: ahahahahahah! Everything about Ukraine's history, its myths, its truths, its lies, its all n all. A wondrous exposé of everything you want to know. The treatment is pretty fair towards Russia which is not needlessly critizised throughout but the approach is pro-Ukraine at the core. Therefore, if you entertain pro-Ukraine sentiments in your heart of hearts, this is a book designed to make you have a good good time. Expensive (1100 руб, дом книги) but printed on fancy First let me gasp from joy: ahahahahahah! Everything about Ukraine's history, its myths, its truths, its lies, its all n all. A wondrous exposé of everything you want to know. The treatment is pretty fair towards Russia which is not needlessly critizised throughout but the approach is pro-Ukraine at the core. Therefore, if you entertain pro-Ukraine sentiments in your heart of hearts, this is a book designed to make you have a good good time. Expensive (1100 руб, дом книги) but printed on fancy paper.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Wilson's assessment of identity in Ukraine often matched my own experiences here. The first chapters are somewhat dry, especially for anyone without a scholarly interest in identity politics, but the later sections are fascinating. I particularly enjoyed the chapter on politics since independence. There was a point in my reading where I stopped and thought to myself, "Wow, I live in a state where kleptokrats routinely jossle for control of the political apparatus and related goods/resources. How Wilson's assessment of identity in Ukraine often matched my own experiences here. The first chapters are somewhat dry, especially for anyone without a scholarly interest in identity politics, but the later sections are fascinating. I particularly enjoyed the chapter on politics since independence. There was a point in my reading where I stopped and thought to myself, "Wow, I live in a state where kleptokrats routinely jossle for control of the political apparatus and related goods/resources. How about that?" Am looking forward to getting my hands on Wilson's Orange Revolution.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Masha Luka

    Finally a book that is not monological, but trying to give a voice to Ukrainians and Russians as well instead of solely depicting Russia as a devil.Very balanced and objective view on the history of Ukraine.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Antonia

    This highly detailed history has brought the current situation into better perspective. Now I understand how and why Putin took Crimea; it was almost predictable, given the history. Ukraine is a nation of dueling dichotomies!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Yoko Nemchinova

    Good review of the forming of a nation and the underlying problems involved

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jason Hebert

    This was a very interesting overview of the history of Ukraine; the idea and its people. There were some parts that were overly detailed and dry but on the whole a very good overview.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Richard PH

  10. 5 out of 5

    Volodymyr Krynytsky

  11. 5 out of 5

    Richard Blake

  12. 5 out of 5

    Max Spektor

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dan Kugler

  14. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ross

  16. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mary

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andriy Voloshyn

  19. 4 out of 5

    Leo

  20. 5 out of 5

    Justin

  21. 5 out of 5

    Olga Kerziouk

  22. 5 out of 5

    Goethicus

  23. 5 out of 5

    João Henriques

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kw Estes

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Busa

  26. 5 out of 5

    Max

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan D

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

  30. 4 out of 5

    nandana.T

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.