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A Look Inside the Sacred Book of One of the World's Fastest-Growing Religions What used to be an exotic religion of people halfway around the world is now the belief system of people living across the street. Through fair, contextual use of the Qur'an as the primary source text, apologist James R. White presents Islamic beliefs about Christ, salvation, the Trinity, the aft A Look Inside the Sacred Book of One of the World's Fastest-Growing Religions What used to be an exotic religion of people halfway around the world is now the belief system of people living across the street. Through fair, contextual use of the Qur'an as the primary source text, apologist James R. White presents Islamic beliefs about Christ, salvation, the Trinity, the afterlife, and other important topics. White shows how the sacred text of Islam differs from the teachings of the Bible in order to help Christians engage in open, honest discussions with Muslims.


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A Look Inside the Sacred Book of One of the World's Fastest-Growing Religions What used to be an exotic religion of people halfway around the world is now the belief system of people living across the street. Through fair, contextual use of the Qur'an as the primary source text, apologist James R. White presents Islamic beliefs about Christ, salvation, the Trinity, the aft A Look Inside the Sacred Book of One of the World's Fastest-Growing Religions What used to be an exotic religion of people halfway around the world is now the belief system of people living across the street. Through fair, contextual use of the Qur'an as the primary source text, apologist James R. White presents Islamic beliefs about Christ, salvation, the Trinity, the afterlife, and other important topics. White shows how the sacred text of Islam differs from the teachings of the Bible in order to help Christians engage in open, honest discussions with Muslims.

30 review for What Every Christian Needs to Know about the Qur'an

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Lehr

    Islam It's everywhere. Just watch the news. Muslim terrorists engaged in jihad, while Western Islamists proclaim that theirs is a religion of peace. What do we know about them? About their book, the Qur'an? When did the Muslim religion begin? Who was involved? Do their claims of truth hold up under scrutiny? James White has written an excellent resource exploring and explaining these issues. What Every Christian Needs to Know About the Qur'an, is the book for every Christian who does indeed need to Islam It's everywhere. Just watch the news. Muslim terrorists engaged in jihad, while Western Islamists proclaim that theirs is a religion of peace. What do we know about them? About their book, the Qur'an? When did the Muslim religion begin? Who was involved? Do their claims of truth hold up under scrutiny? James White has written an excellent resource exploring and explaining these issues. What Every Christian Needs to Know About the Qur'an, is the book for every Christian who does indeed need to know about the Qur'an! Islam is one of the biggest challenges we face today in evangelism, culture, and politics. If we are to reach them for Christ we need to know them. First of all, I am so glad to see a resource such as this written by James White. I have followed his ministry for years and have always been impressed with his relentless pursuit of truth, all while possessing a heart filled with love, overflowing in evangelism. He continually puts himself out there, whether it is in debates or ministry broadcasts, seeking to engage, challenge, and persuade others to the truth of Christ. The Qur'an Having read and studied much on the Bible and how it came to be in its present form, I was eager to learn of the Qur'an and its history. But this curiosity presents itself as problem right off the bat. Muslims believe that that the Qur'an is the eternal word of Allah, perfectly transmitted to the prophet Muhammad without error or need of question. Just our asking and seeking is seen as an insult, yet they are not hindered in the slightest when it comes to discussing the history and transmission of our Bible. Unfortunately, both sides most likely suffer from having a majority who have very little knowledge or understanding in how their sacred texts came to be. James White sheds light on this essential topic, exposing the truth behind its creation. He looks at when it was initially written down. Under what conditions was the task completed. Who was in control of process and what motives may there have been in reaching its current form. All of which can be examined historically. What I found interesting was the differences between texts such as the New testament and the Qur'an and their development. The New Testament was a very open model with no central control. Gospels and epistles were written, delivered, and copied continuously. We have fragments from all over the place at all times. Because of these many and varied sources, we can study them and discover by comparing them what the original text was. The Qur'an on the other hand, is much different. Tradition claims the Muhammad received its message little by little over many years. The message itself was transmitted orally. This was how things remained till after the death of Muhammad. Interestingly enough the decision to begin writing the text down came after a battle in which many of the best reciters of the Qur'an were killed. After this a few began to write and distribute their versions. Later all the texts were ordered to be collected and an "official" version was to be written. Once this was completed all competing copies were to be destroyed. This presents a challenge to those wanting to determine the original text. With so little evidence to work with, what can be discovered? While this closed system has produced the appearance of textual accuracy without variation, it does raise the question of the ability of the text to be manipulated. The Islamic claim has always been that the books of the Christians and Jews have been corrupted, but as we can see it would be much easier to corrupt the confined and controlled source of the Qur'an. This is just one area the book covers. I could go on and on retelling it, but you would benefit much more by simply reading it for yourself. The biggest point I took away, was that if the Qur'an is in fact the eternal word of Allah, then every claim or statement contained there within should be true. Makes sense doesn't it. White argues this and then points out time and again where the "writer" of the Qur'an was wrong. This is especially apparent when it comes to the subject of Christian beliefs, most notably in regards to the trinity. So often it is evident that the writer had no idea or was greatly confused on these matters. Not something you would expect to find in a text sent directly from Allah. I can't recommend this book enough. As Christians desiring to present the Gospel to everyone, we must take the time to understand others and their beliefs. One important note. White not only wrote with Christians in mind, he also addresses the Muslim reader who may be seeking to know more of us. He reaches out to them to consider the material presented and examine their truthfulness for themselves. So if you are currently witnessing to Muslims this may be a work to share with them. I'd like to thank Bethany House Publishers for sending me this free copy for review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Eustacia Tan

    You know, growing up in a multi-religious society, you'd think that I'd know the basics of the major religions. Well, I know what Buddhism, Shinto-ism is about; I know a little about Hinduism, and I know about the different cults (there was a reading phase). But suprisingly (to me anyway), I didn't know much about Islam. Sure, I knew about Hari Raya, about the Haj, but what about the fundamentals? And along comes this book! It's stated purpose is to "seek to honestly communicate what the Qur'an sa You know, growing up in a multi-religious society, you'd think that I'd know the basics of the major religions. Well, I know what Buddhism, Shinto-ism is about; I know a little about Hinduism, and I know about the different cults (there was a reading phase). But suprisingly (to me anyway), I didn't know much about Islam. Sure, I knew about Hari Raya, about the Haj, but what about the fundamentals? And along comes this book! It's stated purpose is to "seek to honestly communicate what the Qur'an says about who God is, what His purpose are, and how we are to know Him." At first, I was a little worried about how impartial the book would be, but I came across this line about examining the Qur'an and my fears were put to rest: "We will invest great effort to examine the text fairly and honestly. If we do so more closely than might seem neccessary, as Christians we must. Just as we ask the Muslim to handle the Bible fairly and listen to it in its own context, so as lovers of truth and consistency we extend the same courtesy." Just to be on the safe side, I asked my Google+ friend +Brandon Yusuf Toropov if he would listen to my questions. Surprisingly (for me at least), I had a total of... 2 questions. One was on the wives of the Prophet and the other was on the issue of Mushkrim (check spelling) ('idolators'). Both didn't come about because of some mis-representation, the questions arose because I wanted more answers. The book looks at "The Qur'an and Muhammad of Mecca", an introduction to the Qur'an, and then on to the different theological positions, like what the Qur'an says about the Trinity, Jesus, Salvation. Then, the book looks at the Bible, to see if it's been corrupted, and if there are any prophesies about Muhammad in the Bible. Lastly, the book looks at the "Perfection of the Qur'an". It's slightly over 300 pages, but it packs a lot of punch. In fact, if there was an expanded edition, I'd probably buy it straightaway. After each chapter, there are extensive footnotes and at the end, there is an extensive bibliography. In my opinion, this makes it a good book as a starting point for a study of Christianity and Islam. Because this book is aimed at Christians, the book is very much focused on how Christianity and Islam relate to each other. Apart from the Christian, the author has written this book for the Muslim reader in mind too (they have a note at the beginning and the end of the book). I'm really hoping that a Muslim will read this book too and let everyone know what their opinion is. Still, I think it's possible for anyone to learn something from this book. Disclaimer: I got a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for a free and honest review This review was first posted at Inside the mind of a Bibliophile

  3. 5 out of 5

    Paul Bassett

    Dr. James White is today’s leading Christian apologist, debater and scholar. He has engaged in nearly one hundred moderated debates with proponents of Mormonism, Roman Catholicism and Islam and is the author of nearly thirty books. (Dr. White’s bio can be found here.) Dr. White has also taught extensively at the university level. So the depth that he brings to his latest work, “What Every Christian Needs to Know About the Qur’an” is not surprising . The work begins with a brief history of the life Dr. James White is today’s leading Christian apologist, debater and scholar. He has engaged in nearly one hundred moderated debates with proponents of Mormonism, Roman Catholicism and Islam and is the author of nearly thirty books. (Dr. White’s bio can be found here.) Dr. White has also taught extensively at the university level. So the depth that he brings to his latest work, “What Every Christian Needs to Know About the Qur’an” is not surprising . The work begins with a brief history of the life of Mohammed and then transitions into a description of the content of the Qur’an – all of which is very helpful to those unfamiliar with Islam, its prophet and holy book. Therein the reader will find some very helpful explanations of the key terms - tawhid, shirk, the Mithaq and Fitra – which are essential to discussing the Qur’an. He then explains the Islamic concept of salvation (which is essentially “works righteousness”) and then explores the Islamic misunderstanding of the Trinity. White also examines the allegation of Islamic scholars that the text of the Christian Scriptures has been corrupted in their meaning or text with some very interesting discoveries. He is then able – using a wide array of scholarly sources – to document the errors of that allegation while pointing to some problematic examples in the Qur’an itself all the while maintaining a charitable and non-confrontational style. The fact is that in our day, Islam is on the march. One cannot turn on any media which is devoid of the mention of Islam or its followers. Given that environment, Dr. White has provided an invaluable resource in our interaction with Islam around us. And he has done so in a winsome manner. Thanks to his efforts we now have – in a single volume – a beginning resource to the understanding of Islam and its holy book. And because Dr. White is an apologist, the information is presented in a way that will cause Muslims and non-Muslims to think more deeply about their respective religions. I like this book – and highly recommend it – for that very reason. One previous reviewer put the book down because she was unprepared for the book’s apologetic focus. But don’t let that deter you – this is not by any means a fundamentalist diatribe – but rather a clear explanation of the Qur’an and its claims. Read it – you won’t be sorry.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Colin Smith

    * DISCLOSURE: James White is a friend of mine and my former academic mentor. In this book, Dr. White's primary audience is fellow Christians who need orientation with regard to the Qur'an--what it is, how Muslims view it, and how Christians should handle its claims. James also includes some historical overview with regard to the rise of Islam, and other background topics that shed light on issues raised by the Qur'an. But this book isn't just for Christians. He also addresses Muslims, contrasting * DISCLOSURE: James White is a friend of mine and my former academic mentor. In this book, Dr. White's primary audience is fellow Christians who need orientation with regard to the Qur'an--what it is, how Muslims view it, and how Christians should handle its claims. James also includes some historical overview with regard to the rise of Islam, and other background topics that shed light on issues raised by the Qur'an. But this book isn't just for Christians. He also addresses Muslims, contrasting Islamic beliefs drawn from the Qur'an with central Christian teaching (for example: Are Christians polytheists? Did Jesus die on the cross? Has the Bible been corrupted, while the Qur'an remains pure?). These will at least be of interest to the Muslim grappling to understand Christian doctrine, and curious to see how educated an Christian views Islam. For those who hold to neither Christianity nor Islam, this book could be used as a basis for investigation of both faiths. James uses primary sources as much as possible, and notes differing opinions. There's a bibliography at the back, as well as a glossary of Arabic terms. Since the primary audience is Christian, James' work as an apologist and debater will show through in his criticisms of the Muslim and Qur'anic claims. However, he tries to be even-handed and fair in his representations of the side he is critiquing, and shows respect for Muslims by quoting primary sources in context, and not attacking straw men. James has been studying Islam for a number of years, and has even been learning Arabic so that he might examine the Qur'an in its original language. The level of study and scholarship he brings to the subject has earned him the respect and friendship of a number of his Muslim debate opponents. And it's this same level of study, scholarship, and respect that he brings to this book. I highly recommend it to anyone who wants to learn more about the Qur'an. While mostly very readable (there are some places where James' sentence structure is a bit obscure), this is not a light and fluffy book; but this is not a light and fluffy topic. Christians who are serious about reaching out to Muslims shouldn't fear having to apply their minds. This is the only way to approach such outreach in a way that honors our Muslim neighbors, and, most importantly, the Lord we serve.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Did you know that Muslims believe in the virgin birth of Jesus? Did you know that the Qur'an teaches that Christians believe that God is three gods forming a trinity made up of a father, son(Jesus) and surprisingly, Mary. These and other interesting facts are brought out in this educational critique of the Qur'an by James White. The history of the Muhammad and the Qur'an are both given as far as possible from historical/traditional accounts. What the Qur'an teaches about Jesus is examined, as al Did you know that Muslims believe in the virgin birth of Jesus? Did you know that the Qur'an teaches that Christians believe that God is three gods forming a trinity made up of a father, son(Jesus) and surprisingly, Mary. These and other interesting facts are brought out in this educational critique of the Qur'an by James White. The history of the Muhammad and the Qur'an are both given as far as possible from historical/traditional accounts. What the Qur'an teaches about Jesus is examined, as also are so-called 'proofs' that the Christian Bible foretold of Muhammad's coming and status as prophet. White shows that their own document does not stand against some of their tests for the holiness of the Christian Bible. It was very interesting to find that Muhammad apparently did not know exactly what the New and Old Testaments actually said when he wrote the Qur'an. He seems to have gotten his information on the Torah and Gospels from hearsay and observation of 'churches' rather than from the documents themselves. It was particularly fascinating to see learn that although Jesus is viewed as a great prophet, and apparently a sinless one as well, Muhammad is the greater prophet, despite having sinned and been forgiven by Allah. I would disagree somewhat with White's declaration that the best way to share the Gospel and honor truth is to enter into another's worldview and their theology. I do not need to know or understand a person's false notions about baking cookies in order to teach them how to make them correctly. I just need to know the right way to make cookies. When God sent Phillip to the Ethiopian Eunuch, Philip did not have to enter into the man's worldview or theology to get him to want to talk about the Gospel. Perhaps I am too critical, but I just feel as though I need to mention these things. I am not discounting the helpfulness and at times the necessity of understanding worldviews or theologies, I believe that a biblical case may be made for that also. I simply do not think that it is imperative to do so since the Gospel is the power of God to salvation, not logical demolition of worldviews. Apologetics may lead to presenting the Gospel but the apology is not the Gospel itself, which is affirmative. So do I think that every Christian needs to know these things about the Qur'an? No. But I really liked this book, this information would be very helpful to have when God brings along opportunities for us to share the Gospel with Muslims. Let me end with a point that White makes in response to a Muslim Criticism of Christianity, it struck me funny: "Islamic apologists make much of the so-called 'Synoptic Problem' in the New Testament studies. When you study the synoptic Gospels(Mathew, Mark, and Luke)…… you discern differences between them. Which makes sense - what would be the purpose for three carbon-copy gospels?" Thanks to Bethany House publishers for sending me a free review copy of this book!(My review did not have to be favorable)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Justin Tyme

    This book is a scholarly work about the Qur'an that does not pull punches. It may be too technical for some, but for others looking for more than an elementary study of comparative religions, this book is for them. I found it fascinating, accurate, and eye-opening. There is a general and popular misconception that the Christian Bible and the Muslim Qur'an are essentially the same book with a different cover. This could not be further from the truth, and to be intellectually honest, one must stud This book is a scholarly work about the Qur'an that does not pull punches. It may be too technical for some, but for others looking for more than an elementary study of comparative religions, this book is for them. I found it fascinating, accurate, and eye-opening. There is a general and popular misconception that the Christian Bible and the Muslim Qur'an are essentially the same book with a different cover. This could not be further from the truth, and to be intellectually honest, one must study the differences to make such a claim. "What Every Christian Needs to Know about the Qur'an" is not only for Christians, but for anyone wanting to know about what the Qur'an says and how it was written.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    This book is another phenomenal addition from Dr James White. Anyone looking to gain deep insight into the religion of Islam and the Koran should consider this a must read. The book is incredibly in depth but at the same time very readable. The author takes great pains to handle the text consistently and fairly. do yourself a favor and read this book

  8. 4 out of 5

    Paul,

    There aren't many books on Islam or the Christian's perspective that are fair and unbiased. For the most part, this book is, hence the high rating. Although White makes a few arguments which are untenable in my view, the overall tone is one of fairness and respect. White is the first Christian that I've read that defends the cultural legitimacy of Muhammad's marriage with the child bride Ai'sha. He correctly notes that no one (Christian, Jew, or Muslims) at that time censured Muhammad for consum There aren't many books on Islam or the Christian's perspective that are fair and unbiased. For the most part, this book is, hence the high rating. Although White makes a few arguments which are untenable in my view, the overall tone is one of fairness and respect. White is the first Christian that I've read that defends the cultural legitimacy of Muhammad's marriage with the child bride Ai'sha. He correctly notes that no one (Christian, Jew, or Muslims) at that time censured Muhammad for consummating a marriage with a 9-year-old girl. That is important to realize. It doesn't make that action moral, but it should influence our opinion. White did a good, thorough job of documenting his sources in the Qur'an and using widely accepted hadith. Particularly interesting was the argument about the difference between a centrally-controlled textual transmission (like the government controlled distribution of the Qur'an) and the distributed transmission and translation of the New Testament (which makes deleting unorthodox readings virtually impossible). There were only a few major objections that I had. One was that White claims that Muslims and Christians worship a different God because Muslims deny the incarnation. That might be true, but White's argument is entirely invalid because Abraham would also have to be considered as worshiping a different God. Obviously, Abraham didn't specifically believe in the Incarnation. This book is well-worth reading for any Christian who wants to better understand the Muslim religion. Beware though, there is a "clipping limit" for purchasers of the Kindle version. VERY annoying for a reference text!!! Here are a few of my favorite quotes. ========== - Highlight Loc. 203-5 | Added on Saturday, May 24, 2014, 04:57 PM From the position of Sunni Islamic orthodoxy, the Qur’an is as eternal as Allah himself. It is the very Word of God, without even the slightest imperfection. The finger of man has no place in it, as the book held reverently in the hand today is an exact copy of a tablet in heaven upon which the Qur’an has been written from eternity past. ========== - Highlight Loc. 212-14 | Added on Saturday, May 24, 2014, 04:57 PM Putting together Muhammad’s story is a challenge, as the sources from which the orthodox Islamic account are drawn come from at least a century after the events of his life. Further, even those show clear evidence of legendary expansion and the influence of piety in the early generations of adherents. ========== - Highlight Loc. 456-66 | Added on Saturday, May 24, 2014, 05:18 PM Without question, the harshest denunciations of Muhammad have been based upon his marriage to the young Aisha, who was betrothed at age six. Islamic sources are almost unanimous in saying the marriage was consummated at age nine (one major source saying ten). The idea of a fifty-three-or fifty-four-year-old man together with a child of nine is the basis upon which many have denounced even Islam as a whole. Add to this the scandal of Islamic child brides around the world today, and related horror stories associated with Taliban-like violence toward women and girls, and one can see why this conversation can become most strident. But the Qur’an gives no evidence of any embarrassment or apology as to Muhammad’s taking of Aisha. Unlike the Zaynab situation (see below), where a clear cultural taboo was broken, no such concern comes into the text here. Life spans were considerably shorter, and child brides were common. In fact, the Islamic literature’s emphasis on Aisha’s youthfulness may well be related to defense of her obvious virginity and purity. ========== - Highlight Loc. 525-46 | Added on Saturday, May 24, 2014, 05:24 PM To let the Muslim sources explain, [20] we start with Al-Tabari’s massive history, which places the story’s backdrop in its all-too-human setting: The Messenger of God came to the house of Zayd b. Harithah. (Zayd was always called Zayd b. Muhammad.) Perhaps the Messenger of God missed him at that moment, so as to ask, “Where is Zayd?” He came to his residence to look for him but did not find him. Zaynab bt. Jash, Zayd’s wife, rose to meet him. Because she was dressed only in a shift, the Messenger of God turned away from her. She said: “He is not here, Messenger of God. Come in, you who are as dear to me as my father and mother!” The Messenger of God refused to enter. Zaynab had dressed in haste when she was told “the Messenger of God is at the door.” She jumped up in haste and excited the admiration of the Messenger of God, so that he turned away murmuring something that could scarcely be understood. However, he did say overtly: “Glory be to God the Almighty! Glory be to God, who causes the hearts to turn!” When Zayd came home, his wife told him that the Messenger of God had come to his house. Zayd said, “Why didn’t you ask him to come in?” She replied, “I asked him, but he refused.” “Did you hear him say anything?” he asked. She replied, “As he turned away, I heard him say: ‘Glory be to God the Almighty! Glory be to God, who causes hearts to turn!’” So Zayd left, and having come to the Messenger of God, he said: “Messenger of God, I have heard that you came to my house. Why didn’t you go in, you who are as dear to me as my father and mother? Messenger of God, perhaps Zaynab has excited your admiration, and so I will separate myself from her.” Zayd could find no possible way to [approach] her after that day. He would come to the Messenger of God and tell him so, but the Messenger of God would say to him, “Keep your wife.” Zayd separated from her and left her, and she became free. While the Messenger of God was talking with ’A’ishah, a fainting overcame him. When he was released from it, he smiled and said, “Who will go to Zaynab to tell her the good news, saying that God has married her to me?” Then the Messenger of God recited: “And when you said unto him on whom God has conferred favor and you have conferred favor, ‘Keep your wife to yourself.’” and the entire passage. According to ’A’ishah, who said: “I became very uneasy because of what we heard about her beauty and another thing, the greatest and loftiest of matters—what God had done for her by giving her in marriage. I said she would boast of it over us.” ========== - Highlight Loc. 557-65 | Added on Saturday, May 24, 2014, 05:26 PM But the marriage between Zayd and Zaynab had not been a happy one, and Zayd found it no longer tolerable, so by mutual agreement with Zaynab he divorced her. This did not, however, make Zaynab eligible as a wife for the Prophet, for although the Koran had only specified that men were forbidden to marry the wives of sons sprung from their loins, it was a strong social principle not to make a distinction between sons by birth and sons by adoption. Nor was the Prophet himself eligible, for he had already four wives, the most that the Islamic law allows. Some months passed and then one day when the Prophet was talking with one of his wives the power of Revelation overwhelmed him; and when he came to himself his first words were: “Who will go unto Zaynab and tell her the good tidings that God hath given her to me in marriage, even from Heaven?” Salma was near at hand . . . and she went in haste to Zaynab’s house. When she heard the wonderful tidings, Zaynab magnified God and threw herself down in prostration toward Mecca. Then she took off her anklets and bracelets of silver, and gave them to Salma. To overcome immediate charges of impropriety (even of incest), a revelation comes down to solve the great and vexing problem of the marriage of divorced wives of adopted sons. Except, of course, it is more than hard to believe this was a great and vexing problem. We would expect the great and vexing problem to be divorce, let alone even the consideration of marrying your former daughter-in-law. [23] But Allah commands his Prophet to break the customs of his day and marry his first cousin. It seems even Aisha, his favorite (but who clearly experienced much jealousy toward his other wives), recognized an issue, for she is recorded to have said, “I feel that your Lord hastens in fulfilling your wishes and desires.” [24] Certainly this must give one pause in weighing the claims of the Qur’an to status as a divine revelation. Modern Islamic orthodoxy identifies Muhammad as the ideal man, the model to which all should seek to conform their behavior and lifestyle. Yet here, plainly the Qur’an displays acute embarrassment and must provide an apologetic, a defense of his actions. Many motives are possible, from the seemingly blatant marriage breakup, and the resultant diminishment of the evil of divorce, to the political tensions that were formative of the early generations of Islam and that led to the formation of its two major branches, Sunni and Shia. Whatever the motivation, the attempt to justify Muhammad’s actions and their wide-ranging results is obvious and forceful. ========== - Highlight Loc. 697-700 | Added on Monday, May 26, 2014, 06:04 PM For now, again, note Arabic’s centrality to the Muslim understanding: The Qur’an itself exists in no other tongue. Even though the Islamic majority depends on translations, Muslims still would say the Qur’an itself is not translatable, at least in the religious or theological sense. While Arabic can be translated into any other language, the Qur’an’s essence as Allah’s very words is tied to the Arabic tongue. ========== - Highlight Loc. 1276-78 | Added on Monday, June 02, 2014, 10:05 PM We simply must insist that if its author believed Christians hold to three gods, Allah, Mary, and evidently their offspring, Jesus, then the Qur’an is the result of human effort, is marked by ignorance and error, and so is not what Muslims claim it to be. No other Qur’anic text is as blatant in its misrepresentation of the Trinity. 116. And when Allah said: “O Jesus son of Mary! Did you say to mankind: ‘Take me and my mother for two gods other than Allah?’” He said: “Transcendent are You! It was not mine to say that of which I had no right. In saying it, then You knew it. You know what is in my self, but I know not what is in Your self. It is You, only You, Who know well all hidden things.” 117. I told them only that which You commanded me, [saying]: “Worship Allah, my Lord and your Lord!” I was a witness over them while I dwelt among them, and when You took me, You were the Watcher over them. You are Witness over all things. Most commentators project this text to the Day of Judgment, and many translations insert such an indication by inserting “And beware the day” or something similar. Allah then asks Jesus if He taught mankind to take Him and His mother as “two gods other than Allah.” Jesus denies ever doing so, asserting that He only proclaimed that they were to engage in tawhid. At this juncture, we need not belabor the point that is so plainly stated. The charge is blatant polytheism, and here alone is the “three” so listed (though in ayah 75 it is obvious two of the three are Jesus and Mary, with Allah assumed). Nowhere does the Qur’an ever give Father, Son, and Holy Spirit or even Allah, Son, and Spirit (the Holy Spirit in the Qur’an being the angel Gabriel, or Jabril). The Muslim must understand what is at stake. It is not an arguable fact that Christianity is clear in its profession of monotheism. Followers of Christ did not believe God had taken a human wife and by her sired a child named Jesus, and hence He was the “son of God.” The Qur’anic text seems plainly to say otherwise. What does this say concerning the truthfulness of its claims to divine origin and inspiration?

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brock

    Originally appeared in my blog www.castrobabble.blogspot.com We share the planet with over a billion Muslims. According to the 2010 U.S. Religion Census, there are 2.6 million Muslims living in the U.S. today with Islam being the fastest growing religion in America in the last decade. As the Muslim community continues to grow in the U.S., the likelihood of having an opportunity to engage them with the gospel has increased. As redeemed people, we need to be ready to tell others about our Redeemer. Originally appeared in my blog www.castrobabble.blogspot.com We share the planet with over a billion Muslims. According to the 2010 U.S. Religion Census, there are 2.6 million Muslims living in the U.S. today with Islam being the fastest growing religion in America in the last decade. As the Muslim community continues to grow in the U.S., the likelihood of having an opportunity to engage them with the gospel has increased. As redeemed people, we need to be ready to tell others about our Redeemer. Are you ready? Many moons ago, I studied Islam in a World Religions and a World History course in college, but I couldn't have an intelligent conversation with a Muslim about their religion and even pretend to have a clue. Enter James R. White, director of Alpha and Omega Ministries and apologist par excellence. When it comes to exposing error in light of the truth and teaching it in a way that is attainable no one does it better or more clearly. In What Every Christian Needs To Know About The Qur'an, Dr. White sets out to, "F]ocus on what Christians need to understand about the Qur'an's teachings particularly as it impacts our interactions with Muslims and our thinking on events throughout our world." He accomplishes just that by using primary texts, primarily the Qur'an itself and systematically showing how the Qur'an is not an inspired text, but most likely written by Muhammad despite Islamic orthodoxy to the contrary. For instance, Surah 5:73-75 (a surah is a chapter, 116 is an ayah or verse) convincingly calls into question the Qur'an's accuracy regarding its understanding of the Trinity. "73. They have disbelieved who say: "Allah is the third of three," when there is no god save One God. If they cease not what the say, a painful torment will fall upon those of them who disbelieve." Punishment is promised to those who say that Allah is the third in three gods a belief they attribute to the People of the Book, in this case Christians. Then it continues, "74. Will they not instead turn to Allah in repentance and seek His forgiveness? For Allah is Forgiving, Compassionate.75. The Messiah son of Mary was none other than a Messenger, before whom Messengers had passed away. And his mother was a saintly woman. They both used to eat [earthly] food. See how We make the signs clear for them; then see how they follow falsehood" The author of the Qur'an argues against the deity of Jesus and Mary by stating they were both merely human. In a different section, Dr. White highlights a highly respected Qur'an commentary, the Tafsir al-Jalalayn, which states, "So believe in Allah and His Messengers. Do not say, "Three gods: Allah, Isa [Jesus] and his mother." It is better that you stop saying theses things. Affirming the Divine Unity [is] better. Allah is only One God. He is too Glorious to have a son!" The author of the Qur'an believed that Christians believed the Trinity consisted of Jesus, Mary, and Allah and its prominent commentators believe that is precisely what the Qur'an teaches. This leads us to conclude the Qur'an is in error and cannot be divine. That's just a snippet of what Dr. White interacts with in this book and does it at a level that is very accessible even when using the primary sources. Another feature I appreciate about Dr. White's books is not only how he presents the facts, but how he shows his readers how to practically use them. What Every Christian Needs To Know About the Qur'an is essential reading for the Christian. After reading this book, you will be prepared to engage your Muslim friends, neighbors, and co-workers in a frank and honest discussion about their faith, which may provide you the platform to share the gospel. I cannot recommend this book highly enough! Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Bethany House Publishers as part of their Blogger Review program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  10. 5 out of 5

    George P.

    James R. White, What Every Christian Needs to Know About the Qur’an (Bloomington, MN: Bethany House Publishers, 2013). Paperback | Kindle What Every Christian Needs to Know About the Qur’an presents an introduction to and a critique of Islamic scripture (Qur’an) and tradition (ahadith) as they touch on matters pertaining to orthodox Christianity. Author James R. White is a Christian theologian who has engaged in debates with Islamic scholars. As befits a scholar, White’s tone throughout i James R. White, What Every Christian Needs to Know About the Qur’an (Bloomington, MN: Bethany House Publishers, 2013). Paperback | Kindle What Every Christian Needs to Know About the Qur’an presents an introduction to and a critique of Islamic scripture (Qur’an) and tradition (ahadith) as they touch on matters pertaining to orthodox Christianity. Author James R. White is a Christian theologian who has engaged in debates with Islamic scholars. As befits a scholar, White’s tone throughout is measured and reasonable, and his arguments are nuanced and fair-minded. The first three chapters introduce readers to Muhammad, the Qur’an, and Islamic monotheism (tawhid). In these chapters, and throughout the book, White’s presentation hews closely to Islamic beliefs that are shared by all Muslims (Sunni and Shia). He bases his description of Muhammad’s life and early Islamic history in the Qur’an and ahadith. In other words, he utilizes the same sources that Islamic theologians utilize. This leads Christian readers directly to the textual sources of the Muslim faith and assures them that White’s critiques are based on authoritative texts Muslims themselves acknowledge. The next four chapters focus on areas where the Qur’an and ahadith either misinterpret or contradict orthodox Christianity—or both. Chapter 4 demonstrates that the Qur’an critiques a Trinitarian doctrine that no orthodox Christian holds. Chapter 5 demonstrates the fundamental contradictions between what the Bible and the Qur’an say about Jesus. Chapters 6 and 7 turn to the doctrine of salvation, showing that Muslims deny that Christ died on the cross to graciously atone for people’s sins. When Christians point out these misinterpretations and contradictions to Muslims, Muslims respond by claiming that Christians have “corrupted” their Bible, either by misinterpreting or rewriting the New Testament. The final four chapters thus turn to issues of translation, literary sources, and textual criticism. These are the most technical chapters in the entire book, but they also repay careful study. They demonstrate that Christians have not in fact “corrupted” their Bible and that the textual transmission of the Qur’an is not as clean as Muslims commonly believe. For Christian readers, the effect of White’s overall argument is a shoring up of the intellectual defenses of their faith in Jesus Christ against Muslim assaults on the same. For Muslim readers the effect may be to raise a troubling question: Can we trust an allegedly inspired book that makes false statements about other religions and rests on questionable textual foundations? I recommend What Every Christian Should Know About the Qur’an to both Christian and Muslim readers, though especially the former. We live in an age of great conflict between these two religious communities. Rather than focusing on a small minority of terrorists who commit violence in the name of Islam (against the wishes of the vast majority of Muslims, by the way), we should focus our critique on the doctrines and practices that all Muslims hold in common. Doing so is less exciting, perhaps, than the evening news, but it is also more helpful to the long-term project of winning Muslim hearts and minds. ----- P.S. If you found my review helpful, please vote “Yes” on my Amazon.com review page.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Steven Wedgeworth

    This book provides a helpful but limited popular introduction and criticism of Islam for a Christian audience. It largely avoids the topics of terrorism or "radical Islam," and it sticks to a few basic points of religious belief, namely the accuracy and textual integrity of the Quran. It opens with the history of and a theological survey of Islam, and then quickly jumps into criticism. For those who have heard that White is somehow soft on Islam, this book should provide a contrast. While respec This book provides a helpful but limited popular introduction and criticism of Islam for a Christian audience. It largely avoids the topics of terrorism or "radical Islam," and it sticks to a few basic points of religious belief, namely the accuracy and textual integrity of the Quran. It opens with the history of and a theological survey of Islam, and then quickly jumps into criticism. For those who have heard that White is somehow soft on Islam, this book should provide a contrast. While respectful, he is consistently critical and gets to this point rather quickly. Indeed, I found this book to stand in rather stark contrast to White's dialogues with Yasir Qadhi. I would not recommend this book as a stand-alone guide to understanding Islam, but I do think it makes for a helpful addition to a pastoral "apologetics" collection.

  12. 5 out of 5

    David Bonikowsky

    Very helpful. Learned a whole lot. Here are a few interesting points to keep in mind when witnessing to a Muslim. 1. To a Muslim, the Old Testament (the Torah) is inspired. The Gospels are as well (although a Muslim would claim they have been corrupted over time so they aren't entirely reliable). 2. Mohammed believed (and wrote) that Christians twisted Jesus's message, and went from worshipping one God (Allah/Jehovah) to worshipping 3 Gods (a misunderstanding of the doctrine of the Trinity). Howe Very helpful. Learned a whole lot. Here are a few interesting points to keep in mind when witnessing to a Muslim. 1. To a Muslim, the Old Testament (the Torah) is inspired. The Gospels are as well (although a Muslim would claim they have been corrupted over time so they aren't entirely reliable). 2. Mohammed believed (and wrote) that Christians twisted Jesus's message, and went from worshipping one God (Allah/Jehovah) to worshipping 3 Gods (a misunderstanding of the doctrine of the Trinity). However, and importantly, Mohammed was only very vaguely familiar with the doctrine of the Trinity. The Koran condemns followers of Jesus for worshipping these three gods: the Father (a term they would consider blasphemous), Jesus Christ, and Mary, mother of Jesus. The Koran misrepresents a doctrine that had been foundational to Christianity since it's beginning, and it is seemingly simply a misunderstanding of the doctrine. 3. Muslims point to textual criticism to argue that the New Testament is unreliable because of the number of variants. However, it is noteworthy that the Koran's distribution (before the advent of the printing press) was controlled and regulated. There is evidence that textual variants were widespread before Uthman (in A.D. 650, 18 years after the death of Mohammed) compiled the Koran from fragments. Contradictory versions were destroyed, and there are apparently portions that were lost before the compilation. Arguably, the Koran's accuracy is much less reliable than the New Testament's despite the fact that the NT has more (by orders of magnitude) manuscript evidence available today, since its distribution was never controlled (copies were made and distributed freely all across the known world). A Christian should speak the truth in love when witnessing to a Muslim. And this book is full of helpful information to know when you have that opportunity.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Foundational for Respectful Dialogue "What Every Christian Should Know.." lays a foundation for Christians to begin to humbly and knowledgeably broach difficult topics with Muslim friends. Christians cannot engage without first having some background in Islamic ideology/theology as presented in the Qur'an. This book teaches a whole new vocabulary (you learn tons of Arabic terms without even realizing it!)and conveys a lot of history in a story-format that is readable and interesting. Even as a st Foundational for Respectful Dialogue "What Every Christian Should Know.." lays a foundation for Christians to begin to humbly and knowledgeably broach difficult topics with Muslim friends. Christians cannot engage without first having some background in Islamic ideology/theology as presented in the Qur'an. This book teaches a whole new vocabulary (you learn tons of Arabic terms without even realizing it!)and conveys a lot of history in a story-format that is readable and interesting. Even as a stay-at-home mom who has been out of the learning sphere for many years, I found this highly academic book challenging, yet very attainable and readable. It's vital to look at this rapidly growing worldview through a lens of a Christian worldview, not so that we can accept it passively, but so that we can lovingly show its deep flaws and reveal the exciting Truth of the Gospel. This book comes recommended by Rev. Albert Mohler, John MacArthur and Michael J. Kruger. I was given this book by the publisher to provide a non-biased review.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Tremendous book. Very well researched and written. Dr. White does an outstanding job of explaining the challenges of the Quran and the difficulties that text. He explained in a scholarlary and loving way the differences and errors in the Quran and by extension the concepts of Islam as relates to Jesus and Christianity as a whole. The work is a must read for Christians as a means to meaningfully interact with Islam and also for Muslims as a means to accuratley evaluate the text upon which their b Tremendous book. Very well researched and written. Dr. White does an outstanding job of explaining the challenges of the Quran and the difficulties that text. He explained in a scholarlary and loving way the differences and errors in the Quran and by extension the concepts of Islam as relates to Jesus and Christianity as a whole. The work is a must read for Christians as a means to meaningfully interact with Islam and also for Muslims as a means to accuratley evaluate the text upon which their beliefs are based.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Glaser

    While billed as an introductory work this book is not for the faint of heart. You really need to be able to deal with the many, long quotations from the Qu'ran and the technical terminology that the author uses regularly. While there was a lot of good information and I learned a lot reading it, there was very little "flow" to the chapters, little structure, just a stream-of-consciousness argument (much like Dr. White's podcast, if you are familiar with it that does make the book easier to read). While billed as an introductory work this book is not for the faint of heart. You really need to be able to deal with the many, long quotations from the Qu'ran and the technical terminology that the author uses regularly. While there was a lot of good information and I learned a lot reading it, there was very little "flow" to the chapters, little structure, just a stream-of-consciousness argument (much like Dr. White's podcast, if you are familiar with it that does make the book easier to read). Overall I'd recommend it, but be ready to do some homework and read it with a glossary nearby.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Godly

    Great resource that highlights key inconsistencies of the Quran with Scripture from the Christian perspective.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Vincent Lemieux

    Every Christian who really desire to engage Muslims with the Gospel should read it. James White did a really scholarly, well informed, fair, compassionate and biblical analysis of the Qur’an and Muslims’s claims. Here’s a part of the conclusion that’s going to tell you something of the vast amount of topics you’ll read about in this book : « We have examined information relating to Muhammad, the beginnings of Islam, and the key theological areas of disagreement and division between Christians an Every Christian who really desire to engage Muslims with the Gospel should read it. James White did a really scholarly, well informed, fair, compassionate and biblical analysis of the Qur’an and Muslims’s claims. Here’s a part of the conclusion that’s going to tell you something of the vast amount of topics you’ll read about in this book : « We have examined information relating to Muhammad, the beginnings of Islam, and the key theological areas of disagreement and division between Christians and Muslims as they are touched upon in the Qur’an. We have looked at the Qur’an’s history, the sources it drew from, and its own transmission over time. What then must we conclude? » I so enjoyed it I read it in 6 days.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jóhan Djurholm

    After reading "Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus" and"No God but One" by Nabeel Qureshi (both books which I highly recommend) I wanted to get a even deeper understanding of Islam. I must say that James White did a phenominal job in writing this book. He cover a lot of different topics in depth, with many references. I would absolutely recommend this book to anyone who is looking into understanding Islam better and why we as Christians still can rely on the Bible and in Jesus name.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Shirkman

    A helpful overview of the Quran from a Christian perspective that is authoritative and fair in its criticisms of the sacred Islamic text. Although it is sometimes dry and repetitive, the book is incredibly educational. White book quotes large swaths of the Quran and has footnotes that make up nearly ⅓ of the book. It's incredibly well researched and can help any Christian better understand the Quran and how to dialogue with Muslims about faith.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Thaddeus

    Very interesting learning about the history behind the Qur'an and some more of the story of early Islam! This book was well written and thorough. I liked how much he made use of the original source materials. Excellent read. Highly recommended!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Calvin Coulter

    An eye-opener for me; I confess to a distinct lack of knowledge of the Qur'an before picking up this book. I'd say a must read for any Christian who hopes to engage intelligently with Muslims.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Parker

    Accessible, balanced, and careful. Very helpful in coming to a basic understanding of Islamic thought and how to respond to it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    John

    Monday, November 17, 2014 What Every Christian Needs to Know about the Qur'an by James White - 311 Pages This is a great book for interacting with orthodox Muslims. However it may not be the most effective approach in evangelizing nominal or folk muslims as they may not have the necessary knowledge about their own faith to even interact on a critical level. James White does here what he does best, and applies his wealth of scholarly expertise in exegesis and ancient manuscript transmission to the Monday, November 17, 2014 What Every Christian Needs to Know about the Qur'an by James White - 311 Pages This is a great book for interacting with orthodox Muslims. However it may not be the most effective approach in evangelizing nominal or folk muslims as they may not have the necessary knowledge about their own faith to even interact on a critical level. James White does here what he does best, and applies his wealth of scholarly expertise in exegesis and ancient manuscript transmission to the text of the Qur'an. After doing his best to fairly represent the basic tenets of orthodox Islam and history he lays out his arguments. His basic arguments are: - The author of the Qur'an did not have accurate understanding of the Christian doctrine of the Trinity: "The Qur'an's representation of the the Trinity as "three gods" comprised of Allah, Marry, and Jesus is a complete canard..." - In light of this gross misrepresentation and therefore unnecessary refutation on behalf of the Qur'an, the divine authorship of the Qur'an must be questioned. This fact "...raises serious questions for the honest Muslim who wishes to believe the Qur'an truthful in all things because its author is Allah. How could Allah misrepresent beliefs as the Qur'an so clearly does?" - The claim of the Surah 4:157 that Jesus was not put to death on a cross puts it in clear contradiction with the preceding Scriptures (which the Qur'an claims to be in agreement with) and history itself. - The Islamic view of Divine judgement, justice, and forgiveness is arbitrary and is in complete disharmony with the Old and New Testament view of sin and grace. - The claim of many modern Muslims that the New Testament has been corrupted is in direct conflict with the teaching in Surah 5:47 that the New Testament (Injil) was intact in the days of Muhammad and should therefore be obeyed. We know that the modern New Testament is in line with copies and of the New Testament dating hundreds of years prior to the time of Muhammad. - Contrary to Surah 10:94 there is no recognizable prophecy in the Old or New Testaments about the coming of Muhammad. - "Finally, the Muslim needs to recognize that the Qur'an has a history, in terms of its utilization of previous sources, which Islam seems intent upon denying, as well as a history of textual transmission" - in contrast to the Islamic claim that the Qur'an has been preserved in the exact form in which it was delivered to Muhammed. Each of these claims is thoroughly explored and defended, with many (many) references and recitations of the originals sources. While I found Dr. White's arguments sound and helpful, perhaps the aspect of this book that most impressed me was the firm but respectful tone in which it was written. It was clear that the author's intention was not to merely win and argument and shame opponents of Christianity but to seek the truth in the hopes that people will genuinely be set free from deception. I hope to carry that attitude into conversations I have with Muslims in the future. For more good stuff from Dr. White check out his ministry's website: http://www.aomin.org

  24. 4 out of 5

    Laura Langley

    Author James R. White wrote What Every Christian Needs to Know About the Qur’an “to focus on what Christians need to understand about the Qur’an’s teaching particularly as it impacts our interactions with Muslims and our thinking on events thrthroughout our world.” White points out Christians and Muslims haven’t read each other’s books, so we “tend to talk right past one another.” With this book, the author hopes to encourage open and frank dialogue with Muslims, giving readers “an accurate know Author James R. White wrote What Every Christian Needs to Know About the Qur’an “to focus on what Christians need to understand about the Qur’an’s teaching particularly as it impacts our interactions with Muslims and our thinking on events thrthroughout our world.” White points out Christians and Muslims haven’t read each other’s books, so we “tend to talk right past one another.” With this book, the author hopes to encourage open and frank dialogue with Muslims, giving readers “an accurate knowledge of the Qur’an” to “help open the doors to” conversations with Muslims. Having had quite a few Muslim friends over the years, I was excited to see this book for sale. I truly wanted to better understand my friends’ faith, to look for ways to bridge the gap between our beliefs and find ways to share Jesus with them. Honestly, I only made it halfway through chapter five of this book. I’ve picked it up countless times over the course of two weeks trying to wade through it. I am interested in the topic, and I know the importance of understanding others’ faith, but I find the book so so academic that it would be difficult for “every Christian” to follow. I suppose I was caught up by the title of the book and assumed it would be in plain English for a layperson like me. It is not. Without a doubt, White is well studied and knows the subject well. It is obvious from each chapter’s endnotes and from the bibliography he has done his research. He is also well equipped in apologetics and reasoning. But this is no layperson’s guide. It is a guide for apologists. While every Christian may need to know about the Qur’an and the Muslim faith, for me, the language, the depth of the reasoning and logic, and the academic treatment of the material are far beyond what “every Christian” is willing to read or attempt to digest. I do recommend the book for anyone who is an apologist or academic wants to gain an academic understanding of the Qur’an. But for those of us who slog it out in the day-to-day world who happen to have Muslim friends, this isn’t user-friendly, and it’s not an easy read. You can’t pick up and plan to use it in conversation with your friend over coffee tomorrow. The book includes an introduction the Qur’an along with a brief history of the book and of Muhammed. It also covers issues that stand between Muslims and Christians such as the Trinity, Jesus in the Quran, the Quran and the cross, the scales of salvation, the supposed corruption of the Gospels, prophecies of Muhammed in the Bible. Copies of James R. White’s book What Every Christian Needs to Know About the Qur’an are available through Amazon, Mardel, Christian Book Distributors, Barnes and Noble and other booksellers. * Note: I received a copy of this book from the publisher for this review. However, the opinions expressed are my own.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Adam Smith

    Analysis This book is broken down into the following chapters: 1. The Qur'an and Muhammad of Mecca 2. The Qur'an: A Brief Introduction 3. Allah: Tawhid, Shirk, the Mithaq and the Fitra 4. "Say Not Three": The Quran and the Trinity 5. Jesus in the Qur'an 6. The Qur'an and the Cross 7. The Scales: Salvation in the Qur'an 8. Did the "People of the Book" Corrupt the Gospel? 9. Prophecies of Muhammad in the Bible 10. The Perfection of the Qur'an? Parallels and Sources 11. The Perfection of the Qur'an? Transmissi Analysis This book is broken down into the following chapters: 1. The Qur'an and Muhammad of Mecca 2. The Qur'an: A Brief Introduction 3. Allah: Tawhid, Shirk, the Mithaq and the Fitra 4. "Say Not Three": The Quran and the Trinity 5. Jesus in the Qur'an 6. The Qur'an and the Cross 7. The Scales: Salvation in the Qur'an 8. Did the "People of the Book" Corrupt the Gospel? 9. Prophecies of Muhammad in the Bible 10. The Perfection of the Qur'an? Parallels and Sources 11. The Perfection of the Qur'an? Transmission and Text Dr. White begins with an overview of the Qur'an (Islam's holy book) and focuses in on a discussion of the beginnings of Islam, with an emphasis on the significance of Muhammad and Mecca. Next, he discusses four crucial terms essential for understanding Islam: Tawhid (Islam's emphasis on the Oneness of God), Shirk (the practice of idolatry or polytheism), Mithaq (the covenant between Allah and the descendants of Adam) and Fitra (the Islamic understanding of human nature). Dr. White then discusses the Islamic understanding of the Holy Trinity. He makes the case that the Qur'an mischaracterizes this doctrine. The same is true for the view of Jesus in the Qur'an. There is a fundamental misunderstanding of who Jesus is. Next is the denial in the Qur'an that Jesus died on the cross: Dr. White demonstrates the misunderstanding of the Qur'an's writer on this point. Finally, Dr. white touches on some of the key doctrinal teachings of the Qur'an. First is the idea of the final judgment. The corruption of the Christian scriptures and the supposed prophecies of Muhammad in the Bible are treated next. The last 2 chapters deal with textual critical issues regarding the Qur'an: Dr. White challenges the claim to the perfection of the Qur'an by Muslims. Recommendation I found the book challenging to read, but very educational. This is by no means a light read, but if you desire to better understand Islamic beliefs and you want a book that is thorough and fair, then this book is for you. Dr. white holds true to his oft-repeated mantra that we as Christians need to "fairly represent the other side". This book is driven by fair scholarship, not polemics. He follows this advice in his books, debates and radio shows. His careful scholarship on these issues need to be carefully considered by both Muslims and Christians alike. This a much needed book and needs to be read by all those who are serious minded and want to search out the truth.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

    What Every Christian Needs to Know about the Qur'an should not be dismissed as just another conservative rant against Islam. It's not that kind of book. James White is not primarily concerned with the ages of Muhammad's wives, or the onslaught of jihadi violence today, or the treatment of Muslim women. There are enough books out there that rail against the perils of radical Islam. This book, instead, seeks to shed light on the theological differences between Christianity and Islam, with an eye t What Every Christian Needs to Know about the Qur'an should not be dismissed as just another conservative rant against Islam. It's not that kind of book. James White is not primarily concerned with the ages of Muhammad's wives, or the onslaught of jihadi violence today, or the treatment of Muslim women. There are enough books out there that rail against the perils of radical Islam. This book, instead, seeks to shed light on the theological differences between Christianity and Islam, with an eye toward helping Christians engage in honest, informed, and respectful conversations with their Muslim friends. What does the Qur'an teach about the trinity, and how does it jive with the Bible's teachings on the same topic? What biblical evidence is there in support of Muhammad's claims to prophethood? Are the New Testament scriptures "corrupted" as many Muslims posit? How was the Qur'an recorded, preserved, and transmitted, and why does it matter? What do Muslims believe about the person and work of Jesus? These are the types of questions this book seeks to address. It's a book written for theologically-minded Christians and Muslims who want to better understand one another. James White's respect and love for Muslims is clearly evident throughout the book. This is not a book for people looking for more reasons to fear Islam. While I understand why James White chose the title he did, given its straightforward nature, I think "Weighing with Even Scales" would have been a better choice, since this is a very relevant quranic phrase to the Christian-Muslim dialogue and one he unpacks in the book. Overall, this is a very thoughtful and well-written book. The conclusion is excellent.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy

    One of the best Christian introductory work to Islam that I read and much more academically rigorous than most. For those familiar with the author James White, he is a Christian apologist who has debated and written on many issues over the past decades. Since the mid-2000s, James White started focusing a lot on Islam, beginning with his debut debate with the foremost Islamic apologist Shabir Ally in 2006 at BIOLA university. White was led to specialize in Islam largely because of his love for th One of the best Christian introductory work to Islam that I read and much more academically rigorous than most. For those familiar with the author James White, he is a Christian apologist who has debated and written on many issues over the past decades. Since the mid-2000s, James White started focusing a lot on Islam, beginning with his debut debate with the foremost Islamic apologist Shabir Ally in 2006 at BIOLA university. White was led to specialize in Islam largely because of his love for the persecuted Church today, many of whom live in Islamic land. The thing that stood out to me in this work is White's familiarity with Arabic and careful interaction with the primary sources. It's not just the Qur'an but he is able to engage in "Hadith Science." He does all this while also balancing his work with an awareness of the need of his readers to have explained to them definitions and concepts in Islamic theology. In my estimation, the best part of the book were chapters 4, 8, 9 and 11. I have been hesitant in the past when I hear Christian apologist say that the Qur'an and the early Islamic community has a misunderstanding of the Trinity (to include Mary in place of the Holy Spirit) but James White has done a masterful job of showing from early Islamic sources that this was what they believed in chapter four of the book. In chapter eight James White shows how the Qur'an and the early Muslim community did not believe that the Bible was corrupted textually but instead they presupposes otherwise. If you only have one work on Islam in your bookshelf, I would say this would be it. I have this on my shelf with all the highlights and notes for future references.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Kennedy

    [[This is an excerpt from my full review on my blog here: http://mydigitalseminary.com/what-eve...]] I learned a great deal from this book about Islam and am extremely thankful for this book. I was also very grateful for White's thoroughness. There's nothing better than hearing your opponent express their views in their own words. White even represents disagreements within Islam when he could have only represented one side and taken an easy cheap shot instead. At times the large block quotes and [[This is an excerpt from my full review on my blog here: http://mydigitalseminary.com/what-eve...]] I learned a great deal from this book about Islam and am extremely thankful for this book. I was also very grateful for White's thoroughness. There's nothing better than hearing your opponent express their views in their own words. White even represents disagreements within Islam when he could have only represented one side and taken an easy cheap shot instead. At times the large block quotes and very detailed engagement with Islam became tedious though. However with that said, I cannot praise this book highly enough! I know of no other introduction to the Qur'an with this level of fairness and detail. White's representation and eventual criticisms of the Qur'an are fair and laser-sharp, ignoring the easy shots that others take at Islam and getting straight to the most important points in the discussion. White is not just an apologist but a theologian, he is not simply attacking Islam from no sure foundation of his own, he is constantly drawing the reader's attention to the most important theological issues dividing both religions. What Every Christian Needs to Know About the Qur'an is a real step forward in serious dialogue between Islam and Christianity. If every Christian read this book carefully we would avoid oversimplification and stereotype and be better apologists to Muslims, and with the Spirit's empowering, win more to Christ. [[Many thanks to Bethany House and Netgalley for providing a copy of this book in exchange for a fair review. All opinions expressed are my own.]]

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    I have been looking for a fair analysis of the Islam and the Qur'an from a Christians scholar. A lot of the arguments I have read or heard were all based in emotions and fear. I wanted to read a book from a scholar that has taken the time to study the Qur'an and who is committed to fairly represent it's perspectives. What Every Christians Needs to Know about the Qur'an is by Dr. James White. I have listened to several debates that Dr. White has add with some of the leading Muslim apologists and I have been looking for a fair analysis of the Islam and the Qur'an from a Christians scholar. A lot of the arguments I have read or heard were all based in emotions and fear. I wanted to read a book from a scholar that has taken the time to study the Qur'an and who is committed to fairly represent it's perspectives. What Every Christians Needs to Know about the Qur'an is by Dr. James White. I have listened to several debates that Dr. White has add with some of the leading Muslim apologists and each time I have not heard or seen him intentionally misrepresent the other side. This book is not a a refutation of the Qur'an as a whole. Dr. White sets out to highlight the major areas of conflict in the Qur'an and give Christians an understanding of Muslim theology. He tries to show Christians the challenges they they face in engaging with Muslims friends. The Trinity, the Crucifixion, and the misunderstanding of Biblical transmission all represent stumbling blocks to the modern Muslim. What Every Christians Needs to Know about the Qur'an has a great introduction to the history of the Qur'an and the establishment of Islam. It highlights what the Qur'an says about Jesus and Christians (People of the Book). It develops Islam's theology of Salvation and their view revelation. This is a great primer on how Christians should engage in intellectual conversations with Muslim friends. More than anything, I found that it was helpful in beginning to understand the presuppositions and intellectual commitments that Muslims have to the Qur'an.

  30. 5 out of 5

    G. Jorge Medina

    Excellent research on a much-needed subject… Book Review: What Every Christian Needs to Know About the Qur'an by James R. White James R. White is a well-known Apologist that has held over one hundred professionally moderated debates. He is usually a good researcher and generally learns the opposing viewpoints straight from the authoritative sources. Therefore, he provides excellent first-hand accounts of what the Qur’an really teaches and what truly faithful Muslims must believe about their faith Excellent research on a much-needed subject… Book Review: What Every Christian Needs to Know About the Qur'an by James R. White James R. White is a well-known Apologist that has held over one hundred professionally moderated debates. He is usually a good researcher and generally learns the opposing viewpoints straight from the authoritative sources. Therefore, he provides excellent first-hand accounts of what the Qur’an really teaches and what truly faithful Muslims must believe about their faith and about those that reject it. More people need to read books like this one. Islam is not a passing fad, but it’s here to stay. It’s mandate is not to coexist with other religions but rather to bring everyone in the world under submission to Allah. If you have been obtaining your information on Islam from the news or politicians, hold on to your seat; authoritative Islamic sources will alter your point of view on the subject after reading this book. Is the book perfect? No, and maybe White spends a little too much time on certain hobbyhorses; but, overall, you will get your money’s worth. You cannot afford to live in the dark on this all-important topic. [Kindle version only: Before purchasing, make sure the footnote links work. My version didn't and it was a hassle.] Disclosure: The book was received for free from Net Galley book review program. The program does not require a positive review, only an unbiased one.

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