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30 review for Jose Rizal: The Man and the Hero (An Anthology of Legacies and Controversies)

  1. 4 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    Jose Rizal is the national hero of our country, the Philippines. His huge statue is at the center of the famous park, named after him, in the city of Manila. The image of his face is on our one-peso coin. His photograph is displayed on a wall inside every classroom. Books about him are read in all school levels, i.e., from elementary to college. His two novels, Noli Me Tangere (Touch Me Not) and El Filibusterismo are required readings in junior and senior high school levels, respectively. Jose Rizal is the national hero of our country, the Philippines. His huge statue is at the center of the famous park, named after him, in the city of Manila. The image of his face is on our one-peso coin. His photograph is displayed on a wall inside every classroom. Books about him are read in all school levels, i.e., from elementary to college. His two novels, Noli Me Tangere (Touch Me Not) and El Filibusterismo are required readings in junior and senior high school levels, respectively. There are countless streets, building, schools and other establishments bearing his name. His death anniversary, December 30th of every year, is a legal non-working holiday. 117 years after he was executed by firing squad by the Spanish government, he is still considered as the greatest Filipino ever lived. But for middle-aged father like me, is Rizal as a hero still relevant? Frankly, my answer is I don't know. For me, Rizal has been there since I was a child and I never spent time to ponder this question. In fact, it never crossed my mind that this could be an interesting question. I read all those books to get good grades. I memorized the facts: the names, dates, places, events etc. and my schools thought that those were enough to inculcate in my mind the heroism of Rizal. Enough for me to emulate and hopefully make me like a mini-Rizal. At this point in my life, I am not sure my schools succeeded. Rizal was a rich kid so he studied in an elite schools: the The Ateneo de Manila University for grade school; the University of Santo Tomas for college; and Unibersidad Central de Madrid for his degree of licentiate in medicine. If I were alive during that time, I would not think that my parents would have the money to send me in any of those schools. In fact, during my time in the 80's, my parents would not have afford to send me to a school as prestigious as the Ateneo. Also, Rizal was a polymath: a linguist, political scientist, artist, poet, teacher, doctor, newspaper publisher, inventor and sculptor. Again, I am not any of those. So, I am not sure if there is a tinge of Rizal's blood in my body. Worse, Rizal died at the age of 35 and he accomplished all of these. I am now 47 and have not done any heroic deed in my life. Anyway, maybe because we lived in different times (he: 1861-1896; I: 1964-only God knows when) and the circumstances are different. The country is now independent, although this one has always been debatable, and my family has no huge tracks of agricultural land from where we can be evicted by the government. So, frankly, I still don't know if there is something I can relate with Rizal's life. Maybe his good characteristics: passion for continuous learning, intellectually curious, lover of good books (for example: he was inspired by Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin to write his first novel, Noli Me Tangere) and being steadfast on something that he believed was right. Although on this last one, he also gave in when he had fought for his life. So, he was said to have retracted during his incarceration and denounced that he supported the revolution being led by another Filipino hero, Andres Bonifacio. Bottomline, I do not know how he can is still relevant in our modern times. However, some of his good characteristics are worth emulating. Not only because he had those but they are good characteristics and one cannot go wrong with them. In short, you can emulate them on any of the good folks around and you don't need Rizal to do that. However, I learned a lot from this book. It's really different when you are old and you read something that is not a required book in school. You read in relaxed pace and you don't worry about which facts or figures would have a big chance of showing up on the test questionnaire. Then of course, you are older and wiser and you have more life experiences to relate with the character(s) in the book. One thing I am sure though, given the many Filipino heroes presented in the book, I still go for Rizal. However, I thought the book missed discussing the option of why not changing the National Hero to Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino, Jr. Oh, maybe later on since his son is our incumbent President. In my mind, Rizal's weak points are: (1) the idea of having Rizal as the national hero came from the US who chose him because he had no anti-American sentiments; (2) he denied that he supported the revolution when he was being tried in court. This, for me, was a sign of cowardice; and (3) he was not the the right person to represent the masses; he was too elitist. The masses, those living below poverty line, comprise the majority of the Filipinos. So, it is difficult for them to see how they can do what Rizal did. Given the choice between Rizal and Bonifacio, I'd go go Rizal. Given the choice between Rizal and Aguinaldo, still Rizal. But between Rizal and Ninoy, I'll go for Ninoy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Apokripos

    One of the best textbooks recently published I read about José Rizal. The intrigues and controversies concerning our National Hero's life was handled deftly and scholarly accompanied by written documents to support the authors' analyses. The only misgiving I have about the book is that it was written a tad too academic (this is a textbook used in schools after all!); if only it could have the same lively discourse of history as I've seen from Gregorio F. Zaide book on the same subject (which I One of the best textbooks recently published I read about José Rizal. The intrigues and controversies concerning our National Hero's life was handled deftly and scholarly accompanied by written documents to support the authors' analyses. The only misgiving I have about the book is that it was written a tad too academic (this is a textbook used in schools after all!); if only it could have the same lively discourse of history as I've seen from Gregorio F. Zaide book on the same subject (which I read on-and-off during high school and straight during my third year in college) or with the zesty writing style as that of Ambeth Ocampo this could have earned one more star rating from me.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dominic Garcia

    good

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kakay

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Very good book

  5. 4 out of 5

    Christine Monta

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. interesting

  6. 5 out of 5

    Blessie Faith

    where can i buy this one?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Joey Fetalvero

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. nothing

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rovi Ann

    i love it

  9. 5 out of 5

    Darwin

    its very good

  10. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

  11. 4 out of 5

    Julez Maurei

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lyka Cruz

  13. 4 out of 5

    Marvin Giordan

  14. 5 out of 5

    Febeilyn Kimmayong

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rosella Bacay

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marlon Maranan

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jovilyn Dizon

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dick Tengay

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jhoane

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lysander Gatmaitan

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joanne Ricalde

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kuroi Neko-Chan

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ner

  24. 4 out of 5

    Charles Potenciano

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sheila

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jerrome Cataga

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gallant Philippine Peacekeepers

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rj Dalisay

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

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