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The American School: A Global Context: From the Puritans to the Obama Administration

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"The American School: From the Puritans to Global Corporatism" by Joel Spring focuses on the process of educational globalization and the development of American schools in a global context.


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"The American School: From the Puritans to Global Corporatism" by Joel Spring focuses on the process of educational globalization and the development of American schools in a global context.

30 review for The American School: A Global Context: From the Puritans to the Obama Administration

  1. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    While this book is very dense, it is an excellent foundations of education book. With an historical foundation, it follows the US educational system from the Puritans to No Child Left Behind. He also brings in a sociological and philosophical view. Sometimes it is clear that Spring has allowed his viewpoint to permeate his writing, but for the most part he does a nice job of looking at several viewpoints. His bibliography is impressive.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Blake

    The education system is slipping into oblivion very rapidly. Here is the history of how it got to that point. Not exactly a page turner, but informative and a good picture of why we are where we are today. But don't read it looking for answers. This book does nothing but bring up more questions.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chase Parsley

    A clear-headed look at the history of education in America. Every educator, if not every voter, should read this book with care.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Erin Waddell

    Joel Spring's text provides various viewpoints on the events which have sculpted the American school system as we know it. His primary thesis is that politicians and civilians alike have simultaneously viewed education as both the cause of and answer to economical, social, and political complications. As Spring explains our school system in the United States has a history of being thought of as the great panacea for all of our woes. And yet, he argues, those in favor of an influential educationa Joel Spring's text provides various viewpoints on the events which have sculpted the American school system as we know it. His primary thesis is that politicians and civilians alike have simultaneously viewed education as both the cause of and answer to economical, social, and political complications. As Spring explains our school system in the United States has a history of being thought of as the great panacea for all of our woes. And yet, he argues, those in favor of an influential educational system rarely define their intended outcomes of such an “education” in the same terms. Merle Curti, great intellectual historian, in his 1935 publication of The Social Ideas of American Educators, comments on the origins of the American school system: “We tend today to think of our American system of public schools as having been founded out of a great zeal for the welfare of the plain people. But actually this zeal was tempered by zeal for the welfare of the employers of labor, by zeal for maintaining the political and social status quo” (85). Curti does not stand alone in his assessment that our school system blossomed out of a complex soil of diverse motives. Joel Spring’s work argues much of the same point and, in fact, places the arguments of other historians side-by-side in an effort to illustrate the sheer multitude of opinions on the issue of who exactly influenced our educational past, and what exactly their intentions were. Utilizing the exhaustive work of both Spring and Curti, one can ascertain with relative certainty that our public system of education arose with the backing of both those who wanted to maintain, as Curti states, “the political and social status quo,” and also with the support of those who wanted a critically-thinking and informed citizenry who would oppose tyranny and dictatorship, whatever its form—from power-hungry politicians to avaricious business executives. These constant and oppositional forces are clearly evidenced by historical fact.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin Barlow

  6. 4 out of 5

    Wryly

  7. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Waters

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chaim Shapiro

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Sullivan

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Forbes

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chris Flieger

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

  13. 5 out of 5

    Evan Heymann

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jessenia Diaz

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ike Shaw

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  17. 5 out of 5

    Angela Kitchin

  18. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Terzic

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra B

  20. 4 out of 5

    Simon

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tarah Hall

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chalen Kelly

  23. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Land

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Osburn

  26. 4 out of 5

    Angela Dye

  27. 5 out of 5

    April Mills

  28. 5 out of 5

    missvix

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shani

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Bastian

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