counter create hit Fairy Tales (Barnes Noble Classics Series) - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Fairy Tales (Barnes Noble Classics Series)

Availability: Ready to download

Fairy Tales, by Hans Christian Andersen, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from Fairy Tales, by Hans Christian Andersen, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriateAll editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works. Who has not laughed at the emperor’s new clothes, thrilled to the song of the nightingale, or sympathized with the ugly duckling? In the 170 years since they first began to appear, Hans Christian Andersen’s Fairy Tales have entranced and bewitched millions of readers, adults and children alike. Writing in the midst of a Europe-wide rebirth of national literature, Anderson broke new ground with his fairy tales in two important ways. First, he composed them in the vernacular, mimicking the language he used in telling them to children aloud. Second, he set his tales in his own land and time, giving rise to his loving descriptions of the Danish countryside. In contrast to such folklorists as the Brothers Grimm, Anderson’s tales are grounded in the real and often focus on the significance of small or overlooked things. Here are all of Andersen’s collected tales, many—such as “The Little Mermaid,” “The Red Shoes,” and “The Steadfast Tin Soldier”—still popular through modern adaptations, and others, including “The Flying Trunk” and “The Most Incredible Thing,” well worth rediscovering. Jack Zipes is professor of German and comparative literature at the University of Minnesota. A specialist in folklore and fairy tales, he has authored numerous books of criticism over the last thirty years and edited several major anthologies, including the Norton Anthology of Children’s Literature (2005). Marte Hvam Hult holds a Ph.D. in Scandinavian languages and literatures from the University of Minnesota. She is the author of Framing a National Narrative: The Legend Collections of Peter Christen Asbjørnsen and a forthcoming translation of Asbjørnsen’s Huldreeventyr.


Compare
Ads Banner

Fairy Tales, by Hans Christian Andersen, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from Fairy Tales, by Hans Christian Andersen, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriateAll editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works. Who has not laughed at the emperor’s new clothes, thrilled to the song of the nightingale, or sympathized with the ugly duckling? In the 170 years since they first began to appear, Hans Christian Andersen’s Fairy Tales have entranced and bewitched millions of readers, adults and children alike. Writing in the midst of a Europe-wide rebirth of national literature, Anderson broke new ground with his fairy tales in two important ways. First, he composed them in the vernacular, mimicking the language he used in telling them to children aloud. Second, he set his tales in his own land and time, giving rise to his loving descriptions of the Danish countryside. In contrast to such folklorists as the Brothers Grimm, Anderson’s tales are grounded in the real and often focus on the significance of small or overlooked things. Here are all of Andersen’s collected tales, many—such as “The Little Mermaid,” “The Red Shoes,” and “The Steadfast Tin Soldier”—still popular through modern adaptations, and others, including “The Flying Trunk” and “The Most Incredible Thing,” well worth rediscovering. Jack Zipes is professor of German and comparative literature at the University of Minnesota. A specialist in folklore and fairy tales, he has authored numerous books of criticism over the last thirty years and edited several major anthologies, including the Norton Anthology of Children’s Literature (2005). Marte Hvam Hult holds a Ph.D. in Scandinavian languages and literatures from the University of Minnesota. She is the author of Framing a National Narrative: The Legend Collections of Peter Christen Asbjørnsen and a forthcoming translation of Asbjørnsen’s Huldreeventyr.

30 review for Fairy Tales (Barnes Noble Classics Series)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Good gravy but something was wrong with Hans Christian Anderson. If household objects aren't chatting about their social status, then people are dying in the streets of Copenhagen! I mean, seriously. I knew the original story of The Little Mermaid, but my kids didn't. The horror on their faces was priceless. I also knew the basic story of The Snow Queen, mostly from the Faerie Tale Theatre version. I'd never read the whole thing. I think the best part was when Gerda asks the flowers if they've s Good gravy but something was wrong with Hans Christian Anderson. If household objects aren't chatting about their social status, then people are dying in the streets of Copenhagen! I mean, seriously. I knew the original story of The Little Mermaid, but my kids didn't. The horror on their faces was priceless. I also knew the basic story of The Snow Queen, mostly from the Faerie Tale Theatre version. I'd never read the whole thing. I think the best part was when Gerda asks the flowers if they've seen Kai, and they all reply with weird, existential imagery, and Gerda says, "Well, that's not at all helpful!" HILARIOUS. This is a beautiful edition, though. Color and black-and-white illustrations, gilt-edged, rich paper. Very nice!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kimberley doruyter

    this is a beautiful barnes & noble edition has some of my favorite fairy tales in it. also some i've never read before. with wonderful illustrations some in colour and full page. this is a beautiful barnes & noble edition has some of my favorite fairy tales in it. also some i've never read before. with wonderful illustrations some in colour and full page.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    These stories make me cry. Grimm's fairy tales are cautionary fables. These are tiny little slices of tragic reality, dressed up in doll's clothing or hidden behind animal masks. Check out "The Steadfast Tin Soldier,""The Ugly Duckling,"and "The Little Match Girl." Devastating.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Fairytales are the only place I find validation. Fairytales are the only place I find validation.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    I'm not going to lie- this was a bit of a slog. Some of the stories are very good (typically the famous ones, like the Little Mermaid, or the Emperor's New Clothes). Many others dragged on, and were too moral for me (eg. a little girl loves wearing red shoes, so she is punished for her vanity). Would not recommend- especially not this 1000+ page anthology. I'd never have gotten through it without some back to back flights.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shira

    What's left after finishing this collection is a memory of beautifully described nature, of quircky characters all struggling with being in whatever form they are being, and the joy of reading these fairy tales aloud to someone else, commenting on these weird tales as we went on and on and on. I noticed that reading them with someone else really upped my enjoyment, because as I was left to finish the last ones on my own I kind of didn't care anymore. Maybe that's due to the fairy tales becoming What's left after finishing this collection is a memory of beautifully described nature, of quircky characters all struggling with being in whatever form they are being, and the joy of reading these fairy tales aloud to someone else, commenting on these weird tales as we went on and on and on. I noticed that reading them with someone else really upped my enjoyment, because as I was left to finish the last ones on my own I kind of didn't care anymore. Maybe that's due to the fairy tales becoming sort of weird towards the end, a kind of weirdness where it felt the tales themselves were not really going anywhere. Before they felt dark and weird, but good weird in the sense that there was humor and silly random things happening. Most of the tales are concerned with kings and queens and princesses and (talking/thinking/feeling) animals and trees - that sounds less coherent than I wanted it to sound. Just, maybe that's nice to know. I'm definitely giving the collection at least 3.5 stars. It's a very well put together selection of Andersen's fairy tales, I'm assuming, and the introduction is quite interesting! If you decide to read it, please do read it to someone else or let someone else read it to you (if possible), no matter your age - well, maybe not when you're two years old, maybe. Some tales that stood out for me were: "Little Claus and big Claus", "The little mermaid", "The emperor's new clothes", "The ugly duckling", "The shadow" & "The snowman".

  7. 5 out of 5

    Xiomara Canizales

    I finally finished this book!!! My reading was improved since the first half took me about 4 moths while the second half took me less than 15 days!!! Most of the stories deal with Death and Sorrow, is also a very religious book. I’m so use to ‘happy endings’ with fairy tales that was, for my surprise, not the case with most of the stories. The fact that is more realistic with the idea of death and how to deal with it made me get more engaged than I expected. It has a lot of fantasy elements but not I finally finished this book!!! My reading was improved since the first half took me about 4 moths while the second half took me less than 15 days!!! Most of the stories deal with Death and Sorrow, is also a very religious book. I’m so use to ‘happy endings’ with fairy tales that was, for my surprise, not the case with most of the stories. The fact that is more realistic with the idea of death and how to deal with it made me get more engaged than I expected. It has a lot of fantasy elements but not in the way of ‘finding a godmother with a magic wand that can change the life of the characters’. The book is perfect for fall/winter! I got to say is very atmospheric. I like most of the stories, I didn’t understand a few and I was really disappointed with ‘Snow Queen’ (I have to say it!!!). Overall a great book to read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ali

    I could never imagine that there comes a day in my life when I read H.C.Andersen in his own language! I would say Andersen has more dimensions than I imagined him in Persian.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    3.5/5 This collection contains 100 of Andersen's tales, some of them very famous, and some less well known. Like with the Barnes & Noble edition of the Grimms' tales I read a couple of years ago, these can get quite repetitive. There are tales here about inanimate objects thinking better of themselves than they are. There are tales about humble plants or people or objects making the best of their situation and the best of their lives. There are tales of friendship and love. There are tales of stea 3.5/5 This collection contains 100 of Andersen's tales, some of them very famous, and some less well known. Like with the Barnes & Noble edition of the Grimms' tales I read a couple of years ago, these can get quite repetitive. There are tales here about inanimate objects thinking better of themselves than they are. There are tales about humble plants or people or objects making the best of their situation and the best of their lives. There are tales of friendship and love. There are tales of steadfastness against all the odds. Also like the Grimms' tales, these are quite religious, which, for me, is at odds with the fantastical element of the stories. I don't mind morality tales, but the piety grates with me. That said, many of these tales were original to Andersen, rather than collected, and there's a reason his most famous tales, like "The Ugly Duckling", "The Snow Queen", "The Little Mermaid" and others have endured. I would probably recommend a more streamlined, slimmed down version, though, that just contains his most famous tales.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    There are two frequent observations made about fairy tales, and these two supposed truisms contradict one another. The first is that fairy tales are actually more shocking than we realised, and the second is that children can take this more than we think they can, and they enjoy the darkness of the original tales. Clearly if the second comment was true, then adults would not be so shocked to learn what is really in fairy tales. In reality, we only learn about the dark side of fairy tales when we There are two frequent observations made about fairy tales, and these two supposed truisms contradict one another. The first is that fairy tales are actually more shocking than we realised, and the second is that children can take this more than we think they can, and they enjoy the darkness of the original tales. Clearly if the second comment was true, then adults would not be so shocked to learn what is really in fairy tales. In reality, we only learn about the dark side of fairy tales when we are adults because we are carefully protected from them when we are children, often given abridged versions of the books or Disneyfied movies that remove the more frightening or upsetting scenes. Whether or not children really enjoy macabre tales is open to question, but I can only say that I would have been repelled by any tale that offered bleak endings and grim happenings with no great moral to them. Andersen’s fairy tales fit well into this model. Whilst they are not the most shocking children’s stories around, they offer up tales of beheadings, mutilation, hypothermia and needless deaths and sufferings, not all of them. For Andersen, there is none of the certainties of ‘once upon a time’ or ‘lived happily ever after’. He sometimes improbably insists that the stories are true, and sometimes there is no happy ending, or at least not in this world. It is difficult to summarise the contents of a collection of short stories, and in any case the reader probably knows many of the tales, albeit perhaps not in their original form. Andersen provided the world with The (Little) Mermaid, The Red Shoes, Thumbelina, The Snow Queen (made into the movie ‘Frozen’), The Emperor’s New Clothes and The Ugly Duckling. The stories are characterised by a certain imaginative empathy that allows Andersen to put himself in the place of his talking animals or inanimate, but sentient objects. What would a bottle stopper or the moon see, and how would they feel about it? How would animals talk to each other? This quality, along with plenty of flowery and romantic descriptions, is one of the aspects of Andersen that makes his tales so appealing. Another appealing quality is the brevity of the stories. The stories are short, sometimes very short. The longest ones would barely supply half a novella. This ensures that none of the tales outstay their welcome, even when they descend into morbid sentimentality or trite pieties. The length of the tales also makes them child-friendly, and good bedtime stories. As a final advantage, a short story is useful to anyone who wishes to adapt the tale, since they can keep the bare bones of the story whilst imposing their own individual stamp on it. This is clear in the many movie versions of Andersen’s stories, but sometimes his works have a more subtle influence. When we read of a corrupted young boy who leaves with a Snow Queen, we can detect echoes of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. A supporting character in another story is a master builder who builds castles in the air, and later Ibsen went on to write a play about just that. The other appealing quality about Andersen is that his tales are innocent and literal-minded, sometimes to the point of absurdity. We live in an age where children’s stories are a little too knowing and stuffed with subtext and postmodernist winks to the adult members of the readership or audience. There are many advantages to this latter style, and we now finally have family fiction, something that can appeal to all ages. However, it is hard not to hark back to the innocence of the days of earlier storytelling for children where the story is told simply and we are left to impose our own meaning on it. This is something that people can easily do with Andersen, and it is easy to apply your own criteria to his tales – Marxist, feminist, and (especially) psychoanalytical. However, none of this is put their intentionally by the author. His tales pour out their meanings in an entirely artless and unconscious way, and perhaps this is what makes them so seemingly rich in alternative meanings. In reality, there is little even of allegorical or metaphorical meaning in Andersen. The Emperor’s New Clothes seems to come closest, but even this tale can be read literally as an exemplary tale, rather than as a metaphor. If there is any subtext in Andersen, it is perhaps autobiographical, and it is here that we can find some glimpses into the political, moral and religious thoughts and feelings of its author. Indeed, Andersen admits that his characters were based on real people. The tale that seems to come closest to telling that of Andersen’s life is The Ugly Duckling, in which an unattractive and awkward duckling is shunned by everyone until it grows up into a beautiful swan that is admired by everyone. Andersen had a difficult start to his life. He knew poverty and hard conditions, and he remained socially awkward throughout his life, forming unsuccessful and often embarrassing attachments to both men and women. He famously visited Dickens once, but stayed so long that Dickens and his wife grew heartily sick of him, leading to a rift that he never understood. This may explain why Andersen’s stories often deal with people who are hard on their luck, and have known suffering. A notable example is the tale of The Little Match Girl. Shivering in the cold, she lights the matches and fantasises about beautiful things, including her grandmother coming to take her to Heaven. The next day she is found frozen to death. Andersen then had compassion for suffering and for people who are hard on their luck. The tale also illustrates another element of his fairy tales, which is that they are suffused with Christian sentiment, often of a morbid and mawkish nature, and the stories often end with characters ascending to Heaven. The morality of the tales is curious though. Sometimes there is a very harsh Christian judgmentalism in them, and at other times there is a strangely amoral tinge. Hence a little girl is punished very harshly for pride in The Girl Who Trod on a Loaf, experiencing a living death beneath the marshes because she chooses to protect her shoes by treading on a loaf. However, in The Tinder Box, a soldier decapitates a witch who has helped him to a fortune, purely because she has refused to hand him a tinder box. In spite of improvidently spending this fortune, he is saved at the end of the tale by an act of mass-murder which includes regicide, and is able to marry the dead king’s daughter. Andersen often refers to Old Testament tales as if they are true. It is not clear, however, whether he believes they are literally true or if this is simply the respect given by one spinner of fairy tales to another. However, while morality and justice are often confused in the stories, and often only to be found in the next world, there is always a romanticism about the tales, and we are left in little doubt about Andersen’s enthusiasm for the past, and the writers he likes. He fills the tales with beautiful descriptive passages that are a pleasure to read, and he writes with great imagination and variety.

  11. 4 out of 5

    AfraA523 AlMajed

    This book is intresting. although its a fairy tale book and you would say these story are pretty obvious and i know most of them since i was a kid, but no they are very different from the stories we have read when younger it has much of grown ups content. Really intresting and you wont get bored of. Its just amazing how you recall a story from childhood and expect a certain ending but you see something that is totally different from what you know.

  12. 4 out of 5

    SR

    Meh.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    I can't bring myself to review every story in here, but this version is broken into sections, and I'll be glad to review those as I go along. Usual disclaimer: Short stories aren't my favorite thing (unless they have a common character); I typically prefer novels. But it's good to get out of my comfort zone, and I enjoy some anyway. If you like short stories, you'll probably like these more than I am apt to. The Artist and Society, 2/21/18-2/28/18: ★★✰✰✰ Includes: "The Nightingale" "The Gardner and t I can't bring myself to review every story in here, but this version is broken into sections, and I'll be glad to review those as I go along. Usual disclaimer: Short stories aren't my favorite thing (unless they have a common character); I typically prefer novels. But it's good to get out of my comfort zone, and I enjoy some anyway. If you like short stories, you'll probably like these more than I am apt to. The Artist and Society, 2/21/18-2/28/18: ★★✰✰✰ Includes: "The Nightingale" "The Gardner and the Gentry" "The Flying Trunk" "The Will-o'-the-Wisps Are in Town" "The Pixie and the Gardener's Wife" "The Puppeteer" "'Something'" "What One Can Think Up" "The Most Incredible Thing" "Auntie Toothache" "The Cripple" This shit's fucking weird, and not in a way that speaks to me. Part of this section focuses on artistry and patronage. The others are just kind of artsy-fartsy. This section is already at a disadvantage since those things typically don't swing it for me. I really enjoyed "The Nightingale," "The Gardener and the Gentry," and "The Cripple." 3.5 stars for each of them. All the rest were just "eh" even though there were a few amusing moments. The three I mentioned read more like stories and eventually got to a point; the others not so much. I think I'll like the next two sections more than this one. Folk Tales, 2/28/18-3/4/18: ★★★★✰ Includes: "The Tinderbox" "Little Claus and Big Claus" "The Princess on the Pea" "The Traveling Companion" "The Wild Swans" "The Swineherd" "Mother Elderberry" "The Hill of the Elves" "Clod Hans" "What Father Does is Always Right" The Folk Tales are stories that already existed, mostly told by word of mouth through the years, but that Hans put down in writing. I really want to give this section five stars, and it easily would be if it didn't include "Mother Elderberry" and "The Hill of the Elves." Those didn't do much for me, though they're not bad. The others were fantastic. I don't know if I want to give it five stars because these stories really are that amazing or because this section was such a breath of fresh air after the disappointing start. Regardless, they were great. They were weird, but not in the frou-frou way "The Artist and Society" stories were. I also love how he's so matter-of-fact about some of the weird parts, and I wish I had noted an example to include here, but alas. Some of these are rather violent, but it's all fantasy. There's no social justice preaching, (and sometimes no justice of any kind), and its absence is so, so wonderful. I loved "The Tinderbox." The main character kills an old hag "who was so disgusting that her lower lip hung down on her chest," and he takes her tinderbox which gives him control over some powerful dogs which appeared in my mind kind of like this: By the end of the story (view spoiler)[he's about to be hanged for courting the princess who wasn't allowed to date. (Well, he also kidnapped her every evening while she was asleep if you want to be technical about it.) He kills a ton of other people and becomes king, but it's all ridiculous and hilarious and reminds me of the parts of Candide that I actually liked. And while I enjoy reading about this kind of thing and find it funny, I've never once thought of killing everyone around me so I can become the leader of the land. (hide spoiler)] It's fiction, and not all writing needs moral lessons or explanations to "put things in context." And speaking of the immoral (as well as amoral), "Little Claus and Big Claus" was a riot as well. Original Fairy Tales, 3/12/18-4/21/18 ★★★✰✰ Includes: "The Shadow" "The Little Mermaid" "The Emperor's New Clothes" "Thumbelina" "The Naughty Boy" "The Galoshes of Fortune" "The Garden of Eden" "The Bronze Pig" "The Rose Elf" "The Pixie at the Grocer's" "Ib and Little Christine" "The Ice Maiden" It took me over a month to read a piddly 180 pages, but that's more the fault of tax season and not because these stories were bad. I didn't enjoy them as much as the folk tales, but that could also be tax season related. I'm a different person at that time of year, a little surlier and less prone to enjoy flim-flammy stuff, and fairy tales lend themselves to that by nature. But! I did remember to nick an example of the "matter-of-fact" thing I mentioned in the last section. From "Ib and Little Christine:" "Little Ib, seven years old and the only child in the house, watched and whittled a stick. He also cut his fingers..." Isn't that just great? It's little, humorous things like that (of which there are plenty) which make these enjoyable. Of course, it works better if the story is good too, but that's a matter of personal preference. As for me, I really enjoyed "The Little Mermaid" (which is so much darker than the Disney version, and I wouldn't go into it looking for a happy ending, at least not for the mermaid), "The Emperor's New Clothes," "The Pixie at the Grocer's," "Ib and Little Christine," and "The Ice Maiden,' but all for different reasons. The last two are a little tragic, but a good tragedy can be enjoyable too. Evangelical and Religious Tales, 8/5/18-8/18/18 ★★✰✰✰ Includes: "The Snow Queen" "The Red Shoes" "The Little Match Girl" "The Bog King's Daughter" "The Girl Who Stepped on Bread" "The Bell" "The Thorny Path to Glory" "The Jewish Maid" "The Story Old Johanna Told" "She Was No Good" I think I need to face the fact that these just aren't doing it for me. You can see I stalled for three and a half months between the last section and this one. These were rough going, but not because of the religious theme. I have no problem there, and I'm even on board with it. The problem is that some of these are just boring. Andersen's writing style is still very entertaining albeit in a somewhat annoying manner, and if it weren't for that I probably would've given up on this a while ago. But the stories, by and large, just aren't cutting it. I really enjoyed "The Red Shoes," though I'm surprised "The Thorny Path to Glory" ever got published, for it was a snoozefest and a half. Luckily it was only four pages of pointlessness. "The Snow Queen" and "The Bog King's Daughter" were about 40 pages each. I had to force myself to continue them, and I kept finding other things to do anyway. Those bogged (heh heh) me down the most and account for most of the 13 days it took me to read 125 pages, and I can't blame tax season for this one. One great thing about this section is the title of the last story. The story itself is fine, nothing to write home about, but the title is wonderful because it reminded me of this little ditty by Linda Ronstadt which is a fave. But if the best one can do with his writing is remind someone of a 1970's cover of a 60's hit, well, he's got some work to do. The Anthropomorphization of Animals and Nature, 9/9/18 ★★★✰✰ Includes: "The Ugly Duckling" "In the Duckyard" "The Storks" "The Spruce Tree" "It's Perfectly True!" "The Dung Beetle" "The Butterfly" "The Snowdrop" "The Sunshine's Stories" "The Drop of Water" "The Flea and the Professor" "The Snowman" The title of this section sums up what's going on in the stories pretty accurately. "The Ugly Duckling" was great, and I understand why it's been lauded for the past 175 years. I also enjoyed "In the Duckyard" though there's a surprisingly violent part in it where a duck is taking care of a young songbird, but the bird accidentally insults the duck. Says the duck... "I've taken good care of you, and now I'm going to teach you a lesson." And then she bit the head off the songbird, and he lay there dead. "What's this?" she said, "Couldn't he take that? Well, then he really wasn't meant for this world." Whiskey tango foxtrot. But that's the kind of thing that makes these tales enjoyable when they can be enjoyable at all. "The Spruce Tree" was quite sad, but I really liked it. I think I heard it on tape back in the days when people used to use cassette tapes. It actually took a long time for me to start using the term "audiobook" instead of "book on tape," and I still slip from time to time. And I'll end this digression with a riddle for whipper-snappers: You can substitute a number two pencil for the pen, but I reckon that's really no hint at all. Alas. Anyway, that story always stuck with me. "The Dung Beetle" was also amusing. As for the rest... eh. In fact, I read these only five days ago, and I can barely remember them. (Such is the peril of reading stuff when you're house-sitting for peeps who have no internet, and you can't review anything until you get home.) That might be a memory problem, or it might be that the tales were just that unremarkable. The Humanization of Toys and Objects, 9/9/18 ★★✰✰✰ Includes: "The Steadfast Tin Soldier" "The Shepherdess and the Chimney Sweep" "The Darning Needle" "The Old House" "The Rags" I enjoyed "The Steadfast Tin Soldier" and "The Darning Needle..." I think. The former was cute, and the latter was humorous. But here's a confession: With the commencement of the previous section, I was going to finish this book on that day, dammit, and I confess I was plowing through these. The same sentiment applies to the next section. Legends, 9/9/18 ★★✰✰✰ Includes: "Holger the Dane" "Bird Phoenix" "The Family of Hen-Grethe" "Everything in Its Proper Place" These were fine, I guess, but none stood out. Thankfully they were short. The important thing is that I finished the book. I want a cookie. Final Analysis, 9/14/18: Well, I set out to get out of my comfort zone, and I succeeded. These weren't agonizing, but I had to force myself back into it every time, and I managed to slip several books between some sections. This book gets two stars, but it could easily be four had it included only the stories I enjoyed, all of which are mentioned above. There's a reason most of the obscure ones remain obscure: they suck. There's a reason the popular ones remain popular: they rock. 200 pages of this would've been fine, but I made myself slog through 600, and that was just too much for me. But like I said at the beginning, this collection is at a disadvantage from the start since I'm not a big short story person. And I pointed out that Hans Christian Andersen's writing style and wit are great, but such works better if there's a story worth hearing to go along with it. And I'll also note that the community rating right now is 4.23, so I'm giving a minority opinion here. If you really like short stories, give these a go. If you sometimes enjoy short stories but mostly tolerate them and read them because you think you're supposed to from time to time, and you have an appreciation for off-the-wall wit and humor, then just read the ones I commented on. If you can deal with heavier what-the-hell-is-this-shit flim-flam, then check out all of them. If you don't like short stories, then obviously you should skip this entirely.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    In a nutshell: This is a collection of thirty fairy tales written by the famous Danish author Hans Christian Andersen and translated into English by Tiina Nunnally. The collection includes famous tales such as “The Little Mermaid”, “The Ugly Duckling”, “The Little Match Girl” and “The Steadfast Tin Soldier” as well as lesser known tales. The tales are ordered chronologically from when they were published. Review: I loved this book. I was familiar with Andersen’s stories, but they were usually the s In a nutshell: This is a collection of thirty fairy tales written by the famous Danish author Hans Christian Andersen and translated into English by Tiina Nunnally. The collection includes famous tales such as “The Little Mermaid”, “The Ugly Duckling”, “The Little Match Girl” and “The Steadfast Tin Soldier” as well as lesser known tales. The tales are ordered chronologically from when they were published. Review: I loved this book. I was familiar with Andersen’s stories, but they were usually the simplified versions put in children’s picture books. I can’t believe I have been missing out on his writing and his voice all of these years. Andersen adds to his stories funny observations, lovely setting detail, haunting dream and vision sequences, and little asides to the reader. His writing is apparently notoriously difficult to translate, which makes me appreciate Nunnally’s fresh and vivid translation even more. The introduction to this book, written by Jackie Wullschlager, does a splendid job in portraying who Andersen was, as a writer and person. Wullschlager explains how his tales reflected his regard for art and story, and also his deep sense of being a lonely outsider. I recommend reading the introduction after reading the rest of the book, not because of spoilers, but because reading about Andersen’s life was more moving to me after reading his stories. Andersen’s early stories were largely inspired or adapted by folk tales and myths. “The Tinderbox” features a witch whose magic treasures are guarded by dogs with very large eyes. According to the back-of-the-book notes, the violent “Little Claus and Big Claus” is based on traditional Danish landlord-and-tenant stories. “The Little Mermaid” was an exquisite tragedy. I knew that Andersen’s story did not end happily for the mermaid, but the end made my heart twinge anyway. (Well, not the very end, which was a slapped-on lame moralistic ‘lesson’.) “The Steadfast Tin Soldier” and “The Wild Swans” were also very lovely tales. “The Steadfast Tin Soldier” was notable for being Andersen’s first published tale that was not based on a prior folktale or story. Andersen has a number of stories that feature anthropomorphized objects. Of course “The Steadfast Tin Soldier” is the most famous, but there is one where a top falls in love with a leather ball; a fir tree wishes always to be where it’s not; a porcelain shepherdess is engaged against her will to a cupboard carved with the figure of a man. Jackie Wullschlager points out in her introduction that Andersen often uses animals, plants and even the wind to act as a sort of Greek chorus in the stories. “The Marsh King’s Daughter” is an odd and dark tale about a girl who is a beautiful hellion by day and a froggish sad creature by night. She is raised by Vikings but decides to free a captured Christian priest. Throughout the story, a family of storks observe and comment. In “The Ice Maiden”, two cats swap gossip about the main characters: “Is there any news from the mill?” said the parlor cat. “Here in the house a secret engagement has taken place. The father doesn’t yet know about it. Rudy and Babbette have been stepping on each other’s paws all evening under the table. They stepped on me twice, but I didn’t meow because that would have attracted attention.” “Well I would have meowed,” said the kitchen cat. “What’s proper in the kitchen is not proper in the parlor,” said the parlor cat. p. 357 Two of my favorite stories in this collection were also two of the longest stories: “The Snow Queen” and “The Ice Maiden.” In “The Snow Queen”, young Gerda goes on a quest to save her best friend Kai from the Snow Queen who has abducted him. Along the way, she meets, among others: a garden full of flowers that talk to Gerda but don’t say anything useful; a couple of friendly crows; and a little robber girl (one of my favorite minor characters who gets an awesome line near the end.) “The Ice Maiden” is set in Switzerland and Andersen both intentionally and unintentionally evokes a bygone world, as he describes Swiss men who hunt on the glaciers as well as the modern locomotive. I found the specificity of Andersen’s fairy tales delightful. I have enough geographical knowledge to recognize Danish place names thrown out in “The Wind Tells of Valdemar Daae and His Daughters.” An aging Andersen talked to girls at a brothel to research his story “The Wood Nymph” which is set in Paris during that city’s 1867 Exposition. An amazing tidbit about Andersen’s tale “The Most Incredible Thing”: published in 1872, it became a symbolic story for the Danish Resistance in the 1940′s. There is so much in these stories that would be wonderful to discuss. There is the way that Christianity operates like another kind of magic, and alongside the fantasy elements. There is the high-stakes element of Andersen’s tales; happy endings are definitely not a guarantee. Apparently “The Story of a Mother” had a different ending and then Andersen capriciously decided to change it. There are also a number of stories that I haven’t mentioned at all that would be great to discuss in detail, but I don’t think this review should be much longer. My recommendation then is to read this collection for yourselves!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    About: Classic Fairy Tales is a collection of the Danish author Hans Christian Anderson’s fairy tales, which were all written in the 19th century. This collection includes some well known stories such as “The Little Mermaid”, “The Ugly Duckling” and “The Snow Queen” as well as many stories that are not quite as well known. There is a good mix in this collection of stories with a fairy tale bent and others that seem more realistic. There is also a good mix of stories that seem to have been written About: Classic Fairy Tales is a collection of the Danish author Hans Christian Anderson’s fairy tales, which were all written in the 19th century. This collection includes some well known stories such as “The Little Mermaid”, “The Ugly Duckling” and “The Snow Queen” as well as many stories that are not quite as well known. There is a good mix in this collection of stories with a fairy tale bent and others that seem more realistic. There is also a good mix of stories that seem to have been written for children and stories that seem more mature in theme. Did I Like It?: Yes, I did like this collection. I didn’t love it, but I feel that is to be expected with such a large collection of fairy tales. I enjoyed reading the original stories of fairy tales I already knew about as well as reading some stories I had never heard of. I tended to like his longer stories as I felt like they were more profound and I could get sucked into them. While there were many stories that I liked, there were a lot that were a little tedious and some even that seemed pointless as well. These tended to be his shorter stories, especially his stories about inanimate objects. While I enjoyed the Grimm’s fairy tales that I read last year, I will say that because Hans Christian Anderson was actually a writer I naturally find his writing to be better and therefore nicer to read. Also, none of his stories were overly repetitive, which was something I found annoying with the Grimm’s fairy tales. Favorite Stories: My favorite story whose fairy tale I already was familiar with was The Little Mermaid. The original story was much different than the Disney version and I found it very interesting to read and even a bit sad. Thumbelina was another classic that I enjoyed a good deal as well and inspired me to watch the 90’s animated version which was a lot of fun. The Wild Swans was a favorite of mine that seemed like a proper fairytale. It was one of the longer stories and I got pretty engrossed in it. The Bond of Friendship was an interesting story that I took a liking too as it was quite different to a lot of the other stories. It was set in Greece and involved a strange Greek ceremony of brotherhood that I had never heard of before. It involved an interesting love triangle and an almost homosexual friendship as well. There were a lot of fascinating relationship dynamics in that story. The Ice Maiden was potentially my favorite story. It was well written and absorbing. The setting was described so wonderfully and the story was great and a little sad. There also seemed to be a lot of underlying messages in this story about love, fear, nature, death etc. It seemed wiser than some of his other tales. While these stories were my absolute favorites, there were quite a few others that I quite liked as well. Do I Recommend It?: If you are interested than yes! It takes a lot of patience to read a large collection of classic fairy tales, but it is worth it if you have interest in reading them. If you are just intrigued by certain stories you can always look them up online as well.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    A wonderful collection of fairy tales. I have to say right at the beginning that "only" giving 4 stars might seem a bit harsh but considering I just liked a handful of Hans Christian Andersen's tales as much as those I know from the Brothers Grimm justifies it for me. The others weren't bad but they also weren't dazzling. I guess, many of you know the most popular of his tales, such as The Ugly Duckling The Little Mermaid The Princess on the Pea Thumbelina and, of course, The Snow Queen Again, as with A wonderful collection of fairy tales. I have to say right at the beginning that "only" giving 4 stars might seem a bit harsh but considering I just liked a handful of Hans Christian Andersen's tales as much as those I know from the Brothers Grimm justifies it for me. The others weren't bad but they also weren't dazzling. I guess, many of you know the most popular of his tales, such as The Ugly Duckling The Little Mermaid The Princess on the Pea Thumbelina and, of course, The Snow Queen Again, as with Grimm's Fairy Tales it has to be noted that these are not the watered down versions but the original ones. Thus, there is quite a lot of blood, most lack a happy ending and not everyone would let their kids read these. I, personally, would because these are the original stories and even if they are dark, it's part of it. Explain it to the kids, comfort them whenever necessary and if they don't like it, stop. But don't change the stories because you think the kids can't handle it. I hate that! ... Maybe I've read too much Gaiman. ... Anyway. The stories themselves are quite good and vary greatly. Also, it was interesting to read this collection shortly after the tales by the Brothers Grimm because it made me see the similarities and differences (as far as stories go but also regarding the writing style). And reading this collection prompted me to research some of the folklore online. :D To me, at least one fairy tale collection belongs in every household.

  17. 5 out of 5

    C Joy

    After reading this collection of classic fairy tales, I learned/realized some new things. First, it is not for children. Second, it doesn't always have a happy ending. Most of them were entertaining, some were boring, but there are morals in the stories. Hans Christian Andersen uses symbols to represent good and evil, we can't always have what we want, but somewhere along the way we get something better that's essential for us. My favorite Disney story is "The Little Mermaid", and after reading th After reading this collection of classic fairy tales, I learned/realized some new things. First, it is not for children. Second, it doesn't always have a happy ending. Most of them were entertaining, some were boring, but there are morals in the stories. Hans Christian Andersen uses symbols to represent good and evil, we can't always have what we want, but somewhere along the way we get something better that's essential for us. My favorite Disney story is "The Little Mermaid", and after reading the real tale, I was, of course, sad about Ariel and her prince not ending up together; but when I realized that Ariel moved on to a better life than the one she has, I figured everything happens for a reason, and some things aren't just meant to be. The author used characters that appeal to children, inanimate objects, the elements, but they are just masking the real subjects - man's quest for perfection, power, and how this makes him greedy. I'm looking forward to reading the full unabridged versions.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    I read this when I was tiny and just found it today and had a flick through. I remember these as being well told, simple, absorbing. I remember absolutely loving "The Snow Queen". I think I actually had a separate book with that in, as well, with absolutely beautiful illustrations. [April 09:] Just reread this book. It's surprising how rich these fairy tales are considering that they're given to children. Some of them are ridiculous and pointless, really, except that they're charming little storie I read this when I was tiny and just found it today and had a flick through. I remember these as being well told, simple, absorbing. I remember absolutely loving "The Snow Queen". I think I actually had a separate book with that in, as well, with absolutely beautiful illustrations. [April 09:] Just reread this book. It's surprising how rich these fairy tales are considering that they're given to children. Some of them are ridiculous and pointless, really, except that they're charming little stories. Some of them have morals, which can be irritating to us. I remember loving some of these stories so much, as I said when I first reviewed this: my favourites now are "The Snow Queen" and "The Little Mermaid", while I remember loving "The Ugly Duckling"... Some of these are actually so much in a kid's consciousness that I didn't remember they were by Andersen. Lovely little collection, I reread them via the Penguin £2 edition, which is definitely worth the money.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    I was somewhat amazed by the large number of fairy tales that Hans Christian Andersen wrote. Apparently he wrote more than 200 in all, of which over sixty are included in this volume. In this book these tales are grouped into different sections according to the type of tales that they are. For example there are some which are grouped under the title 'Original Fairy Tales' which include The Little Mermaid and Thumbelina which are two of my favorites. Others are grouped under the title 'Evangelica I was somewhat amazed by the large number of fairy tales that Hans Christian Andersen wrote. Apparently he wrote more than 200 in all, of which over sixty are included in this volume. In this book these tales are grouped into different sections according to the type of tales that they are. For example there are some which are grouped under the title 'Original Fairy Tales' which include The Little Mermaid and Thumbelina which are two of my favorites. Others are grouped under the title 'Evangelical and Religious Tales' which include The Red Shoes and The Little Match Girl. These often have a moral to them. Some of my other favorites include The Ugly Duckling, The Emperor's New Clothes, The Princess and the Pea, and The Nightingale. There are also many more of which I had never heard, and it was a joy to read many of them.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    My grandparents have a copy of this book. Years ago, I adopted it and put it in the room I always sleep in when I go to their house. I have such fond memories of poring over the tales of The Little Mermaid, The Little Red Shoes, and Hans Clodhopper (my favourite!). I remember sharing my superior knowledge of how The Little Mermaid was supposed to end with anyone who happened to mention the Disney version. I infinitely preferred the sadder, original version. I'm not sure if I would call these child My grandparents have a copy of this book. Years ago, I adopted it and put it in the room I always sleep in when I go to their house. I have such fond memories of poring over the tales of The Little Mermaid, The Little Red Shoes, and Hans Clodhopper (my favourite!). I remember sharing my superior knowledge of how The Little Mermaid was supposed to end with anyone who happened to mention the Disney version. I infinitely preferred the sadder, original version. I'm not sure if I would call these children's tales though I was a child when I read them. Though they certainly aren't as macabre as the Brothers Grimm's.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Johan Haneveld

    3,5 stars. Fascinating collection of stories. There were some in here that were very powerful. Well written, showing a vivid imagination and knowledge of our human nature. I liked reading the stories that I knew in a more sanitized version, e.g. the little mermaid. I think the original versions are more powerful, and it's clear to see why they survived up till today. There were also a lot of (often shorter) stories that were more parables than fairy tales, intended to convey a message, but didn' 3,5 stars. Fascinating collection of stories. There were some in here that were very powerful. Well written, showing a vivid imagination and knowledge of our human nature. I liked reading the stories that I knew in a more sanitized version, e.g. the little mermaid. I think the original versions are more powerful, and it's clear to see why they survived up till today. There were also a lot of (often shorter) stories that were more parables than fairy tales, intended to convey a message, but didn't really work for me, often missing a real resolution, or interesting twist in the tail. So a bit of a mixed bag, but fascinating to read some classic tales.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Angie Schmidt

    Lessons and Observations from 47 Fairy Tales... 1. Bad things happen and people die. 2. Always be shrewd and occasionally cunning, it will keep you alive and might make you rich. 3. Stay humble or you will be humbled. 4. Names are rarely worth mentioning. 5. Do not try to overthrow or outwit the Lord God. It will end badly for you. 6. The knick-knacks, tools and decorations around your house have vivid personal lives and are likely engaged to each other. 7. It's best to have a trusted friend, partner, Lessons and Observations from 47 Fairy Tales... 1. Bad things happen and people die. 2. Always be shrewd and occasionally cunning, it will keep you alive and might make you rich. 3. Stay humble or you will be humbled. 4. Names are rarely worth mentioning. 5. Do not try to overthrow or outwit the Lord God. It will end badly for you. 6. The knick-knacks, tools and decorations around your house have vivid personal lives and are likely engaged to each other. 7. It's best to have a trusted friend, partner, pal or spouse by your side.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Anne (Booklady) Molinarolo

    Has all of my favorite stories in it: The Nightingale, The Snow Queen, The Flying Trunk, Aunt Toothache, The Emperor Has No Clothes, The Ugly Duckling, The Pixie and the Gardener's Wife just to name a few. I love that Andersen always has a little moral to his tales - a Christian one too! I never did pick up on those Christian values when I was a kid. Reading these tales brought my mom back to life, sitting on my twin, and reading me these stories before I fell asleep!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Wrenaria

    Really a fantastic collection of stories overall. I love a good fairytale, even it it doesn't end happily ever after, which many of these do not. A few of them were less interesting to me, hence the 4 stars, but overall I really enjoyed picking up this book now and then and reading a tale or two at a time in the evening to end the day. Anderson writes beautifully and weaves some really lovely tales together in this collection.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    I've never realized just how amazing Hans Christian Andersen was until I read all of his fairy tales. He has become one of my author-heroes, not only for his amazing stories, but for the amazing story of his life, and the connections I made with him on so many different levels. Simply beautiful stories, and a simply beautiful storyteller.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Faye

    Some of these are excellent (The Little Mermaid, The Emperor's New Clothes), some are entertaining (The Ugly Duckling, Shadow), some are downright heartbreaking (The Little Match Girl, Snowman), but then there are some that are tedious and boring (The Ice Maiden, Traveling Companion). All in all, I enjoyed it, but I've come to the opinion that Andersen was at his best when he was at his briefest.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Risa

    Very different from the sanitized versions most of us grew up with.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    'The Ice Maiden' is totally amazing.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joelle

    this is my current "read in bed" book. So far my favorite story has been THE SNOW QUEEN, it made me stay up so late! Also- I really love Hans' paper cut-out illustrations.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    My favorite stories as a child, I read and reread "The Little Match Girl," "The Shadow," "The Traveling Companion," and many others over and over again.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.