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Pride and Prescience (Or, A Truth Universally Acknowledged), a Mr. and Mrs. Darcy Mystery, embroils the joyous newlyweds Elizabeth and Fitzwilliam Darcy in a mystery involving one of their wedding guests. The lovely Caroline Bingley is engaged to marry a rich and charismatic American. Unfortunately, this windswept courtship is marred by many strange events-- nocturnal wande Pride and Prescience (Or, A Truth Universally Acknowledged), a Mr. and Mrs. Darcy Mystery, embroils the joyous newlyweds Elizabeth and Fitzwilliam Darcy in a mystery involving one of their wedding guests. The lovely Caroline Bingley is engaged to marry a rich and charismatic American. Unfortunately, this windswept courtship is marred by many strange events-- nocturnal wanderings, spooked horses, carriage accidents, and even an apparent suicide attempt. Soon the whole Bingley family seems the target of a mysterious plot, with only the Darcys recognizing the danger Sinister forces are afoot and the Darcys must get to the bottom of the plot before the blushing bride descends into madness--or worse.


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Pride and Prescience (Or, A Truth Universally Acknowledged), a Mr. and Mrs. Darcy Mystery, embroils the joyous newlyweds Elizabeth and Fitzwilliam Darcy in a mystery involving one of their wedding guests. The lovely Caroline Bingley is engaged to marry a rich and charismatic American. Unfortunately, this windswept courtship is marred by many strange events-- nocturnal wande Pride and Prescience (Or, A Truth Universally Acknowledged), a Mr. and Mrs. Darcy Mystery, embroils the joyous newlyweds Elizabeth and Fitzwilliam Darcy in a mystery involving one of their wedding guests. The lovely Caroline Bingley is engaged to marry a rich and charismatic American. Unfortunately, this windswept courtship is marred by many strange events-- nocturnal wanderings, spooked horses, carriage accidents, and even an apparent suicide attempt. Soon the whole Bingley family seems the target of a mysterious plot, with only the Darcys recognizing the danger Sinister forces are afoot and the Darcys must get to the bottom of the plot before the blushing bride descends into madness--or worse.

30 review for Pride and Prescience: Or, A Truth Universally Acknowledged

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I've always liked the idea of a sequel for Lizzie and Darcy; the original Pride and Prejudice story almost demands further exploration than the simple happy ending that Jane Austen leaves us with. I was also pleased to find that this was not another bodice-ripping romance sequal of Lizzie and Darcy like others I have read and been disappointed with. I thought that Bebris did a very good job in keeping the characters of Lizzie and Darcy intact; everything they do and say in the novel is fairly on I've always liked the idea of a sequel for Lizzie and Darcy; the original Pride and Prejudice story almost demands further exploration than the simple happy ending that Jane Austen leaves us with. I was also pleased to find that this was not another bodice-ripping romance sequal of Lizzie and Darcy like others I have read and been disappointed with. I thought that Bebris did a very good job in keeping the characters of Lizzie and Darcy intact; everything they do and say in the novel is fairly on par with what I felt Austen herself may have written about the couple. Bebris' language was perhaps slightly too descriptive; it is the type of descriptiveness and attention to ordinary everyday items that you find in a regular 'historical novel' - which is perfectly fine, but not quite the style of Austen's writing. However, that is a very minor annoyance. My main grievance was the whole supernatural story line. Perhaps the hint of supernatural elements or mysterious happenings would have been acceptable, but I felt that the use of real enchanted rings and amulets and magic took the characters too far from their original setting and made the whole story not feel a bit unlikely. That said, I did enjoy the novel overall, in particular the character's accuracy to their original counterparts.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kavita

    I have read a later book of the Mr & Mrs Darcy series and really liked it. So I decided to read all the books of the series in sequence. The first one, Pride and Prescience is set immediately after the marriage of Elizabeth and Fitzwilliam. The Bingleys are also newly married in a double ceremony. But there is also a third wedding that takes place soon, that of Caroline Bingley to an American called Parrish. Soon after the wedding, Caroline starts to behave strangely and both the Darcys and the B I have read a later book of the Mr & Mrs Darcy series and really liked it. So I decided to read all the books of the series in sequence. The first one, Pride and Prescience is set immediately after the marriage of Elizabeth and Fitzwilliam. The Bingleys are also newly married in a double ceremony. But there is also a third wedding that takes place soon, that of Caroline Bingley to an American called Parrish. Soon after the wedding, Caroline starts to behave strangely and both the Darcys and the Bingleys decide to postpone the start of their married lives to help her out. The rivalry between Parrish and the Kendall family spices things up, while Professor Randolph, an archaeologist cum mystic, also tags along. What ails Caroline? Who is out to harm the Bingleys? And then - a murder takes place! As far as the characters are concerned, I found that Bebris managed to keep them mostly believable. The Austen feel was strong and I liked the portrayal Elizabeth and Darcy's relationship. However, the plot left a lot to be desired. It all centred around supernatural mumbo jumbo and somehow appeared far removed from the earthly and satirical atmosphere of the original Austen novels. In fact, I feel Austen would have made fun of this book. The book drags endlessly and I kept waiting for something to happen as I wasn't really too interested in Caroline's problems. Something did happen - but I had to wait for 75% of the book for it. I felt some of the scenes were repetitive, especially with respect to Caroline. Less than halfway through the book, I guessed at the culprit. It simply couldn't have been anyone else. And finally, it is shocking that Caroline married a stranger unknown to any of the English society families. Even more shocking that her brother didn't even bother to check up on prospective grooms. This seems to be a massive oversight on the part of the author. Austen families were over-cautious in their choice of a spouse for their wards. This bit rang a bit untrue to me. I think the rest of the series should be better, but I can't be bothered recommending this one to anyone. When I am promised a mystery, I want a mystery, not some supernatural solution that isn't even scary or interesting!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Since first reading Pride and Prejudice many years ago, I've always had a vague hankering to read a good continuation. But the operative word here is good--I've skimmed many a sequel in a Barnes & Noble, only to be horrified by awful writing and ridiculous characterization. Anyway, I enjoyed the first chapter of this one when I read it online, so I decided to commit to the whole book. Unfortunately, the first chapter was by far the best. Overall, the writing was tolerable (but not handsome enough Since first reading Pride and Prejudice many years ago, I've always had a vague hankering to read a good continuation. But the operative word here is good--I've skimmed many a sequel in a Barnes & Noble, only to be horrified by awful writing and ridiculous characterization. Anyway, I enjoyed the first chapter of this one when I read it online, so I decided to commit to the whole book. Unfortunately, the first chapter was by far the best. Overall, the writing was tolerable (but not handsome enough to tempt me). There were a bunch of words and phrases that didn't seem true to the period, like when Elizabeth tells Darcy, "You must admit, it's a really shiny stick." ...A really shiny stick? Are we in Regency England, or Buffy the Vampire Slayer? Some of the characterization was questionable also--Caroline Bingley is a major character in this book, and she was unrecognizable. But the worst, the worst, the absolute worst thing was the plot. Everything just seemed so implausible. The resolution of the mystery was a joke. (view spoiler)[Hello! You can't explain the crazy things that have been happening by asserting that voodoo magic is real and that's caused everything. (hide spoiler)] So the hunt continues for a Pride and Prejudice sequel I can stomach. I don't want to have to write this for myself!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I'd like to give this book 5 stars, because much of it is delightful. The whole idea of following Elizabeth and Darcy through their marriage and into their new life together, was a joy. The way the story of their new life unfolded into a mystery was beautifully executed. So often the event that begins the mystery is abrupt, shocking, out of proportion with what has come before. And sometime this is very effective. But having spent many hours in Jane Austen's version of this world, it would not h I'd like to give this book 5 stars, because much of it is delightful. The whole idea of following Elizabeth and Darcy through their marriage and into their new life together, was a joy. The way the story of their new life unfolded into a mystery was beautifully executed. So often the event that begins the mystery is abrupt, shocking, out of proportion with what has come before. And sometime this is very effective. But having spent many hours in Jane Austen's version of this world, it would not have been, in this case, and the author did not make that mistake. She is, however, a very good example of just how brilliant Georgette Heyer is. Was. No, is. Her work still lives, and will forever. Georgette Heyer managed to write books in the Regency period, using Regency slang and Regency idioms, and yet never becoming obscure or prescious. Bebris uses modern slang unconsciously, throughout the book. "I figured," "all right," "inside information," "sure is," "you're sure," "right now." There's hardly a page in the book without a glaring example. One of the delights of good historical fiction is to sink oneself in the period, and this includes the language. To use modern phraseology seems, well, lazy on the part of the writer. But that wouldn't lose the book two whole stars. That was just a disappointment. The relationship between all the various characters is true to the source. The relationship between Elizabeth and Darcy, after they are married, is a delight. No, the problem with the book is where the author takes it at the ending. I've already indicated that this review contains spoilers, but let me reiterate, I'm now going to spoil the ending of the book. Read no further, unless you don't care! Elizabeth Darcy is one of the most clever and witty women in literature. But in this book, she doesn't solve the mystery because she is smart. She solves the mystery because she is psychic. Yup. We discover at the end that Elizabeth Darcy has "the Gift," and I gather that is going to fuel the subsequent novels in the series, probababy right into the Darcys' old age. Why does Elizabeth Darcy, Jane Austen's Elizabeth Darcy, need to be psychic to figure out a puzzle? The puzzle was, what is wrong with Caroline Bingley, whose behavior after her marriage goes from odd to demonstrably insane. So, wouldn't the first guess be, it's probably something about her marriage? Even Mr. Collins ought to be able to get that far. The uncanny power that Caroline's husband turns out to possess over her, is because of an enchanted ring. And there we are, right out of the bounds of Regency story telling. The ring's power is abated at the touch of Elizabeth; she intuits that it is an item of power, and thus solves the crime. Well, no, the crime is solved (as is traditional in British mysteries) with the bad guy's confession. And the fact is, if someone seemed to have an uncanny power over another, in Regency England, sorcery is NOT the first thing anyone would think of. This is, after all, the Age of Enlightenment, and educated men (and these are all educated men) scorned such superstitions. And at this time, Dr. Mesmer was the talk of Europe! Dr. Mesmer's techniques were used in an attempt to cure King George III of his madness. Demonstrations of Mesmerism were seen in every capitol, and every knowledgable person would have heard of him. And yet no one brings it up in this story. Which means the author never heard of him. Which means the author's research seems to have been, let us say, less than optimal for the writing of this book. She does mention the War of 1812, as a reason why the American is stuck in England, but doesn't carry that further; one of the characters is corresponding with someone in the United States throughout the story. And who would be carrying these letters? The Redcoats on their way to attack New Orleans? The lack of research was a disappointment. But stepping off into the world of fantasy, giving Elizabeth Darcy, whose character is firmly set by her creator, a significant power not in the original, well, that took the book out of the "delightful" category and into the, "Huh, what the heck?" And here's the thing. A psychic power, in storytelling, is an external plot point. An external plot point is an event that is completely in the control of the writer, that comes and goes at any point. "Captain! The Dilithium Crystals are melting! No, wait, they're fine!" "The child is dying. No, he's better. Oh, wait, he's dead. Nope, he's up again!" An internal plot point, events driven by previous events, or by character behavior, are much more satisfying. A Deus ex machina, after all, is an external plot point at the climax of a story. Most annoying. An example of an internal plot point would be Darcy writing Elizabeth a long letter to explain their misunderstandings, and reveal his family history, and then not staying around while she reads it. An internal plot point would be Elizabeth's friend choosing to marry Mr. Collins because she doesn't want to be an old maid, or Lydia running off with Wickham because she is a flibbertigibbet. Giving Elizabeth Darcy psychic powers just means the Dilithium Crystals will always be there to help her solve the problem. And isn't that lazy storytelling as well?

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ruby

    The first in the series of mysteries with Mr. & Mrs. Darcy and other beloved Austen characters. This story follows up on Pride and Prejudice. At the double wedding of Elizabeth and Darcy, and Jane and Bingley, Caroline Bingley announces her engagement to a charming American, and their wedding is the sensation of the season in London. When Caroline starts acting very strangely, beginning on her wedding night, the Darcys investigate. It's fun reading for Austen fans and or mystery fans. You don't The first in the series of mysteries with Mr. & Mrs. Darcy and other beloved Austen characters. This story follows up on Pride and Prejudice. At the double wedding of Elizabeth and Darcy, and Jane and Bingley, Caroline Bingley announces her engagement to a charming American, and their wedding is the sensation of the season in London. When Caroline starts acting very strangely, beginning on her wedding night, the Darcys investigate. It's fun reading for Austen fans and or mystery fans. You don't necessarily need to be thoroughly familiar with Pride and Prejudice to enjoy it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    CJ

    Have I mentioned how much I love Pride and Prejudice? I do, without apology. My daughter and I sit down to watch the BBC version at least every other month. I've seen all the movies (Matthew McFadden is my favorite Darcy). Naturally, I would gravitate towards anything even remotely related to the story (except those stupid zombie ones - a girl has to have some standards). I liked this book. Yes, it was silly and didn't quite get the feel of the time period, but Bebris put on a good show. The stor Have I mentioned how much I love Pride and Prejudice? I do, without apology. My daughter and I sit down to watch the BBC version at least every other month. I've seen all the movies (Matthew McFadden is my favorite Darcy). Naturally, I would gravitate towards anything even remotely related to the story (except those stupid zombie ones - a girl has to have some standards). I liked this book. Yes, it was silly and didn't quite get the feel of the time period, but Bebris put on a good show. The story begins only days after the double wedding. Caroline Bingley has announced her engagement to an American at the reception. What follows is a mystery with a supernatural flair. I loved the interaction between the Darcys, but felt what went on between Jane and Bingley fell a little flat. I could not find any sympathy for Caroline Bingley at all. She's just too awful a character to garner any delicate feelings. It was a fun read. I think I'll be picking up Bebris' other Mr. & Mrs. Darcy mysteries in the near future.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    I must admit to having achieved the mid-century mark without having read Pride and Prejudice; this book may compel me to correct that failing. Further I have never seen any of the movies made from the book. I truly enjoyed Pride and Prescience and I plan to read more of the series. It was great fun even for a Pride and Prejudice newbie.

  8. 5 out of 5

    ❂ Murder by Death

    I had put off reading these for ages, because I normally don't like a new author taking a beloved set of characters from the classics and 'extending' their stories. But this was recently recommended to me by a GR friend who felt that the author did a credible job with the characters. I must say, I agree. I love the original Pride and Prejudice, and was relieved to find that Ms. Bebris did a fantastic job of respecting Ms. Austen and the characters themselves. The mystery itself was clever. I don' I had put off reading these for ages, because I normally don't like a new author taking a beloved set of characters from the classics and 'extending' their stories. But this was recently recommended to me by a GR friend who felt that the author did a credible job with the characters. I must say, I agree. I love the original Pride and Prejudice, and was relieved to find that Ms. Bebris did a fantastic job of respecting Ms. Austen and the characters themselves. The mystery itself was clever. I don't often vacillate between suspects, but reading this, I at once knew who the culprit was, only to change my mind several times in the course of just a few chapters. In the end, ultimately, the villain is not a shocker, but I have to say, I just wasn't sure until the denouement. There was also a paranormal element to all of it that I hadn't expected and enjoyed quite a bit. A fabulous read I'm happy to say I discovered when there are a whole raft of additional books in the series just waiting to be bought and read - I look forward to being happily entertained by one of my favorite all-time fictional couples for quite a while to come.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joy Gerbode

    This is a great books for Jane Austen fans. Although not strictly a "cozy" by today's formula, it does feature a mystery, with Elizabeth (now Mrs. Darcy) trying to figure out is behind it. It eventually features a murder (about page 225) but the murder does tie into all the mysterious "accidents" that have been occurring throughout the book. The characters are delightful, very much the beloved Jane Austen characters we already know. The settings are old English estates, with the staircases, and This is a great books for Jane Austen fans. Although not strictly a "cozy" by today's formula, it does feature a mystery, with Elizabeth (now Mrs. Darcy) trying to figure out is behind it. It eventually features a murder (about page 225) but the murder does tie into all the mysterious "accidents" that have been occurring throughout the book. The characters are delightful, very much the beloved Jane Austen characters we already know. The settings are old English estates, with the staircases, and drawing rooms, and vast "parks" for walking paths. About 2/3 of the way through I began to suspect who the perpetrator is ... but it's not completely obvious. A little more "sluggish" reading than most cozies because of the Austen era resemblance ... but easier English to read. Good book ... and I will continue this series.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lollyletsgo

    It was really more of a 3.5, while I enjoyed the blissful afterglow of Darcy & Elizabeth's (and for that matter Bingley and Jane's) nuptials, the introduction of "voodoo"-esque touches left me feeling- meh. The mystery itself was enjoyable, and I thought the victim was deserving enough without having to add that additional layer. Having read one or two of the others, I get that Ms. Bebris is going for a more Gothic feel to these tomes, so if you are interested in the injection of the supernatura It was really more of a 3.5, while I enjoyed the blissful afterglow of Darcy & Elizabeth's (and for that matter Bingley and Jane's) nuptials, the introduction of "voodoo"-esque touches left me feeling- meh. The mystery itself was enjoyable, and I thought the victim was deserving enough without having to add that additional layer. Having read one or two of the others, I get that Ms. Bebris is going for a more Gothic feel to these tomes, so if you are interested in the injection of the supernatural added to Jane Austen's characters and time period- Enjoy! And yes, I'm going to read them all just to see if I'm correct about the supernatural aspect flowing throughout the series.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    This totally delightful series of regency mysteries completely capture the wit and whimsy of Jane Austen providing a completely believable "what comes next" story line for Darcy and Elizabeth assuming they started solving vaguely supernatural crimes together and frequently ran into every other character Austen ever wrote. I'm a bit of a fanatic for Austen sequels and Bebris totally nails the style and light, frothy energy that is the hallmark of any Austen story. Yes, the stories can veer into t This totally delightful series of regency mysteries completely capture the wit and whimsy of Jane Austen providing a completely believable "what comes next" story line for Darcy and Elizabeth assuming they started solving vaguely supernatural crimes together and frequently ran into every other character Austen ever wrote. I'm a bit of a fanatic for Austen sequels and Bebris totally nails the style and light, frothy energy that is the hallmark of any Austen story. Yes, the stories can veer into the supernatural to the point where one feels like one might be reading Austen by way of Bram Stoker but honestly they're so much fun I can forgive some flights of fancy. Bebris also gets her leads just right. Whatever Pride and Prejudice lovers may claim as their reason for loving the book the way they do I guarantee its alllll because of these two and their beautiful, sizzling chemistry. Elizabeth is every bit the witty fireball we know her to be and Darcy is her besotted, slightly starchy perfect match. The whole series is great fun and I absolutely recommend it to any fan of Austen fiction.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    This book had a couple of things going for it. It's set in the regency area and the author made an honest attempt to keep with the cultue of the period. She states up front that she wouldn't dare try to write with the skill of Austen though she must be one of those humble people one hears tell about cos she did a bang up job of it. Bravo! I love how the characters were presented as faithful portrayals of Austen's originals and didn't run 'round doing modern vulgar things with modern vulgar attit This book had a couple of things going for it. It's set in the regency area and the author made an honest attempt to keep with the cultue of the period. She states up front that she wouldn't dare try to write with the skill of Austen though she must be one of those humble people one hears tell about cos she did a bang up job of it. Bravo! I love how the characters were presented as faithful portrayals of Austen's originals and didn't run 'round doing modern vulgar things with modern vulgar attitudes and speech. Villains are villains here but no ghastly details are forced upon the reader. You really can escape to regency England for a spell. It wasn't so clean and shiny to be boring though, I mean, even Austen had Wickham and Willougby didn't she? So I rather liked it, though it's a little on the light and fluffy side, I will probably read the second one.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Sigh. A hokey beginning to an excellent series. Unfortunately, this isn't a series where you can skip over some of the books. Keep at it, the other books are much better. The characters' personalities are well written well, and true to Austen's material. The stories -- not so much. The supernatural elements are major misfits to the story, and I am relieved that Bebris abandons the supernatural parts later in the series. Elizabeth Bennett doesn't need to have psychic powers. I do like how in the l Sigh. A hokey beginning to an excellent series. Unfortunately, this isn't a series where you can skip over some of the books. Keep at it, the other books are much better. The characters' personalities are well written well, and true to Austen's material. The stories -- not so much. The supernatural elements are major misfits to the story, and I am relieved that Bebris abandons the supernatural parts later in the series. Elizabeth Bennett doesn't need to have psychic powers. I do like how in the later books, she and Darcy interact with other Austen characters. (I'm a sucker for crossovers.) Bebris chooses good matches for the single characters in the later books (Kitty, Anne de Burgh, Georgiana). Though the books have a fanfiction feel to them, for the most part they are polished and compelling. Above all, they are entertaining and enjoyable.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    Once again I really wanted to like this book. It had its good side but there were probably more negatives than I could overlook. 1. If the Darcys are to be a "detective couple" (are they?) they aren't astute or clever enough. 2. They don't work well as a couple and do not communicate adequately. 3. Mr Darcy is much too gentlemanly to confront or suspect the bad guys, while Elizabeth is too naive and trusting. 4. The supernatural element was cloudy and I thought silly. It ruined the story for me. 5. T Once again I really wanted to like this book. It had its good side but there were probably more negatives than I could overlook. 1. If the Darcys are to be a "detective couple" (are they?) they aren't astute or clever enough. 2. They don't work well as a couple and do not communicate adequately. 3. Mr Darcy is much too gentlemanly to confront or suspect the bad guys, while Elizabeth is too naive and trusting. 4. The supernatural element was cloudy and I thought silly. It ruined the story for me. 5. Too many red herrings. 6. I had to stop and make a chart to keep the characters straight. Maybe I'm a lazy reader because I read purely for entertainment but the character relationships would get lost on me and I had to backtrack. (referring to someone as so-and-so's brother-in-law rather than naming him, for instance) I'm probably not going to follow this series.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kerry

    I got about half way through this before giving up because I wasn't enjoying it. The characterisation of Elizabeth and Darcy starts off okay, but as the story takes a turn into the supernatural, so does the characterisation, especially of Elizabeth who takes this all in her stride, begins to fail. To me, the supernatural doesn't belong with these characters and the story soon failed for me. I skipped to the end, but didn't really care. Pride and Prescience, Or a Truth Universally Acknowledged Mr a I got about half way through this before giving up because I wasn't enjoying it. The characterisation of Elizabeth and Darcy starts off okay, but as the story takes a turn into the supernatural, so does the characterisation, especially of Elizabeth who takes this all in her stride, begins to fail. To me, the supernatural doesn't belong with these characters and the story soon failed for me. I skipped to the end, but didn't really care. Pride and Prescience, Or a Truth Universally Acknowledged Mr and Mrs Darcy Mysteries, Book 1 Carrie Bebris DNF

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laura Hanby

    Finally, a Pride and Prejudice continuation that I love! This was a nice bit of light reading between novels. Bebris nailed the characterization of the Darcy and the other Pride and Prejudice characters. I loved getting to see Elizabeth and Darcy's relationship grow and the mystery was quite enjoyable too! I look forward to reading the rest of the series!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    It gave me something to do while I was sick in bed, but the writing was bad, the story was ridiculous and for Pete's sake can we please get off the Austen remake train? Stop trying to imitate her characters, they always end up sounding so fake.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lili

    This was actually really good... until the last few chapters happened. The supernatural twist was very unexpected — and unnecessary. It also kinda spoiled some of the joy I had. So I settled for three instead of four stars. I really enjoyed the chemistry and the banter between Darcy and Elizabeth, though, and might read another book in the anthology.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I've now read two P&P mysteries and this one was by far the better one. The characters seemed true to P&P, the mystery was actually a mystery, and it was just fun to read. It isn't classic lit but for a cozy mystery it worked and worked well. I will read more in this series! I've now read two P&P mysteries and this one was by far the better one. The characters seemed true to P&P, the mystery was actually a mystery, and it was just fun to read. It isn't classic lit but for a cozy mystery it worked and worked well. I will read more in this series!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nancy L Owens

    I love historical mystery series and this is one which I discovered recently. I recommend the series to anyone who likes to spend time with Elizabeth and Fitzwilliam Darcy and other characters created by Jane Austen.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    Read this in basically one sitting. Racial politics are insane, but it's fan fiction about the British empire.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    I finished it! But........ This kind of book is not my cup of tea! I kept reading hoping that something interesting would happen. I found the book rather boring. I might recommend it to some of my friends because I do know the ones who would like to read this kind of book. I was happy to finally finish it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lisa (Harmonybites)

    Although I admit Bebris is no Jane Austen, I must confess I relished this book, often smiling while reading, and went on to read and enjoy the rest in the series published to date. The book is first of a series where Mr and Mrs Darcy of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice are sleuths, often with an element of the supernatural and romance. I have a couple of friends who are Jane Austen fans I pointed this series to who didn't care for them as much as I did. One said she didn't find them anything sp Although I admit Bebris is no Jane Austen, I must confess I relished this book, often smiling while reading, and went on to read and enjoy the rest in the series published to date. The book is first of a series where Mr and Mrs Darcy of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice are sleuths, often with an element of the supernatural and romance. I have a couple of friends who are Jane Austen fans I pointed this series to who didn't care for them as much as I did. One said she didn't find them anything special and another didn't finish that first book. That friend though said something that gave me insight into why I do enjoy these so much. She said at least Bebris doesn't try to imitate Austen's style--that those who do always fail. I've tried and disliked Stephenie Barron's Jane Austen mysteries. There the conceit is these are written by Austen, and Barron takes a stab at reproducing Jane Austen's prose style and never convinces me. She just doesn't have the wit and insight to carry it off. Bebris, in trying instead to just capture the personality of the Austen characters and sound of their dialogue, succeeds much better, I think. Much better in that than the one Austen pastiche I'd tried before this, Linda Berdoll's Mr Darcy Takes a Wife where I found the characters unrecognizable. And there's the charm for me in the books by Bebris--that they're good enough to make me feel like I'm visiting old friends. This particular book centers on a mystery surrounding Caroline Bingley, who has married a charming American, Frederick Parrish, soon after the Darcys marry. After her wedding Caroline seems to be becoming unhinged and dangerous accidents dog the Bingleys. There's an element of the supernatural in the events reminiscent of the gothic novels Austen parodied in Northanger Abbey I feel mixed about, with a psychic Elizabeth acting as Mulder to a skeptic Scully Darcy. It's well-done though--just know going in you're dealing with the paranormal taken seriously, which after all is more than hinted at in the title. Although I'm hardly a scholar of the period, the book feels to me like it gets it right, with lots of details that suggest Bebris did her homework. Even if you changed the names involved, this would work well as a historical mystery with a deft twist and resolution.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I’ve always wanted to venture into the realm of the “spin off” books when it came to Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice.” I love the book, adore the movies, and although I don’t know if Elizabeth Bennet and Fitzwilliam Darcy are my absolute favorite literary characters, they are wonderful. Unfortunately, I decided to begin this foray into spin offs with “Mr. Darcy Takes a Wife.” It was wretched. All it seemed to be was an excuse to write graphic sex scenes between the poorly portrayed Darcy newl I’ve always wanted to venture into the realm of the “spin off” books when it came to Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice.” I love the book, adore the movies, and although I don’t know if Elizabeth Bennet and Fitzwilliam Darcy are my absolute favorite literary characters, they are wonderful. Unfortunately, I decided to begin this foray into spin offs with “Mr. Darcy Takes a Wife.” It was wretched. All it seemed to be was an excuse to write graphic sex scenes between the poorly portrayed Darcy newlyweds with a few obligatory attempts at a plot which wasn’t all that interesting anyway. I was much depressed over this for a few days. Enter Carrie Bebris and her “Mr. and Mrs. Darcy Mystery” series. I am not a big mystery novel fan. But this woman’s book blew me away. She doesn’t just use Jane Austen’s characters for her own mysteries but allows the mysteries to be shaped and influenced by the people who populate “Pride and Prejudice.” Elizabeth is still inquisitive and outspoken, curious and stubborn. And Darcy is still proud but kind, caring but…well – stubborn. And the other characters from the book are also captured and further developed skillfully. The plot is good enough to keep me guessing (and if you’ve ever watched CSI with me, you know how hard that is…) and has a supernatural element to it that naturally appeals to me. The author even writes to her readers at the beginning of the novel apologizing for any liberties she may have taken with the characters and explains part of her struggle in using such classic persons in a modern novel. And that, my friends…earns points in my book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Acorn Queen

    Quite the guilty pleasure. As one of the many readers who enjoyed "Pride and Predjustice" tremendously, I found myself looking into the sheer mass of inofficial sequels that tend to get mediocre ratings on goodreads at most. I usually do not end up getting one potential candidate of inofficial sequels due to this factor, though I have to say that I might just change that after having read "Pride and Prescience" by Carrie Bebris. Intrigued by the Series-title ("A Mr. and Mrs. Darcy Mystery") I st Quite the guilty pleasure. As one of the many readers who enjoyed "Pride and Predjustice" tremendously, I found myself looking into the sheer mass of inofficial sequels that tend to get mediocre ratings on goodreads at most. I usually do not end up getting one potential candidate of inofficial sequels due to this factor, though I have to say that I might just change that after having read "Pride and Prescience" by Carrie Bebris. Intrigued by the Series-title ("A Mr. and Mrs. Darcy Mystery") I started reading with certain doubts as to whether the original characters with their special ways of acting, talking and feeling to the reader can actually be recognized. What can I say - they can. To me, Pride and Prescience actually does read pretty much like the original in style and story. Thoughts the characters had in the original are being picked up and continued, old friendships and grudges kept and worked with in a credible way that makes it fun to read without ever having to think about the fact that this is actually not Austen's work. Even the way the character's predjudices keep influencing whom they accuse of being responsible for the strange events feels just as though this story was actually an official contemporary sequel. The plot itself - the mysterious events starting after Caroline Bingley's unexpected marriage to an American gentleman - is entertaining, although a tad linear and simple (which is why I didn't give it 5 stars) and does keep the reader guessing and turning pages right until the conclusion. Definately recommended. Nothing intellectual, but a fun and fast read!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Recent years have seen an explosion in Jane Austen fan fiction. I used to have aspirations to read them all, but that was before everyone and her sister (and a few brothers, it must be said) started writing Austen sequels and re-tellings from alternative perspectives. I have read quite a few, though, and Bebris's book is definitely on my very short list of Austen-related fiction that succeeds. This particular book is a sequel to Pride and Prejudice, and it is also the first in a series that has Recent years have seen an explosion in Jane Austen fan fiction. I used to have aspirations to read them all, but that was before everyone and her sister (and a few brothers, it must be said) started writing Austen sequels and re-tellings from alternative perspectives. I have read quite a few, though, and Bebris's book is definitely on my very short list of Austen-related fiction that succeeds. This particular book is a sequel to Pride and Prejudice, and it is also the first in a series that has Elizabeth and Darcy solving mysteries. The subsequent novels have them visiting the characters of other Jane Austen novels. I'm interested to see how that works out. What makes this book work (for me, at least) is that Bebris has done a very good job of capturing Austen's tone and narrative style. I did actually feel that, should Elizabeth and Darcy walk into the drawing room and discover a dead body, this is the kind of stuff they would say and do about it. And while their were some allusions to the more private aspects of their married life, those aspects remained private - which they certainly would have been if Austen herself had been writing.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Heidi-Marie

    I've recommended this series plenty of times, and always wanted to try it out. About time I did! Light, enjoyable read that I actually enjoyed. (One never knows with me and Austen spin-offs.) A few teeny things that had me go "uh" as far as Austenesque or Georgian time period. But otherwise I was fine. Loved revisiting the P&P characters, and Bebris stayed pretty close to who they were. I had immediate suspicions as to the mystery and all--and most of them were correct. But the author still did w I've recommended this series plenty of times, and always wanted to try it out. About time I did! Light, enjoyable read that I actually enjoyed. (One never knows with me and Austen spin-offs.) A few teeny things that had me go "uh" as far as Austenesque or Georgian time period. But otherwise I was fine. Loved revisiting the P&P characters, and Bebris stayed pretty close to who they were. I had immediate suspicions as to the mystery and all--and most of them were correct. But the author still did well in creating viable suspects and reasons and such. I was a bit surprised by the paranormal/magic element. It isn't a huge presence as in other books, but it is a vital point and I thought it odd (though it worked, too). Though I wouldn't say it's my favorite book or Austen spin-off, I enjoyed it quite well and am excited for the next books--especially as we re-meet other Austen characters! I also thought it very fitting to read this book during the Christmas season.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    If you're a big fan of classic literature and loved the Darcys from Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice and other classic novels, you'll love this classic historical mystery series. After Elizabeth and Fitzwilliam Darcy married with their happily ever after, did you wonder what happened to them? This series answered the question. In Pride and Prescience, the Darcys are happily married. At the same time, Jane's married too with another couple. When Caroline Bingley married Frederick Parrish, nothin If you're a big fan of classic literature and loved the Darcys from Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice and other classic novels, you'll love this classic historical mystery series. After Elizabeth and Fitzwilliam Darcy married with their happily ever after, did you wonder what happened to them? This series answered the question. In Pride and Prescience, the Darcys are happily married. At the same time, Jane's married too with another couple. When Caroline Bingley married Frederick Parrish, nothing's what it seemed. She's been acting strange ever since she said "I do". From there, there's been some mishaps and a fire and a murder, all during a blizzard before Christmas series. While they've wonder about these odd happenings, they suspect everyone until one of them is found out, placing the Darcys in a world of dangerous trouble. Lots of shocking drama with classical twists to make you a fan and fall in love with them again. A must-read for all Jane Austen reader fans.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    Having just read "Death Comes to Pemberley" by P.D. James, I was eager to read another Austen pastiche. This one was highly recommended by a friend and I really enjoyed it. The story takes place right after the double wedding of Darcy and Elizabeth and Jane and Bingley. The conversations between Darcy and Elizabeth sparkle with wit and playfulness. The mystery is intriguing and characters are true to form. Jane is almost too good to be true, as usual; Bingley, charming and ever-attentive to Jane Having just read "Death Comes to Pemberley" by P.D. James, I was eager to read another Austen pastiche. This one was highly recommended by a friend and I really enjoyed it. The story takes place right after the double wedding of Darcy and Elizabeth and Jane and Bingley. The conversations between Darcy and Elizabeth sparkle with wit and playfulness. The mystery is intriguing and characters are true to form. Jane is almost too good to be true, as usual; Bingley, charming and ever-attentive to Jane; Caroine, haughty and condescending; they're all here. I must say towards the end, the story took sort of a silly turn, delving into voodoo and the supernatural. But Bebris has started a series of Darcy and Elizabeth mysteries that I will be returning to. If you love Austen, you'll love Bebris.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kim_reads

    OK, so now I'm going to be addicted to another Jane Austen series. This book was so much fun, I couldn't put it down. Bebris is a talented writer who treats JA's characters with love and respect. The storyline was great and the characters were true to themselves, well, except for Ms. Bingley, but you'll have to read it to find out what I mean. I'm glad to have discovered this series and hope the other books match this one for style and suspense. What fun!

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