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The White House

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Poetry. Introduction by John Beer. Joel Craig's poems first reach out with quiet Midwestern sincerity—precise craft mixed with personal invention—but quickly thicken: "Let me try to lay out what I think I understand" leads to "Las Vegas / and the end of Western history." Ethical without being political, popular without being pop, personal without being sentimental, Craig s Poetry. Introduction by John Beer. Joel Craig's poems first reach out with quiet Midwestern sincerity—precise craft mixed with personal invention—but quickly thicken: "Let me try to lay out what I think I understand" leads to "Las Vegas / and the end of Western history." Ethical without being political, popular without being pop, personal without being sentimental, Craig sings of how we are "stuck near a river / [we] can feel the evidence of / but can't imagine." Filled with elegies to aging rock 'n' rollers, explorations of skipping romance, and studied frustration with the world as it appears (and a sincere belief that quiet hands, by themselves, can change it), Craig's book doesn't so much demand as much as call out to the reader, in sequence like an all-night deejay party, with time to dance, time to rest, time to go to the bar and get a refill, or outside for a quick cigarette, hitting on someone on the way back in, hoping to strut, step and swing with them. Author City: CHICAGO, IL USA Joel Craig lives and works in Chicago, Illinois. He co- founded and curates the Danny's Reading Series, and is the poetry editor for MAKE: A Literary Magazine.


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Poetry. Introduction by John Beer. Joel Craig's poems first reach out with quiet Midwestern sincerity—precise craft mixed with personal invention—but quickly thicken: "Let me try to lay out what I think I understand" leads to "Las Vegas / and the end of Western history." Ethical without being political, popular without being pop, personal without being sentimental, Craig s Poetry. Introduction by John Beer. Joel Craig's poems first reach out with quiet Midwestern sincerity—precise craft mixed with personal invention—but quickly thicken: "Let me try to lay out what I think I understand" leads to "Las Vegas / and the end of Western history." Ethical without being political, popular without being pop, personal without being sentimental, Craig sings of how we are "stuck near a river / [we] can feel the evidence of / but can't imagine." Filled with elegies to aging rock 'n' rollers, explorations of skipping romance, and studied frustration with the world as it appears (and a sincere belief that quiet hands, by themselves, can change it), Craig's book doesn't so much demand as much as call out to the reader, in sequence like an all-night deejay party, with time to dance, time to rest, time to go to the bar and get a refill, or outside for a quick cigarette, hitting on someone on the way back in, hoping to strut, step and swing with them. Author City: CHICAGO, IL USA Joel Craig lives and works in Chicago, Illinois. He co- founded and curates the Danny's Reading Series, and is the poetry editor for MAKE: A Literary Magazine.

24 review for The White House

  1. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    Understated, patient. "What's so special about the second line?" With a kind of equilibrium that makes me interested in what Joel has to say. "I'm growing kale and tomato together in the same undersized pot knowing they likely won't become food." It's the deferrals in the poems, things opening up into smaller containers. "My love, I just thought of something I might do. When I returned from the porch several others were seated at the table." Sort of exactly what I need to read right now, as the rest of my Understated, patient. "What's so special about the second line?" With a kind of equilibrium that makes me interested in what Joel has to say. "I'm growing kale and tomato together in the same undersized pot knowing they likely won't become food." It's the deferrals in the poems, things opening up into smaller containers. "My love, I just thought of something I might do. When I returned from the porch several others were seated at the table." Sort of exactly what I need to read right now, as the rest of my reading is the master theory trying to replace the other master theory. Thanks, Joel. See: "Rational Rational", "Instructions For Building A Paper House", "Cabbage Alley", "Harry Nilsson"

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Kenealy

    Great first book of poems.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Paula

  4. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  5. 5 out of 5

    James Eidson

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  7. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Theis

  8. 4 out of 5

    Meesh

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jason Kerns

  10. 5 out of 5

    Abby Hagler

  11. 5 out of 5

    Adam

  12. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jac

  15. 4 out of 5

    joe m

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Baran

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jared

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  20. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie

  21. 5 out of 5

    Holly

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jerrod

  23. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

  24. 4 out of 5

    Carolina

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