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The Bungalow Mystery

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While trying to help a friend out of a difficulty, Nancy has a perilous experience in and around a deserted bungalow, from which only her bravery and quick thinking save her.


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While trying to help a friend out of a difficulty, Nancy has a perilous experience in and around a deserted bungalow, from which only her bravery and quick thinking save her.

30 review for The Bungalow Mystery

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sheri

    The book starts off with heart pounding action, as Nancy and her friend Helen are caught out on the lake in a thunderstorm. Will they reach the shore through the blowing winds and treacherous waves? Luckily, a young gal, Laura, hears Nancy's cries for help and rescues the two. After introductions are made, Laura rather cryptically responds that she may need Nancy's help some day soon. What mystery will find Nancy tracking down clues? Another sound mystery in the series. Love how each chapter end The book starts off with heart pounding action, as Nancy and her friend Helen are caught out on the lake in a thunderstorm. Will they reach the shore through the blowing winds and treacherous waves? Luckily, a young gal, Laura, hears Nancy's cries for help and rescues the two. After introductions are made, Laura rather cryptically responds that she may need Nancy's help some day soon. What mystery will find Nancy tracking down clues? Another sound mystery in the series. Love how each chapter ends on a suspenseful note. Predictable but fun.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Madeline

    I will probably never get over my girl-crush on Nancy Drew, and this book just confirms that fact. Which is not to say that the series is flawless and beyond criticism - kinda the opposite, really. One thing I've learned from re-reading some of these books as an adult is that whenever you start one, you have basically a fifty-fifty chance of ending up with 190 pages of dated, stupid crap. But this time, I was lucky. This book rocked. That being said, it doesn't escape from the flaws that personi I will probably never get over my girl-crush on Nancy Drew, and this book just confirms that fact. Which is not to say that the series is flawless and beyond criticism - kinda the opposite, really. One thing I've learned from re-reading some of these books as an adult is that whenever you start one, you have basically a fifty-fifty chance of ending up with 190 pages of dated, stupid crap. But this time, I was lucky. This book rocked. That being said, it doesn't escape from the flaws that personify the entire series - at least it's good to see that Carolyn Keene had already established these issues early in the series, and dammit if she didn't stick to them. Several things are to be expected from the Nancy Drew books, and I've taken the time to document them here: 1. We will be reminded, rather insistently, that Nancy is perfect. Over and over. She is skinny and pretty and brilliant and everyone loves her and the sooner we all just accept this the sooner we can get back to the mystery solving stuff. 2. Although Nancy lives in a time where teenage girls had about as many personal freedoms as trained dogs and were treated with a similar level of respect, she herself exists in a sort of bubble that makes her exempt from such social limitations. She has her own car, her own money (but, oddly, no apparent source of income), and doesn't seem to have any demands on her time such as a job or school. This is proved in this book, when Nancy decides on a whim to drive upstate for some investigating, and then when it runs long, checks herself into a hotel for the night. This is awesome, but I question the reality of it. 3. Carolyn Keene loves the words "sleuth" and "girl detective" and will use them as many times as she possibly can. 4. The bad guys are easily recognizable, because they are the only characters in the book who are ever rude to anyone. These are the series' main flaws. In the good Nancy Drews, such as this one, these flaws can be overlooked as soon as Nancy starts being a badass. And there's a lot of that here. She survives a boat crash in a storm, breaks into not one but three houses, and manages to escape after the bad guys tie her up. She also taught me a valuable life lesson: if the hotel you're having dinner in leaves souvenir matchbooks on the table, take them, because you are guaranteed to need them in the next few hours. As an added bonus, Nancy's boyfriend Ned Nickerson (affectionately known as "Candy-Ass" in my head) is not present, and in fact may not have been introduced as a character yet. Also conspicuously absent are Nancy's friends, Fat Bess and Butch George, so we don't have to listen to Carolyn Keene delivering backhanded compliments in her narration that would embarrass Regina George. It isn't a great series, to be sure, and by all logic should not get such high ratings. But the fact remains that Nancy Drew is a literary heroine far ahead of her time, and even with all her books' issues, she's still a much better role model than certain contemporary literary ladies I could name.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Preacher

    This is a comparative review of the 1930s and 1950s editions of this book - if you get a chance to read them side-by-side, I very strongly recommend it. Of the three books I've read comparatively, this one diverges the furthest. Points of difference include: - In the 50s edition, the guardian is accompanied by his wife - which makes the whole thing much less sinister. They also don't behave nearly as villainously. - The 50s version introduces an entire subplot where Nancy is helping with a bank fra This is a comparative review of the 1930s and 1950s editions of this book - if you get a chance to read them side-by-side, I very strongly recommend it. Of the three books I've read comparatively, this one diverges the furthest. Points of difference include: - In the 50s edition, the guardian is accompanied by his wife - which makes the whole thing much less sinister. They also don't behave nearly as villainously. - The 50s version introduces an entire subplot where Nancy is helping with a bank fraud case for her dad that ends up being related. This is really only odd in comparison (and it feels a little too convenient, but there's only so much I'm going to ask for, plotting-wise.) - Don't forget the Gratuitous Housework Scene, a must in the 50s editions! - All guns mysteriously disappear in the 50s versions. This appears to be consistent book-to-book. - Any moral ambiguity in the finale is removed for 50s audiences. I believe that the original versions remain more interesting than the revised versions, even when they have highly problematic elements (class, race, etc.) But the comparison is definitely best of all.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Juli

    In this 3rd Nancy Drew Mystery, Nancy and her friend Helen are enjoying a trip out of town, when they have a boating accident during a thunderstorm. They are saved by a girl named Laura. Nancy doesn't realize at the time that meeting Laura will draw her into yet another mystery. This time, Nancy suspects Laura's guardians are stealing the orphan's inheritance. She just has to find proof! I listened to the audio version of this story. Narrated by Laura Linney, the audio is just over 3 hours long. In this 3rd Nancy Drew Mystery, Nancy and her friend Helen are enjoying a trip out of town, when they have a boating accident during a thunderstorm. They are saved by a girl named Laura. Nancy doesn't realize at the time that meeting Laura will draw her into yet another mystery. This time, Nancy suspects Laura's guardians are stealing the orphan's inheritance. She just has to find proof! I listened to the audio version of this story. Narrated by Laura Linney, the audio is just over 3 hours long. Linney reads at a nice, even pace and gives a great acting performance. The audio (Penguin Random House Audio Publishing) is enhanced by some background sounds, suspenseful music at the end of chapters, and other sound effects. I enjoyed this story! I'm having a great time re-visiting this series. It's been so many years since I last read these books, that I don't remember whodunnit! It makes the stories seem fresh and new, despite the fact I read all the books as a child. :) The Bungalow Mystery was originally written in 1930, and revised/updated in 1960. The stories are a bit dated, but not enough to impair my enjoyment. I'm having fun listening to the audio books as I work in my yard and garden. The mystery progresses quickly since the books are short, so I can easily finish one in a day. The books do follow a formula. Usually, the story opens with Nancy in some sort of danger that connects her to a mystery she needs to investigate. At some point, she will be confronted or threatened by the bad guys...barely escape unscathed....and discover some pivotal clue that helps further her investigation. Each chapter ends on a cliffhanger of some sort....pulling the reader to continue on to the next chapter immediately. It's definitely formula....but an enjoyable formula! This series is totally appropriate for middle grade age kids and up. Nothing graphic or too scary. Nancy is an intelligent and resourceful main character, who occasionally gets help from her lawyer father to solve her cases. The books are short, quick reads so there isn't a lot of character development, but the plots really revolve more around the action and investigation than the characters themselves. I love to read/listen to children's stories in between more the heavy adult fiction I read. Sometimes a light, simple mystery is a nice palate cleanser after a horror or thriller novel! Plus, I can listen to Nancy Drew books outside in my yard without worrying what the young neighbor children are over-hearing. Enjoyable and a great dose of nostalgia! I'm enjoying these books just as much at 50 years old as I did at 10! Luckily my local library has these audio books always available with no waiting on their digital site! I can indulge myself with some good ol' Nancy Drew whenever I want! Sweet! On to the next book -- The Mystery at Lilac Inn!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

    I am really enjoying my trip down memory lane by revisiting Nancy Drew from the beginning. This is by far the best one. The addition of Laura Linney narrating makes them even better. Though they are dated, you could imagine Nancy today. She is self-reliant and independent and an excellent role model for young girls. Her dad doesn't even spend the whole time telling her to get a young man and get married. He supports her and admires her "plucky" attitude. This story involved embezzlement, kidnappi I am really enjoying my trip down memory lane by revisiting Nancy Drew from the beginning. This is by far the best one. The addition of Laura Linney narrating makes them even better. Though they are dated, you could imagine Nancy today. She is self-reliant and independent and an excellent role model for young girls. Her dad doesn't even spend the whole time telling her to get a young man and get married. He supports her and admires her "plucky" attitude. This story involved embezzlement, kidnapping, and a threatened heiress. Great fun as always!!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    I used to love Nancy Drew books as a kid, but I think I preferred the "newer" stories. This one wasn't quite as interesting or as exciting I hoped it would be. Still, it was fun to read as an adult to my daughter, who enjoyed the climax of the story.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    It's so hard to rate these books. It's all about context. But which context? I read them as a young reader, age eight or so, in the early 1980s. They were written in the 1930s, rewritten in the 1960s to contemporize them, and in some cases, rewritten again. Oh, and then there were the ones contemporary to my era in the first place, though I don't remember those well. Carolyn Keene was never a real person...if I researched the context of author, how much more would I understand these books? Part o It's so hard to rate these books. It's all about context. But which context? I read them as a young reader, age eight or so, in the early 1980s. They were written in the 1930s, rewritten in the 1960s to contemporize them, and in some cases, rewritten again. Oh, and then there were the ones contemporary to my era in the first place, though I don't remember those well. Carolyn Keene was never a real person...if I researched the context of author, how much more would I understand these books? Part of what I love about these books is really simple childhood nostalgia. And part is the fact that whatever era the story (or version of the story) is from, Nancy was ahead of her time in her independence and curiosity. Even in the 1930s, Ned is never anything but a pleasant distraction or an accomplice to her sleuthing plan. Okay, he's an occasional deus-ex-machina, but only because they have plans that she doesn't show up for and he becomes suspicious--he's never the strong male savior there to protect the weak girl. The downside of these books is that it's nearly impossible to describe or rate them individually. The upside is that the cultural context and the history of the series over time makes every book slightly more interesting, and the more I learn about the series, the more I appreciate it as a whole.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mark Baker

    While out of town, Nancy meets Laura, a recent orphan who is about to meet her new guardians. However, when Nancy meets them, she thinks that something is off about these adults. Meanwhile, Mr. Drew asks Nancy to help him figure out how bearer bonds have disappeared from a bank in town. Can Nancy juggle these two cases? Or is there a connection? I can’t remember if I read this one as a kid or not, but I quickly got caught up in the fun as an adult. There is plenty of action. Some of the twists we While out of town, Nancy meets Laura, a recent orphan who is about to meet her new guardians. However, when Nancy meets them, she thinks that something is off about these adults. Meanwhile, Mr. Drew asks Nancy to help him figure out how bearer bonds have disappeared from a bank in town. Can Nancy juggle these two cases? Or is there a connection? I can’t remember if I read this one as a kid or not, but I quickly got caught up in the fun as an adult. There is plenty of action. Some of the twists were a little obvious, but I couldn’t figure out how everything quite fit together until the end. We still haven’t met Nancy’s usual friends, but with the emphasis on plot and action, the characters are thin anyway. Read my full review at Carstairs Considers.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    While on vacation at Twin Lakes Nancy meets and befriends an orphaned named Laura Pendleton. Laura is there to meet her new guardians, Mr. and Mrs. Aborn. The Aborn's seem nice enough but when they begin doing strange things like demanding Laura hand over her inherited jewelry and lock her in her room, Laura decides to run away to River Heights in the hopes that Nancy can help her. Nancy begins to investigate the Aborn's which leads her to a strange bungalow in the woods and a giant mystery. - Wh While on vacation at Twin Lakes Nancy meets and befriends an orphaned named Laura Pendleton. Laura is there to meet her new guardians, Mr. and Mrs. Aborn. The Aborn's seem nice enough but when they begin doing strange things like demanding Laura hand over her inherited jewelry and lock her in her room, Laura decides to run away to River Heights in the hopes that Nancy can help her. Nancy begins to investigate the Aborn's which leads her to a strange bungalow in the woods and a giant mystery. - While in the cabin in the woods Nancy uses matches she had taken from the hotel dining table. It specifically says she took them during dinner yet after dinner she changed clothes before going to the Aborn's; Eagerly she reached into the pocket of her dress, recalling that at dinner she had taken a pack of matches from the hotel dining table for her suvinier collection. Good! The pack was still there! Pg.116 Then she changed to walking shoes, sweater, and skirt. Pg.103 Awakening at six o'clock, Nancy put on the simple black cotton dress from her suitcase and pumps. After brushing her hair until it snapped with electricity, she was ready for supper. Pg.103 - Mr. Aborn says he's going to write and sell a story about the mystery. He declares he will donate profits from the story to Nancy's favorite charity, the River Heights Youth Center...how did he know this is Nancy's favorite charity? Although she mentions it in the book she doesn't tell Mr. Aborn that. - After Jim and Cathy help her move the fallen tree from the road Nancy says "is Mrs. Aborn a blonde-haired woman, rather small and slightly, Cathy?". Why does she direct this question solely to Cathy? Jim knows the Aborn's too. You can read the rest of this review at VintageGirlsBooks.blogspot.com

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kavita

    Nancy makes a new friend, Laura Pendleton, who rescues her from a wrecked boat in a storm. It turns out that Laura might need her services as a detective. The orphaned girl is wary of her new guardians and wants Nancy to check them out. Nancy is puzzled as to why her mother would entrust Laura to people who only seem interested in her jewellery and money? Of course, at the same time, Carson Drew is bound to have a case that Nancy's helping him on that's bound to connect with Laura's problems. The Nancy makes a new friend, Laura Pendleton, who rescues her from a wrecked boat in a storm. It turns out that Laura might need her services as a detective. The orphaned girl is wary of her new guardians and wants Nancy to check them out. Nancy is puzzled as to why her mother would entrust Laura to people who only seem interested in her jewellery and money? Of course, at the same time, Carson Drew is bound to have a case that Nancy's helping him on that's bound to connect with Laura's problems. The reader can easily join the dots. Not a bad book at all! I rather enjoyed Nancy's foray into danger in this one. Helen Corning appears in this book but is left out for most of the sleuthing bits. Instead, Don Cameron, Nancy's 'boyfriend', helps her out. Undoubtedly, the book is rather dramatic, even more than usual Nancy Drews, what with Nancy escaping after being tied up because someone showed her how to loosen knots. This becomes a regular feature in later books. At the end, Nancy also risks her life to rescue Laura's inheritance. All this apart, it's an enjoyable foray into the life of a daredevil young woman.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Moonkiszt

    #3 of the ND challenge. . . .a near drowning, a careening storm-damaged tree that misses ND's car by inches in a storm, almost hauntings, skulking around bungalows (which are NOT houses), and stolen identities! On the other hand: a bunch of new friends, Mr. Drew's mystery solved, Hannah's ankle healed, a male red-head nearly romanced but dismissed with a gentle laugh that conveys responsibility AND regret (No sign of the dependable and attrative Ned yet), a new and stunning aquamarine ring (give #3 of the ND challenge. . . .a near drowning, a careening storm-damaged tree that misses ND's car by inches in a storm, almost hauntings, skulking around bungalows (which are NOT houses), and stolen identities! On the other hand: a bunch of new friends, Mr. Drew's mystery solved, Hannah's ankle healed, a male red-head nearly romanced but dismissed with a gentle laugh that conveys responsibility AND regret (No sign of the dependable and attrative Ned yet), a new and stunning aquamarine ring (given in sincere thanks) and a pout because all mysteries are solved. Will she ever have another??? Wait, Wait!!! There's more. . . . . .

  12. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

    I highly recommend the 1930 edition. Nancy and young Laura take turns rescuing each other. And then Nancy rescues herself. And, wow, Mr. Carson Drew shows up to rescue everybody! As a prosecution attorney, or whatever he is, he sure knows his way around a car chase. He advises Laura: "Get in the roadster with Nancy. If it comes to a battle, you girls can drop back and be out of range of the bullets." Sir, yes, sir! This version also features a cunning and ruthless criminal named "Stumpy." Strikes I highly recommend the 1930 edition. Nancy and young Laura take turns rescuing each other. And then Nancy rescues herself. And, wow, Mr. Carson Drew shows up to rescue everybody! As a prosecution attorney, or whatever he is, he sure knows his way around a car chase. He advises Laura: "Get in the roadster with Nancy. If it comes to a battle, you girls can drop back and be out of range of the bullets." Sir, yes, sir! This version also features a cunning and ruthless criminal named "Stumpy." Strikes fear into my heart.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    That inimitable girl sleuth, Nancy Drew, returns in this third mysterious adventure, confronting all kinds of life-threatening situations with aplomb. The story opens as Nancy and her chum, Helen Corning, out for a expedition on Moon Lake, find themselves swimming for their lives when their boat goes down in a storm. Really, it's Nancy doing the swimming, valiantly towing the hapless Helen. When a girl their own age rows out to rescue them, at the risk of her own life, they make a new friend, le That inimitable girl sleuth, Nancy Drew, returns in this third mysterious adventure, confronting all kinds of life-threatening situations with aplomb. The story opens as Nancy and her chum, Helen Corning, out for a expedition on Moon Lake, find themselves swimming for their lives when their boat goes down in a storm. Really, it's Nancy doing the swimming, valiantly towing the hapless Helen. When a girl their own age rows out to rescue them, at the risk of her own life, they make a new friend, learning that Laura Pendleton had only recently been orphaned, and left in the guardianship of an as-yet-unknown childhood friend of her mother's. When this guardian turns out to be a cruel tyrant, Laura runs away, seeking refuge with Nancy. Determined to help in any way she can, the girl sleuth loses no time in investigating, discovering that Jacob Aborn is not who he seems. Tracking him to a deserted bungalow, Nancy embarks on a nighttime adventure that involves many dangers, but which eventually restores her new friend's fortune, and (view spoiler)[reunites her with her true guardian, held captive for weeks by the criminal imposter, Stumpy Dowd (hide spoiler)] ... As with its two predecessors, The Secret of the Old Clock and The Hidden Staircase , I read the original 1930 version of The Bungalow Mystery, reprinted in this facsimile edition by Applewood Books. I read the revised 1950s versions as a girl - the yellow-spined hardcovers so many readers of today remember - and never cared for them, only discovering the charm of the series when I started reading the originals. These longer versions are better written than their more contemporary counterparts, I feel, and are more descriptive, with plenty of period vocabulary and charm. They are also often far more racist - one of the reasons for the revision of the 1950s was to excise anything considered racially insensitive - although in this particular title there isn't anything of that nature. There is plenty of classism however, as Nancy is able to discern the villain's true nature by his "mistreatment" of his ward, which conduct includes such atrocities as expecting Laura to clean the house. The horror of it! Leaving that aside, this was just a fun little romp, complete with plenty of unlikely escapes for our heroine, and a happy ending in which all is restored to its proper order. Nancy is quite daring here! I understand from some comparative reviews that I have read online that her behavior has been toned down in the 1950s edition, making me quite happy to have read the original. It is a particularly nice feature of these Applewood Books editions that each one features an introduction by a contemporary woman mystery author, describing how reading Nancy Drew as a girl inspired her. Here that author is P.M. Carlson, author of the Maggie Ryan mystery series. Recommended to middle-grade mystery readers, and anyone who enjoys vintage girls' fare.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tabi34

    In my quest to read (re-read) all of the Nancy Drew mysteries this year, I have just completed The Bungalow Mystery. I remember reading this one when I was a kid. Once again, it boggles my mind how dependent I've become on my cell phone. Every time Nancy goes off to investigate or sleuth as she calls it, I keep thinking - use your cell phone. Her car breaks down, today she'd be whipping out the cell phone and calling Triple A or using her GPS. Because Nancy doesn't have these modern day devices, In my quest to read (re-read) all of the Nancy Drew mysteries this year, I have just completed The Bungalow Mystery. I remember reading this one when I was a kid. Once again, it boggles my mind how dependent I've become on my cell phone. Every time Nancy goes off to investigate or sleuth as she calls it, I keep thinking - use your cell phone. Her car breaks down, today she'd be whipping out the cell phone and calling Triple A or using her GPS. Because Nancy doesn't have these modern day devices, it heightens the suspense. I have to chuckle at the language. I teach college English and Communications and wonder if any of my students have ever used "bade" or sleuth for that matter. Considering these are young adult novels, the language is above what most kids read today. Once again "Carolyn Keene" uses a lot of description of food, clothes and is light on descriptions of other things. It is apparent that these books were meant to appeal to young ladies who were going to grow up to be housewives and cook beautiful meals for their husbands and they'd do it all in high heels shoes while wearing pearls. The story is good and keeps me reading. I won't go into detail about the story line; I'll just say that once again Nancy stumbles upon someone needing help and comes to the rescue. This is the second book where Nancy rescues an orphan.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    I have mixed thoughts on this one. It was more predictable every step of the way, yet also a bit more intense. From the storm and near drowning at the start to the kidnapping, knockouts and other violent acts. Nancy gets in a bit over her head in this mystery! I liked the edgier approach! And the dog walking bit was amusing! I still get confused when the housekeeper goes by first name one moment and last name the next. It had me picturing two different people at times.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tarissa

    A great Nancy Drew mystery! I devoured it in one evening. The plot twists had perfect timing. I love that Nancy solves her own mysteries while assisting her father with his predicaments. An enjoyable read!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth Ensor

    Why have I waited so long to read Nancy Drew? I love mysteries, vintage books and classics! This story was so fun, quick and easy to read but the writer has an interesting way of adding in simple details that I liked. I will continue reading these mysteries!

  18. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    Yet another excellent addition to the Nancy Drew mystery book series.

  19. 4 out of 5

    SheriC (PM)

    Overall review for both the 1930 original story and the 1960 revision. The third book in the series was perhaps the most exciting so far, with Nancy almost continually in peril and getting herself out of one scrape after another. As usual, the mystery depends heavily on coincidence and inconsistencies that don’t stand up to much scrutiny, but it gives Nancy plenty of opportunity to show off (modestly, of course) her smarts, her skills, and her courage. There is a significant difference in storyt Overall review for both the 1930 original story and the 1960 revision. The third book in the series was perhaps the most exciting so far, with Nancy almost continually in peril and getting herself out of one scrape after another. As usual, the mystery depends heavily on coincidence and inconsistencies that don’t stand up to much scrutiny, but it gives Nancy plenty of opportunity to show off (modestly, of course) her smarts, her skills, and her courage. There is a significant difference in storytelling style and characterization between the versions. The 1930 plot and characters are kept simple and few. We are more often inside Nancy’s head as she’s working out the clues and coming to conclusions. There is a buildup of suspense, violence both actual and implied, and Nancy is far more impulsive and emotional – she gets spooked, is at times frightened, but bravely recovers and thinks things through. The 1960 version introduces many more characters, romance elements, and a far more complicated plot, but we don’t get to solve the mystery inside Nancy’s head. We are on the outside and she just tells us her conclusions along with the other characters. This Nancy is also brave, but she is almost always deliberate, cool, and collected; justifying her actions as staying within the letter of the law and as morally just Original 1930 text: ★★★★★ Revised 1960 text: ★★☆☆☆ Averages out to a probably over-generous ★★★★☆ Full review with a chapter-by-chapter comparison of original and revised versions at Booklikes.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    Hot as hell without power after Hurricane Flo, but Nancy keeps calm and carries on. Read in tandum the original and revised editions: Original Published 1930 25 chapters / 204 pages Plot synopsis: Nancy sets out to help a young orphan whose legal guardian is not all he appears. Revised Revised 1960 20 chapters / 180 pages Plot synopsis: Nancy sets out to help a young orphan whose legal guardians (a married couple) are not all they appear. An intersecting side plot involves a bank securities embez Hot as hell without power after Hurricane Flo, but Nancy keeps calm and carries on. Read in tandum the original and revised editions: Original Published 1930 25 chapters / 204 pages Plot synopsis: Nancy sets out to help a young orphan whose legal guardian is not all he appears. Revised Revised 1960 20 chapters / 180 pages Plot synopsis: Nancy sets out to help a young orphan whose legal guardians (a married couple) are not all they appear. An intersecting side plot involves a bank securities embezzlement case that Nancy is assisting her father with. *** 2012 personal reading challenge for the month of January: Childhood favorites that influenced my subsequent reading life Adult Equivalent: Footsteps in the Dark by Georgette Heyer

  21. 4 out of 5

    Missy

    Paid a visit to Nancy Drew today while going through a bit of a reading slump. As a child Nancy was one of my most reliable friends. Reading her today I still love her. However now I see her through different eyes than I did then. She is perfect. In every way. No one else shines quite as brightly as she does. Would I want her as a role model for my kids? Probably not. We learn from our failures. Character building and all that. And perfection is exhausting. But do I still love paying her a visit Paid a visit to Nancy Drew today while going through a bit of a reading slump. As a child Nancy was one of my most reliable friends. Reading her today I still love her. However now I see her through different eyes than I did then. She is perfect. In every way. No one else shines quite as brightly as she does. Would I want her as a role model for my kids? Probably not. We learn from our failures. Character building and all that. And perfection is exhausting. But do I still love paying her a visit now and then? Absolutely.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    What a delight! This is the first Nancy Drew book I've read and although some of the language is somewhat outdated and old fashion I couldn't put it down!!! Suspense and action packed from the first page! Why didn't I start reading these earlier? It was grand!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Read for March Mystery Madness 2020. I haven't read a Nancy Drew in years, and was actually pretty impressed with her forwardness given the time. I do find the descriptions of meals all the time a bit weird, but maybe that's just a thing from the time as well!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gary Butler

    95th book read in 2017. Number 149 out of 659 on my all time book list. Best in the series so far. Real villains and extra characters. Nancy can't do it alone!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Logan

    Good

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jaksen

    Definitely not the best Nancy Drew book ever written. The writing in this one is sort of stale, and has the feel of having been written over, or revised, or perhaps was written by committee. If that's not the case, it's certainly how it seems. Nancy sets out to help a girl who's suddenly orphaned, and is preparing to live with two new guardians. How does Nancy meet said girl? With Helen, another friend, Nancy is out on a boat on a lake and they caught in a storm and nearly drown. Of course they do Definitely not the best Nancy Drew book ever written. The writing in this one is sort of stale, and has the feel of having been written over, or revised, or perhaps was written by committee. If that's not the case, it's certainly how it seems. Nancy sets out to help a girl who's suddenly orphaned, and is preparing to live with two new guardians. How does Nancy meet said girl? With Helen, another friend, Nancy is out on a boat on a lake and they caught in a storm and nearly drown. Of course they don't have any life jackets on board. Of course. Anyhow, Laura Pendleton, who's walking along the shore, just happens to hear their cries for help, gets into another boat, paddles out and saves both Nancy and Helen. (And oh, btw, Nancy's (rented) boat sinks to the bottom of the lake. Oh, well, the owner says, I've got insurance!) (The 'no life jackets' makes me laugh because in other instances in the book Nancy is very safety-conscious and prepared for every emergency! She's carrying matches when she needs to light a kerosene lamp. Her excuse: well she picked said matches up off a table in a restaurant for her 'match collection.' This is mentioned at the time Nancy needs the matches. In another scene Nancy conveniently remembers a detective showing her how to 'loosen her hands' while being tied up so that she can later free herself (if she's ever tied up.) Again, this is mentioned only after Nancy IS tied up.) Anyhow, it turns out that Nancy's rescuer, Laura, is being duped by two con artist criminals who want the girl's inheritance AND her late mother's jewelry collection. There's a subplot about bonds being stolen from a bank's vault, and who's to blame, and it all rather (conveniently) ties in with Laura's phony guardians, her inheritance, and so on. Problem is, there are so many convenient and contrived incidents in the book that it gets a little tiresome. Nancy's driving down a dirt road and a tree falls across her path. But oh wait! A handsome young man and his sister just happen to be driving in the other direction and voila! (Or presto!) The young man, his sister and Nancy all are able to move the tree to the side of the road. Also, the 'bungalow' in question, where Nancy, Helen and Laura take shelter (after the boating accident) is reused later in the story as a 'hideout' for a criminal. Everything fits together like a jigsaw puzzle - or a sort of warped jigsaw puzzle. Contrived and convenient coincidences just litter the story, and IMO, ruin it. Nancy gets in and out of dangerous situations constantly and yet father, prominent lawyer Carson Drew, merely admonishes her with, Wow, you're so courageous, Nancy, but gee whiz, I wish you'd be more careful! Not one of my favorite Nancy Drews by a long shot.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amy Holland

    It doesn't get more Scooby Doo than this: Why, you fool, how do you propose to get help? If it hadn’t been for this meddlesome Drew girl only the rats would have known you were here! Also, this: After brushing her hair until it snapped with electricity, she was ready for supper. Nancy, that shouldn't be the goal when you brush your hair. 🤦 Honestly, though, I appreciated that Nancy can fix a car, drive a boat, and keep her cool in very tense situations. She's a smart go-getter, and I imagine she was It doesn't get more Scooby Doo than this: Why, you fool, how do you propose to get help? If it hadn’t been for this meddlesome Drew girl only the rats would have known you were here! Also, this: After brushing her hair until it snapped with electricity, she was ready for supper. Nancy, that shouldn't be the goal when you brush your hair. 🤦 Honestly, though, I appreciated that Nancy can fix a car, drive a boat, and keep her cool in very tense situations. She's a smart go-getter, and I imagine she was one of the best examples of feminism for young girls in the 30s and 40s. Of course, stupid Ned hasn't shown up yet--hopefully she doesn't dumb herself down once he's in the picture.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    What a pleasure it was to be reading the original text during Nancy Drew’s 90th Anniversary. The first three books of the original text of this young detective, The Secret of the Old Clock, The Hidden Staircase and The Bungalow Mystery were all first published on April 28, 1930. Nancy owes her life to the timid Laura Pendleton and then proceeds to help this orphan heiress out of her own dire predicament. Nancy finds herself in plenty of narrow circumstances as she takes on risks to help her new What a pleasure it was to be reading the original text during Nancy Drew’s 90th Anniversary. The first three books of the original text of this young detective, The Secret of the Old Clock, The Hidden Staircase and The Bungalow Mystery were all first published on April 28, 1930. Nancy owes her life to the timid Laura Pendleton and then proceeds to help this orphan heiress out of her own dire predicament. Nancy finds herself in plenty of narrow circumstances as she takes on risks to help her new friend. I found this book to be one of the finest in this “breeder set” as if the ghost writer, Mildred Wirt Benson, was getting familiar and enjoying this brave and kind heroine.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    When Nancy and friend Helen are rescued in a boating accident by a girl named Laura, a new mystery falls in her lap. Laura is orphaned and on her way to meet new guardian Jacob Aborn, who seems to be after Laura's inheritance. Could this man really be who he says he is? This mystery wasn't as exciting as others in the series, as Nancy's friends aren't involved in the book. They tend to be better with the sidekicks.

  30. 4 out of 5

    annika

    I loved The Bungalow Mystery! This was one of the first ND books I read. It's really memorable. The characters were great, it was a nice mystery. I think this is one of the best Nancy Drew mysteries. Content: G - No inappropriate content

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