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Crazy Weather

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In four days of glory-hunting with an Indian comrade, South Boy, who is white, realizes that he must choose between two cultures.


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In four days of glory-hunting with an Indian comrade, South Boy, who is white, realizes that he must choose between two cultures.

30 review for Crazy Weather

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    This was a surprising read. It's true that some of the language is dated and the women characters are a bit trite but overall, I was impressed by the story of a boy grappling with two cultures and what it takes to live with integrity, as a consistent man.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Virginia

    McNichols's subtle and agile portrait of a young man coming of age on the cusp of white and Mojave cultures helps us understand what is universal, and what each culture has to offer. It's a poignant story of courage and confusion, loyalty and separation. South Boy, a white teen coming of age on a Mojave Indian reservation, and his native friend Havek, set off on a journey in hopes that they will have an opportunity to do A Great Thing and win honor and new names for themselves. South Boy is also McNichols's subtle and agile portrait of a young man coming of age on the cusp of white and Mojave cultures helps us understand what is universal, and what each culture has to offer. It's a poignant story of courage and confusion, loyalty and separation. South Boy, a white teen coming of age on a Mojave Indian reservation, and his native friend Havek, set off on a journey in hopes that they will have an opportunity to do A Great Thing and win honor and new names for themselves. South Boy is also fleeing his mother's intention to send him away to a white school to be educated. South Boy struggles with his dual view of the world, and longs for the clarity that Havek enjoys. At one point, after South Boy shows courage, Havek is elated, but South Boy's "white" side cannot join in the celebration: "Havek was staring at him, his mouth open, the whites of his eyes showing. 'Truly,' he muttered. 'Truly. A hawk-dreamer. His hands empty. He went down into Death's face. He walked slowly away. Truly -- truly -- truly -- a Great Thing.' South Boy heard him and felt low and cheap. ... He could not explain because he had promised ... and how could he explain a thing like that to an Indian, anyway? So he walked in silence, which was exactly what a Mojave would have done after an act of great courage. ... The trouble is, he was thinking, I act Indian one time and white another time and I get all mixed." While South Boy's dilemma is unique, we can all relate to the thicket of choices he must penetrate in order to find a place of his own in the adult world.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cathy Douglas

    This read like something lived. Not the story itself, but the background. So many of the details are things you just couldn't make up -- for example, the Mojave habit of gesturing with the chin. The way this story is told really takes you back into lost time. It was written in the forties, but I get the feeling a lot of it came from the author's childhood. The story itself is about a boy coming of age caught between two worlds. South Boy isn't much of a deep thinker, but he feels things strongly. This read like something lived. Not the story itself, but the background. So many of the details are things you just couldn't make up -- for example, the Mojave habit of gesturing with the chin. The way this story is told really takes you back into lost time. It was written in the forties, but I get the feeling a lot of it came from the author's childhood. The story itself is about a boy coming of age caught between two worlds. South Boy isn't much of a deep thinker, but he feels things strongly. These kids just go off to kill people like it was nothing, because Paiutes are the enemy. You can't even imagine thinking that way, but people were different in those times.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    A truly unique coming-of-age book about a boy who straddles two worlds and struggles to find where he belongs-and the inner strength to accept his human struggles. It is the only book I've ever read that gives such an interesting telling of Mojave myths and culture, and has piqued my interest in reading more (if it exists). A great read for adults and kids alike. Unfortunately it was a little slow-paced and narratively distracted with native stories at times, hence only 4 stars.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

    I have a copy of this book and there is no jacket cover, but inside is stamped 'Department of English Wichita High School East' and it was first published by The MacMillan Company, New York, 1944.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Karen Boruff

    Excellent and interesting book. I read it out loud to my son who is young and he loved it...begged for one more chapter every time. I would recommend this book

  7. 5 out of 5

    Louie van Bommel

    A nice journey into a world very much removed from this one. Well written.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Wightman-teixeira

    Excellent I love the FIRST EDITION CLASSICS

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Sang

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

  11. 4 out of 5

    ├ůsa

  12. 4 out of 5

    Susan Elg

  13. 5 out of 5

    Billy Jarnagin

  14. 4 out of 5

    Micha

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

  16. 4 out of 5

    Argyl

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

  18. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Sjostedt

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  20. 4 out of 5

    Max Carmichael

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Nesson

  22. 4 out of 5

    Elyce Feliz

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kjerstin

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

  25. 4 out of 5

    Richard

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brian Slattery

  27. 5 out of 5

    Megan Macfarlane

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dan

  29. 5 out of 5

    Janet

  30. 4 out of 5

    Laura Eilers

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