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Classified Woman-The Sibel Edmonds Story: A Memoir

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In this startling new memoir, Sibel Edmonds — the most classified woman in U.S. history — takes us on a surreal journey that begins with the secretive FBI and down the dark halls of a feckless Congress to a stonewalling judiciary and finally, to the national security whistleblowers movement she spearheaded. Having lived under Middle East dictatorships, Edmonds knows firsth In this startling new memoir, Sibel Edmonds — the most classified woman in U.S. history — takes us on a surreal journey that begins with the secretive FBI and down the dark halls of a feckless Congress to a stonewalling judiciary and finally, to the national security whistleblowers movement she spearheaded. Having lived under Middle East dictatorships, Edmonds knows firsthand what can happen when government is allowed to operate in secret. Hers is a sobering perspective that combines painful experience with a rallying cry for the public’s right to know and to hold the lawbreakers accountable. With U.S. citizens increasingly stripped of their rights in a calibrated media blackout, Edmonds’ story is a wake-up call for all Americans who, willingly or unwillingly, traded liberty for security in the wake of 9/11.


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In this startling new memoir, Sibel Edmonds — the most classified woman in U.S. history — takes us on a surreal journey that begins with the secretive FBI and down the dark halls of a feckless Congress to a stonewalling judiciary and finally, to the national security whistleblowers movement she spearheaded. Having lived under Middle East dictatorships, Edmonds knows firsth In this startling new memoir, Sibel Edmonds — the most classified woman in U.S. history — takes us on a surreal journey that begins with the secretive FBI and down the dark halls of a feckless Congress to a stonewalling judiciary and finally, to the national security whistleblowers movement she spearheaded. Having lived under Middle East dictatorships, Edmonds knows firsthand what can happen when government is allowed to operate in secret. Hers is a sobering perspective that combines painful experience with a rallying cry for the public’s right to know and to hold the lawbreakers accountable. With U.S. citizens increasingly stripped of their rights in a calibrated media blackout, Edmonds’ story is a wake-up call for all Americans who, willingly or unwillingly, traded liberty for security in the wake of 9/11.

30 review for Classified Woman-The Sibel Edmonds Story: A Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Wittig

    I've been familiar with Ms. Edmonds work and story since I started questioning what really happened 9/11/2001. I was in the ready reserves at the time, and knew something was deeply wrong. I started to read/research everything I could get my hands on. I checked and cross check all my sources for continuity of data and credibility. Ms. Edmond's name kept coming up. Without question, Sibel Edmonds is one of the most credible people I've read/listened to. Classified Woman is a powerful, compelling s I've been familiar with Ms. Edmonds work and story since I started questioning what really happened 9/11/2001. I was in the ready reserves at the time, and knew something was deeply wrong. I started to read/research everything I could get my hands on. I checked and cross check all my sources for continuity of data and credibility. Ms. Edmond's name kept coming up. Without question, Sibel Edmonds is one of the most credible people I've read/listened to. Classified Woman is a powerful, compelling story. After becoming a citizen Ms. Edmonds began working with the FBI as a translator. While reviewing allegedly translated correspondence, she realizes very important information was intentionally "overlooked" with devastating, ongoing results.... It would be my hope that everyone who cares about the future of the United States take the time to read "Classified Woman" and really absorb the predicament we are in now. We are not safe from our own leaders and our rights are being compromised in the name of "Homeland Security"

  2. 4 out of 5

    Charles Moody

    This is an important story, in a somewhat flawed book. Ms. Edmonds went to work as a translator for the FBI shortly after 9/11. Soon a series of very suspicious events happens with one of her fellow translators, suggesting that this translator might be working behalf of Turkish interests who have infiltrated the U.S. government and could be shielding U.S. intelligence targets from scrutiny by blocking key information at the translation stage. Ms. Edmonds duly reports the facts and her suspicions This is an important story, in a somewhat flawed book. Ms. Edmonds went to work as a translator for the FBI shortly after 9/11. Soon a series of very suspicious events happens with one of her fellow translators, suggesting that this translator might be working behalf of Turkish interests who have infiltrated the U.S. government and could be shielding U.S. intelligence targets from scrutiny by blocking key information at the translation stage. Ms. Edmonds duly reports the facts and her suspicions up the chain of command at the FBI, and gets a variety of unsatisfactory responses. Some FBI officials acknowledge that she has put her finger on a problem within the bureau they were already aware of, but caution her not to take it any further. One superior assures Ms. Edmonds that she has now done all that is required to keep herself from ever being blamed, but seems mystified that Ms. Edmonds actually wants the superior to take action. Ms. Edmonds refuses to let the matter rest, however, and eventually launches congressional investigations and court cases. The book tells in detail the story of her frustrating quest, where she is met with stonewalling and with bizarre invocations of national security privileges. Her description of how the FBI operated during her short tenure there is a frighteningly realistic picture of a dysfunctional bureaucracy; officials were roused to energy and efficiency only in thwarting accountability for themselves and in protecting one another’s careers. The story raises some sickening possibilities about specific and actionable pre-9/11 intelligence that was missed. Because Ms. Edmonds was ultimately unable to get people in positions of responsibility to answer questions under oath, it’s never clear whether or not she stumbled on the edges of a highly influential foreign espionage operation within the U.S. government. But her book raises the disturbing thought that ineptitude and careerism in our own agencies could be nearly as dangerous. The book itself is overlong; some segments are told through conversations when a brief factual summary would have sufficed and would have kept the narrative flowing better. Episodes that are crucial to the chain of events sometimes get blurred with less important things. A 2005 article from Vanity Fair gives her story more concisely and with more journalistic discipline. http://www.vanityfair.com/politics/fe... But that’s kind of a quibble; she’s a courageous whistleblower telling her own story, and apparently had to self-publish this book. She may not win a Nobel Lit Prize, but that’s hardly her goal. And the first third or so of her book is actually pretty riveting reading. It will almost certainly inspire you to do a little more online research into Ms. Edmonds’ case. I did so expecting to find many people challenging or refuting her account, and found none. You’re left wondering why her story is not better known and more discussed. If Hardball and similar shows can devote a week nonstop to dissecting one idiotic comment about women being able to prevent pregnancy in cases of rape, they should be able to devote some time to the far more serious implications of Ms. Edmonds’ charges.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Classified Woman is a book that does three difficult things at once – it makes a historically significant contribution to our understanding of the domestic political roots of our foreign policy, it identifies flaws in our systems of justice and accountability that should be addressed, and it does so in a way that makes for a good day or two at the beach for every individual reader. Reading a book can be a chore, but not in this case. Edmonds has turned what can be difficult material into a page-t Classified Woman is a book that does three difficult things at once – it makes a historically significant contribution to our understanding of the domestic political roots of our foreign policy, it identifies flaws in our systems of justice and accountability that should be addressed, and it does so in a way that makes for a good day or two at the beach for every individual reader. Reading a book can be a chore, but not in this case. Edmonds has turned what can be difficult material into a page-turner. The reader is drawn into a real life drama, with curiosity growing as you get further and further into the book – even for readers who already know the endgame. The book is a memoir, including the story of Edmonds’ youth, with some good perspective coming from her informed understanding of living in totalitarian societies. The book is rooted in an idealistic, motivating Introduction, where Edmonds provides an articulate outline of her understanding of fundamental principles outlined in our Declaration of Independence and Constitution. They laid a foundation for her initial idealism and rugged perseverance in dealing with the unfortunate, selfish political consequences arising from her best efforts to do what she saw as her duty. Edmonds’ story is a shocking tale, a bureaucratic nightmare. We learn about meaningful incompetence and corruption in our Justice and State Departments, as well the 9/11 Commission’s failure to fully document and present the truth. We gain greater appreciation for the importance of the press – the ‘Fourth Estate’ – as a check on our government, even the corruptible judicial branch. Unfortunately, this appreciation is gained with some dismay at the failure of much of the traditional media to perform this role in Edmonds’ case, either from negligence or because it has been captured by powerful special interest groups like much of the rest of our government. We learn about the application of a dubious legal doctrine called the State Secrets Privilege and how it can be applied arbitrarily in individual cases. (Readers interested in a formal and damning review of the origins of the State Secrets Privilege are referred to Louis Fisher’s excellent book In The Name of National Security.) The book does have at least one flaw. This is a book that deserves an Index, but it doesn’t have one. That could have helped. Edmonds self-published the book, which is a story all by itself, including the reasons some of the publishers with whom she spoke declined to work with her on terms she deemed appropriate. Even so, a self-published book can still develop an Index. Future printings could benefit from some work on that score. But as a citizen, I’m very happy this book is out there, and I hope you are too. As a reader, I’m really glad I read it, and I’m looking forward to reading it again.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mark E. Smith

    For those who think that there is even the slightest possibility that the United States government could become less evil instead of more and more evil every day, this book is required reading. I bought the Kindle edition to read on my computer, and then ordered a paper copy to loan to two different friends who recently became US citizens and haven't yet lost all their illusions. Sibel Edmonds was an immigrant, someone who had experienced brutal dictatorships and expected something different in t For those who think that there is even the slightest possibility that the United States government could become less evil instead of more and more evil every day, this book is required reading. I bought the Kindle edition to read on my computer, and then ordered a paper copy to loan to two different friends who recently became US citizens and haven't yet lost all their illusions. Sibel Edmonds was an immigrant, someone who had experienced brutal dictatorships and expected something different in the USA--something called freedom. Instead the US turned out to be even worse than many of the brutal dictatorships it had installed and supported, which only stands to reason of course. The Shah, Pinochet, and others were but pale replicas of the country that put them in power. But until recently the US carried on a pretense of democracy and freedom at home. Not a shred of that facade remains, yet there are still people who believe in it, or are afraid to admit that they don't. This book is written in blood and tears, the blood of all the innocent people the United States government has tortured and killed with impunity, and the tears of someone who suffered greatly in attempting to avert those deaths and to preserve what had appeared to be freedoms. For those of us with any personal experience as whistleblowers, every word of Classified Woman resonates with the truth of our own lives. For those capable of learning from the experiences of others without having to suffer personally, this is the best book about the United States government I've ever seen.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Haley

    Explosive! I often think of this term as just a hyperbolic publishing buzzword to hype a book but this is the only word that describes this book. The revelations: Explosive! The cover-up: Explosive! The government deceit: Explosive! This is a MUST READ for every American who is still under the delusions that we are a government of, by, and for the People. I believe in Sibel and the power of this story so much, that I have offered to buy it for anyone in my circle of friends who shows an interest Explosive! I often think of this term as just a hyperbolic publishing buzzword to hype a book but this is the only word that describes this book. The revelations: Explosive! The cover-up: Explosive! The government deceit: Explosive! This is a MUST READ for every American who is still under the delusions that we are a government of, by, and for the People. I believe in Sibel and the power of this story so much, that I have offered to buy it for anyone in my circle of friends who shows an interest. This is the shocking story of former FBI agent and government whistle-blower Sibel Edmonds. Edmonds was recruited by the FBI shortly after 9/11 for her proficient skills in Middle Eastern languages from having lived under oppressive Turkish and Iranian regimes. When she uncovers espionage, narco-trafficking, money laundering, and crucial 9/11 evidence and takes these revelations to her superiors, she is told to forget about it and move along. She takes her case all the way up to the highest FBI ranks where she is subsequently fired. She then tries to take her case to Congress, where she is largely ignored. When she tries to bring her case to the court system, she is slapped with the at-the-time rare and arcane "State Secret Privilege" which was so rare that it rendered only 7 Google hits when Ashcroft invoked it on her. Her entire life history is retroactively classified and she and Congress are gagged from talking about her or anything to do with her case. This is her 10 year ordeal in trying to get her story out. What isn't made clear in this book but which I've heard her speak about in press interviews is that in the end she had to self-publish the book. Part of her contract with the FBI requires that any book written must be submitted to them for review so they can redact any classified or otherwise sensitive information. They have 30 days with which to do so. They sat on her manuscript for 341 days and still never returned it to her! Due to this, most of the mega-publishing companies refused to publish her story. Those that did show an interest wanted her to edit it to show more partisan bias. "Readers want to identify with one side or the other", she was told. In typical Sibel fashion, she refused to edit her story just to please the editors and insisted on the whole truth. Despite her not receiving clearance from the FBI, she determined that her 1st Amendment rights trump their null and void contract, and so she published the book herself. I cannot speak highly enough of this book and I hope beyond hope that this will provide many Americans with the wake-up call they need to finally take their government back and return it to the system envisioned by our Founders.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Robert Kirkconnell

    As an FBI language interpreter Sibel blew the lid off of the 9/11 investigation. Problem was that no one wanted to listen to her, and she was fired for "truthing." She took her case to federal court and was gagged by Attorney General John Ashcroft for disclosing state secrets. Other info she disclosed was U.S. politicians involved in the drug trade, and high level Pentagon officials selling nuclear secrets to enemies of the U.S. She sent a letter to President Obama about the above and never got As an FBI language interpreter Sibel blew the lid off of the 9/11 investigation. Problem was that no one wanted to listen to her, and she was fired for "truthing." She took her case to federal court and was gagged by Attorney General John Ashcroft for disclosing state secrets. Other info she disclosed was U.S. politicians involved in the drug trade, and high level Pentagon officials selling nuclear secrets to enemies of the U.S. She sent a letter to President Obama about the above and never got an answer. Sibel's "problem" is that she is honest and does a professional job. This will get you in real trouble when you are working with psychopaths and thieves. The courage and integrity this women has is a wonderful thing. The fact that the very best Americans, such as Sibel Edmonds, end up in real trouble is something that the American people should not, and cannot tolerate any longer. Thank you Sibel for your courage, character, and integrity. Robert Kirkconnell Author of: American Heart of Darkness

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Actual rating: 3.5 stars. I had an odd reaction to this book. I believe everything Sibel Edmonds says about the FBI, congress, and the executive branch taking extraordinary pains to cover up internal malfeasance. I believe her when she describes what they do to employees who try to bring them unwelcome messages, and I believe her descriptions of the ways they get back at whistleblowers. I believe much of what she reports about our government's failure to act on clear and specific intelligence tha Actual rating: 3.5 stars. I had an odd reaction to this book. I believe everything Sibel Edmonds says about the FBI, congress, and the executive branch taking extraordinary pains to cover up internal malfeasance. I believe her when she describes what they do to employees who try to bring them unwelcome messages, and I believe her descriptions of the ways they get back at whistleblowers. I believe much of what she reports about our government's failure to act on clear and specific intelligence that al Qaeda was about to attack, leading to our failure to prevent the terror attacks on 9/11. She drops some tantalizing hints about some of the pre-9/11 intelligence that was ignored, including a frightening detail I've not seen reported elsewhere: that al Qaeda was planning to use young women in the "next wave" of terror attacks on the West. At the risk of being labeled a "9/11 truther," I believe everything Sibel Edmonds says about our government's continuing efforts to keep its colossal failures hidden from the public, and its refusal to hold anyone accountable. I believe her accusations of corruption at the highest levels of our government. Trouble is, I have a hard time believing Sibel Edmonds herself. In her recounting of confrontations with co-workers and supervisors at the FBI, her story seems too self-serving, her villains too cartoon-like. Her account is full of fishy details that make her seem less a person of principles and, at least when it comes to certain former FBI co-workers, more a person bent on personal revenge. In short, I don't accept the wholly-innocent, goody two-shoes image of herself she presents. Also odd: no other reviewers of Classified Woman share my discomfort. I've explored reader reviews on Goodreads, Amazon, and B&N, and have searched for others on Google. Everyone seems to buy her story, lock, stock, and barrel. Very strange. I can't be the only one to think there's something wrong with her account. In the last third of the book, Edmonds describes her post-FBI work as an activist working on behalf of other persecuted whistleblowers, and this part of her narrative was generally uplifting and positive. In her post-FBI life, Sibel seems to be what she presents herself to be, and I can only admire her perseverance. And that's where this interesting book left me, ashamed of my government, more than ever aware of and watchful for high-level lying and coverups, yet mistrustful of the messenger herself.

  8. 5 out of 5

    N. Jr.

    Here is a firsthand account of just how corrupt US government agencies are. Especially when it comes to foreign policy and the war on terror. It paints quite a different picture than that presented by the public relations stooges we call the mainstream media. Ms Edmonds was there, right in the midst of it, the lies and cover-ups emerging all around her. It took her by surprise, her previously held idealism and faith in the US government shattered at every turn. While some of it is due to the cult Here is a firsthand account of just how corrupt US government agencies are. Especially when it comes to foreign policy and the war on terror. It paints quite a different picture than that presented by the public relations stooges we call the mainstream media. Ms Edmonds was there, right in the midst of it, the lies and cover-ups emerging all around her. It took her by surprise, her previously held idealism and faith in the US government shattered at every turn. While some of it is due to the culture of bureaucracy (see Moral Mazes: The World of Corporate Managersby Robert Jackall), the more serious factor is the mafia-like nature of those in power. This is not conspiracy theory, it is conspiracy fact, the unpleasant realization that human society is dominated by its own conspiratorial behavior. The book deals with two main controversial matters: 1) the widely cited instances of withholding information and obstructing investigations related to the Sept 11 attacks 2)arms trafficking and proliferation of nuclear technology, specifically in this case, involving the American Turkish Council. Regarding the latter, the book does not mention Valerie Plame's assignment in investigating the ATC's trafficking of nuclear technology, the real reason for exposing her (and her operation) as CIA by the Bush administration (i.e. to preserve the ATC's illegal activities). If you are a person whose apathy causes you to bury your head in the sand, you may not want to read this book. If you are someone desiring a clearer perspective on the way things really are, then this is a mandatory read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dirk

    I read it cover to cover over the course of one day. Pretty hard to put down all in all. I heard about this book from an interview with the author on RTAmerica, where I go for much of my news (along with Democracy Now), and decided I needed to order it before it is pulled or banned. The author is very brave to have brought this story to light considering what her former employer and two administrations had already done to her. Every American should read this book. I have no doubt that you will c I read it cover to cover over the course of one day. Pretty hard to put down all in all. I heard about this book from an interview with the author on RTAmerica, where I go for much of my news (along with Democracy Now), and decided I needed to order it before it is pulled or banned. The author is very brave to have brought this story to light considering what her former employer and two administrations had already done to her. Every American should read this book. I have no doubt that you will conclude that things are far worse than you ever thought.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Incredible story! How does a person become "classified?" Your birthday is classified; your place of birth is classified; your driver's license is classified....how would you function in our technological, informational 21st Century? This is not a Tom Clancy novel, but you'll be hard pressed to believe this could really happen in the United States, but yet, it did! 60 minutes reported it, the NY Times, Washington Post, Glamour, and numerous other major media outlets covered this story. It is NOT Incredible story! How does a person become "classified?" Your birthday is classified; your place of birth is classified; your driver's license is classified....how would you function in our technological, informational 21st Century? This is not a Tom Clancy novel, but you'll be hard pressed to believe this could really happen in the United States, but yet, it did! 60 minutes reported it, the NY Times, Washington Post, Glamour, and numerous other major media outlets covered this story. It is NOT fictional. Author, Sibel Edmonds has my utmost respect. This is a must read for every American!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This book is both amazing and chilling, all the more so because it is true. The things this woman went through for trying to blow the whistle on corruption, criminal activity and espionage in the FBI as well as both elected and appointed officials in the executive and congressional branches of Congress (including actions and inactions leading up to 9/11) has to be read to be believed. This book is a must read for anyone concerned about the USA and it's future. If even 10% of the American populati This book is both amazing and chilling, all the more so because it is true. The things this woman went through for trying to blow the whistle on corruption, criminal activity and espionage in the FBI as well as both elected and appointed officials in the executive and congressional branches of Congress (including actions and inactions leading up to 9/11) has to be read to be believed. This book is a must read for anyone concerned about the USA and it's future. If even 10% of the American population read this book there wouldn't be enough torches and pitchforks to go around, nor holes deep enough for the crooks in Washington to hide.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    After reading this book I wonder why I am taking off my shoes in the airport. The true tale of Sibel Edmonds is frightening and eye opening. It is the story of a woman hired as a translator by the FBI after 9/11. It tells the story of how she tried to expose corruption and incompetence in the FBI. Edmonds shows how easily individual rights protected by the constitution are ignored and abused. Indeed Ms Edmonds is the scapegoat with no one in the FBI willing to stand with her or fight for her when After reading this book I wonder why I am taking off my shoes in the airport. The true tale of Sibel Edmonds is frightening and eye opening. It is the story of a woman hired as a translator by the FBI after 9/11. It tells the story of how she tried to expose corruption and incompetence in the FBI. Edmonds shows how easily individual rights protected by the constitution are ignored and abused. Indeed Ms Edmonds is the scapegoat with no one in the FBI willing to stand with her or fight for her when she threatens to expose this corruption.

  13. 4 out of 5

    John Mesler

    One of the most important books ever written. Not only is Sibel credible but she puts you there .I don't know how she got out of bed every day to continue her fight against a secretive, corrupt government which continually changed it's rules...keeping even congress in the dark. Should be a must read for every American . Especially those who still believe America is even a semblance of what it was in the (good old days".It is a "must read" ,but of course you won't find mainstream media out there One of the most important books ever written. Not only is Sibel credible but she puts you there .I don't know how she got out of bed every day to continue her fight against a secretive, corrupt government which continually changed it's rules...keeping even congress in the dark. Should be a must read for every American . Especially those who still believe America is even a semblance of what it was in the (good old days".It is a "must read" ,but of course you won't find mainstream media out there pushing it!

  14. 4 out of 5

    A.J.

    I hope more citizens read Sibel Edmonds' story. Unlike those in and out of government who attempt to dispute what she saw during her tenure with the FBI, Edmonds' account is credible. As one commenter noted, her account is true-to-life spy fiction, and it deserves widespread circulation. Sadly, in today's corporate media world, the high point of her story happened way back in 2002 when 60 Minutes interviewed her. Lucky for her she started her journey then and not under the current Administration I hope more citizens read Sibel Edmonds' story. Unlike those in and out of government who attempt to dispute what she saw during her tenure with the FBI, Edmonds' account is credible. As one commenter noted, her account is true-to-life spy fiction, and it deserves widespread circulation. Sadly, in today's corporate media world, the high point of her story happened way back in 2002 when 60 Minutes interviewed her. Lucky for her she started her journey then and not under the current Administration which would have found a method to silence her whistle-blowing with criminal injunction.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dean

    Wow what a book! and Wow what a woman! Sibel is a new hero of mine and I have a new-found sense of what makes America great... It's women like her and her persistence of exposing corruption at the highest levels of our intelligence agencies, even after being fired, targeted for retaliation, and fought every step of the way by the same government she just wanted to help after the tragedy of 9/11. I have listened to many of her interviews and feel that if more people had a backbone like her in our Wow what a book! and Wow what a woman! Sibel is a new hero of mine and I have a new-found sense of what makes America great... It's women like her and her persistence of exposing corruption at the highest levels of our intelligence agencies, even after being fired, targeted for retaliation, and fought every step of the way by the same government she just wanted to help after the tragedy of 9/11. I have listened to many of her interviews and feel that if more people had a backbone like her in our government we wouldn't be in the mess we're in!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    This is a well written and eye-opening book. If you ever had doubts about the truthfulness and honesty of your government and their departments, you will be confirmed in your worst fears. Sibel Edmonds is a courageous lady that never got her day in court, but was a whistle blower anyway. See her blogs, boilingfrogpost.com for updates on things the major media will black out and not tell you about!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bruno de Maremma

    I frankly don't know where to begin to comment on this book. I only hope that enough U.S. citizens read it and become so outraged at that they will start a movement to recover the liberties lost to them over the last 12 years. Please read this book America.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cyrus Carter

    As well-written as any piece of spy-fiction, except this one is real. A whistleblower proves that even in the strongest democracies of the world, base human nature can overwhelm principles. Greed, corruption and incompetence exposed. Required reading if you have a stomach for disappointment.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Poupina

    This is a memoir, and that in itself stands as an act of defiance. (Give her all the stars! jk) Sibel Edmonds takes us on her roller-coaster journey from her days as a translator to her battles in the courts and before Congress. Her story made headlines in the U.S., as well as in Turkey, where she was accused of being a U.S. spy, an enemy of the state, and even an agent working for the Armenians. Her true struggle, however, was within U.S. government bodies. When Attorney General John Ashcroft i This is a memoir, and that in itself stands as an act of defiance. (Give her all the stars! jk) Sibel Edmonds takes us on her roller-coaster journey from her days as a translator to her battles in the courts and before Congress. Her story made headlines in the U.S., as well as in Turkey, where she was accused of being a U.S. spy, an enemy of the state, and even an agent working for the Armenians. Her true struggle, however, was within U.S. government bodies. When Attorney General John Ashcroft invoked the State Secrets Privilege act against her, she became the most gagged woman in U.S. history—unable to speak about what she had seen and even who she was. She finally joined forces with the ACLU, and eventually helped form the National Whistleblowers Coalition.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mike Trapp

    Wow. This book has me on the edge of my seat. Sibel was a Turkish linguist with the FBI immediately after 9/11. She began having trouble with her superiors as she tried to perform her duties the way they should be done. Having worked for the government I feel an affinity for Sibel - and the incredible stand she took in the face of her superiors insisting that she stand down. This is a book of courage and intelligence.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Reynolds

    I thought this was a very powerful story. I am amazed by this woman's courage and determination in defense of the U.S. Constitution.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andy Kurzweil

    This is a remarkably good read considering the gravity of the subject matter. Sibel Edmonds' courageousness in the face of tyranny is positively uplifting.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sue-Ellen

    I am left speechless after reading this book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    I knew about much of this, but the more I read, the angrier I got. The depth of the fraud and the profligate, dissolute actions of those who are supposed to be making decisions on behalf of the people is sickening. This proves there are no Heros. If we want our country back, we have to do it ourselves. Does this mean revolution? I can't see any other way to right the ship. The judges were the most disgusting of all. They cannot be fired or voted out, they are supposed to protect us. But instead I knew about much of this, but the more I read, the angrier I got. The depth of the fraud and the profligate, dissolute actions of those who are supposed to be making decisions on behalf of the people is sickening. This proves there are no Heros. If we want our country back, we have to do it ourselves. Does this mean revolution? I can't see any other way to right the ship. The judges were the most disgusting of all. They cannot be fired or voted out, they are supposed to protect us. But instead they choose to play ball with evil entities. Ms. Edmonds showed more perseverance than anyone I know of. She deserves a medal for her valiant effort, but the cards were always stacked against her. And against the people not only in the USA, but the whole world. This is the book that should be taught in civics classes. It should be a mandatory course for every student on the country. But the education system is just as putrid, just as much a festering mess of misconduct as the rest of the government. They'd never allow something to be taught that would cause people to think, instead of merely react.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Contentmo

    Excellent close up view of the Middle East, and many stats to document any claims made.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Imagine the following: A secret is a secret but why it's a secret is a secret or who says it's a secret is a secret. That's what Sibel Edmonds, a recruited translator for the FBI, faced in the years following 9/11. Her memoir takes you on a dark journey through the US government - from their unprecedented use of the State Secrets Privilege to their attempts to cover up espionage within the FBI, CIA, etc. Her story as a FBI whistleblower is explosive and compelling, hence why she is the most clas Imagine the following: A secret is a secret but why it's a secret is a secret or who says it's a secret is a secret. That's what Sibel Edmonds, a recruited translator for the FBI, faced in the years following 9/11. Her memoir takes you on a dark journey through the US government - from their unprecedented use of the State Secrets Privilege to their attempts to cover up espionage within the FBI, CIA, etc. Her story as a FBI whistleblower is explosive and compelling, hence why she is the most classified woman in US history. As Clay Risen from The New Republic wrote, "The silencing of Edmonds has been remarkably silent. Which is probably just what the FBI was counting on in the first place." Her memoir is a sobering perspective of unchecked power within the government. She persevered against all odds because of her belief in the First Amendment, and she advocated for the greater good of our nation. Informative and eye opening.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Frank

    This may very well be the most important book you will ever read. The light shone on the dark and putrid corridors of power inside our own US government is truly disturbing. There is no need to go looking for the terrorists who seek to destroy America, they are right here amongst us. They are our fellow citizens who would sacrifice freedom for the illusion of safety. Read this book, investigate Sibel and her claims on your own, come to your own conclusions about whether her story is believable.

  28. 4 out of 5

    RN

    Truly an amazing book, it is so very well written and straight to the point. I am glad Sibel is able to tell her side of the story. I admire her courage and continued desire to uncover what power-influence-money can do especially amongst institutions that are meant up to uphold the law and national security!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Richard Lowe

    If you've ever wondered who is blowing the whistle on our corrupt government agencies, you would do well to start with this book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    G. L.

    THE CRACK WHERE THE LIGHT GETS IN --Leonard Cohn The long journey of disclosure begins here. Donald Trump was asked to run for POTUS and fund the members of the U.S. military who have decided to return the country to its originally intended constitutional purpose of true freedom. Recognizing that the country is too valuable to be run by a politician, they chose a businessman--and that has made all the difference! WHISTLEBLOWERS have made it all possible--and the long journey to freedom has finally THE CRACK WHERE THE LIGHT GETS IN --Leonard Cohn The long journey of disclosure begins here. Donald Trump was asked to run for POTUS and fund the members of the U.S. military who have decided to return the country to its originally intended constitutional purpose of true freedom. Recognizing that the country is too valuable to be run by a politician, they chose a businessman--and that has made all the difference! WHISTLEBLOWERS have made it all possible--and the long journey to freedom has finally begun.

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