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History is made as Ultimate Spider-Man Miles Morales meets the one and only Peter Parker, your Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man!


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History is made as Ultimate Spider-Man Miles Morales meets the one and only Peter Parker, your Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man!

30 review for Spider-Men

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Because bullhonky, Mysterio somehow creates a device that opens a portal to the Ultimates universe where (I think 616-Universe) Peter Parker gets zapped and meets Miles Morales aka Ultimate Spider-Man. They have some conveniently book-sized ‘ventures before the status quo is reinstated. And that’s Spider-Men. Any good? Nah. NEXT! I loves me some Miles Morales comics and even though his creators, the Bendyman and the Pitcher-laydee, reunite to helm this one, it just felt hopelessly contrived and Because bullhonky, Mysterio somehow creates a device that opens a portal to the Ultimates universe where (I think 616-Universe) Peter Parker gets zapped and meets Miles Morales aka Ultimate Spider-Man. They have some conveniently book-sized ‘ventures before the status quo is reinstated. And that’s Spider-Men. Any good? Nah. NEXT! I loves me some Miles Morales comics and even though his creators, the Bendyman and the Pitcher-laydee, reunite to helm this one, it just felt hopelessly contrived and pointless. Sara Pichelli’s art is super awesome and the scene where Peter meets Ultimate-universe May, Gwen and MJ was surprisingly moving and beautifully written, though, my word, Brian Bendis is milking the hell out of Ultimate PP’s death, ain’t he? Gawd, enough already, dude! Most of the book is a run-through of tiresome superhero comics cliches that couldn’t have been more dull to read: the two stupidly fight when they first meet, they stupidly fight the villain at the end, and the whole crossover is predictably irrelevant. The ending is an unsatisfying cop-out too. Spider-Men is spider crap! My shitty-comics-senses are tingling - I suspect there be no more good Miles Morales/Bendis comics left!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Terence

    After a hard day of keeping the city safe, Peter Parker finds what clearly looks to be a criminal's hideout. Inside he discovers a bright light and what appears to be a fish bowl. Spidey has stumbled into Mysterio's lair and before he knows what's happening he's transported somewhere else and it's daytime. As he prepares to swing away he bumps into someone quite unexpected. Of course Peter freaks out especially as everyone here knows Peter Parker was Spider-Man. As Peter tries to find out wha After a hard day of keeping the city safe, Peter Parker finds what clearly looks to be a criminal's hideout. Inside he discovers a bright light and what appears to be a fish bowl. Spidey has stumbled into Mysterio's lair and before he knows what's happening he's transported somewhere else and it's daytime. As he prepares to swing away he bumps into someone quite unexpected. Of course Peter freaks out especially as everyone here knows Peter Parker was Spider-Man. As Peter tries to find out what's happening he causes some unfortunate pain. Spider-Men is a fun short series that I imagine any fan of Miles Morales and Peter Parker would enjoy. It was good to see an adult Peter from another dimension get to bond with Miles Morales. I also had a laugh or two when they compared the differences between the different Marvel Universes.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nicolo Yu

    The awaited crossover between the regular Marvel 616 universe and of the Ultimate variety featured two versions of the company's most iconic character. It was also a rare opportunity for Brian Bendis to write the classic Spider-Man not as the class clown as he appeared in his Avengers titles but as the main lead of his own title and as a matured and more experienced hero. Even after three readings, I discover a lot of stuff I missed initially. There is a lot of things going on for this five issu The awaited crossover between the regular Marvel 616 universe and of the Ultimate variety featured two versions of the company's most iconic character. It was also a rare opportunity for Brian Bendis to write the classic Spider-Man not as the class clown as he appeared in his Avengers titles but as the main lead of his own title and as a matured and more experienced hero. Even after three readings, I discover a lot of stuff I missed initially. There is a lot of things going on for this five issue miniseries. This is not the first time Bendis has written a Peter Parker Spider-Man in his own solo book. He has written Peter initially in his acclaimed first volume of Ultimate Spider-Man. He killed Peter off and replaced him Miles Morales, whose ascension to the role of the arachnid superhero garnered a lot of media attention for his being of African-American and Latino parentage. His take on classic Peter is as a more mature veteran hero who n the course of the series became a big brother figure for Miles. They did have a little clash early on in the series when they first met. It came on because of Peter's unease of his civilian identity being public knowledge in the Ultimate universe. Ultimate Peter was outed as Spider-Man when died a heroic death at the hands of his worse enemies. This noble sacrifice gained Ultimate Peter a status of a folk hero, but his life was not the only price paid. Aunt May suffered guilt and its greatest heroes, the Ultimates, blamed themselves for what happened. Critics may call this story a money grab, since this crossover fulfilled a lot of fan dreams, but Bendis used it to further important plot points for the Ultimate Spider-Man ongoing. The story gave Miles web shooters and some badly needed advice in how to be a hero from classic Peter. It also allowed Aunt May to get closure. Seeing an adult Peter made her realized she made the right decisions raising her own nephew. It also had light moments, when Peter, Miles and Gwen shared and compared the adventures and life of both classic and Ultimate Peter. This all happened in issue four, which in my opinion is one of the best single issues of 2012. Bendis definitely knocked this story out of the park, but the art deserves as much praise. Sarah Pichelli handled the art and is also part of the regular art team on the Ultimate Spider-Man ongoing. I would definitely would want to see more of her art, especially on the top tier Marvel titles. She has a great talent in capturing and depicting the right facial expression in her characters. Nowhere is it more evident than in the fourth chapter.. There isn't much action though she could execute those scenes but it is her character work that is really a joy to behold. The interaction of classic Peter with his counterpart's family and friends when he visited Aunt May's house. Was priceless. This supports my assessment that issue four was one of the best single issues of 2012. I've read this story in singles, digitally on Comixology and the Marvel app. Marvel has released a hardcover collecting these issues and I give it my best recommendation. Read it in print or digitally, it was one of the best stories of 2012 and proof that Bendis still has the skills. Originally reviewed on The Raving Asgardian, my personal blog on comics and its myriad forms.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    You know, on paper this concept must've sounded like a guaranteed home run -- team up Peter Parker and Miles Morales under their arachnid alter egos and let the webs and quips fly. Too bad in execution it only had a good start, a great scene in the middle (Peter is reunited with Aunt May and Gwen Stacy - the book's best part), and then it sort of forgot about having much of a solid ending.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    So it's a gimmick book. There's no other way to describe a reality hopping adventure that allows two different versions of Spider-Man to meet: Peter Parker from the original Marvel universe and Miles Morales from the Ultimate universe. It's a gimmick, the sort of thing that's usually meant to drive up sales. It doesn't need to be good. It doesn't need to have heart. And yet, against all odds, Spider-Men is good, and it does have a heart. But I might be biased at this point. I've become a big fan So it's a gimmick book. There's no other way to describe a reality hopping adventure that allows two different versions of Spider-Man to meet: Peter Parker from the original Marvel universe and Miles Morales from the Ultimate universe. It's a gimmick, the sort of thing that's usually meant to drive up sales. It doesn't need to be good. It doesn't need to have heart. And yet, against all odds, Spider-Men is good, and it does have a heart. But I might be biased at this point. I've become a big fan of what Bendis has done with the Ultimate Spider-Man title, so I was predisposed to like this. I expected that I would. I expected that it would be fun to see Bendis write an older, more mature Peter Parker and to let young and inexperienced Miles Morales see that being Spider-Man can be a long term deal. And I did get that. Peter and Miles worked great together, and I would've been happy to have this miniseries stretch out a few more issues, just to get to see them taking on a few more villains together. It was fun, a lot of fun, and that was all I could have hoped for from a miniseries like this. So far, so good. And then Peter goes and does the one thing that I should have expected him to do: he goes to see Aunt May. Now, this could have been overwrought, but it wasn't. No copious weeping here. Instead, the visit ends up being mostly happy for Peter, who gets to see a version of Gwen Stacy who is alive and well, and for May, who gets to see her boy grown up into a man she can be proud of. There's that heart I was talking about. Issue #4 is mostly taken up with that meeting, and it is by far the best of the miniseries. It isn't all fabulous. The main villain, Mysterio, never really comes across as a credible threat. Frankly, I just can't take the guy seriously. There's never any doubt in my mind that Tony Stark will fix everything, so there's no tension that Peter will wind up stranded in a world where he's officially dead. That's a relatively minor thing, though, because Mysterio himself doesn't take up that much panel space. This isn't about him, it's about Peter and Miles. Also, I could have done myself a favor and read this a little later on. I'd only read the first collection with Miles, and I probably should have read at least through the second, if not the third. Yes, it's still a gimmick book. I'm not claiming it's anything but. But for a gimmick book, it's very well-written, with the characters themselves at center stage.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sud666

    Wow what can I say? This is really, really good. There I said it. Written by the supern B.M. Bendis this is a tale of two different realities. The "normal" one and the "Ultimates" universe. In one, Peter Parker is Spiderman and things are more like our reality. In the Ultimates world- Peter Parker was killed as a teenager and Miles Morales became Spiderman. This is the universe where Nick Fury is a black guy, and SHIELD is a US run organization (not the retards from the UN) and operates out of t Wow what can I say? This is really, really good. There I said it. Written by the supern B.M. Bendis this is a tale of two different realities. The "normal" one and the "Ultimates" universe. In one, Peter Parker is Spiderman and things are more like our reality. In the Ultimates world- Peter Parker was killed as a teenager and Miles Morales became Spiderman. This is the universe where Nick Fury is a black guy, and SHIELD is a US run organization (not the retards from the UN) and operates out of the Triskelion. Well Mysterio opens up a portal and send our Spiderman to the Ultimates universe. What follows is a really well done story. All in all there is not a great deal of action, but the writing is wonderful. From Peter meeting Miles, to meeting Nick Fury (the black one..)..to running into Gwen Stacy and Aunt May (since he is dead in their reality)..this was done is a great way. Bendis' writing is always funny and very true to the Spiderman style. The artwork is gorgeous. rare indeed is a comic that is so well written that it can make me laugh or reread it immediately after finishing it. It is that good. An instant classic. A must-have for any Spiderman fan. I'm glad I added it to my collection.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    This is the best thing Bendis has written in years. It's up to the same high standard as his early Ultimate Spider-man stuff. It's a simple story: Peter Parker, of the regular Marvel Universe, ends up in the Ultimate Universe. It's the crossover they told us would never happen. But it did, so we may as well get over that and enjoy it for what it is. I think doing a '616 Peter meets Ultimate Peter' story would have been boring, since Ultimate Peter was just a younger version of 616 Peter. But, Pet This is the best thing Bendis has written in years. It's up to the same high standard as his early Ultimate Spider-man stuff. It's a simple story: Peter Parker, of the regular Marvel Universe, ends up in the Ultimate Universe. It's the crossover they told us would never happen. But it did, so we may as well get over that and enjoy it for what it is. I think doing a '616 Peter meets Ultimate Peter' story would have been boring, since Ultimate Peter was just a younger version of 616 Peter. But, Peter meets Miles, and given the origin and short history of Miles, it's a much more interesting meeting. I've yet to read The Death of Spider-man story or the introduction of Miles, but I don't think that matters here. Since this story is through the eyes of Peter, it doesn't matter if you haven't read an Ultimate Spider-man comic starring Miles, since what we need to know is in the story. Obviously, if you're heavily invested into the Ultimate Comics, moments like Peter meeting Ultimate Gwen have more emotional weight. Sarah Pichelli's art is also gorgeous. Like, it really actually is. It's clear that she takes as much time drawing her facial and working on character body language as she does panelling action scenes. Her clean sleek lines are so nice to look at. She is going to be a HUGE artist (she's nearly there already). I'll admit, I was very skeptical about this series when it first came out. But once I got over that and sat down and actually read it, I really enjoyed it. It's a Spider-man story for the ages, and we're always in need for more of those.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    Even though Brian M Bendis created Spider-Men as a five-issue mini-series, I thought that this short run deserved an 8-12 issue set. Having Peter Parker jump through a portal and actually meet Miles Morales in a world without Peter Parker was brilliant. They battled for a bit and got to learn each other's powers which I thought was pretty neat. When Peter Parker meets Aunt May and Gwen Stacy was truly touching. I almost cried. I was touched but no tears fell down. On the other side, I felt as if My Even though Brian M Bendis created Spider-Men as a five-issue mini-series, I thought that this short run deserved an 8-12 issue set. Having Peter Parker jump through a portal and actually meet Miles Morales in a world without Peter Parker was brilliant. They battled for a bit and got to learn each other's powers which I thought was pretty neat. When Peter Parker meets Aunt May and Gwen Stacy was truly touching. I almost cried. I was touched but no tears fell down. On the other side, I felt as if Mysterio was a pretty weak villain and never really posed as an immediate, deadly threat. I'd like to see more of Peter and Miles fighting side-by-side. I thought their quips were pretty funny and enjoyable! Not only was the storyline exceptional and art was just as stunning, but in the end Bendis had me wanting more. I highly recommend this read. Five out of five web shooters... or venom blasts.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Bendis is consistently great. Not easy to do for such a prolific funny book writer (some inevitable stinkers here and there). The cliffhanger at the end of the series...I must know who/what 616 Miles Morales is!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Taschima

    I was so excited when I found this comic at the comic book shop! 50% off no less! I quickly bought it, quickly read it, and quickly got slightly confused. I am not confused, am I confused? Are you confused? You are, aren't you? I think I may be too. I wish these comics came with a little guide that helped you find yourself in the comics timeline. I figure this story happened before Big Time, definitely before Spider-Verse. I also don't think Spider-Gwen and Mile Morales share the same Earth (PLEA I was so excited when I found this comic at the comic book shop! 50% off no less! I quickly bought it, quickly read it, and quickly got slightly confused. I am not confused, am I confused? Are you confused? You are, aren't you? I think I may be too. I wish these comics came with a little guide that helped you find yourself in the comics timeline. I figure this story happened before Big Time, definitely before Spider-Verse. I also don't think Spider-Gwen and Mile Morales share the same Earth (PLEASE correct me if I am wrong), so I guess I shouldn't be too annoyed at how Gwen Stacy is portrayed in this comic? Kind of a spoiled brat vibe, or maybe just entitled? Didn't really like her. MJ on the other hand is all dark and gothic/emo (?), which is not how I think about MJ at all but I would have actually enjoyed reading of her journey in this particular Earth. Anyways, this comic is not really about Gwen or MJ, it is about Peter Parker meeting Miles Morales! Two awesome spider men coming together, getting to know each other, and kick ass together! Sounds quite amazing, and it really was. I loved seeing their interactions, and I only wish we had more page time. Miles is so cute idolizing Peter, and Peter is just all kinds of confused cause one minute he was fighting Mysterio, then he goes through a "portal" and suddenly everybody knows his secret identity and oh they think he is dead. This is enough to give anybody a slight headache. After a little, am, disagreement/spider fight with Miles Morales, soon enough Peter is taken to the big guns (Nick Fury! Iron Man!) and shown he is definitely not in his side of New York anymore. Mysterio of course will not leave well enough alone, and decides to follow Peter in order to "end him once and for all!" (like a good, classic, dumb-ass super villain). Peter in the mean time must navigate this new Earth, dodge Mysterio's attempt at the killing, and somehow make it back home before it is too late. Things I am still confused about: • What is up with Peter Parker and MJ here? Why is he so hesitant to see her? I started reading Spider-Man for reals during Spider-Man: Big Time Ultimate Collection and I THINK this takes place before then. So I have no clue as to the context. • Peter mentions his Nick Fury is white? Come again? Is this really a thing in his Earth? Cause for most Marvel (that I know of, let's call it the "main stream Marvel world") Nick Fury is definitely black unless I am all messed up in my Earths. Please someone clarify. Extra things I really enjoyed: • Mile's Earth Iron Man. He just cracked me up. He was soo pissed Mysterio beat him to the inter-dimensional punch, and every time he got some page time he was just making me chuckle. We also get to see Thor and others, but Iron Man definitely stole the spotlight. Anyways, I enjoyed the comic book for what it is and it actually gives me some context for scenes that happen in Spider-Verse when they reference Peter having met Miles before. It was a very quick read, and yes Humberto Ramos did not do the drawings (his Peter Parker is my favorite) but this artist I think is my second favorite Peter Parker. He is drawn very mature looking and all grown up. Just like I like my Peter Parkers, I am so done reading about his teenage years (or even watching him go through the same shit again and again-- though I love Andrew Garfield...) But that is a conversation for another time, Spider-Men is definitely worth picking up!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Gene Kannenberg Jr

    The reason this book exists is the very reason that so many people find it hard to "get" superhero comics. Briefly? There's another "Marvel Universe"* outside the regular one with all the heroes you probably know (from the movies if nowhere else**). This "Ultimate universe" has the same heroes, mostly, although with sometimes subtle, other times profound differences. Perhaps the biggest difference is that "Ultimate" Spider-Man--a youthful Peter Parker--died. In the Ultimate universe, at least so The reason this book exists is the very reason that so many people find it hard to "get" superhero comics. Briefly? There's another "Marvel Universe"* outside the regular one with all the heroes you probably know (from the movies if nowhere else**). This "Ultimate universe" has the same heroes, mostly, although with sometimes subtle, other times profound differences. Perhaps the biggest difference is that "Ultimate" Spider-Man--a youthful Peter Parker--died. In the Ultimate universe, at least so far, dead means dead (unlike the regular Marvel Universe, where people die and come back to life over and over, like clockwork). But before too long, Miles Morales, a thirteen-year-old mixed-race youth, gained spider-powers and assumed the mantle of Spider-Man. These two universes existed side-by-side on the comics store shelves for a dozen years, but until Spider-Men, there had never been a cross-over story bringing them together. If you're confused, you probably don't read superhero comics all that regularly. And therefore, Spider-Men might not be the book for you to start with. Writer Brian Michael Bendis (who's scribed Ultimate Spider-Man from day one) does his best to set the stage(s) for this event: we get a very clear idea of who Peter Parker is, and a somewhat less-clear but still revealing portrait of Miles Morales. The first chapter opens with a several-page monologue by Peter/Spider-Man about why he loves New York City; once Peter gets transported to the Ultimate universe and Miles shows up, we see how the young hero is slowly fitting into the super-fabric of his own version of the city. But the heart of the book--and I do mean heart--lies in the meeting, mid-point in the narrative, between "our" Peter Parker and the Ultimate versions of Peter's Aunt May May and Gwen Stacy (who, in our universe, was Peter's girlfriend until she was killed at the hands of the Green Goblin, in one of the most momentous story lines in the character's history--a death which haunts him only second to that of his Uncle Ben). Clearly, beyond the hook of the first cross-over between these universes, what writer Bendis is most interested in is these characters. At first, May and Gwen--like everyone else--chides this adult Spider-Man for dressing up in the dead Parker's costume (his identity having been revealed to the world at his death). Once Peter unmasks and, predictably, May faints at the knowledge that her beloved nephew (at least a version of him) is alive and in her life again, the three characters have a lengthy conversation, which moves from tentative outreach and regret to gradual acceptance and, eventually, a kind of joy. It's pure soap opera. But then, that's really what superhero comics are, when they work well. The costumes and powers and fights are part of the genre, of course, but the serial nature of superhero comic book storytelling has relied on the emotional histrionics of soap opera since at least the birth of the so-called Marvel Age of Comics in the 1960s. Writer Stan Lee and artist Jack Kirby's Fantastic Four began the trend, but Lee and artist Steve Ditko's Amazing Spider-Man arguably perfected the formula. Bendis and Ultimate Spider-Man artist Sara Pichelli show a lot of comfort working in larger-than-life, character-based psychodrama here. Pichelli's artwork is lean and clean and very much what good super-hero comic art looks like now, with detailed environments and some very nicely exaggerated spider-poses on our eponymous heroes. But if anything, her depiction of facial expressions is a bit restrained--which would be fine in a literary slice-of-life comic, but super-soap gives you a license to kick up the histrionics. Still, that's a small quibble. I prefer my cartooning a bit more expressive and abstracted (see: Ditko and Kirby again), but as contemporary superhero art goes, this is fine stuff. Layouts are varied but always readable, moving the story forward without much in the way of flashy distractions. I haven't talked much about the plot or the villain here. But really, beyond the fact that Spider-Man goes to the Ultimate Universe*** and meets not only his replacement but also several other heroes, the plot's incidental to the character interactions. If you haven't read many superhero comics--particularly Spider-Man comics--the character stakes might not mean all that much to you. (Again, serial storytelling means that you get to know these characters in depth; a small verbal aside here can feel freighted with import if you've followed the characters beforehand.) But for regular Spider-Man readers, Spider-Men provides a dose of emotion and a bit of wonder. And Peter's mysterious discovery at the very end ensures that there will be more where this story came from, in some other fashion. *Actually, there are an infinite number of them, but I'm trying to keep this simple... **Although the Marvel movies often conflate the "original" and "ultimate" versions of these heroes... ***Where everyone talks in a mixed-case typeface, unlike the all-caps "regular" universe. No, there's no particular reason I placed this footnote in this sentence; I just wanted to shoehorn in a font-nerd reference somewhere... (originally published at http://one-sentence-reviews.blogspot....)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Natasha

    Why can’t Bendis write this good all the time?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Your Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man (the one bitten by the radioactive spider) spots an eerie purple energy bolt while swinging through New York one evening. On investigating, he encounters his old enemy Mysterio and is sucked into the damaged eerie-purple-energy-bolt-creating device and delivered into a different part of Manhattan, now in broad daylight. Well, not exactly the Manhattan he knows. Turns out there is a different Spider-Man here, successor to Peter Parker and in a different suit ( Your Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man (the one bitten by the radioactive spider) spots an eerie purple energy bolt while swinging through New York one evening. On investigating, he encounters his old enemy Mysterio and is sucked into the damaged eerie-purple-energy-bolt-creating device and delivered into a different part of Manhattan, now in broad daylight. Well, not exactly the Manhattan he knows. Turns out there is a different Spider-Man here, successor to Peter Parker and in a different suit (and bitten by a second-generation genetically modified super-spider). Needless to say, adventures ensue.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Will Cooper

    Spider-Man (from age 13, so a while back) swings around and finds Mysterio who has found a portal to the Ultimate universe and Mystie throws him in the portal. Interesting premise. But then it's dumb. SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS Mysterio thinks about shutting down the portal to banish Spider-Man forever...but he decides to send his avatar to fight him in the Ultimate universe. He jostled him, but GASP didn't kill him, so instead of shutting down the portal, he just keeps it open? I guess the small sa Spider-Man (from age 13, so a while back) swings around and finds Mysterio who has found a portal to the Ultimate universe and Mystie throws him in the portal. Interesting premise. But then it's dumb. SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS Mysterio thinks about shutting down the portal to banish Spider-Man forever...but he decides to send his avatar to fight him in the Ultimate universe. He jostled him, but GASP didn't kill him, so instead of shutting down the portal, he just keeps it open? I guess the small saving grace is that Spidey explores the differences between his world and the Ultimate universe, like Aunt May, Gwen, Nick Fury, etc. But nothing really happens in this 5 issue story. Oh, and once again Mysterio talks about shutting down the portal, but decides against it for no real reason, allowing Spidey and the Ultimates to come through and defeat him. Very dumb. (Though, if we're being honest, if Mysterio actually acted like a villain with any brains and did shut the portal down, Bendis would have had Tony Stark make another portal because of Mysterio's avatar, but still. Dumb.)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    Just as powerful the second time around. Cannot wait for Spider-Men II.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sina Tavoosi

    I needed something to rekindle my love for comics. This wasn't it. Should read something from Image, just to be safe.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    I really enjoyed this its alot of fun. Peter Parker meeting Ultimate May and Gwen sure pulled on the heart strings.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cameron

    Spider-Men is the worst kind of amazing. The kind that goes by way too fast and is over way too soon. It's so good that I considered not giving it back to the library I borrowed it from because I didn't want the book to leave my house. (I said considered! I returned it. I'm not evil.) It's not the best Spider-Man (Men? Whatever.) story, but few have left me with a bigger desire to obtain more of it than this one. The story sees Spider-Man attempting to foil an evil plot by Mysterio involving a tr Spider-Men is the worst kind of amazing. The kind that goes by way too fast and is over way too soon. It's so good that I considered not giving it back to the library I borrowed it from because I didn't want the book to leave my house. (I said considered! I returned it. I'm not evil.) It's not the best Spider-Man (Men? Whatever.) story, but few have left me with a bigger desire to obtain more of it than this one. The story sees Spider-Man attempting to foil an evil plot by Mysterio involving a trans-dimensional portal. Things don't quite go according to plan and Spider-Man ends up falling through the portal leading to, astonishingly, the first crossover between the standard and Ultimate Marvel universes. Where this tired trope is often just an excuse to get some cheap laughs from the audience, Bendis doesn't waste the opportunity he has here. This one's a heavy hitter. Peter Parker meets his alter-ego's Ultimate counterpart, learns of Ultimate Pete's death, reunites with people he lost in his world, and much more. Brian Michael Bendis is incredibly good at touching on all the different emotional aspects of Peter and his family's lives. It's what made Ultimate Spider-Man so good, and it's clear he hasn't lost his handle on the character. Most of the right notes are hit with just enough left in reserve for future stories. (Please let there be future stories). The interactions between all the characters are great and you can tell that Bendis really understands them (which he should, considering he created most of them). Helping matters immensely is Sara Pichelli's art, which, while not problem free, really sells each emotional beat. She can draw facial expressions with the best of them. In fact, I haven't seen faces this expressive since Ryan Sook drew "Life Support" in Action Comics #900. Every scene benefits from her penciling and increases the impact of every panel twofold. One disclaimer is necessary here. The book is great, but a lot of reading is required to get the full enjoyment of it. You'll need a fondness for both iterations of Spider-Man. Otherwise the book is mostly just a bunch of characters reminiscing about people you don't know with a few action scenes thrown in. I can't say much more about the book without spoiling it, but I can say that you'll laugh, you'll cry, you'll search the back of the book for more pages because it ended too soon. One of the best Spidey books I've read in quite a while, and I read a lot of them.

  19. 4 out of 5

    B. P. Rinehart

    This is, to my mind, the third best storyline in Miles Morales' initial run (after Ultimate Comics Spider-Man, Vol. 4 and Ultimate Comics Spider-Man, Vol. 5, respectively). This series would be taking place some time around the events of Ultimate Comics Spider-Man, Vol.3 (I would say before the official meeting took place in that book) and this special is the deal breaker. If you did not like the title or character after this you were not going to ever and the opposite is true. I still read this This is, to my mind, the third best storyline in Miles Morales' initial run (after Ultimate Comics Spider-Man, Vol. 4 and Ultimate Comics Spider-Man, Vol. 5, respectively). This series would be taking place some time around the events of Ultimate Comics Spider-Man, Vol.3 (I would say before the official meeting took place in that book) and this special is the deal breaker. If you did not like the title or character after this you were not going to ever and the opposite is true. I still read this one over again because everything clicked and it manages to bring the whole Spider-Man mythos to bear in such a neat intimate way. When I read this series I had not read the pre-Miles Ultimate Spider-Man and had not been keeping up with the Amazing Spider-Man comic. This book was a crossover that brought both of these legacies to the fore and was the first time we really saw the emergence of a unique superhero in Miles Morales. Of course, so much has changed in Marvel Comics since this crossover (which was written to commemorate Spider-Man's 50th anniversary), but yet this book seems even now to transcend and quietly point to these changes. This book cemented in my mind how crucial Sara Pichelli's artwork was to the book and I am glad she is coming back for the 2016 relaunch. I love the totality of expressions on her character's faces and how her characters literally leap out of the frame. To make it short: this book for me marks the beginning to Morales' transition to truly becoming Spider-Man.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Stewart

    Re-read 2019: I'm on a big arachnid kick after the incredible Spiderverse movie, and this really held up on a second reading. It's still a blast. My initial opinions haven't changed, only solidified. 2015 review: What to say about Spider-Men? ... Holy web shooters this was fun. I know people love to hate on Brian Michael Bendis but, for my money, he spins some of the best Spider-Man tales ever told. And he's really in tip-top form here. The premise is pretty simple: Peter accidentally stumbles u Re-read 2019: I'm on a big arachnid kick after the incredible Spiderverse movie, and this really held up on a second reading. It's still a blast. My initial opinions haven't changed, only solidified. 2015 review: What to say about Spider-Men? ... Holy web shooters this was fun. I know people love to hate on Brian Michael Bendis but, for my money, he spins some of the best Spider-Man tales ever told. And he's really in tip-top form here. The premise is pretty simple: Peter accidentally stumbles upon Mysterio’s secret lair. A brief fight breaks out and Peter gets sucked into a dimensional portal. As it turns out, the universe he got sucked into has its own Spider-Man: Miles Morales. And Peter Parker is dead. Let the games begin! Simple in theory, yes. But it is so much more. Bendis absolutely CRUSHES this. The dialogue is spot-on and he makes all of the characters come right off the page. It’s really a very… emotional experience, I guess you could say. The art is also fantastic. I don’t really know what my expectations were when I started reading it but it wildly exceeded whatever they were. I'm sure others won't feel as strongly as I do about this but I'm a massive fan of the Ultimate Spider-Man universe and everything about this resonated with me in a positive way.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Justyn Rampa

    So I read this in single issues mostly because I am a HUGE Brian Michael Bendis fan and I also have been reading Ultimate Comics Spiderman featuring Miles Morales, plus it seemed like an intriguing concept that was promised never to happen. The premise is a crossover event between the 616 Marvel Universe (where most Marvel stories takes place) and the Ultimate Universe (where all the Ultimate Marvel stories take place). Originally, Ultimate Marvel was created as a way to tell new and different st So I read this in single issues mostly because I am a HUGE Brian Michael Bendis fan and I also have been reading Ultimate Comics Spiderman featuring Miles Morales, plus it seemed like an intriguing concept that was promised never to happen. The premise is a crossover event between the 616 Marvel Universe (where most Marvel stories takes place) and the Ultimate Universe (where all the Ultimate Marvel stories take place). Originally, Ultimate Marvel was created as a way to tell new and different stories featuring the long standing Marvel characters like Spider-man and X-Men. It became wildly successful and has continued to this day. Brian Michael Bendis, who has been writing Ultimate Spider-man exclusively since it began which has been at least a decade, is a creative and prolific genius and has created what many are calling perhaps the greatest crossover event of the year. I don't want to go into too many details but having Miles Morales and Peter Parker in the same story led to some powerful storytelling that was equally humorous and awesome as it was emotional and profound. This miniseries was nothing short of brilliant for Spidey fans in all universes!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Fun, funny and occasionally touching. A great crossover event that ends too soon. I wish to hell this had gone on for a very long time - there are so many ways to mine the possibilities of these Spider-Men touching each others' lives. Just getting to see and talk to an alternate-reality version of so many people you know, love, trust or hate is an amazing confluence of wish-fulfilment and fantasy. Why *wouldn't* you want to stick around as long as possible and find out what's fundamental about p Fun, funny and occasionally touching. A great crossover event that ends too soon. I wish to hell this had gone on for a very long time - there are so many ways to mine the possibilities of these Spider-Men touching each others' lives. Just getting to see and talk to an alternate-reality version of so many people you know, love, trust or hate is an amazing confluence of wish-fulfilment and fantasy. Why *wouldn't* you want to stick around as long as possible and find out what's fundamental about people and what's dependent on circumstances? I enjoyed Bendis' writing as always, and Pichelli's art is growing on me (though she needs to be more careful with people's heads - misshapen other body parts I can handle, but when Parker's head looks like the love child of Hammerhead and an oxen, there's a problem). But her drawing talent is obvious - and her ability to convey real emotional weight with facial expressions is huge - not to mention her ability to make action seem so easy and fluid. Damn I really wish this had gone on for a lot longer. What's the latest trade with some Bendis writing in it? Lemme go track that down right now...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    I really enjoyed this book, as I do most by Bendis. However, this was a great idea, crossing over Peter Parker from the regular Marvel Universe into the Ultimate Marvel Universe. In that universe, he's dead, so it's sort of like a ghost appearing, and he manages to make quite an impact in his time there. He runs into the new Ultimate Spider-Man, Miles Morales, and it's like a kid getting to meet his hero back from the dead. He also runs into the Ultimate versions of Nick Fury, Iron Man, Thor and I really enjoyed this book, as I do most by Bendis. However, this was a great idea, crossing over Peter Parker from the regular Marvel Universe into the Ultimate Marvel Universe. In that universe, he's dead, so it's sort of like a ghost appearing, and he manages to make quite an impact in his time there. He runs into the new Ultimate Spider-Man, Miles Morales, and it's like a kid getting to meet his hero back from the dead. He also runs into the Ultimate versions of Nick Fury, Iron Man, Thor and Hawkeye (the Ultimates - an Avengers like team of this universe). That makes for some interesting discussions of each version, as in 'My Tony Stark quit drinking'. All this happens because of a crazy scheme by Mysterio. So it was quasi-believable in that regard. I also enjoyed the scenes between Peter and Aunt May/Gwen Stacy (who is alive in the Ulitmate Universe) and the emotion felt there. All in all a great book storyline wise, but mostly for the characters and their interaction. I would be happy to see more of these cross-over/team ups.

  24. 4 out of 5

    William

    Crossover between the mainstream universe Spider-Man and the Ultimate version. The art by Sara Pichelli gives it a higher mark than I'd otherwise give the story. True to form, Bendis just can't write characters with their own voices... everyone sounds like they're parroting him. And he seems to have no idea what Mysterio is capable of, putting the character well above his punching weight in terms of having him be able to cross dimensions. Given that he disregards continuity endlessly, we shouldn Crossover between the mainstream universe Spider-Man and the Ultimate version. The art by Sara Pichelli gives it a higher mark than I'd otherwise give the story. True to form, Bendis just can't write characters with their own voices... everyone sounds like they're parroting him. And he seems to have no idea what Mysterio is capable of, putting the character well above his punching weight in terms of having him be able to cross dimensions. Given that he disregards continuity endlessly, we shouldn't be surprised.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Shaun

    This is an emotionally satisfying passing of the torch of Peter Parker Spider-Man to Miles Morales Spider-Man. The only real failing of this comic is that the story is too short and could have plumbed the depths of this scenario a little more deeply. But I'm also happy with everything we did get out of this book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Charlos

    A universe crossover that succeeds in not sucking. The Miles Morales storyline continues to be strong.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    COME ON, BENDIS! What's up with the Miles Morales of the regular Marvel Universe?! Also, for real, I got choked up when Peter Parker meets Ultimate Aunt May and Gwen Stacy.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    This was everything I wanted and more.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    DNF

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ottery StCatchpole

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I really wanted to love this book, but honestly, this is not the first time I've delved into the Ultimate Universe and felt a great distaste for it. Quite simply, the Ultimate Marvel Universe exemplifies everything that I find wrong with comics today. Written by the architect of what I find are some of the worst atrocities to comic books in our modern age. Hipster douchebombs will likely inform you, on forums about comics no less, that the modern world of comics is spearheaded by the writer's a I really wanted to love this book, but honestly, this is not the first time I've delved into the Ultimate Universe and felt a great distaste for it. Quite simply, the Ultimate Marvel Universe exemplifies everything that I find wrong with comics today. Written by the architect of what I find are some of the worst atrocities to comic books in our modern age. Hipster douchebombs will likely inform you, on forums about comics no less, that the modern world of comics is spearheaded by the writer's as opposed to say the way comics always have been. One of their main examples is Brian Michael Bendis, whose work I've followed on and off for years. I own issues of his series Powers, which I liked. Though I stopped that book soon after he became the chief architect of Marvel Comics where he and others like him, Mark Millar and such, took their superhero deconstruction bit and watched it become an extreme parody of itself. I know a lot of people are a fan of this, though not as many as before as comic sales are constantly in a decline. They repeatedly teeter around 70k and 300k, but those figures of late have become ridiculously inflated given that both DC Comics and Marvel have taken to renumbering their books and forcing all the comic stores to carry tremendous numbers of different covers for the same stupid comics. A practice I loathe and which I find partly responsible for destroying okay, so hurting, since obviously the comic book industry still exists the comic book industry before. Brain Michael Bendis does what he normally does, decompresses a story and makes what any skilled writer might have made a two part issue take five issues. He also gives us an interesting story, but nothing really happens of any great import. If you're a reader of Spider-man in what is referred to as the 616 universe, the regular Marvel universe, nothing happens to change Peter Parker's existence in any great way. Its just another adventure he has. As for Miles Morales, same thing, outside of meeting the grown up alternate reality version of his world's original Spider-man and receiving his blessing, he really doesn't have his continuity much moved or done anything with. This is actually one of those nice books, I so used to love comics doing, that tell a good story without mussing up too much continuity. Either the regular titles can reference it, or they don't have to, and for that I applaud Mr. Bendis. It is nice to have books like that because honestly, they serve to introduce fans of either the Ultimate Universe Spider-man to the regular Spider-man or vice versa. Which, by my comic book writing philosophy, is the job of any great comic book issue. To introduce new readers to new characters or situations while telling a solid story. I don't hate Mr. Bendis' work, just some of the extreme things he has done with the regular Marvel universe that have made the books unpalatable to me, which sadly, the Ultimate books revel in to the extreme. Ridiculously violent imagery, adult themes that are neither handled maturely or entertainingly but rather with the sole purpose of creating shock value and quite honestly disturbing people. Things like Wolverine's and Professor X's unhealthy love of a very young Jean Grey, Quicksilver and Wanda's relationship, and pretty much every violent and disgusting death that has been lauded over in the Ultimate universe. It merely does not work, a world like that could never really have a character like Captain America. It really just doesn't work. I can suspend my belief, but the writer has to sell it and oftentimes Mr. Bendis and his other Ultimate writer's fail to do any such thing. A greater sin that Mr. Bendis commits is that he has never ever been able to sell me on Peter Parker. He just does not sound like Peter when he's narrating or dressed as Spider-man. His Ultimate Spider-man, even that Peter Parker has always been, in my opinion, written very well by Mr. Bendis. He clearly has an ear to how kids nowadays speak and it really works when he's writing Ultimate Spider-man and Miles is an even more loveable version of Spider-Man, I can't help but love and want to read his book, but given the violent and obscene nature of the events that normally take place in the Ultimate Universe I find myself hard pressed to buy his books. But Miles is a loveable character so likely I will. While I've spoken on the many reasons I do not like Mr. Bendis' work, I have to grudgingly admit, this is one of his better stories. Miles is a loveable character, and he writes him very well, but likely because like the original Ultimate Spider-man, he is an original creation. But Peter Parker from the 616 sounds very, very awkward. He just doesn't come across as in character, none of his actions, even if the portal has made him feel wonky really seem to make any sense, and the whole story really could have taken place in two issues and not across 5 and filled with so much useless filler. But these are tropes of Mr. Bendis, who is in the market of selling monthly books and not necessarily good books. As to the art, the covers by Mr. Cheung are awesome. I really do wish he had been the one illustrating this book, but Ms. Pichelli does an awesome job and I am glad that she is the one responsible for illustrating Miles Morale's adventures in his regular book. Her art is beautiful, fine line, and amazing. I did however, have some problems with some panels that seemed to be superfluous, and others that were arranged oddly but as that has happened before with Ultimate Spider-man I think I would lay the blame of that more on Mr. Bendis than on Ms. Pichelli. This book is not necessary to enjoy either of the Spider-men's respective regular titles, so I do not recommend it except to those people like me who are either a fan of Miles, Ms. Pichelli, or crossovers. And also to people who are fans of Mr. Bendis or his Peter Parker, which I do not count myself a fan of. It was a good solid story but not awesome, necessary, except to get Miles more attention and it all ends with a cliffhanger that I do not know or believe will possibly be picked up in the regular 616 Spider-man book any time soon considering his present problems. A good book, not a great one, but definitely a nice introduction to the Ultimate Universe and the new Spider-man. As far as supplemental material, it includes the alternate covers and 2nd printing covers as well as some sketches but nothing else. If, like me, you own the single issues of the series I wouldn't worry about owning the trade, unless of course you'd rather have it collected like that.

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