counter create hit Making A Killing: The Political Economy of Animal Rights - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Making A Killing: The Political Economy of Animal Rights

Availability: Ready to download

Suggest to the average leftist that animals should be part of broader liberation struggles and—once they stop laughing—you'll find yourself casually dismissed. With a focus on labor, property, and the life of commodities, Making a Killing contains key insights into the broad nature of domination, power, and hierarchy. It explores the intersections between human and animal Suggest to the average leftist that animals should be part of broader liberation struggles and—once they stop laughing—you'll find yourself casually dismissed. With a focus on labor, property, and the life of commodities, Making a Killing contains key insights into the broad nature of domination, power, and hierarchy. It explores the intersections between human and animal oppressions in relation to the exploitative dynamics of capitalism. Combining nuts-and-bolts Marxist political economy, a pluralistic anarchist critique, as well as a searing assessment of the animal rights movement, Bob Torres challenges conventional anti-capitalist thinking and convincingly advocates for the abolition of animals in industry—and on the dinner plate.


Compare
Ads Banner

Suggest to the average leftist that animals should be part of broader liberation struggles and—once they stop laughing—you'll find yourself casually dismissed. With a focus on labor, property, and the life of commodities, Making a Killing contains key insights into the broad nature of domination, power, and hierarchy. It explores the intersections between human and animal Suggest to the average leftist that animals should be part of broader liberation struggles and—once they stop laughing—you'll find yourself casually dismissed. With a focus on labor, property, and the life of commodities, Making a Killing contains key insights into the broad nature of domination, power, and hierarchy. It explores the intersections between human and animal oppressions in relation to the exploitative dynamics of capitalism. Combining nuts-and-bolts Marxist political economy, a pluralistic anarchist critique, as well as a searing assessment of the animal rights movement, Bob Torres challenges conventional anti-capitalist thinking and convincingly advocates for the abolition of animals in industry—and on the dinner plate.

30 review for Making A Killing: The Political Economy of Animal Rights

  1. 4 out of 5

    AJ

    Making a Killing is a great primer on animal rights activism and anarchism. Torres's thesis is that anti-speciesism is consistent with a non-hierarchical, anarchist society. He really blasts mainstream animal rights organizations (and rightly so) for ignoring real animal liberation while giving awards to slaughterhouse designers and raising money for their corporate boards. He also criticizes left movements for ignoring animal rights movements as being less important than other human rights stru Making a Killing is a great primer on animal rights activism and anarchism. Torres's thesis is that anti-speciesism is consistent with a non-hierarchical, anarchist society. He really blasts mainstream animal rights organizations (and rightly so) for ignoring real animal liberation while giving awards to slaughterhouse designers and raising money for their corporate boards. He also criticizes left movements for ignoring animal rights movements as being less important than other human rights struggles. He argues that being vegan reduces your dominance over others, and is completely consistent with a radical lifestyle, even if you devote your main energies to feminism, anti-racism, etc. I liked this book because it gave me a better understanding of anarchism and the animal rights movement in general. I also liked his criticisms of people like John Mackey and organizations like PETA, because they always rub me the wrong way, and I always wonder if I'm a strange type of vegan who hates PETA. I always wonder how useful any movement is when it works within the framework of capitalism, and Bob Torres does a great job explaining how animals will never be liberated when they are commodities and property. Animal rights are simply not compatible with capitalism. Definitely recommended for current veg*ns, anyone interested in animal rights and people who are anarchists but don't see the point in helping out animals. You can be an activist and help dismantle capitalist systems of dominance over animals. Go vegan!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    This book links nonhuman oppression with human oppression; its audience is anarchists and other leftists, as well as activists who take a less-political stance. We discussed this in book group last week and one of the comments against it is that it does not use feelings as a valid reason for stopping animal exploitation. I agree with this to an extent. There are far too many books promoting animal liberation that ignore the emotional aspect of nonhuman suffering. It would be ideal, I agree, if e This book links nonhuman oppression with human oppression; its audience is anarchists and other leftists, as well as activists who take a less-political stance. We discussed this in book group last week and one of the comments against it is that it does not use feelings as a valid reason for stopping animal exploitation. I agree with this to an extent. There are far too many books promoting animal liberation that ignore the emotional aspect of nonhuman suffering. It would be ideal, I agree, if everyone could feel something for those who suffer. Personally, I cry at just about everything! I definitely come to animal rights from an emotional perspective. Yet I also am not about to throw out any strategy that helps end any oppression. Maybe you're a person who doesn't know how to feel; maybe you operate on logic. Maybe you're like the guy at the Occupy Asheville meeting who works with homeless and hungry humans and becomes very defensive about the mere concept of animal liberation ("humans have to come first"). This is where Torres' book comes in very handy. He shows how nonhumans suffer just like humans under the oppression of capitalism. I think from reading this that he does, personally, also feel -- he has heart, the suffering he's witnessed hurts him -- but that his strategy is to focus on the oppression of the exploited by exploiter. He takes the political left to task for their complicity in exploiting animals, and he also takes many of the current animal activists groups to tasks. He suggests that activists have lost our way by depending on the larger groups who simply seek donations and reassure you that they will take your money and act "on behalf of" nonhumans (his focus is primarily PeTA and HSUS). He explores this issue and encourages activists to rely on our own talents and creativity; to not depend on others to do activism for us, and to find common ground with other political organizations who focus on ending exploitation. Overall, if you consider yourself a leftie politically, you should read this book.If you are a politically-inclined animal activist, you should read this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Josiah Miller

    This is a great book that reaffirmed my decision for the recent lifestyle I've chosen. This book does a great job of relating human dependence on animal exploitation with the writings of Murray Bookchin. Our domination of human over human and human over nature is a direct correlation to the struggles civilization faces not only with climate change but fascism, racism, sexism, class struggles and homophobia as well.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Maryam

    The author raises some important points on the oppression of human beings and animals and the links between them. However, in many cases, he gets preachy and keeps repeating his arguments.

  5. 4 out of 5

    abclaret

    Does animal rights have a place within anarchism or indeed within the liberation of the working class? Bob Torres’ Making a Killing... is not the first to take up the tenuous issue of animal rights philosophy and anarchism but he certainly tries to cover a lot of ground. By primarily drawing upon a critique model of capitalist economy through Marx and drawing upon issues of social ecology via Bookchin he weaves together a sound argument that is an impassioned plea for the left and libertarians t Does animal rights have a place within anarchism or indeed within the liberation of the working class? Bob Torres’ Making a Killing... is not the first to take up the tenuous issue of animal rights philosophy and anarchism but he certainly tries to cover a lot of ground. By primarily drawing upon a critique model of capitalist economy through Marx and drawing upon issues of social ecology via Bookchin he weaves together a sound argument that is an impassioned plea for the left and libertarians to consider the plight of animals. The hallmarks of this tradition can in large part be traced back to developments within anarcho-punk during the eighties. While a number of appeals about the mistreatment of animals raised important questions and kick-started a number of campaigns, the issue of class and a philosophy based around a lifestyle eschewing animal abuse was never fully resolved. Readers might be familiar with the contemporary beginnings of this debate with the likes of 'Beast of Burden' and 'Animal Liberation: Devastate to Liberate? Or Devastatingly Liberal'. As the animal rights movement progressed from its infancy and hit a zenith in the mass appeal of vegetarianism, it saw the beginnings of numerous campaigns against the fur trade, blood sports, battery and intensive farming, testing on animals and vivisection and so on. It was also drawn into criticisms of misanthropy, fanatical single issue campaigning, violence and professional politicking – or what Torres refers to as the ‘Animal Rights Industry’. Where the book picks up is by fleshing out an understanding of the status of animals. By taking issue with moralisers like Peter Singer, it argues that animals are reduced to the effective position of commodities and our maintaining of this keeps our understanding of nature and ecology entirely on a capitalist and therefore an irrational level. For example racism, sexism and even class have a pre-capitalist basis, but find their oppressive height within capitalism’s existence. These factors can make oppressive forms appear ‘natural’ but, on the contrary, they are mere perversions of nature. The accumulation of wealth at the expense of the few, regardless of its origins, is in fact a distortion of our ‘organic nature’. This is entirely where Bookchin is tied in – by exploring how the exploitation of classes results in various constituted hierarchies of the sexes, races and even of animals. What’s interesting is that it isn’t left there. The ALF and mainstream animal rights groups are rounded on and deconstructed with a class and anarchist analysis and Torres argues for the possibilities of a new form of activism that challenges the status of animals. The question is: will the people who would benefit from reading this book read it? (From a review I wrote in Solidarity Federation's - Direct Action # 42, Spring 2008)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    Of the three books I have (so far!) read about animal rights and veganism (the others being Animal Liberation and The World Peace Diet), this one resonated with me the most deeply. Perhaps I'm just reading it at a particularly ripe time. Torres lays down logical and convincing arguments, drawing on Francione, Bookchin and other theorists, about the connection between animal exploitation and all the various forms of more widely recognized discrimination. The commodification and exploitation of an Of the three books I have (so far!) read about animal rights and veganism (the others being Animal Liberation and The World Peace Diet), this one resonated with me the most deeply. Perhaps I'm just reading it at a particularly ripe time. Torres lays down logical and convincing arguments, drawing on Francione, Bookchin and other theorists, about the connection between animal exploitation and all the various forms of more widely recognized discrimination. The commodification and exploitation of animals is one branch of a tree, sharing roots and trunk with racism, sexism, classism, etc. To work against one injustice, it is necessary to see its place in the whole - to recognize the other, related issues and work against them, too. I think this book will best serve people who are involved in social justice and the dismantling of hierarchies, but who have not accepted the validity of animal liberation, as well as vegans who might overlook the connections to other movements. Personally, it was a reminder to avoid singularity of purpose. Even if one does devote most of their efforts or feel mostly passionately about one particular issue, it is important to seek connections with others and to continue breaking down hierarchies in your own life.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Clement

    One of the best animal philosophy books to come out in a while, this was one of the first books I read to really introduce me to the basics behind abolitionism. Although both Torres and Francione (another well-known abolitionist author) can rub people the wrong way, I particularly like the way Torres looks at the issues. He can be very cold and logical (in a good way), and though not completely sans emotion, he approaches the issues in a very calculated way that made the book fascinating and tho One of the best animal philosophy books to come out in a while, this was one of the first books I read to really introduce me to the basics behind abolitionism. Although both Torres and Francione (another well-known abolitionist author) can rub people the wrong way, I particularly like the way Torres looks at the issues. He can be very cold and logical (in a good way), and though not completely sans emotion, he approaches the issues in a very calculated way that made the book fascinating and thought-provoking. Love him or hate him, anyone who reads this book is unlikely to view animal use in the same way ever again.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Minku

    This is the closest approximation of the book I would have written about the need for animal rights and anarchism to fall in love with each other and start making babies, if you know what I mean. You should also check out Vegan Freak: Being Vegan In A Non-Vegan World, and you should listen to the Vegan Freak Radio podcast. It's all good.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    Left Turn also reviewed this. I've generally been dismissive of animal rights folks, but some theology I've read lately has caused me to question my consistency in respect for life - I still don't fall in the "everyone should be vegan" camp, but I do think folks on the Left need to consider the limits of which lives we value and which hierarchies we fight against.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jinxi Caddel

    Bob Torres is an amazing writer. He offers a compelling argument that there cannot be justice in our society until we stop ignoring the suffering of sentient animals and its relation to capitalism and oppression. I highly recommend this book. Fascinating and insightful.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alma Ramos

    strong argument for vegan advocacy. a little preachy, but i think that's his style.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sean Gardner

    One of my favourite animal rights books out there... Really interesting argument!

  13. 5 out of 5

    FlauFly

    It is book which directed my attention from veganism as such to how veganism relate to other forms of oppresion and dominance. Thanks to this book I also learned about Murray Bookchin and generally about broad tradition of anarchist thought, about what I wasn't aware of. For that reasons I will fondly remember that book. I reduce my score from full by one star, because I felt like in places that book is a little repetitive and heavy in citations, especially to aforementioned Murray Bookchin. Some It is book which directed my attention from veganism as such to how veganism relate to other forms of oppresion and dominance. Thanks to this book I also learned about Murray Bookchin and generally about broad tradition of anarchist thought, about what I wasn't aware of. For that reasons I will fondly remember that book. I reduce my score from full by one star, because I felt like in places that book is a little repetitive and heavy in citations, especially to aforementioned Murray Bookchin. Sometimes it seemed to me like it would be better if I just read original Bookchin, and actually I did! It is better to read this book if you already have some broader knowledge about anarchist philosophy. It wasn't my case, but Bob Torres made me interested and engaded that before I even finished this book I read a lot of anarchist texts in the mean-time. Nevertheless, I think this book presents clear and compelling reasoning behind linking animal rights with various human rights. It's not your average book about veganism. It's actually more anarchist/anti-capitalist book with focus on animal rights.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Peacegal

    I’ve lately been listening to the small collection of archived Vegan Freak Radio podcasts hosted by Bob and Jenna Torres, so I figured I’d read their books. Making a Killing is well-written, if dry, and the end result is spotty. Torres has a background dissimilar to that of most animal advocates: He majored in agricultural science and it was through the cold and mechanical view taught by his “animal science” classes that he began exploring a meat-free lifestyle. His familiarity with the world of I’ve lately been listening to the small collection of archived Vegan Freak Radio podcasts hosted by Bob and Jenna Torres, so I figured I’d read their books. Making a Killing is well-written, if dry, and the end result is spotty. Torres has a background dissimilar to that of most animal advocates: He majored in agricultural science and it was through the cold and mechanical view taught by his “animal science” classes that he began exploring a meat-free lifestyle. His familiarity with the world of Big Ag allows him to draw up some blackly humorous quotes from its major players. For example, United Egg Producers guidelines advise that “to minimize public distress, stunning, killing, and carcass disposal should be carried out away from public view.” We also read of the ways in which the animal industry has sought to silence its critics. For example, the National Animal Interest Alliance, an industry mouthpiece that often poses itself as an animal welfare group, criticized the Animal Enterprise Protection Act as too timid and encouraged stronger legislation. A few years later, they got their wish with the infamous Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act, which counted among its supporters Congress’s most conservative and most liberal names. The American left wing, radical, and anarchist communities have, as a whole, expressed no more interest in advancing the cause of animal rights than the right wing and conservative side. Torres argues that capitalism is inherently exploitative of its workers—whether they are disenfranchised humans or animals—and social progressives must add animals to their framework of concern if they wish to challenge the system of domination and hierarchy. However, this will be tough going. Torres admits he has noticed a shift in attitude among some of the students in his class, in which even the most radical and open-minded began pulling away from him once discovering their professor was a vegan who supported animal rights. Torres has seen for himself how entrenched the consumptive use mindset regarding animals is, and that’s what makes it all the more perplexing (to me) that he is an abolitionist and fan of the controversial animal rights theologian Gary Francione. To understand the point of view of Francione and his abolitionists, let’s use a real-life example: if your state proposes a bill that would ban gestation crates for pigs in the pork industry, as a good activist you should oppose it, because the law doesn’t go far enough by abolishing the pork industry altogether nor challenging the legality of pigs as property. Yes, really. Torres opposes Vegan.com editor Erik Marcus and his book Meat Market, which is, in my humble opinion, one of the best books ever written on the subject of factory farming. He criticizes Henry Spira, one of the most effective animal advocates in the history of the movement. Torres’ criticism is especially confusing, considering that unlike the abolitionist wing, Spira actually accomplished major goals for animals—some of which could be called abolition, such as stopping a series of bizarre sex experiments upon cats at the American Museum of Natural History (the first time in history an animal research project had ever been ended by anti-vivisectionists.) Torres’s quibble with Spira has to do with the latter’s point of view that pro-animal campaigns must be measured and doable “because if we ask for too much, we may get nothing.” Which is, well, absolutely true. As a parting note I’ll highlight Torres’s repeated injunctions against “gurus” in the movement—which is good, nobody has all the answers--but at the same time he has nothing but good things to say about Gary Francione. Like most abolitionists, Torres dislikes the big groups of the animal movement. He charges that “mainstream organizations and activists have forged ties with industries that exploit animals.” This is true to a point. Working under the assumption that the meat, dairy, and egg industries are going nowhere soon, large organizations have sat down with CEOs and legislators to make some changes that would reduce suffering, if even a little bit. Torres finds this unacceptable, as mainstream animal activists end up promoting the work of slaughterhouse designers and merchants of free-range meat. He does not consider the perhaps more insidious ways in which big groups such as the ASPCA, HSUS, and American Humane are unwittingly colluding with the dog breeding lobby in their relentless promotion of fighting dogs. Even Gary Francione, who should by rights oppose dog breeds in general, and breeds developed for the purpose of mauling other animals specifically, has bought into this foolishness. This story ends on a strange note. Despite being fairly well-known activists with substantial followings, Bob and Jenna Torres have seemingly left animal rights activism. They have taken down their websites and well-regarded podcasts, and no longer have any significant presence on the Internet.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lili Trenkova

    Too much regurgitating of Gary Francione's oversimplified and privileged theories, but skipping those parts, the book offers an excellent primer for bridging of animal rights and social anarchism for someone who is familiar with one but not the other.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dayton

    Disappointing: the first half is sort of a haphazard Marx and Kropotkin 101 interspersed with Animal Rights 101, but I'm not sure the target audience. If you aren't familiar with these ideas (either social anarchism or animal liberation) he doesn't do a lot to convince you, and if you are familiar it can be fairly repetitive. Also the animal section is perhaps overly reliant on Francione's work, which I haven't read much of but is I think The book becomes much more interesting in the second half Disappointing: the first half is sort of a haphazard Marx and Kropotkin 101 interspersed with Animal Rights 101, but I'm not sure the target audience. If you aren't familiar with these ideas (either social anarchism or animal liberation) he doesn't do a lot to convince you, and if you are familiar it can be fairly repetitive. Also the animal section is perhaps overly reliant on Francione's work, which I haven't read much of but is I think The book becomes much more interesting in the second half, when it enters into a brief Bookchin 101 (which mainly made me want to read more Bookchin) and then criticizes both the animal rights and broader Left/progressive movements for not being more understanding of/cooperative with each other. I agree with a lot of his critiques and suggestions, though I think sometimes (not always) he is overly harsh. I also disagree with his endorsement of Francione's hard-line, no-compromise attitude--it's admirable but I think puts purity too far ahead of results. (Again, they're right that PETA, HSUS, et al., can skew too much to the other side of things, but for all its rightfully criticized flaws, PETA deserves at least some credit.) I should add too that, as someone quite familiar with Peter Singer's work, Torres's critiques of Singer are spot-on and necessary--but I'd still recommend reading Animal Liberation over Making a Killing. The final thesis--that the socialist libertarian Left and the animal rights movement should embrace each other, and change their tactics accordingly--is one I endorse wholeheartedly. I just don't think this book is the best articulation of that idea I've seen.

  17. 4 out of 5

    pinktheory

    I already listen to Bob Torres on the Vegan Freak podcast, so I have heard many of the arguments that he raises in this book. But it was nice to read the book as it expands on his ideas in an organized fashion. In this book, Torres provides parallelisms between other forms of oppression in our society and animal exploitation. He explains in a logical manner how animal exploitation is perpetuated in our society because of decades and decades of socialization in a hierarchal capitalist world. Like I already listen to Bob Torres on the Vegan Freak podcast, so I have heard many of the arguments that he raises in this book. But it was nice to read the book as it expands on his ideas in an organized fashion. In this book, Torres provides parallelisms between other forms of oppression in our society and animal exploitation. He explains in a logical manner how animal exploitation is perpetuated in our society because of decades and decades of socialization in a hierarchal capitalist world. Like Francione (another great voice in the animal rights movement), Torres tells it like it is using clear logic. Anyone who truly is against inequality, oppression and injustice (among humans and non-human animals alike) should read this book. If you are against racism, sexism or any other oppressive "isms" that stem from society's hierarchies, this book will clearly show you that the underlying driving forces behind these "isms" are no different from those that drive speciesism. Therefore, as Torres argues, if you reject any of the aforementioned "isms", the logical next step (if you are to truly live consistently by your principles and ethics) is to reject speciesism and GO VEGAN!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kara

    I'm glad Bob wrote this book about two essential things: why anarchists must care about animals, and why the animal rights movement must be integrated with other justice movements. I agree with Bob on many things, but, I can't say I enjoyed reading the book. It's that cold kind of logical/theoretical approach that I'm sure someone out there needs in order to understand these issues, but that leaves me, well, cold. He started to warm up with some discussion of how his students struggled with a coo I'm glad Bob wrote this book about two essential things: why anarchists must care about animals, and why the animal rights movement must be integrated with other justice movements. I agree with Bob on many things, but, I can't say I enjoyed reading the book. It's that cold kind of logical/theoretical approach that I'm sure someone out there needs in order to understand these issues, but that leaves me, well, cold. He started to warm up with some discussion of how his students struggled with a cooperative approach to teaching/learning, but didn't go far enough down that road for me. I wanted more application (more, more, more), less drawing paths of logic. I hope this book gets in the hands of the people that need the bald theoretical discussion of why the liberation of animals matters, and why it is integral to the liberation of the earth and people. Again, I appreciate the fact of this books existence. But I am not its audience. (on to Terry Tempest Williams, where I fell in love with her in the the first 50 pages)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Radical, controversial and boundary pushing all summarize Torres' book about animal rights, veganism and the animal rights movement. I greatly appreciated how he brought capitalism and Marxist theory into the discussion and he slammed home points about the double standards that many organizations have when it comes to animal rights and double standards that we, human animals in this world, often carry with us. For example, PETA's fight for animal rights, while also giving awards to slaughterhous Radical, controversial and boundary pushing all summarize Torres' book about animal rights, veganism and the animal rights movement. I greatly appreciated how he brought capitalism and Marxist theory into the discussion and he slammed home points about the double standards that many organizations have when it comes to animal rights and double standards that we, human animals in this world, often carry with us. For example, PETA's fight for animal rights, while also giving awards to slaughterhouse 'designers' such as Temple Grandin. Also, their blatant sexism towards women in their ads and campaigns. The most powerful piece for me was his discussion of the need to have one unified activist movement - we cannot cry, "Down with racism/sexism/classism!!" while eating a double cheeseburger. You cannot preach one way and not live what you preach wholly. Definitely pushed my comfort limit with his radical veganism, while also still contradicting himself by having pets; however, a definite quick read worth delving into with social anarchism as an alternative to capitalism and Marxism.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    Bob Torres is a sociologist, so this book definitely comes from an academic place, but he is also a vegan and a social anarchist, so it is bound with passionate opposition to unjust authority and the widespread slaughter of animals for food and convenience. Obviously, as some sort of anarchist and vegan, I came with a sympathetic approach to this book, but I think his thesis that leftists/marxists/anarchists/feminists cannot truly embrace a radically progressive agenda without embracing veganism Bob Torres is a sociologist, so this book definitely comes from an academic place, but he is also a vegan and a social anarchist, so it is bound with passionate opposition to unjust authority and the widespread slaughter of animals for food and convenience. Obviously, as some sort of anarchist and vegan, I came with a sympathetic approach to this book, but I think his thesis that leftists/marxists/anarchists/feminists cannot truly embrace a radically progressive agenda without embracing veganism personally and ideologically. The book's critique of animal-consumption is rooted in egalitarian, anti-authoritarian, libertarian, environmentalist positions and thought so it certainly won't convince conservatives to put down the steak, but a number of cogent dissections of non-vegan lifestyles are present. An excellent read for your "radical" friend who still insists on plates, shoes, and belts of flesh.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anna Bearne

    I wish I could give this book more stars. I totally agree with 99% of its contents (not sure about the ALF critique), but unfortunately Bob Torres is not the best writer. It is repetitive, often boring, and not free from mistakes (both linguistic and typographical, which are the editor's fault, but still...). It lacks the "OMG I couldn't put it better" factor ;) It's short, but could have been shorter (pointless repetitions) and at the same time I feel it should be longer and more thorough. I'm I wish I could give this book more stars. I totally agree with 99% of its contents (not sure about the ALF critique), but unfortunately Bob Torres is not the best writer. It is repetitive, often boring, and not free from mistakes (both linguistic and typographical, which are the editor's fault, but still...). It lacks the "OMG I couldn't put it better" factor ;) It's short, but could have been shorter (pointless repetitions) and at the same time I feel it should be longer and more thorough. I'm sure Bob Torres is a great professor (the classes he described seem really awesome), and he makes some good points in this book, it just lacks appeal and strong argumentation. But of course I would recommend it anyway :)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ari Vangeest

    Torres has an important message for progressives, that when we talk about oppression we need to remember that animals are being oppressed as well. His base solution is that if you truly care you should become a vegan. While I think that many of his critiques of groups such as PETA are justifiable I think that Torres alienates those who deeply care about animals but cannot or are not ready to take the step to becoming a vegan, namely vegetarians (maybe I took offense because I am a vegetarian). T Torres has an important message for progressives, that when we talk about oppression we need to remember that animals are being oppressed as well. His base solution is that if you truly care you should become a vegan. While I think that many of his critiques of groups such as PETA are justifiable I think that Torres alienates those who deeply care about animals but cannot or are not ready to take the step to becoming a vegan, namely vegetarians (maybe I took offense because I am a vegetarian). This is a good book to outline the political and social harms that are caused by the meat industry. One need not agree with his conclusion that social anarchy is the solution to stopping the exploitative industry to gain an insight into what is happening through this harmful industry.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    It's my sincere hope that Bob Torres' Making a Killing will one day be considered a game-changing piece of analysis. To point out, as Torres does, how little credence is given animal rights by people involved in wider struggles for justice and equality is important; to also point out, as Torres does, how little thought is given to those wider struggles for justice and equality by those concerned with animal rights is crucial. His emphasis on placing the struggle for animal rights in a wider cont It's my sincere hope that Bob Torres' Making a Killing will one day be considered a game-changing piece of analysis. To point out, as Torres does, how little credence is given animal rights by people involved in wider struggles for justice and equality is important; to also point out, as Torres does, how little thought is given to those wider struggles for justice and equality by those concerned with animal rights is crucial. His emphasis on placing the struggle for animal rights in a wider continuum of activism -- in short, the rejection of coercive hierarchies -- is one of the most important points I've read anywhere recently. And he's a fun writer, to boot.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    This is a pretty solid discussion of the economic basis of why western culture treats animals the way that they do. I'm not always a huge fan of Torres' writing, but when he is doing more academic styled work he is at his best. Interesting stuff here! Definitly good for folks who have been veg or vegan for a while, OR for folks thinking about it. Torres leans pretty heavily on what might be dubbed an anarcho-marxian analysis of macro economies to underpin his discussion. That's no problem for me This is a pretty solid discussion of the economic basis of why western culture treats animals the way that they do. I'm not always a huge fan of Torres' writing, but when he is doing more academic styled work he is at his best. Interesting stuff here! Definitly good for folks who have been veg or vegan for a while, OR for folks thinking about it. Torres leans pretty heavily on what might be dubbed an anarcho-marxian analysis of macro economies to underpin his discussion. That's no problem for me, but if you are looking to get this book to some republican they might take issue with some of that. Give it a go and see for yourself!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bart

    Bob Torres employs Marx and Bookchin to form a critique on domination of non-human animals. Torres moves beyond typical non-human animal activist writing, examining activist tactics, which are frequently macho, sexist, and misanthropic. I found most of the theoretical analysis boring, but I do agree with Torres in that having theoretical backing is important. Torres quotes some feminists - Adams, Feinberg, LeGuin - for which Torres deserves some props. Like most anti-speciest lit, Making a Killin Bob Torres employs Marx and Bookchin to form a critique on domination of non-human animals. Torres moves beyond typical non-human animal activist writing, examining activist tactics, which are frequently macho, sexist, and misanthropic. I found most of the theoretical analysis boring, but I do agree with Torres in that having theoretical backing is important. Torres quotes some feminists - Adams, Feinberg, LeGuin - for which Torres deserves some props. Like most anti-speciest lit, Making a Killing unfortunately dismisses cultural differences in consumption of animal products.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Margot Friedman

    This book changed how I see the animal-human relationship. It is turgid and hard to read in spots because it is written by a professor with a philosophical Marxist bent. But it is a great introduction to the concept of "speciesism" -- the idea that we put ourselves above animals, without any justification. I predict that in 200 years, we will be very embarrassed that we ever thought we could "own" animals. Just like today we are embarrassed that we ever thought it was okay to "own" another perso This book changed how I see the animal-human relationship. It is turgid and hard to read in spots because it is written by a professor with a philosophical Marxist bent. But it is a great introduction to the concept of "speciesism" -- the idea that we put ourselves above animals, without any justification. I predict that in 200 years, we will be very embarrassed that we ever thought we could "own" animals. Just like today we are embarrassed that we ever thought it was okay to "own" another person.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Richelle Lee

    While the book is quite informative and reinforces other names in animal rights, such as Guy Francione and Peter Singer, Making a Killing truly is an economics book. If you aren't into economics, this book may be too dry for you as it was for me. Still worth a read if you're looking for another angle to this issue. The last chapter is the most practical and interesting. The anarchist approach to animal liberation is novel and thought-provoking and after 11 years of reading animal rights/welfare l While the book is quite informative and reinforces other names in animal rights, such as Guy Francione and Peter Singer, Making a Killing truly is an economics book. If you aren't into economics, this book may be too dry for you as it was for me. Still worth a read if you're looking for another angle to this issue. The last chapter is the most practical and interesting. The anarchist approach to animal liberation is novel and thought-provoking and after 11 years of reading animal rights/welfare literature, I learned something new.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    This was really pretty great. A must for anyone who considers herself a progressive/liberal/lefty of some sort. Quasi-academic in spots but not painfully so. I recommend that the final chapter, 'You Cannot Buy the Revolution', be read first, imho it does a better job of outlining and giving context to the rest of the book than the first chapter does. It's also there that Torres's own ideas really come to the fore. This one's a keeper.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mrdavidpeat

    An articulate, theory-lite argument for including the interests of non-human animals in a broader leftist (and specifically anarchist) movement. It also helpfully provides a brief crash-course in various forms of anarchism, ecology and animal rights. As a card-carrying member of the 'converted', I broadly agreed with many points. Still, it was nice to see them articulated and backed up. It would be interesting to discuss it with a non-vegan lefty.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Luc Brien

    This is definitely not my usual reading material, and I found it a bit of a slog. I'm not all that familiar with anarchistic principles, and this book, to me, kind of assumes a certain level of knowledge. That's fine, I picked it up as I went along. I did really enjoy the meshing of anarchism,animal rights, and other social justice issues, and 'Making a Killing' has left me wanting to know more about anarchism, and how it ties in to other things I care about.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.