counter create hit Stocks for the Long Run 5/E: The Definitive Guide to Financial Market Returns & Long-Term Investment Strategies - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Stocks for the Long Run 5/E: The Definitive Guide to Financial Market Returns & Long-Term Investment Strategies

Availability: Ready to download

The stock-investing classic--UPDATED TO HELP YOU WIN IN TODAY'S CHAOTIC GLOBAL ECONOMY Much has changed since the last edition of Stocks for the Long Run. The financial crisis, the deepest bear market since the Great Depression, and the continued growth of the emerging markets are just some of the contingencies directly affecting every portfolio inthe world. To help you navi The stock-investing classic--UPDATED TO HELP YOU WIN IN TODAY'S CHAOTIC GLOBAL ECONOMY Much has changed since the last edition of Stocks for the Long Run. The financial crisis, the deepest bear market since the Great Depression, and the continued growth of the emerging markets are just some of the contingencies directly affecting every portfolio inthe world. To help you navigate markets and make the best investment decisions, Jeremy Siegel has updated his bestselling guide to stock market investing. This new edition of Stocks for the Long Run answers all the important questions of today: How did the crisis alter the financial markets and the future of stock returns? What are the sources of long-term economic growth? How does the Fed really impact investing decisions? Should you hedge against currency instability? Stocks for the Long Run, Fifth Edition, includes brand-new coverage of: THE FINANCIAL CRISIS Siegel provides an expert's analysis of the most important factors behind the crisis; the state of current stability/instability of the financial system and where the stock market fits in; and the viability of value investing as a long-term strategy. CHINA AND INDIA The economies of these nations are more than one-third larger than they were before the 2008 financial crisis; you'll get the information you need to earn long-termprofits in this new environment. GLOBAL MARKETS Learn all there is to know about the nature, size, and role of diversification in today's global economy; Siegel extends his projections of the global economy until the end of this century. MARKET VALUATION Can stocks still provide 6 to 7 percent per year after inflation? This edition forecasts future stock returns and shows how to determine whether the market is overvalued or not. Essential reading for every investor and advisor who wants to fully understand the forces that move today's markets, Stocks for the Long Run provides the most complete summary available of historical trends that will help you develop a sound and profitable long-term portfolio. PRAISE FOR STOCKS FOR THE LONG RUN "Jeremy Siegel is one of the great ones." --JIM CRAMER, CNBC's Mad Money "[Jeremy Siegel's] contributions to finance and investing are of such significance as to change the direction of the profession." --THE FINANCIAL ANALYST INSTITUTE "A simply great book." --FORBES "One of the top ten business books of the year." --BUSINESSWEEK "Should command a central place on the desk of any 'amateur' investor or beginning professional." --BARRON'S "Siegel's case for stocks is unbridled and compelling." --USA TODAY "A clearly written, neatly organized, highly persuasive exposition that lifts the veil of mystery from investing." --JOHN C. BOGLE, founder and former Chairman, The Vanguard Group


Compare
Ads Banner

The stock-investing classic--UPDATED TO HELP YOU WIN IN TODAY'S CHAOTIC GLOBAL ECONOMY Much has changed since the last edition of Stocks for the Long Run. The financial crisis, the deepest bear market since the Great Depression, and the continued growth of the emerging markets are just some of the contingencies directly affecting every portfolio inthe world. To help you navi The stock-investing classic--UPDATED TO HELP YOU WIN IN TODAY'S CHAOTIC GLOBAL ECONOMY Much has changed since the last edition of Stocks for the Long Run. The financial crisis, the deepest bear market since the Great Depression, and the continued growth of the emerging markets are just some of the contingencies directly affecting every portfolio inthe world. To help you navigate markets and make the best investment decisions, Jeremy Siegel has updated his bestselling guide to stock market investing. This new edition of Stocks for the Long Run answers all the important questions of today: How did the crisis alter the financial markets and the future of stock returns? What are the sources of long-term economic growth? How does the Fed really impact investing decisions? Should you hedge against currency instability? Stocks for the Long Run, Fifth Edition, includes brand-new coverage of: THE FINANCIAL CRISIS Siegel provides an expert's analysis of the most important factors behind the crisis; the state of current stability/instability of the financial system and where the stock market fits in; and the viability of value investing as a long-term strategy. CHINA AND INDIA The economies of these nations are more than one-third larger than they were before the 2008 financial crisis; you'll get the information you need to earn long-termprofits in this new environment. GLOBAL MARKETS Learn all there is to know about the nature, size, and role of diversification in today's global economy; Siegel extends his projections of the global economy until the end of this century. MARKET VALUATION Can stocks still provide 6 to 7 percent per year after inflation? This edition forecasts future stock returns and shows how to determine whether the market is overvalued or not. Essential reading for every investor and advisor who wants to fully understand the forces that move today's markets, Stocks for the Long Run provides the most complete summary available of historical trends that will help you develop a sound and profitable long-term portfolio. PRAISE FOR STOCKS FOR THE LONG RUN "Jeremy Siegel is one of the great ones." --JIM CRAMER, CNBC's Mad Money "[Jeremy Siegel's] contributions to finance and investing are of such significance as to change the direction of the profession." --THE FINANCIAL ANALYST INSTITUTE "A simply great book." --FORBES "One of the top ten business books of the year." --BUSINESSWEEK "Should command a central place on the desk of any 'amateur' investor or beginning professional." --BARRON'S "Siegel's case for stocks is unbridled and compelling." --USA TODAY "A clearly written, neatly organized, highly persuasive exposition that lifts the veil of mystery from investing." --JOHN C. BOGLE, founder and former Chairman, The Vanguard Group

30 review for Stocks for the Long Run 5/E: The Definitive Guide to Financial Market Returns & Long-Term Investment Strategies

  1. 5 out of 5

    George Jankovic

    Fantastic book, great analysis, but a wrong conclusion that stocks can be bought at any time e.g. even when overvalued. the book was written just as the bubble burst.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Steve Bradshaw

    A solid (yet very bullish) defense of long-term investing (for investors with a horizon of 20 years or more). Read with care! If your investment horizon is less (even if its 10 or 15 years) this book must be read in combination with Robert Shiller's Irrational Exuberance. Shiller explains how the business cycle can produce devastating returns even to those following relatively conservative strategies over periods less than 20 years when they invest at times of high P/E and B/V ratios and low div A solid (yet very bullish) defense of long-term investing (for investors with a horizon of 20 years or more). Read with care! If your investment horizon is less (even if its 10 or 15 years) this book must be read in combination with Robert Shiller's Irrational Exuberance. Shiller explains how the business cycle can produce devastating returns even to those following relatively conservative strategies over periods less than 20 years when they invest at times of high P/E and B/V ratios and low dividend yields (i.e. near the peak of a stock market bubble) - conditions such as we find today. With this in mind, Siegel provides some interesting thoughts and some great analysis on 200 years of data. It's interesting how much better the risk profile of stocks has been versus bonds over longer periods (>20 years) during the last 100 years. This has been due to unexpected yet devastating periods of inflation that come along more often than people realize and wipe out real returns on bonds (stocks fare better over the long term given their link to real assets). An interesting section on the book discussed reasons why the average Shiller P/E (that divides current prices by 10 years of earnings data) should be at a higher level than the historic average of 16x - perhaps something more like 20x (we are at 24x as of May 2011) due to structural reasons such as reduced capital gains taxes, decreased earnings volatility in the business cycle, lower dividend payout ratios and a more-aggressive fed that won't let 1929 happen again, In Irrational Exuberance, Shiller provides an excellent defense against these arguments that are actually a lot weaker than they sound in Siegel's hands, as well as a few negative factors not contemplated by Siegel. That said, Siegel's key points are worth reading and considering - perhaps a level between the two authors is an appropriate yardstick going forward. I was concerned to find chapters toward the end of the book on calendar stock market effects and technical and momentum investing strategies - things that should clearly not find a place in a book titled "stocks for the long run"! Despite, weakening substantially toward the end of the book and the author's clearly bullish bias (one that has cost a lot of investors a lot of money given the books first release in 1994!) I found this an interesting companion to the likes of Shiller, Klarman, Montier and Graham and would recommend it those interested in learning what different asset classes have done over the last 200 years and what realistic expectations could be going forward.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michael Greenwell

    Siegel draws together a lot of interesting facts about the market while making his case for well diversified equity investment over long time horizons. The cold, affectless details of investing are at odds with the emotional investment that we have in our assets, and this populist book makes a decent attempt to bridge that gap by detailing common investment mistakes and suggesting a carefully predetermined investment strategy that incorporates index funds. Ironically Chapter 19's narrative struc Siegel draws together a lot of interesting facts about the market while making his case for well diversified equity investment over long time horizons. The cold, affectless details of investing are at odds with the emotional investment that we have in our assets, and this populist book makes a decent attempt to bridge that gap by detailing common investment mistakes and suggesting a carefully predetermined investment strategy that incorporates index funds. Ironically Chapter 19's narrative structure, the books biggest nod toward its broad audience, is also one of the books worst chapters. The awkward, lifeless characters of this chapter provide a stark contrast to Siegel's otherwise enthusiastic tone. The contents of such a book are difficult to digest, given that it brings together a large body of research to reinforce its relatively simple concept, but I appreciate the style as effectively explains the reasoning behind its case for diversified equity investment. I also found the books many diversions quite interesting, in particular its discussion of inflation and the creation of money in the United States and elsewhere. I expect that this novel will positively influence my personal investment strategy, and I also believe that it has provided an excellent platform from which to explore other financial and economic topics.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    The most valuable part of the book is the historical return data and accompanying analysis. He presents interesting reference information on returns, sector composition of the stock markets over time and geographies, and the performance of various strategies that attempt to outperform the market. Siegel presents a convincing case for the historical outperformance of stocks in the US, but does not aggressively tackle the most obvious critique of this work - that by analyzing the current hedgemon i The most valuable part of the book is the historical return data and accompanying analysis. He presents interesting reference information on returns, sector composition of the stock markets over time and geographies, and the performance of various strategies that attempt to outperform the market. Siegel presents a convincing case for the historical outperformance of stocks in the US, but does not aggressively tackle the most obvious critique of this work - that by analyzing the current hedgemon it is not surprising he finds great historical performance of financial instruments linked to growth. He extrapolates past returns to predict future returns, without accounting for the selection bias. See Triumph of the Optimists: 101 Years of Global Investment Returns for a global perspective. That book offers a more academic and more realistic perspective. Still - this is a worthwhile read for amateur investors.

  5. 4 out of 5

    عبدالله

    From where should I begin? This "peace of art" is a must read for anyone who is interested in investment specially those who care most about stock markets. It is crystal clear to anyone who reads this book, the "enormous" effort done by the author of this book. There are hundreds of tables, graphs, comparisons, studies, ... etc. Actually, the book is so rich and so good that I cannot express how good is it. When The Washington Post said about this book: "One of the best investment books of all time From where should I begin? This "peace of art" is a must read for anyone who is interested in investment specially those who care most about stock markets. It is crystal clear to anyone who reads this book, the "enormous" effort done by the author of this book. There are hundreds of tables, graphs, comparisons, studies, ... etc. Actually, the book is so rich and so good that I cannot express how good is it. When The Washington Post said about this book: "One of the best investment books of all time", they were not exaggerating at all. I think I am not able to write a review that contains what can you find in the book. So, take a look at the table of contents and you will know what to expect. I can assure who ever read this book that he will not only have a comprehensive understanding about stocks but the correlation between stocks with nearly everything. I will definitely read the book again and I will read certain chapters again and again and again.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nicolas Schroeter

    One of the best books that I have read about investment. The author is clear and provides plenty of data and statistics about his points of view. It's not a book to read in a couple of days. It took me quite a bit to finish it, because I needed some time understand all the analysis and conclusions, often counter intuitive, that the author puts over the table.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed Hashim

    Here are what I have learned from the book - Losing portfolio outperform winning portfolio on the long run - Small cap outperform large cap on the long run - Buy and hold is the best strategy ever - You can never predict the market, if you do then you will do 0.5% better than buy and hold - Value beats quality in the long term, try comparing google vs Black Stanley with dividends - Never consider any asset class other than stocks - Stocks is less sensitive to inflation in the long term - Stocks are bad Here are what I have learned from the book - Losing portfolio outperform winning portfolio on the long run - Small cap outperform large cap on the long run - Buy and hold is the best strategy ever - You can never predict the market, if you do then you will do 0.5% better than buy and hold - Value beats quality in the long term, try comparing google vs Black Stanley with dividends - Never consider any asset class other than stocks - Stocks is less sensitive to inflation in the long term - Stocks are bad in the short term and great in the long term, the award is given to those who is patient not those who work hard - Studies confirms that checking the portfolio every year have negative effect compared to checking every 10 years - In trading, the past doesn't say anything about the future, every rule made had a random results. - In investing the past say that business quality and value are more important than everything else. - Stocks growth have negative correlation with economic growth - Investing anywhere in the world in the long term will guarantee high results, only avoid bubbles like Japan 90s - Ignore book value in evaluation - Never react to economic or political news, and never look at business cycle trends

  8. 5 out of 5

    Atti

    one of the best books I read so far on the stock market. highly recommended for anyone interested in investing it covers all the main themes in investing

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elliot

    Very interesting book, although many of the chapters boil down to: here's how you could time the market, here's how trends work and how you can buy based on them, here's how.... and end with "but seriously, just buy broad-based low-cost index funds as that's the way to do it. At least the conclusion is right even if the explanation of all sorts of complex ideas that sometimes did and often don't work makes you think for a while that people can actually beat the market (hint: they can't do so con Very interesting book, although many of the chapters boil down to: here's how you could time the market, here's how trends work and how you can buy based on them, here's how.... and end with "but seriously, just buy broad-based low-cost index funds as that's the way to do it. At least the conclusion is right even if the explanation of all sorts of complex ideas that sometimes did and often don't work makes you think for a while that people can actually beat the market (hint: they can't do so consistently, mostly it's luck if they do, and transaction costs means that most of the time they don't actually beat the market after transaction costs and taxes are taken into account).

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dide

    3.5 rating There wasn't any new revelation or conclusion that was made by me when I finished reading this book. I have read quite a couple of other really good books and so haven't been that surprised. That said, as the synopsis describes; this book indeed supplies a nice portrait of the stock exchange especially that of the USA.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stanley Arthur

    A must read for those who are inclined to believe that sending your hard-earned money to strangers on Wall Street who promise to send back even more money over the next 20 - 30 yrs will end well. This still one of the classic stock market investing books by a brilliant economic professor at the Univ. of Pennsylvania Wharton School. If you own stocks you need to own this book. Just remember the "long term" is based on a 50 yr hold period. If you get in at the wrong end of a 10-20 yr flat period (1 A must read for those who are inclined to believe that sending your hard-earned money to strangers on Wall Street who promise to send back even more money over the next 20 - 30 yrs will end well. This still one of the classic stock market investing books by a brilliant economic professor at the Univ. of Pennsylvania Wharton School. If you own stocks you need to own this book. Just remember the "long term" is based on a 50 yr hold period. If you get in at the wrong end of a 10-20 yr flat period (1930-1952, 1967-1977, 1999-2012) the market might remain flat longer than you can remain solvent.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Christian

    This review is for the fifth edition which should be read over past editions for sure with additional information on more recent trends and the great recession of 2008. Excellent book that covers many different topics, supports the firm foundation theory and fundamental analysis of equities. Favors fundamental or value index funds, dividend paying companies with long term growth, low risk long term investing. Obviously biased towards long term investments. I tend to agree with many of the author This review is for the fifth edition which should be read over past editions for sure with additional information on more recent trends and the great recession of 2008. Excellent book that covers many different topics, supports the firm foundation theory and fundamental analysis of equities. Favors fundamental or value index funds, dividend paying companies with long term growth, low risk long term investing. Obviously biased towards long term investments. I tend to agree with many of the authors suggestions based on the data but ignoring higher risk short term opportunities does prevent some potential profits but could keep you from losing a lot as well.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    I first saw and heard about Jeremy Siegel on CNBC one day and it got me curious to learn more about him. I liked the first part of the book which is an interesting reminder of the stock market events over the 20th century. I was also happy to learn about the Irving Fisher Quote from 1929 "a permanently high plateau" which I didn't know before. The author is an advocate of equity long term passive low cost indexing, but it would have been interesting to read his thoughts on the value investing di I first saw and heard about Jeremy Siegel on CNBC one day and it got me curious to learn more about him. I liked the first part of the book which is an interesting reminder of the stock market events over the 20th century. I was also happy to learn about the Irving Fisher Quote from 1929 "a permanently high plateau" which I didn't know before. The author is an advocate of equity long term passive low cost indexing, but it would have been interesting to read his thoughts on the value investing discipline practiced by Warren Buffet.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    A good follow up to a Random Walk Down Wall Street. A good source to show much of the long term data that should drive an investing strategy with adequate reminders (if you are attentive - Siegel has a bullish reputation) that the next 100 years may not have similar outcomes to the last 100 and that we may be looking at a future of lower stock yields. It remains logical to believe that there should still be a risk premium of stocks over bonds, but it seems unlikely to be as large in the future a A good follow up to a Random Walk Down Wall Street. A good source to show much of the long term data that should drive an investing strategy with adequate reminders (if you are attentive - Siegel has a bullish reputation) that the next 100 years may not have similar outcomes to the last 100 and that we may be looking at a future of lower stock yields. It remains logical to believe that there should still be a risk premium of stocks over bonds, but it seems unlikely to be as large in the future as it was over the 20th century.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ben Sutter

    An academic-oriented summary of equity portfolio construction principles. It focuses is on the analysis and interpretation of historical performance data and does not really attempt to go beyond this scope. It is really solid overview which unlike a lot of other books is healthily skeptical about 'beat-the-market' strategies without being dogmatic about it. The book is generally really thorough and evidence-based in its delivery, with some occasional sections which are a little sloppy and could An academic-oriented summary of equity portfolio construction principles. It focuses is on the analysis and interpretation of historical performance data and does not really attempt to go beyond this scope. It is really solid overview which unlike a lot of other books is healthily skeptical about 'beat-the-market' strategies without being dogmatic about it. The book is generally really thorough and evidence-based in its delivery, with some occasional sections which are a little sloppy and could unintentionally encourage speculative behaviour in the eye of the untrained or inexperienced.

  16. 4 out of 5

    David Jacobson

    For the quantitatively inclined, this book gives a thorough and rational discussion of the long-term performance of financial markets. The conclusions are supported by many insightful plots, not by the "rules of thumb" one finds in lesser contributions to this literature. The book does a good job of straddling the line between general discussion and specific, actionable advice. Every person with money to invest over the long term (i.e., every person) should read this book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Erickson

    Begins with an excellent review of how historical events and movement of the market. Explains why the higher risk of equities is more than offset by the higher returns in the long run and is really less risk than bonds or Treasuries. Moves into factors involved in valuing stocks and what has historically been good properties to look for. Explains Wall Street's reasoning for those factors and why they are wrong. Where they put a unreasonable premium and what to avoid.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    A very good book for anyone who is investing or considering investing, including through a retirement plan at work. That makes it a must read for just about everyone, and it helps put recent market and economic events in perspective.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Will

    everything is for the long run

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Williams

    This covered a lot of stuff; I'm still in the early-beginner phase but I feel like it was very educational.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Before you put too much of your money in bonds you should probably read this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Palay

    Before you put too much of your money in bonds you should probably read this book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    David McClendon, Sr

    Many of us would like to invest in stocks, if we just knew how to go about it. We are often presented with a world of different ideas and theories about how to time the market. Stocks for the Long Run gives us some historical data and helps us to see what would have happened if we had used prevailing wisdom at the time to attempt to time the market. This book does not tell you the one best way to invest, because there is none. It simply presents the different beliefs and presents the historical Many of us would like to invest in stocks, if we just knew how to go about it. We are often presented with a world of different ideas and theories about how to time the market. Stocks for the Long Run gives us some historical data and helps us to see what would have happened if we had used prevailing wisdom at the time to attempt to time the market. This book does not tell you the one best way to invest, because there is none. It simply presents the different beliefs and presents the historical data to show us how the trends and prevailing wisdom, at that time, would have worked regarding our investment. We give Stocks for the Long Run all five stars. It is very well-written and impeccably well-researched. We think anyone who is a wannabee investor should read this. This book was a Christmas present. We are under no obligation to write any review, positive or negative. We are disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Littrell

    An authoritative guide Economics (the "dismal science") is dismal because "We have but one sample of history" —Paul Samuelson, as quoted on page 26. Ditto evolution, I might add. This is an excellent book, perhaps the best I've read on the title subject. An interesting point made on page 77 is that there is a conflict of goals between management and shareholders. Shareholders want the stock to go up in value, period. Managers on the other hand are interested in "prestige, control of markets, and o An authoritative guide Economics (the "dismal science") is dismal because "We have but one sample of history" —Paul Samuelson, as quoted on page 26. Ditto evolution, I might add. This is an excellent book, perhaps the best I've read on the title subject. An interesting point made on page 77 is that there is a conflict of goals between management and shareholders. Shareholders want the stock to go up in value, period. Managers on the other hand are interested in "prestige, control of markets, and other objectives." The other objectives that Siegel is too polite to mention include maximizing their power and control and increasing the size of their fiefdoms, which is one reason managers must be periodically tossed. The "long run" is perhaps an ambiguous concept. For the day trader it is like the life of some insects, a day. For "buy and hold" strategists it can be decades. This book conceives of the long run in the latter sense. It has been said, of course, that in the long run we are all dead. --Dennis Littrell, author of “The World Is Not as We Think It Is”

  25. 5 out of 5

    Arif

    Very good and thorough book on stock investing, especially if you interested it to approach a long term results. Complete with historical account, statistics and data. You'll be surprised you got 200 years historical stocks data from this book. Loved this much. Any topic you want, it has data. Economy policy, crisis, inflation, wars. Bonds, stocks, and other so useful comparison such as with: portofolio allocation, timing, holding, indexes, taxes, fees, dividends. This book splitted by three chap Very good and thorough book on stock investing, especially if you interested it to approach a long term results. Complete with historical account, statistics and data. You'll be surprised you got 200 years historical stocks data from this book. Loved this much. Any topic you want, it has data. Economy policy, crisis, inflation, wars. Bonds, stocks, and other so useful comparison such as with: portofolio allocation, timing, holding, indexes, taxes, fees, dividends. This book splitted by three chapters: - Stock returns, past, present, and future. - Verdict of History. Lots of data. I love them! Thanks Mr. Siegel! - Economic Environment Impacts Stocks - Stocks Fluctuatuation in the Short Run - Building Wealth Through Stocks Most of them that I find still surprising, with data, it still proved to be true that value strategy always have most benefit compared to other strategy. Long live value investor, eh?!

  26. 5 out of 5

    James Jr

    If there were only a few investment books that an investor had the opportunity to read in his or her lifetime, Stocks for the Long Run would be one that I strongly recommend. Dr. Jeremy Siegel, as the title suggests, in this excellent book, stresses the importance of buying and holding stocks for the long-term to build wealth. Dr. Siegel backs up his argument with decades of research into the performance of stocks that have been held for the long-term. Most of the world's greatest and most succe If there were only a few investment books that an investor had the opportunity to read in his or her lifetime, Stocks for the Long Run would be one that I strongly recommend. Dr. Jeremy Siegel, as the title suggests, in this excellent book, stresses the importance of buying and holding stocks for the long-term to build wealth. Dr. Siegel backs up his argument with decades of research into the performance of stocks that have been held for the long-term. Most of the world's greatest and most successful investors invest with a long-term mindset. Charlie Munger has stated "The big money is not made in buying or selling but in waiting." This book will still be a great read decades from now in much the same manner as Benjamin Graham's classic, The Intelligent Investor. What a great and educational book to read if you want to learn what it really takes to be a successful long-term investor.

  27. 4 out of 5

    JP

    Professor Siegel's venerable analysis of the stock market is the comprehensive history and guide book you need. I'm well read in this genre and found Stocks for the Long Run unrivaled for several reason. More than anything, the clarity of the writing and supporting figures leaves little margin to dismiss the conclusions. Siegel is sharp in his analysis, which is backed by years of iterating and building on his own research along with the primary findings of finance and behavioral science experts Professor Siegel's venerable analysis of the stock market is the comprehensive history and guide book you need. I'm well read in this genre and found Stocks for the Long Run unrivaled for several reason. More than anything, the clarity of the writing and supporting figures leaves little margin to dismiss the conclusions. Siegel is sharp in his analysis, which is backed by years of iterating and building on his own research along with the primary findings of finance and behavioral science experts. Siegel is also intellectually honest enough to bring out the rare criticisms of his work, in one case explaining how his past conclusions have since evolved. I especially appreciated the historical context and Siegel's ability to take a forward-focused point of view. The book ends with a practical summary for portfolio construction, based of course on the long-term benefits of stocks.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    I cannot believe I finished this one. It looked quite boring to me before starting, but hearing it recommended by people I respect, I thought I would pick it up. Turned out to be very well researched and clearly presented. The whole point of the book is that it is hard to beat a well-diversified portfolio of equities, which is an idea I already subscribe to (after years trying my hand at active investing, starting in 2009). And if you are familiar at all with Warren Buffet, then all this seems o I cannot believe I finished this one. It looked quite boring to me before starting, but hearing it recommended by people I respect, I thought I would pick it up. Turned out to be very well researched and clearly presented. The whole point of the book is that it is hard to beat a well-diversified portfolio of equities, which is an idea I already subscribe to (after years trying my hand at active investing, starting in 2009). And if you are familiar at all with Warren Buffet, then all this seems obvious. But passive investing is much harder than it seems, because of the noise in the business media and our psychological biases. Knowing that the game is as much psychological as it is anything else, this book is a solid reminder of what really matters.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Philip

    In a genre where a lot of nonsense has been written, this the most insightful and valuable book I have read. For the most part it is easily accessible to non-finance types, yet for finance types it still provides a wealth of information and insight. With the insights available from this book, I believe the average person who starts young and saves a few thousand a year can easily retire a millionaire. It's a fascinating read - and better than that, it can start you on your way to building signif In a genre where a lot of nonsense has been written, this the most insightful and valuable book I have read. For the most part it is easily accessible to non-finance types, yet for finance types it still provides a wealth of information and insight. With the insights available from this book, I believe the average person who starts young and saves a few thousand a year can easily retire a millionaire. It's a fascinating read - and better than that, it can start you on your way to building significant personal wealth.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jose

    As the title implies, this is not a get rich quick book. This is a get wealthier assuming you already have some money over a period of decades book. That doesn't sound terribly exciting but it really is.... seriously, no sarcasm, I loved this book. It is a very clear introduction to the power of stocks and a history of their performance. It was very interesting though sometimes veers into the land of outright textbooks. Nonetheless I stuck with it and it never failed to bring insight after insigh As the title implies, this is not a get rich quick book. This is a get wealthier assuming you already have some money over a period of decades book. That doesn't sound terribly exciting but it really is.... seriously, no sarcasm, I loved this book. It is a very clear introduction to the power of stocks and a history of their performance. It was very interesting though sometimes veers into the land of outright textbooks. Nonetheless I stuck with it and it never failed to bring insight after insight. It is insanely optimistic but insanely convincing as well.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.