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This is the kind of assortment that can hook a reader on short fantasy. Thirty-two good stories--some previously anthologized, some hot off the press ("Beauty and the Opera" by Suzy McKee Charnas appeared in July 1996), and a few once considered classic, but now nearly forgotten (Thomas Burnett Swann is rapidly falling out of sight)--offer entertainment for every taste. Ma This is the kind of assortment that can hook a reader on short fantasy. Thirty-two good stories--some previously anthologized, some hot off the press ("Beauty and the Opera" by Suzy McKee Charnas appeared in July 1996), and a few once considered classic, but now nearly forgotten (Thomas Burnett Swann is rapidly falling out of sight)--offer entertainment for every taste. Many of the stories ("The Overworld" by Jack Vance, and "The Changeling" by Michael Swanwick) also offer continuation elsewhere as part of a longer work. Gardner Dozois's emphasis is on magazine fiction. As such, it's an interesting view of the evolution and increasing sophistication of the "pulps"--and their readers. For this reason this would be an excellent text for a course on modern fantasy writing. Stories from Asimov Science Fiction Magazine, which Dozois edits, are prominent among the recent pieces. Providing a brief history of 20th-century fantasy, the introduction seems written with the new reader in mind. Contents Walk Like a Mountain • [John the Balladeer] • (1955) • shortstory by Manly Wade Wellman Scylla's Daughter • [Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser] • (1961) • novella by Fritz Leiber Paper Dragons • (1985) • novelette by James P. Blaylock The Golem • (1955) • shortstory by Avram Davidson Flowers of Edo • (1987) • novelette by Bruce Sterling Bears Discover Fire • (1990) • shortstory by Terry Bisson The Changeling's Tale • (1994) • shortstory by Michael Swanwick Missolonghi 1824 • (1990) • shortstory by John Crowley Blunderbore • (1990) • shortstory by Esther M. Friesner Into Gold • (1986) • novelette by Tanith Lee Space-Time for Springers • [Gummitch the Cat] • (1958) • shortstory by Fritz Leiber Beauty and the Opéra or the Phantom Beast • (1996) • novelette by Suzy McKee Charnas The Man Who Painted the Dragon Griaule • [Griaule] • (1984) • novelette by Lucius Shepard A Cabin on the Coast • (1984) • shortstory by Gene Wolfe The Sleep of Trees • (1980) • shortstory by Jane Yolen Trouble with Water • (1939) • shortstory by H. L. Gold The Gnarly Man • (1939) • novelette by L. Sprague de Camp Death and the Executioner • [Lord of Light] • (1967) • novelette by Roger Zelazny The Manor of Roses • [John & Stephen] • (1966) • novella by Thomas Burnett Swann The Overworld • [Dying Earth] • (1965) • novelette by Jack Vance Extempore • (1956) • shortstory by Damon Knight God's Hooks! • (1982) • shortstory by Howard Waldrop Buffalo Gals, Won't You Come Out Tonight • (1987) • novelette by Ursula K. Le Guin The Tale of Hauk • (1977) • novelette by Poul Anderson A Gift of the People • (1988) • shortstory by Robert Sampson Configuration of the North Shore • (1969) • shortstory by R. A. Lafferty Two Sadnesses • (1973) • shortstory by George Alec Effinger Manatee Gal, Won't You Come Out Tonight • [Jack Limekiller] • (1977) • novelette by Avram Davidson (aka Manatee Gal Ain't You Coming Out Tonight) The Signaller • [Pavane] • (1966) • novelette by Keith Roberts The Troll • (1935) • shortstory by T. H. White Death and the Lady • (1992) • novelette by Judith Tarr Professor Gottesman and the Indian Rhinoceros • (1995) • novelette by Peter S. Beagle Preface (Modern Classics of Fantasy) • (1997) • essay by Gardner Dozois Recommended Reading (Modern Classics of Fantasy) • essay by Gardner Dozois


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This is the kind of assortment that can hook a reader on short fantasy. Thirty-two good stories--some previously anthologized, some hot off the press ("Beauty and the Opera" by Suzy McKee Charnas appeared in July 1996), and a few once considered classic, but now nearly forgotten (Thomas Burnett Swann is rapidly falling out of sight)--offer entertainment for every taste. Ma This is the kind of assortment that can hook a reader on short fantasy. Thirty-two good stories--some previously anthologized, some hot off the press ("Beauty and the Opera" by Suzy McKee Charnas appeared in July 1996), and a few once considered classic, but now nearly forgotten (Thomas Burnett Swann is rapidly falling out of sight)--offer entertainment for every taste. Many of the stories ("The Overworld" by Jack Vance, and "The Changeling" by Michael Swanwick) also offer continuation elsewhere as part of a longer work. Gardner Dozois's emphasis is on magazine fiction. As such, it's an interesting view of the evolution and increasing sophistication of the "pulps"--and their readers. For this reason this would be an excellent text for a course on modern fantasy writing. Stories from Asimov Science Fiction Magazine, which Dozois edits, are prominent among the recent pieces. Providing a brief history of 20th-century fantasy, the introduction seems written with the new reader in mind. Contents Walk Like a Mountain • [John the Balladeer] • (1955) • shortstory by Manly Wade Wellman Scylla's Daughter • [Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser] • (1961) • novella by Fritz Leiber Paper Dragons • (1985) • novelette by James P. Blaylock The Golem • (1955) • shortstory by Avram Davidson Flowers of Edo • (1987) • novelette by Bruce Sterling Bears Discover Fire • (1990) • shortstory by Terry Bisson The Changeling's Tale • (1994) • shortstory by Michael Swanwick Missolonghi 1824 • (1990) • shortstory by John Crowley Blunderbore • (1990) • shortstory by Esther M. Friesner Into Gold • (1986) • novelette by Tanith Lee Space-Time for Springers • [Gummitch the Cat] • (1958) • shortstory by Fritz Leiber Beauty and the Opéra or the Phantom Beast • (1996) • novelette by Suzy McKee Charnas The Man Who Painted the Dragon Griaule • [Griaule] • (1984) • novelette by Lucius Shepard A Cabin on the Coast • (1984) • shortstory by Gene Wolfe The Sleep of Trees • (1980) • shortstory by Jane Yolen Trouble with Water • (1939) • shortstory by H. L. Gold The Gnarly Man • (1939) • novelette by L. Sprague de Camp Death and the Executioner • [Lord of Light] • (1967) • novelette by Roger Zelazny The Manor of Roses • [John & Stephen] • (1966) • novella by Thomas Burnett Swann The Overworld • [Dying Earth] • (1965) • novelette by Jack Vance Extempore • (1956) • shortstory by Damon Knight God's Hooks! • (1982) • shortstory by Howard Waldrop Buffalo Gals, Won't You Come Out Tonight • (1987) • novelette by Ursula K. Le Guin The Tale of Hauk • (1977) • novelette by Poul Anderson A Gift of the People • (1988) • shortstory by Robert Sampson Configuration of the North Shore • (1969) • shortstory by R. A. Lafferty Two Sadnesses • (1973) • shortstory by George Alec Effinger Manatee Gal, Won't You Come Out Tonight • [Jack Limekiller] • (1977) • novelette by Avram Davidson (aka Manatee Gal Ain't You Coming Out Tonight) The Signaller • [Pavane] • (1966) • novelette by Keith Roberts The Troll • (1935) • shortstory by T. H. White Death and the Lady • (1992) • novelette by Judith Tarr Professor Gottesman and the Indian Rhinoceros • (1995) • novelette by Peter S. Beagle Preface (Modern Classics of Fantasy) • (1997) • essay by Gardner Dozois Recommended Reading (Modern Classics of Fantasy) • essay by Gardner Dozois

30 review for Modern Classics of Fantasy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Terence

    CAVEAT EMPTOR - This is not a review/commentary on the entire collection. Though I read many of the other stories in the anthology & enjoyed most of them, my primary focus was on Thomas Burnett Swann's "The Manor of Roses," whose existence was made known to me by Werner A. (thanks, Werner, you were right :-) in a comment on my review of Swann's Green Phoenix here. "The Manor of Roses" is a tale about three children (two boys & a girl) on the cusp of adulthood and the lady of the manor. John is th CAVEAT EMPTOR - This is not a review/commentary on the entire collection. Though I read many of the other stories in the anthology & enjoyed most of them, my primary focus was on Thomas Burnett Swann's "The Manor of Roses," whose existence was made known to me by Werner A. (thanks, Werner, you were right :-) in a comment on my review of Swann's Green Phoenix here. "The Manor of Roses" is a tale about three children (two boys & a girl) on the cusp of adulthood and the lady of the manor. John is the son of a Norman baron in early 13th century England, despised by his father because he'd rather study than join his father's retinue in a hunt; Stephen is one of John's father's villeins and John's closest friend (read "only friend"); and Ruth is a young, mysterious girl found by Stephen in the ruins of a Roman-era Mithraeum. Stephen has dreams of voyaging to Outremer and joining a Crusade. His discovery of Ruth and a final humiliation of John by his father prompt the trio to run off to London, where they'll take ship to the Levant. (view spoiler)[Before they're even a day's journey from home, the boys are abducted by the Mandrake People, faerie-like inhabitants of the wood, who mistakenly believe they've killed one of their children. Ruth rescues them by bribing the Mandrakes with a bejewelled crucifix but incurs John's suspicions that she may be a Mandrake herself - a changling who's lived among humans long enough to pass for one of them. But John's paranoia may be a product of his jealousy as he sees Ruth coming between himself and Stephen. Having escaped the Mandrakes, the children come upon the titular manor and are taken in by its mistress, Lady Mary, the widow of a Crusader, who has lost not only a husband but a son as well, when he hared off to follow in his father's footsteps but was cut down by a thief before he could even set sail. There follows a confrontation with Ruth over her real identity, and a revelation of Lady Mary's that isn't wholly unexpected but nevertheless gives the story a moral power it otherwise might have lacked. (hide spoiler)] Swann resembles one of my favorite authors - Edgar Pangborn - in style and sentiment. Both authors' focus on themes of love, trust, friendship & faith, and the bittersweetness of life, without be preachy or self-righteous. I left Green Phoenix sitting on the fence but in the face "The Manor of Roses," I'm putting Swann on my favorite authors list and will hunt down more of his work.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Werner

    The thirty authors of the selections here (Avram Davidson and Fritz Leiber are represented twice) include a roster of some of the best-known names in speculative fiction in the last 60 years of the 20th-century, plus some less well-known writers who deserve to be more famous. Dozois' definition of fantasy is broad, including pretty much anything supernatural as long as it isn't horrific, plus forays into soft sci-fi; Terry Bisson's "Bears Discover Fire" is an example of surrealism -and one of th The thirty authors of the selections here (Avram Davidson and Fritz Leiber are represented twice) include a roster of some of the best-known names in speculative fiction in the last 60 years of the 20th-century, plus some less well-known writers who deserve to be more famous. Dozois' definition of fantasy is broad, including pretty much anything supernatural as long as it isn't horrific, plus forays into soft sci-fi; Terry Bisson's "Bears Discover Fire" is an example of surrealism -and one of the few works from that school that's really an good, readable story!--, and Charnas' take-off on The Phantom of the Opera is not speculative as such, but certainly exotic and macabre (and makes me want to read the original book). The tone of the stories varies from tragic and poignant to humorous, with settings from the past, present and future, and all around the world and on other worlds. A couple of stories, like Keith Roberts' "The Signaller," are explicitly pagan in their world-view; but a surprising number have a Christian message or favorably- treated Christian elements. Arrangement of the stories is mostly chronological (though T. H. White's "The Troll" is dated by a copyright renewal rather than by its original publication). It's impossible for me to pick a single favorite story here; but if I'd try to narrow it down, some finalists would include: Manly Wade Wellman's Silver John story "Walk Like a Mountain;" Howard Waldrop's "God's Hooks!" White's "The Troll;" Thomas Burnett Swann's "The Manor of Roses;" Avram Davidson's Manatee Gal Ain't You Coming Out Tonight" and "The Golem;" Poul Anderson's Viking ghost story "The Tale of Hauk;" L. Sprague de Camp's "The Gnarly Man;" and Harold L. Gold's "The Trouble With Water." Other authors represented with quality pieces include Tanith Lee, Gene Wolfe, Judith Tarr, James P. Blaylock, and Bruce Sterling. Naturally, in an anthology this thick, few readers will like all of the selections: I didn't care for the ones by Ursula LeGuin, Esther Freisner, or George Alec Effinger. But in the main, Dozois' editorial taste is impeccable; the overall quality of the other 29 stories makes this absolutely one of the best general collections of speculative fiction that I've ever come across. It's a reader's treasury --and an excellent sampler introducing the work of authors you find yourself wanting to get better acquainted with. (And the editor's appended list of "Recommended Reading" is a nice feature for helping you do it!) Dozois is also the editor of Modern Classics of Science Fiction and Modern Classics of Horror; I haven't read either of those --but I definitely want to someday.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Charlie Eckhaus

    Another for me obligatory milestone anthology, with lots of familiar but untasted names. The Trouble with Water by HL Gold: Skipped this one, as I just (re-)read it elsewhere and the experience stuck most satisfactorily. The Gnarly Man by L Sprague deCamp: Re-read to refresh my memory --the story serves its trope so well. The Golem by Avram Davidson: I can't help imagine this as a Gahan Wilson-illustrated comic book story. Walk Like a Mountain by Manly Wade Wellman: Backwoods mythic gem. Extempore by Another for me obligatory milestone anthology, with lots of familiar but untasted names. The Trouble with Water by HL Gold: Skipped this one, as I just (re-)read it elsewhere and the experience stuck most satisfactorily. The Gnarly Man by L Sprague deCamp: Re-read to refresh my memory --the story serves its trope so well. The Golem by Avram Davidson: I can't help imagine this as a Gahan Wilson-illustrated comic book story. Walk Like a Mountain by Manly Wade Wellman: Backwoods mythic gem. Extempore by Damon Knight: A time travel story I think I understand, but Knght's writing clarity is always an issue for me. Space Time for Springers by Fritz Leiber: Delightful point-of-view masterpiece. Scylla's Daughter by Fritz Leiber: Savored the lively writing by this master, long a favorite of mine. The Otherworld by Jack Vance: Another forever favorite with a representative superlative tale of Cugel and The Dying Earth. The Signaller by Keith Roberts: An author I'm barely familiar with creates a distinctive feel and mood. The Manor of Roses by Thomas Burnett Swann: Promising start to journey adventure. Death and the Executioner by Roger Zelazny: Exotic mythic/religious feel, would probably have enjoyed more if I had a stronger grounding in these things. Configuration of the North Shore by RA Lafferty: Unusual for me puzzling example of the author's wonderful whimsy Two Sadnesses by George Alec Effinger: Interest rose from the apparent clash in intent and the nature of the principals, if I got it straight. Tale of Hauk by Poul Anderson: Authenticity of setting, strong rugged writing with touches of warmth Manatee Gals Ain't You Coming Out Tonight by Avram Davidson: Tedious and slow-paced but eventually rewarding, with dialects and even a bit of suspense, but I feel ed overendorses it. The Troll by TH White: A disappointment The Sleep of Trees by Jane Yolen: First sampling of this author, well-written but it just sits there for me God's Hooks by Howard Waldrop: Moderately entertaining tall tale, not so classic for me The Man Who Painted the Dragon Griaule by Lucius Shepard: Another classic that puzzles me: had some trouble visualizing, overlong, rambling and vague in point. Cabin on the Coast by Gene Wolfe: A straightforward (I think) short tale, but classic? Paper Dragons by James P. Blaylock: Evocative writing but not much to latch onto. Into Gold by Tanith Lee: A small effort to get into (I'm poorly-read with this author,) but much worth it for the emotional payoff. Flowers of Edo by Bruce Sterling: The charmes of this one elude me. Buffalo Gals Won't You Come Out Tonight by Ursula K Le Guin: I'm skipping this one due to fairly recent reading elsewhere, with the recollection of enjoyment of the magical atmosphere and thinking I "got" it. Gift of the People by Robert Sampson: Nicely written but meaningless to me Missolonghi 1826 by John Crowley: A delusion? Bears Discover Fire by Terry Bisson: Skipped it, but recollecting my the first reread, I still say it's highly overrated and "So what?" Blunderbore by Esther Friesner: Not so hilarious for me, nor significant. Reliance on modern social attitudes didn't help. Death and the Lady by Judith Tarr: Atmospheric and absorbing, a highlight here. Changeling's Tale by Michael Swanwick: Nice writing, more plot preferred. Professor Gottesman and the Indian Rhinoceros by Peter S Beagle: The hit of the book for me -- whimsical and emotional. Beauty and the Opera or the Phantom Beast by Suzy McKee Charnas: Exceptionally well-told erotic melding of two classic stories. Wisely chosen as the closing piece here. Recommended reading, Very useful guide to erstwhile authors and promising collections to track down.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    Note: Contains Into Gold by Tanith Lee Note: Contains Into Gold by Tanith Lee

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    A big anthology, 32 stories and a long preface that takes about 660+ pages total. The stories date from 1939 to 1996 and according to the editor they were all favorites of his. The majority of the stories were first published in a variety of magazines. Frankly I'm a little disappointed with this - there are too many weak stories. This does manage to present a wide variety of material to show the breadth of writing that can be considered fantasy. For me this meant that some of the types just fail A big anthology, 32 stories and a long preface that takes about 660+ pages total. The stories date from 1939 to 1996 and according to the editor they were all favorites of his. The majority of the stories were first published in a variety of magazines. Frankly I'm a little disappointed with this - there are too many weak stories. This does manage to present a wide variety of material to show the breadth of writing that can be considered fantasy. For me this meant that some of the types just failed to entertain me, especially the ones that tried to be humorous fantasy. The appearance of several strong stories and a few exceptional ones let me give this an overall OK to good rating. The editor writes a nice introduction to each and often gives a long recitation of titles by the author that was probably more useful in pre-internet times than now. I'm not going to give a blow by blow of each story - that would be a task!. Among the stories that entertained and amused me was "Space-time for Springers" by Fritz Leiber, a story inside the head of a precocious kitten. Many years ago, when I was in college in fact, I read Jack Vance's "The Dying Earth" and was quite taken with it as I recall. In this collection is the novelette "The Overlord" which is supposed to be a story (one of many) that follows the original collection. It didn't trigger any recollection at all, although it is clearly written and enjoyable in the stylish fantasy prose that marks Vance's stories. I was glad to have read this but don't know how it connects to the original work. Friends asked recently if I liked Fritz Leiber's Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser stories and I couldn't recall, although I thought I had read a bit of them in my teens or early 20's. Surprisingly (or not) there was one in this collection - a novella "Scylla's Daughter." Unfortunately this story did not catch my fancy at all and I started to skim it and then gave it up. I did later go back and read the latter part of the story I had skimmed. It confirmed that this is just not my sort of story, even with cats. Not a bad story, just not my preference. Keith Roberts' "The Signaller" was a wonderful heartwarming and ultimately heartbreaking story set in an imagined alternate history England which reminded me that I must read Roberts' classic novel "Pavane" much sooner rather than later. The intro to this story tells me that this became part of the novel. Great imagination and storytelling with this one. 'The Manor of Roses' was an awesome piece of historical fiction/fantasy, a novella by Thomas Burnett Swann that the editor, in 1997, proclaimed one of the finest pieces of fantasy of the preceding 30 years. I'll make that 50 years. The writing is lovely without falling over the edge into purple schlock. It is a bit of a horror story as well as a fantasy and I was thoroughly entranced. Without giving things away the horror aspect here is primarily caused by mandrakes. Day of the Triffids type mandrakes! As an adult this is fairly mild but if I had read this as a child I may have missed much of the beauty and skill of the writing but would probably have had a nightmare or two and would never ever have ventured into an English garden or forest. I'll seek out other works by Swann in the future (he died in 1976). I believe I have one of his novels buried away somewhere. I liked Poul Anderson's Nordic historical fiction / supernatural fantasy 'The Tale of Hauk.' This is told like we are reading an old Viking Saga and gives us a taste of what might happen if you die the wrong way. I've enjoyed this type of fantasy from Anderson before. He slips little details in with what might look like a throwaway sentence, but I appreciate it when a skillful author can do that. I do really like it when an author can give me a story in about 10 pages that fully transports my mind to another place or gives me a look at something unexpected with enough detail. Anderson's 'The Tale of Hauk' took 17 pages to do that, but T.H. White and Jane Yolen manage to do that very nicely in about 10 pages each. White takes us on a visit to Lapland where we encounter 'The Troll', and Yolen puts us inside the mind of a tree spirit with 'The Sleep of Trees.' I read quite a few short stories and poems by Yolen within the pages of science fiction and fantasy magazines in the mid 80's and onward. They generally always satisfied. 'The Sleep of Trees' dates to a 1980 magazine publication and was new to me. One of the grandest stories in here, and the story that is the source of the painting that graces the cover of this collection, is Lucius Shepard's 'The Man Who Painted the Dragon Griaule.' I had just started (in 1984) a one year sub to the Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction (a Christmas gift from my spouse to be) and this story showed up in the last issue of the year (December 1984). I was devouring every one of the stories in the mags but this one knocked it out of the park. Re-reading it I can once again experience the discovery of the imagination that created this story. A little dark, and the sequel if I recall gets even darker (note to self - re-read the followup novella 'The Scalehunter's Beautiful Daughter'). I won't spoil the story but it is certainly among the best pieces of fantasy I read in the 80's. The story here is only 24 pages but I had it in my memory as much longer. I think I had added in one or two of the followup novellas. Shepard wrote some amazing stuff in the fantasy and science fiction genre in the 80's and into the 90's but his focus shifted more to horror in later years which I did not enjoy nearly as much as his earlier work. I need to read and re-read more of his works. Slightly awesome to my warped mind is that the story that follows Griaule is 'A Cabin on the Coast' by Gene Wolfe, which appeared in the first copy (February 1984) of The magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction I recieved in the mail those many years ago. This is a subtly spooky story about a ghost ship on the California coast that ventures into horror territory and even gave me a nightmare! Ursula K Le Guin's 'Buffalo Gals, Won't You Come Out Tonight' is good but left me with mixed feelings. The story is a long short story that maybe needed to be the length of a true novella. It plays with the coyote-trickster character of Native American mythology who rescues a small girl who fell from the sky - the girl remembers being in a small plane. The coyote seems to be a shapeshifter. In fact just about everyone who shows up seems likely to be a shapeshifter. I won't try to analyze this story - I'm sure there is intended to be layers of meaning. There's some strange creepiness in here. 'Bears Discover Fire' by Terry Bisson is one of my very favorite fantasy short stories of all time. I first read it when it was published in Asimov''s magazine in 1990 and I've read it several times since. It won a slew of awards. It is a story that is what the title says - and it is also something more. Highly recommended.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Some really good stuff, but unfortunately suffers that common anthology affliction of having a few too many duds.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Silvio Curtis

    For one reason or another none of these stories is my favorite kind of fantasy, but I'm not sorry I read them except one or two. The only one I'd read already is "Buffalo Gals, Won't You Come Out Tonight" by Le Guin. Only a few are in a proper secondary world. Almost all are centered on the interplay between an ordinary world and a supernatural one. The stories I enjoyed most had a historical or historically inspired setting, especially two that were later rewritten as parts of novels that I unf For one reason or another none of these stories is my favorite kind of fantasy, but I'm not sorry I read them except one or two. The only one I'd read already is "Buffalo Gals, Won't You Come Out Tonight" by Le Guin. Only a few are in a proper secondary world. Almost all are centered on the interplay between an ordinary world and a supernatural one. The stories I enjoyed most had a historical or historically inspired setting, especially two that were later rewritten as parts of novels that I unfortunately haven't read yet: "The Signaller" (Pavane) and "Death and the Executioner" (Lord of Light). The stories were published between the early-ish twentieth century and about 1990. I forget if all the authors are from the U.S., but most are. There's an informative introduction about the history of fantasy as a genre in the U.S.

  8. 4 out of 5

    John

    Huge collection with lots of negligible stories but most of the significant authors (sans Tolkien, Anne McCaffrey, Emma Bull, R.A. McAvoy, R.A. Salvatore, C.J. Cherryh among others) active between WWII and the late 1990s in genre fantasy represented.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Gallan

    44/646

  10. 5 out of 5

    bluetyson

    Modern Classics of Fantasy by Gardner R. Dozois (1997)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Terry McGarry

  12. 5 out of 5

    Erin

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kiel

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Clothier

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sherry Meador

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  17. 5 out of 5

    Richard Pistole

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dnxn

  19. 4 out of 5

    Vincent

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kaylee

  21. 5 out of 5

    Levent Mollamustafaoglu

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jere

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dane Wilkins

  24. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Garr

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marv

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nivekian

  29. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

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