counter create hit Carnival in Romans: Mayhem and Massacre in a French City - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Carnival in Romans: Mayhem and Massacre in a French City

Availability: Ready to download

The city of Romans, in Dauphine province in S. France, was the annual scene of a colorfully animated Mardi gras carnival. In 1580, however, winter festivities degenerated into bloody ambush. While costumed craftsmen & peasants mimed & danced their uprising in the streets, & notables & bourgeoisie hurried from banquets to balls in ostentatious finery, Jean Serve-Paumier, ma The city of Romans, in Dauphine province in S. France, was the annual scene of a colorfully animated Mardi gras carnival. In 1580, however, winter festivities degenerated into bloody ambush. While costumed craftsmen & peasants mimed & danced their uprising in the streets, & notables & bourgeoisie hurried from banquets to balls in ostentatious finery, Jean Serve-Paumier, master craftsman, draper & popular party leader was assassinated, his supporters beaten & pursued by a mob hired by Judge Antoine Guerin, leader of the inflexibly reactionary part of the ruling party. More than a cruel incident, this night marked the intersection of an urban movement & even larger rural stirrings. Ladurie marshals a wealth of evidence & reveals the town of Romans as a microcosm of the political & religious antagonisms tearing 16th-century France. Le Carnival de Romans: de la chandeleur au mercredi des cenders describes the massacre of about 20 artisans at an annual carnival. Ladurie uses the two surviving eyewitness accounts--one hostile towards the victims by Guérin, the other sympathetic yet often inaccurate by Piémond--along with such information as plague & tax lists, to treat the massacre as a microcosm of rural political, social & religious conflicts, thereby providing a good example of microhistory.


Compare
Ads Banner

The city of Romans, in Dauphine province in S. France, was the annual scene of a colorfully animated Mardi gras carnival. In 1580, however, winter festivities degenerated into bloody ambush. While costumed craftsmen & peasants mimed & danced their uprising in the streets, & notables & bourgeoisie hurried from banquets to balls in ostentatious finery, Jean Serve-Paumier, ma The city of Romans, in Dauphine province in S. France, was the annual scene of a colorfully animated Mardi gras carnival. In 1580, however, winter festivities degenerated into bloody ambush. While costumed craftsmen & peasants mimed & danced their uprising in the streets, & notables & bourgeoisie hurried from banquets to balls in ostentatious finery, Jean Serve-Paumier, master craftsman, draper & popular party leader was assassinated, his supporters beaten & pursued by a mob hired by Judge Antoine Guerin, leader of the inflexibly reactionary part of the ruling party. More than a cruel incident, this night marked the intersection of an urban movement & even larger rural stirrings. Ladurie marshals a wealth of evidence & reveals the town of Romans as a microcosm of the political & religious antagonisms tearing 16th-century France. Le Carnival de Romans: de la chandeleur au mercredi des cenders describes the massacre of about 20 artisans at an annual carnival. Ladurie uses the two surviving eyewitness accounts--one hostile towards the victims by Guérin, the other sympathetic yet often inaccurate by Piémond--along with such information as plague & tax lists, to treat the massacre as a microcosm of rural political, social & religious conflicts, thereby providing a good example of microhistory.

30 review for Carnival in Romans: Mayhem and Massacre in a French City

  1. 4 out of 5

    Siria

    A slog. As befits an annaliste, Le Roy Ladurie is more interested in long-term structure than he is the personalities which drove the popular revolt in a small town in sixteenth-century southern France. He explores the ways in which rising discontent with the minimal taxes paid by the nobility, rising prices, tensions between Protestantism and Catholicism, and a host of other issues fed into the bloody events of St Blaise's Day, 1580. But ironically, for someone who pays so much attention to str A slog. As befits an annaliste, Le Roy Ladurie is more interested in long-term structure than he is the personalities which drove the popular revolt in a small town in sixteenth-century southern France. He explores the ways in which rising discontent with the minimal taxes paid by the nobility, rising prices, tensions between Protestantism and Catholicism, and a host of other issues fed into the bloody events of St Blaise's Day, 1580. But ironically, for someone who pays so much attention to structures in general, Le Roy Ladurie paid little to the internal organisation of this book. I found it difficult to get a clear picture of how all the pieces of his argument hung together, and some of his statements a bit... dubious. Particularly the page he spent discussing young men and sexual assault, which smacked entirely too much of apologia to my mind. If you work specifically on this time period, you might find more here of interest and relevance than I did, but I bounced off this one hard.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dan Urbach

    This book is very interesting, but it is a bit of slog. The idea is fascinating, and the author states his excitement about it in the introduction: the history of a single place in France. He had to focus on one event or the history would have been too long. The book is apparently written to engage scholars as well as the general public, but it seems more likely to work for the former than the latter. Not being a scholar myself, it's difficult, but I'm determined. It does show one how digging in This book is very interesting, but it is a bit of slog. The idea is fascinating, and the author states his excitement about it in the introduction: the history of a single place in France. He had to focus on one event or the history would have been too long. The book is apparently written to engage scholars as well as the general public, but it seems more likely to work for the former than the latter. Not being a scholar myself, it's difficult, but I'm determined. It does show one how digging into history works, and that is probably the most interesting thing about tit.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Norman Smith

    This is a very impressive work of scholarship, but it does plunge more deeply into the pool of facts than I am really interested in. Consequently, I found myself skimming through large stretches of the book. However, if I were interested in 16th century France and social relations, this would be aces!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    Not as interesting for me as Montaillou, probably because I know so much more about the Cathars than about the general peasant situation in sixteenth century southern France, but still an excellent example of the increasingly popular field of microhistory.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lanny

    I'll read anything by Emmanuel.

  6. 5 out of 5

    João Leonel

  7. 4 out of 5

    Max

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marc

  9. 4 out of 5

    Harald Lindbach

  10. 5 out of 5

    Eeva Suhonen

  11. 4 out of 5

    Averin

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dasman

  13. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dale

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joppe

  16. 4 out of 5

    Paul Cohen

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rik Mets

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mike Follett

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

  20. 5 out of 5

    Renaud

  21. 5 out of 5

    Eric Vollmer

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kenzie

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nina Ylinen

  24. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Svensson

  25. 5 out of 5

    Steven Teasdale

  26. 5 out of 5

    Eliel Karhu

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ansley

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  29. 5 out of 5

    Karl Øen

  30. 5 out of 5

    Derek

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.