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Licor de Dente-de-Leão

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Na cidadezinha de Green Town, no interior dos Estados Unidos, alguns personagens extraordinários se unem nesse verão tão especial na vida de Douglas - o inventor que redescobriu os prazeres da vida ao construir a Máquina da Felicidade; o jovem repórter que se apaixonou por uma idosa de 95 anos; o contador de histórias que conseguiu falar com o passado telefonando para um l Na cidadezinha de Green Town, no interior dos Estados Unidos, alguns personagens extraordinários se unem nesse verão tão especial na vida de Douglas - o inventor que redescobriu os prazeres da vida ao construir a Máquina da Felicidade; o jovem repórter que se apaixonou por uma idosa de 95 anos; o contador de histórias que conseguiu falar com o passado telefonando para um lugar distante.


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Na cidadezinha de Green Town, no interior dos Estados Unidos, alguns personagens extraordinários se unem nesse verão tão especial na vida de Douglas - o inventor que redescobriu os prazeres da vida ao construir a Máquina da Felicidade; o jovem repórter que se apaixonou por uma idosa de 95 anos; o contador de histórias que conseguiu falar com o passado telefonando para um l Na cidadezinha de Green Town, no interior dos Estados Unidos, alguns personagens extraordinários se unem nesse verão tão especial na vida de Douglas - o inventor que redescobriu os prazeres da vida ao construir a Máquina da Felicidade; o jovem repórter que se apaixonou por uma idosa de 95 anos; o contador de histórias que conseguiu falar com o passado telefonando para um lugar distante.

30 review for Licor de Dente-de-Leão

  1. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    The only reason I gave this book five stars was because I couldn't give it five thousand. I can't express how beautiful this book is. I've never cried so hard (no, not even when Mrs. Johnson read us "Where the Red Fern Grows" in the third grade), nor have I felt so much love from a bunch of grouped together, sixty-year-old, courier-fonted words. I've never been more scared than I was by the possibility of the Lonely One being just around the corner, hiding in the shadows. I've never thought so mu The only reason I gave this book five stars was because I couldn't give it five thousand. I can't express how beautiful this book is. I've never cried so hard (no, not even when Mrs. Johnson read us "Where the Red Fern Grows" in the third grade), nor have I felt so much love from a bunch of grouped together, sixty-year-old, courier-fonted words. I've never been more scared than I was by the possibility of the Lonely One being just around the corner, hiding in the shadows. I've never thought so much about my own mortality without running away from the subject in fear and forced-naivete. I've never felt more fulfilled by a reading experience on both an intellectual and spiritual level as I was with "Dandelion Wine." Read it. I beg of you. Your life will be better for it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Magic Realism - according to Wikipedia "Magical realism, magic realism, or marvelous realism is a genre of narrative fiction and, more broadly, art (literature, painting, film, theatre, etc.) that, while encompassing a range of subtly different concepts, expresses a primarily realistic view of the real world while also adding or revealing magical elements. It is sometimes called fabulism, in reference to the conventions of fables, myths, and allegory. "Magical realism", perhaps the most common te Magic Realism - according to Wikipedia "Magical realism, magic realism, or marvelous realism is a genre of narrative fiction and, more broadly, art (literature, painting, film, theatre, etc.) that, while encompassing a range of subtly different concepts, expresses a primarily realistic view of the real world while also adding or revealing magical elements. It is sometimes called fabulism, in reference to the conventions of fables, myths, and allegory. "Magical realism", perhaps the most common term, often refers to fiction and literature in particular, with magic or the supernatural presented in an otherwise real-world or mundane setting." This book is the essence of Magic Realism. If you are a fan of other Magic Realism books (i.e. McCammon's Boy's Life) you should definitely check this out. The setting is small town America, the main characters are your average young boys, but the things they encounter are far from normal (or are they?) - you will question what is real and what is imagination. Nostalgia, young vs old, new ideas vs the status quo are all main themes. Learning from past mistakes, respecting the experience of your elders, and history repeating itself all make appearances. There is no life or death - just sunrises/sunsets, new beginnings, strong tradition, and acceptance of your place in all of it. This book is deeply poetic and rightly so. A fantastically written story that should be read by anyone that appreciates great literature. I am looking forward to the sequel, Something Wicked This Way Comes.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lyn

    “Some people turn sad awfully young. No special reason, it seems, but they seem almost to be born that way. They bruise easier, tire faster, cry quicker, remember longer and, as I say, get sadder younger than anyone else in the world. I know, for I'm one of them.” I re-read this after a couple of decades and like most works, I appreciate it better now than then. “A good night sleep, or a ten minute bawl, or a pint of chocolate ice cream, or all three together, is good medicine.” It could be that “Some people turn sad awfully young. No special reason, it seems, but they seem almost to be born that way. They bruise easier, tire faster, cry quicker, remember longer and, as I say, get sadder younger than anyone else in the world. I know, for I'm one of them.” I re-read this after a couple of decades and like most works, I appreciate it better now than then. “A good night sleep, or a ten minute bawl, or a pint of chocolate ice cream, or all three together, is good medicine.” It could be that the 40 plus year old is better suited to understand the perspective of the mature writer than the 16-year-old reader, or it could just be that this great work speaks on many different levels. “The first thing you learn in life is you're a fool. The last thing you learn in life is you're the same fool.” Fundamental Bradbury, this work explores many of the themes that are representative of his canon: coming of age, spirituality, imagination, and the importance of remaining human amidst an ever increasingly dehumanizing world of technology. “Sandwich outdoors isn’t a sandwich anymore. Tastes different than indoors, notice? Got more spice. Tastes like mint and pinesap. Does wonders for the appetite.”

  4. 4 out of 5

    Darwin8u

    "I want to feel all there is to feel, he thought. Let me feel tired, now, let me feel tired. I mustn't forget, I'm alive, I know I'm alive, I mustn't forget it tonight or tomorrow or the day after that." -Ray Bradbury, Dandelion Wine Ingredients 1 quart yellow dandelion blossoms, well rinsed 1 gallon boiling water 1 (.25 ounce) package active dry yeast 1 orange, sliced 1 lemon slice Directions Place dandelion blossoms in the boiling water, and allow to stand for 4 minutes. Remove and discard the blo "I want to feel all there is to feel, he thought. Let me feel tired, now, let me feel tired. I mustn't forget, I'm alive, I know I'm alive, I mustn't forget it tonight or tomorrow or the day after that." -Ray Bradbury, Dandelion Wine Ingredients 1 quart yellow dandelion blossoms, well rinsed 1 gallon boiling water 1 (.25 ounce) package active dry yeast 1 orange, sliced 1 lemon slice Directions Place dandelion blossoms in the boiling water, and allow to stand for 4 minutes. Remove and discard the blossoms, and let the water cool to 90 degrees F (32 degrees C). Stir in the yeast, sugar, orange slices, and lemon slice; pour into a plastic fermentor, and attach a fermentation lock. Let the wine ferment in a cool area until the bubbles stop, 10 to 14 days. Siphon the wine off of the lees, and strain through cheesecloth before bottling in quart-sized, sterilized canning jars with lids and rings. Age the wine at least a week for best flavor.* Review Periodically this year I've been revisiting the great novels of my youth. I can't escape Ray Bradbury. He was the Michael Chabon of my childhood. He taught me to see magic in seasons and find miracles in the ordinary moments in the day. This is another Bradbury reread from 30 years ago that has improved with age. Add sugar and nostalgia and time. Let life ferment you for 30 years. Come back to his delicate, nuanced prose. Read his sweet notes of youth, of a past infused with both sunshine and magic and see if you don't add a couple stars to your re-read. Reading this on the Fourth of July was nearly perfect. This book, bookended a day filled with family BBQs, fireworks, community festivals, apple pie and icecream. The book bottles youth, Summer, Americana, etc. It is a love note to being alive, being young, and flirting with the knowledge that life IS fleating, Summer ends, friends move, loved ones die, and there are no machine of happiness. Just 93 days, 15 hours, and 38 minutes of Summer in 2017 to be absorbed one day, one smell, one word at a time. * stolen wholecloth from one Internet receipe machine or another. Look for the one that is smoking.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Evgeny

    This book is a beloved classic dear to lots of people. Thus I have to give a warning before I say anything else. This time I am going to be that guy everybody hates. I did not like it. You may call me grumpy old man. I probably read it wrong, quite possible right to left bottom to top (English language edition). If you love the book stop here and proceed no further. Pay no attention to the incoherent ramblings of an old man. This would be me by the way: Usually I give a brief description of plot, This book is a beloved classic dear to lots of people. Thus I have to give a warning before I say anything else. This time I am going to be that guy everybody hates. I did not like it. You may call me grumpy old man. I probably read it wrong, quite possible right to left bottom to top (English language edition). If you love the book stop here and proceed no further. Pay no attention to the incoherent ramblings of an old man. This would be me by the way: Usually I give a brief description of plot, at least its initial development. This time I have nothing to say: there is no plot. This book is about a boy's summer, the summer of 1928. The guy and his brother make some small discoveries while some happenings go on around town. These happenings feel like stories with no beginning and almost always no end. Take the one about the Happiness Machine. It felt too obvious to me and too preachy. The inventor's wife came out a stereotypical nagging one. The inventor himself felt retarded. So no plot and no character development: kids remain exactly the same no matter what happens to them. The book has two things to boast about: it is really great at inducing nostalgia (this is a compliment and not criticism!!!) and it is good at showing a boy's childhood experiences of summer. To the first positive part I can reply that I cannot feel any nostalgia for 1928 by definition as even my parents were not born at that time. My reply to the second: there are plenty of books that do it better and with exciting meaningful plots and character developments too. I was bored reading the book. A question came to me during the read and it kept bugging me all the time. What would happened if a transcript of this book was submitted to a publisher not by an undisputed classic of science fiction Ray Bradbury, but an unknown guy John Smith? Would this mess even be published? Would a self-respecting publisher even look at the manuscript twice? We may never know. After finishing this book I almost ended up in a dreadful reading slump. My salvation was switching quickly to my special anti-slump book pile. On the other hand I understand that this is a favorite book of quite a few people with some of them classifying it as classic, so I cannot give it one star for the fear of a lynching mob showing up on my doorsteps. Let me find something nice to say about it and raise the rating. The book has great writing, is a classic, has great writing, and is a classic... I am going in circles, am I not? Two stars is as high as I can go. Yes, I repeat: I most probably read it wrong. P.S. If any of my friends that happened to like this book want to de-friend me, I understand. Sorry. My rating stands no matter what.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    Damn it! I just knew I would love this book. That’s what I get for thinking. And almost everyone loves it. Oh well! Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾 Damn it! I just knew I would love this book. That’s what I get for thinking. And almost everyone loves it. Oh well! Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joe Valdez

    My introduction to the fiction of Ray Bradbury is Dandelion Wine, his much-loved ode to small towns, summers and strangeness as only a twelve-year-old boy could discover it. Published in 1957, the book is not a short story collection per se but of the twenty-seven vignettes, ten had been published before: "Season of Disbelief" and "The Window" appeared in Collier's in 1950, "A Story About Love" in McCall's in 1951, "The Lawns of Summer" in Nation’s Business in 1952, "The Swan" in Cosmopolitan an My introduction to the fiction of Ray Bradbury is Dandelion Wine, his much-loved ode to small towns, summers and strangeness as only a twelve-year-old boy could discover it. Published in 1957, the book is not a short story collection per se but of the twenty-seven vignettes, ten had been published before: "Season of Disbelief" and "The Window" appeared in Collier's in 1950, "A Story About Love" in McCall's in 1951, "The Lawns of Summer" in Nation’s Business in 1952, "The Swan" in Cosmopolitan and "The Magical Kitchen" in Everywoman’s Magazine in 1954, "The Trolley" in Good Housekeeping in 1955, etc. Bradbury's ability to enrapture me is divided between his marvelous curiosities (tinkerers, time travel, ghosts, witchcraft, tarot cards, Death) and his prose, which is jeweled and beautifully captures the glow of a boy's summer. When it comes to a strong narrative or characters I could relate to, the book left me wanting, with most of the chapters or vignettes feeling more like what would fill three or four paragraphs of a book as it gears up or takes a break from its central story. If there are central characters, they would be Douglas Spaulding, a twelve-year-old boy and his ten-year-old brother Tom, who experience the summer of 1928 in their hometown of Green Town, Illinois. From "Summer in the Air": Well, he felt sorry for boys who lived in California where they wore tennis shoes all year and never knew what it was to get winter off your feet, peel off the iron leather shoes all full of snow and rain and run barefoot for a day and then lace on the first new tennis shoes of the season, which was better than barefoot. The magic was always in the new pair of shoes. The magic might die by the first of September, but now in late June there was still plenty of magic, and shoes like these could jump you over trees and rivers and houses. And if you wanted, they could jump you over fences and sidewalks and dogs. From "The Swan": It was the face of spring, it was the face of summer, it was the warmness of clover breath. Pomegranate glowed in her lips, and the noon sky in her eyes. To touch her face was that always new experience of opening your window one December morning, early, and putting out your hand to the first white cool powdering of snow that had come, silently, with no announcement, in the night. And all of this, this breath-warmness and plum-tenderness was held forever in one miracle of photographic chemistry which no clock winds could blow upon to change one hour or one second; this fine first cool white snow would never melt, but live a thousand summers. That was the photograph; that was the way he knew her. From "The Tarot Witch": Now Douglas knew why the arcade had drawn him so steadily this week and drew him still tonight. For there was a world completely set in place, predictable, certain, sure, with its bright silver slots, its terrible gorilla behind glass forever stabbed by waxen hero to save still more waxen heroine, and then the flipping waterfalling chitter of Keystone Kops on eternal photographic spindles set spiraling in darkness by Indian-head pennies under naked bulb light. The Kops, forever in collision or near-collision with train, truck, streetcar, forever gone off piers in oceans which did not drown, because there they rushed to collide again with train, truck, streetcar, dive off old and beautifully familiar pier. Worlds within worlds, the penny peek shows which you cranked to repeat old rites and formulas. There, when you wished, the Wright Brothers sailed sandy winds at Kittyhawk, Teddy Roosevelt exposed his dazzling teeth, San Francisco was built and burned, burned and built, as long as sweaty coins fed self-satisfied machines. From "Dinner at Dawn": Whoever he was or whatever he was and no matter how different and crazy he seemed, he was not crazy. As he himself had often explained gently, he had tired of business in Chicago many years before and looked around for a way to spend the rest of his life. Couldn't stand churches, though he appreciated their ideas, and having a tendency toward preaching and decanting knowledge, he bought the horse and the wagon and set out to spend the rest of his life seeing it that one part of town had a chance to pick over what the other part of town had cast off. He looked upon himself as a kind of process, like osmosis, that made various cultures within the city limits available to one another. He could not stand waste, for he knew that one man's junk is another man's luxury. My favorite vignette in Dandelion Wine is "The Swan", in which a young newspaper columnist named Bill Forrester impresses ninety-five year old Miss Helen Loomis with the way he orders at an ice cream parlor. An unlikely relationship blooms based on an old photo he finds that was taken in 1853, when Helen was twenty. The way the old woman makes the younger man feel experienced and worldly and the way the younger man makes her feel energetic and young is told with mesmerizing prose by Bradbury. His imagination and facility with language were tailor-made for the magazine format and while the book struggles to gel, I did enjoy reading it. Length: 78,792 words

  8. 4 out of 5

    Johann (jobis89)

    “Some people turn sad awfully young. No special reason, it seems, but they seem almost to be born that way. They bruise easier, tire faster, cry quicker, remember longer and, as I say, get sadder younger than anyone else in the world. I know, for I’m one of them.” A magical, timeless summer in the life of a twelve-year-old boy named Douglas Spaulding. Forewarning: this review might just be a series of fangirling comments with no real structure or order. Halfway between being a novel and a series of “Some people turn sad awfully young. No special reason, it seems, but they seem almost to be born that way. They bruise easier, tire faster, cry quicker, remember longer and, as I say, get sadder younger than anyone else in the world. I know, for I’m one of them.” A magical, timeless summer in the life of a twelve-year-old boy named Douglas Spaulding. Forewarning: this review might just be a series of fangirling comments with no real structure or order. Halfway between being a novel and a series of vignettes, Dandelion Wine is Bradbury’s ode to summer - and if you know me at all, I kinda hate that season. And yet somehow Bradbury had me brimming with nostalgia for childhood summers when it seemed like anything was possible and that summer might just last forever. *wipes tear away* In some ways I would compare this to Robert McCammon’s Boy’s Life, there are a lot of similar themes and it gave me that same feeling of magic - that magical realism where you can’t tell what is real and what is simply a young boy’s imagination. The descriptions and prose are mesmerising, you can almost smell, hear and see summer. And any book that evokes nostalgia for childhood memories is a winner in my eyes. Surprisingly, one of the creepiest and most unsettling passages I’ve ever read was in here too! It really played on one of my biggest fears - a murderer following you home or trying to get into your house. I got goosebumps as Bradbury turned up the tension and really set me on edge. It’s a book that reminds you that you’re ALIVE - right here, right now- and yes, people will die, friends move away, seasons end, but there’s always magic to be discovered in little everyday things. Does this also sound like another one of my favourite books?? The Thief of Always perhaps?? I think this type of story is really my favourite. Already marking this one as one of my favourite books of the year. How I would love to spend my summer in Green Town. 5/5. (Because I can’t give five thousand!) This book is so amazing that it made a summer-hater actually start to appreciate summer... and it also made her nostalgic for childhood summers. Bradbury just has this insane ability to convey emotions and settings. Will certainly be one of my fave books of the year! Update: Reread in May 2020. Remains one of my favourite books of all-time!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    Um....ok so I totally hated this book. I hope someone out there can tell me why this is a good book. It's unique, sure, but it's just a mess of words. In reading the introduction, I felt like I got a sense of why that is. The author said he forced himself to word-dump every single morning - just writing as creatively etc as he could. Well, I think he just put those "creative" word-dumps together and called it a story. It has no story line, no voice, no character development, no point. The author Um....ok so I totally hated this book. I hope someone out there can tell me why this is a good book. It's unique, sure, but it's just a mess of words. In reading the introduction, I felt like I got a sense of why that is. The author said he forced himself to word-dump every single morning - just writing as creatively etc as he could. Well, I think he just put those "creative" word-dumps together and called it a story. It has no story line, no voice, no character development, no point. The author just seems to want to hear himself write....

  10. 4 out of 5

    Russell

    Recently while moving bookcases, books and furniture around, I came across my copy of Dandelion Wine . I had read it once, years ago, during my own personal Golden Age of Science Fiction, ages 8 to 16. Now was a good time as any to revisit this novel. Bradbury had been marked, incorrectly, in my mind as a sci-fi writer on the same level as Heinlein or Asimov. He's not a hard core, I, Robot type of sci-fi writer, really. More like a fantasy writer who touched on sci-fi themes. And, he's in his o Recently while moving bookcases, books and furniture around, I came across my copy of Dandelion Wine . I had read it once, years ago, during my own personal Golden Age of Science Fiction, ages 8 to 16. Now was a good time as any to revisit this novel. Bradbury had been marked, incorrectly, in my mind as a sci-fi writer on the same level as Heinlein or Asimov. He's not a hard core, I, Robot type of sci-fi writer, really. More like a fantasy writer who touched on sci-fi themes. And, he's in his own league. There haven't been many authors like Bradbury, heart of a poet, imagination as great as any, and a style that is both comfortable and familiar to the reader and yet is still unique. Dandelion Wine is in my opinion the most 'poetical' of anything I've read by him. It's a pean to childhood joys and fears, a story of the rite of passage from young child to a more aware young man. The town, fictional, of Green Town is a nod to Bradbury's real home town of Waukegan, Illinois, as seen from the eyes of Douglas Spaulding, a 12 year old boy learning he is alive and mortal all in one summer. The novel is a series of short stories about the town and its people, told mostly through Douglas or his younger brother, Tom. The Happiness Machine, the Green Machine, the old tarot witch, friends moving away, old ways coming to an end, new ways being noticed, and sometimes an old way being restored, death and life, all parade past on the pages of this luminous novel. The Summer of 1928 is perfectly bottled and stored in the cellar, just waiting for someone to come down, open the cap, and breathe deep of the golden light, and let the feelings play around like incandescent beetles scattering in the bright summer sun. It is nostalgic without being maudlin or self pitying. It is magical without being vulgar and ostentatious. It bobs and weaves around the darkness and light of being alive, of being young or old and, always at the center, of being human. Bradbury is a master storyteller. He is at the top of his game as he casts a spell about the rite of passage for Douglas as he progresses from a simple child to be a more complex and self-reflecting young man. I really can't give this book enough praise. It's delightful and thought-provoking. The themes are all known, but they are expressed with such skill and care that they don't feel old. Rather like the streets around your home after a spring rain. You know them, yes, but they are refreshed and clean. I encourage you to get a copy and read it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    mark monday

    ¡apparently my 1,000th rating! I should be stoked at the milestone I guess, but I was really digging how that 999 looked under my avatar. maybe I should go back and un-rate something and then just keep doing that as needed. ¡apparently my 1,000th rating! I should be stoked at the milestone I guess, but I was really digging how that 999 looked under my avatar. maybe I should go back and un-rate something and then just keep doing that as needed.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Sure, it's overly sentimental and largely ignores the social problems of the time depicted, but when you're 12 years old in small-town America, there are no social problems. There are only problems regarding the new pair of tennis shoes you want, the creepy guy who hangs out in the ravine, the desire to live forever, to be young forever, to build the perfect happiness machine. Besides, Bradbury's writing is so rich it practically drips, much like biting into a perfectly ripe peach in August. Sure, it's overly sentimental and largely ignores the social problems of the time depicted, but when you're 12 years old in small-town America, there are no social problems. There are only problems regarding the new pair of tennis shoes you want, the creepy guy who hangs out in the ravine, the desire to live forever, to be young forever, to build the perfect happiness machine. Besides, Bradbury's writing is so rich it practically drips, much like biting into a perfectly ripe peach in August.

  13. 4 out of 5

    J.K. Grice

    I doubt if there has been a better book written about summer and boyhood than DANDELION WINE. Dan Simmon's Summer of Night of course comes to mind. But where Simmons gives us the delicious darkness, Bradbury's tale is a bit more full of light and magic. It's all about Green Town, Illinois in the early 20th century. There are no TV's, computers, or cell phones. Just small town citizens interacting as human beings should. It was a time of cigar stores and front porches and soda fountains. Young Do I doubt if there has been a better book written about summer and boyhood than DANDELION WINE. Dan Simmon's Summer of Night of course comes to mind. But where Simmons gives us the delicious darkness, Bradbury's tale is a bit more full of light and magic. It's all about Green Town, Illinois in the early 20th century. There are no TV's, computers, or cell phones. Just small town citizens interacting as human beings should. It was a time of cigar stores and front porches and soda fountains. Young Douglas Spaulding and his brother make dandelion wine with their grandfather, and they also have many wonderful adventures together. I try to revisit Green Town every other summer or so. The light and magic never fail to amaze me.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kenny

    "You want to see the real Happiness Machine? The one they patented a couple thousand years ago, it still runs, not good, all the time, no! but it runs. It's been here all along." Ray Bradbury ~~ Dandelion Wine Uncork and inhale slowly ... Ray Bradbury's book, Dandelion Wine is nearly perfect. You don't need me prattling on about it. Instead, get a hold of Dandelion Wine, and then read and reread it. "You want to see the real Happiness Machine? The one they patented a couple thousand years ago, it still runs, not good, all the time, no! but it runs. It's been here all along." Ray Bradbury ~~ Dandelion Wine Uncork and inhale slowly ... Ray Bradbury's book, Dandelion Wine is nearly perfect. You don't need me prattling on about it. Instead, get a hold of Dandelion Wine, and then read and reread it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Char

    Once I realized there wasn't going to be a plot, but instead a loosely connected set of vignettes about boys coming of age, I relaxed and enjoyed DANDELION WINE. I marked several pages that I wanted to quote in my review, but now find myself thinking that reviewing it is going to take some of the magic out of it for me. I absolutely adored the end, (Aunt Rose got sent packing!), and there's no doubt that this book is steeped in nostalgia, but overall, it was a little too wordy for me. I would ha Once I realized there wasn't going to be a plot, but instead a loosely connected set of vignettes about boys coming of age, I relaxed and enjoyed DANDELION WINE. I marked several pages that I wanted to quote in my review, but now find myself thinking that reviewing it is going to take some of the magic out of it for me. I absolutely adored the end, (Aunt Rose got sent packing!), and there's no doubt that this book is steeped in nostalgia, but overall, it was a little too wordy for me. I would have liked fewer pages of solid text and more dialogue, but hey, this is Ray Bradbury and I love the guy, however- I think The October Country is still my favorite of all his works. Lastly, much as I love Ray Bradbury, I still hold Robert McCammon's BOY'S LIFE as my favorite novel of all time.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andy Marr

    SO much better than Fahrenheit Thingy-Bobby.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Apatt

    Let’s get one thing clear Dandelion Wine is not science fiction, it is not exactly fantasy either, though there is some element of magic realism to it. So if you are a fan of Ray Bradbury’s sci-fi books like Fahrenheit 451 and The Martian Chronicles, or his fantasy Something Wicked This Way Comes, and you are looking for more in that fantastical vein, Dandelion Wine may disappoint you. The best mental preparation is to forget about genre and just let Bradbury tell his story in that uniquely beau Let’s get one thing clear Dandelion Wine is not science fiction, it is not exactly fantasy either, though there is some element of magic realism to it. So if you are a fan of Ray Bradbury’s sci-fi books like Fahrenheit 451 and The Martian Chronicles, or his fantasy Something Wicked This Way Comes, and you are looking for more in that fantastical vein, Dandelion Wine may disappoint you. The best mental preparation is to forget about genre and just let Bradbury tell his story in that uniquely beautiful way he does. “Somehow the people who made tennis shoes knew what boys needed and wanted. They put marshmallows and coiled springs in the soles and they wove the rest out of grasses bleached and fired in the wilderness. Somewhere deep in the soft loam of the shoes the thin hard sinews of the buck deer were hidden. The people that made the shoes must have watched a lot of winds blow the trees and a lot of rivers going down to the lakes. Whatever it was, it was in the shoes, and it was summer.” If one adjective can describe Dandelion Wine it would be “whimsical”. This book is not really about anything, but in some ways, it is also about everything. On the surface it does not seem to be about anything because nothing particularly dramatic, strange or exciting happen in it. At the same time, looking at it another way, it seems to be about everything in so far as it covers a wide spectrum of the human experience; growing up, growing old, making friends, losing friends, acceptance of old age and of death etc. While Dandelion Wine is a novel, not an anthology, it is episodic in structure and reads a little like an interrelated collection of short stories. That said it seems more cohesive as a novel than The Martian Chronicles; perhaps because it features one central character, twelve year old Douglas Spaulding. Most of the novel is seen through his eyes though there are parts where other characters briefly take centre stage as protagonists. The story is set in Green Town, Illinois in the summer of 1928 where brand spanking new tennis shoes seem to have a life of their own when you put them on, where a man constructs a Happiness Machine that almost works, where a time machine sort of exists and many other magical things occur which are only magical if you look at them the right way. The most memorable chapter deals with a serial killer called The Lonely One and his creepy stalking of a girl who may be too brave for her own good. If this sounds like some James Patterson style nastiness it really is not, the brief episode is atmospheric and almost scary but done in the best possible taste. I also love the poignant story about a pair of “star-crossed lovers”, one born too early, the other too late; and the story of an old lady who learns to accept her age through some annoying meddling kids. The coming of age stories of Douglas Spaulding and his brother are charming but they did not really grab me as my childhood was nothing like theirs. As always Bradbury’s prose manages to be highly lyrical without any inclusion of highfalutin words that would have you reaching for the dictionary. This is the sort of book to curl up with and read at a leisurely pace. At less than 300 pages you could read it in a day or two but this is not a book to simply plow through. You would get more from it if you relax, soak in the atmosphere and the nostalgia, perhaps pausing now and then to reflect on episodes of your life that the book reminds you of. My only criticism of Dandelion Wine is that it may be too nice, sweet and gentle for my taste (serial killer notwithstanding). Dandelion Wine is said to be the first volume of Bradbury’s "Green Town” series, where Something Wicked This Way Comes is the second volume, followed by a couple more volumes which I have not read. Something Wicked This Way Comes is my favorite Bradbury book but it is an overt fantasy book and does not seem to be connected to Dandelion Wine in any way except for the setting. In any case, although Dandelion Wine is not my favorite Bradbury it is a pleasant enough reading experience that puts me in a good mood. Definitely, time well spent.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sr3yas

    "Dandelion Wine.... The words were summer on the tongue". We all love to travel, one way or another. That's why we read! To experience time; To experience new worlds; To experience... And sometimes, we find those peculiar time machines that take us to somewhere special. Let's say, a reminiscent of nostalgic childhood. That one is always special. My favorite in that category are To Kill a Mockingbird and Malgudi Days Now I have Dandelion Wine... And It is different from all these books! I "Dandelion Wine.... The words were summer on the tongue". We all love to travel, one way or another. That's why we read! To experience time; To experience new worlds; To experience... And sometimes, we find those peculiar time machines that take us to somewhere special. Let's say, a reminiscent of nostalgic childhood. That one is always special. My favorite in that category are To Kill a Mockingbird and Malgudi Days Now I have Dandelion Wine... And It is different from all these books! In Dandelion Wine, Ray Bradbury welcomes us to Summer of 1928 in the fictional world of Green town. We are introduced to Douglas, a 12-year-old boy, and his brother Tom, a 10-year-old. We follow them through an array of loosely connected stories of summer of '28. The kind of stories that just don't happen in our world anymore. A kid finding himself as he understands that he is alive and his reaction as he understands the unfairness of life and death; A family man trying to create a happiness machine; An elderly woman trying to convince the young children that she was young once too... So many beautiful stories. This work is considered as Bradbury's most personal work as the stories presented in here are a blend of his own childhood and imagination. This wicked concoction produces a world of magical realism, wonder, innocence and pure imagination. This is a unique work that touches multiple genres and a multitude of philosophy through the eyes of children. Well, they are not the regular children you find in fiction. They are the thoughtful kind of children. I never knew there were thoughtful children like these in the world! Highly recommended. Especially if you like lyrical prose, coming of age stories or/and the movie Big Fish (2003) Oh, wait. There is also a serial killer lurking somewhere in the town. Needless to say, summer of '28 was very eventful. -------------------------- First Update -------------------------- Sometimes, there might just be a story behind how a particular book gets into your radar. Dandelion Wine has such a story to tell! Back in 2015, I was catching up with some of my dreadful assignments and tasks which took hours to complete. I was exhausted by the end of the session, but not at all sleepy (I deduce that it was all the coffee that did the trick). So I decided to watch a movie to kill some time. And the movie was Age of Adaline. Oddly enough, I liked the movie. And there was this one particular scene that really caught my attention. I am not a romantic, but I adore this scene. It also created a mental TBR for me. My own personal "Flower Trilogy". And Dandelion wine came to me first. I don't have a book review right now. This......this book is something else. I might need days involving hours of wall staring to fully comprehend what I've just read. But I will tell you this, Dandelion wine is so damn beautiful.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Wayne Barrett

    Is it possible to catch magic in a bottle? Sunshine or the stars in the sky like captured fireflies? Maybe not, but Bradbury certainly captured a boys summer in a bottle and it was sweet as Dandelion Wine. There is something about Bradbury's style that makes me reminisce about my boyhood like no other writer has. Similar to what he did with Something Wicked this way Comes and The Halloween Tree, Bradbury pulls me into his story with his poetic, symbolically descriptive style in a way that does w Is it possible to catch magic in a bottle? Sunshine or the stars in the sky like captured fireflies? Maybe not, but Bradbury certainly captured a boys summer in a bottle and it was sweet as Dandelion Wine. There is something about Bradbury's style that makes me reminisce about my boyhood like no other writer has. Similar to what he did with Something Wicked this way Comes and The Halloween Tree, Bradbury pulls me into his story with his poetic, symbolically descriptive style in a way that does what true readers of fiction literature love; he transforms me from my world of reality into his story, and being a man, these stories are something to treasure because it is easy with age to forget your childhood, but when I am captured and taken up into these stories, I am reminded what it's like to be a boy again. I remember the adventures, running through fields, leaping fences and climbing trees. I remember the feeling of rolling in the grass and swimming through murky ponds. I can actually smell the aromas of the darkened movie theater, the county fair, and grandmas cobblers baking in the oven. This story was a breath of fresh air, a sip from the fountain of youth, and it brought back some memories about life and loss that touched me in a way that I can only give this my highest rating. I admit, Dandelion Wine is not an epic, not an action packed adventure or thriller to tantalize a readers fancy. But what it accomplished in the heart of this reader makes it deserving of the best I can offer.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Fabian

    Haven't tasted anything as good as this season's dandelion wine. It is rich, effervescent: it transports you like some Madeline to a time when it was bottled: its sunshine color will redden your cheeks and make you remember... This coming of age idyll is absolute perfection. This, because idylls are fictional: the remembered anecdotes of childhood is where darkness creeps, and where nature has plans that are cyclical and macabre. Of this Bradbury writes in astonishing prose, of the undertow, of " Haven't tasted anything as good as this season's dandelion wine. It is rich, effervescent: it transports you like some Madeline to a time when it was bottled: its sunshine color will redden your cheeks and make you remember... This coming of age idyll is absolute perfection. This, because idylls are fictional: the remembered anecdotes of childhood is where darkness creeps, and where nature has plans that are cyclical and macabre. Of this Bradbury writes in astonishing prose, of the undertow, of "that crouching malignancy down below." (45) That the child realizes his mortality, this slice of personal history we all may share, this is what's at stake in "Dandelion Wine" (I avidly question why the book hasn't been received as a genuine All American Novel, as it is wicked, like "Winesburg, Ohio," & has more (complex) lessons than any Atticus Finch could possibly pass on to his students). The childhood lessons border on the metaphysical--again, I am sure Bradbury has arrived at the root of the root of... It shows us this part of himself that shows us part of ourselves. The novel is very unpredictable, life-as-lived. What image from the writer's early biography will we be standing before in awe next? Even the fantastic dialogue displays tremendous themes, battling it out with everyday minutia. Youth and age are in silent revolt: as is technology and daily life, as is life and death. In this ebb-and-flow-created "harmony", the master brings out the shady outlines of death; almost a century old, the novel is nothing if not modern, futuristic even, in so many regards... You know the popular adage: It takes a Whitman to make us value/pay close attention the little natural details of life; it takes a Bradbury to make us question such unholy a communion with the grass under our feet...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dean

    like good poesy and full of magic.. Enorm in his description power, you can see, hear and even smell the summer!! I must digest all this beauty and enchanted prose, folks.. Bradbury has blown me away with Dandelion wine!! But I must continuing my readings, Ray Bradbury has me again on the hook, and he will not let me go until the last page is enjoyed!! The Storys are superb.. I want much more by Bradbury and his Green Town series!!! A wonderful and exciting experience!!! "The Tarot Witch" and other Sto like good poesy and full of magic.. Enorm in his description power, you can see, hear and even smell the summer!! I must digest all this beauty and enchanted prose, folks.. Bradbury has blown me away with Dandelion wine!! But I must continuing my readings, Ray Bradbury has me again on the hook, and he will not let me go until the last page is enjoyed!! The Storys are superb.. I want much more by Bradbury and his Green Town series!!! A wonderful and exciting experience!!! "The Tarot Witch" and other Storys full of ambiente and saturated with colors, pictures and even smells, creating a world--vivid and sparkling-- Bradbury has keep me fascinated and has made me forget my reality and surroundings.. Great and powerful written!!! Highly recommendable to all of you lovers of very good fiction!!! Dean;)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    "Dandelion wine. The words were summer on the tongue. The wine was summer caught and stoppered." “I want to feel all there is to feel, he thought. Let me feel tired, now, let me feel tired. I mustn't forget, I'm alive, I know I'm alive, I mustn't forget it tonight or tomorrow or the day after that.” Doug (12) and Tom (10) Spaulding live in Green Town, Illinois. Bradbury published this book in 1957, though you can see why this became popular in the late sixties, celebrating summer and nature as it "Dandelion wine. The words were summer on the tongue. The wine was summer caught and stoppered." “I want to feel all there is to feel, he thought. Let me feel tired, now, let me feel tired. I mustn't forget, I'm alive, I know I'm alive, I mustn't forget it tonight or tomorrow or the day after that.” Doug (12) and Tom (10) Spaulding live in Green Town, Illinois. Bradbury published this book in 1957, though you can see why this became popular in the late sixties, celebrating summer and nature as it does. As Bradbury says in an introduction to a later edition, “Green Town. Waukegan. Byzantium.” For an Illinois reader as I am now, it feels very much like an Illinois book, situated as it is in a small town on Lake Michigan. As I began the book, a reread after decades of separation, it felt romanticized and sentimental, compared to my teenaged reading of it, which was just celebratory, as I seem to recall. It certainly is nostalgic, which as a much older man I appreciate more than I would have earlier in my life. Rereading the early chapters made me want to write my own book about, say, my own summer of 1965. I was annoyed at times by some of Bradbury’s romantic writing along the lines of “Somewhere, a bird whistled,” “Somewhere, a dog barked” and sort of stereotypical assumptions about how all American small towns are alike in their apparent homogeneity. But on the whole I liked these early chapters quite a bit. “It was the face of spring, it was the face of summer, it was the warmness of clover breath. Pomegranate glowed in her lips, and the noon sky in her eyes. To touch her face was that always new experience of opening your window one December morning, early, and putting out your hand to the first white cool powdering of snow that had come, silently, with no announcement, in the night. And all of this, this breath-warmness and plum-tenderness was held forever in one miracle of photographic is chemistry which no clock winds could blow upon to change one hour or one second; this fine first cool white snow would never melt, but live a thousand summers.” The book is episodic, a series of autobiographically fictional vignettes based on Bradbury’s Waukegan 1928 life, which is not to say it doesn’t develop and grow as a narrative of Doug’s coming of age summer. One incident I like has to do with the almost ecstatic memory of wearing new sneakers on a sunny day. They’re magic, as we see many things are in this summer. Which is to say that several things operate as what would now be called magic realism. Early themes established include the importance of memory, of course; youth vs. adulthood/old age (some kids talk to an old woman, 95, who shows them pictures when she was a young girl; the young kids don’t believe she was ever young!); spirituality, imagination, and--a Bradbury staple--the importance of being human in the often dehumanizing world of technology. I was completely seduced by the book just at the point the fantasy—the magical realism--turns dark, which is an important part of Doug’s coming of age, of course. The Ravine, Mr. Lonely (who kills young women), and the Tarot Witch from the Penny Arcade, all these loom ever larger as the summer proceeds. The specter of death is everywhere, as Grandmother dies, a young woman is killed, and as Doug himself gets very ill at one point. Doug has a realization: "So if trolleys and runabouts and friends can go away for a while or go away forever, or rust, or fall part and die, and if people can be murdered, and if someone like great-grandma, who was going to live forever, can die. . . if all of this is true. . . Then I Douglas Spaulding must also . . ." In the end, Doug still has fireflies and cicadas and starry nights and long conversations in the dark with family and friends. “Praying mantises, zeppelins, acrobats, sword swallowers!” But there is now the specter of death that is present in a way it had not been before. There remains over all a kind of sweet celebration of Doug’s twelfth summer, for any youthful summer, which I also had, which I hope you also had. It’s more special for me this year because I have kids that age (12, 11, 10) who had their own joyous (and thankfully not very dark) summer. It kind of reminded me of the nostalgic horror fantasy of Neil Gaiman’s The Ocean at the End of the Lane. I bet Gaiman owes something to Bradbury in this book, not the least a deep sense of the human and a meditation on the passage of time and memory, all within the context of fantasy/horror/magic. The sequel, which I recently read, is Something Wicked This Ways Comes, which ups the darkness quotient. Goodreads friend Michael Jandrok says one should read Dandelion Wine, a meditation on summer, and summer's (childhood's) end, every September. Wicked is Bradbury's Halloween book, to be read maybe every October. Dandelion Wine Recipe: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/162202/d...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Em Lost In Books

    it was the summer of 1928, way before Radio or TV were part of our life. 12 year old Douglas spent that summer exploring his small town and its people. He started jotting down his "discoveries and revelations" in a notepad so that he won't forget about them. We through him met extraordinary people of this small town. A man adamant on making a Happiness Machine, an old woman who thought that she had met her lover from her past life, going away of a dear friend, last ride on the trolley, and magic it was the summer of 1928, way before Radio or TV were part of our life. 12 year old Douglas spent that summer exploring his small town and its people. He started jotting down his "discoveries and revelations" in a notepad so that he won't forget about them. We through him met extraordinary people of this small town. A man adamant on making a Happiness Machine, an old woman who thought that she had met her lover from her past life, going away of a dear friend, last ride on the trolley, and magical kitchen and many more stories. Each story was unique in its own way and was connected to other stories. this was my first Bradbury and it won't be my last. I fell in love with how beautifully and smoothly he mixed these simple stories with magic. he made me feel like a child who was listening to these stories before sleeping at night and who in dream would revisit this magical world. this story has all the right elements in the right proportion that made me squeal, jubilant, scared, mad, lonely, hungry, and love like a child. highly recommended!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ananthu

    If a day ever comes when the patisseries of the world draw back their prized pastries and sweets, and replace them with old and new copies of Dandelion Wine, I would be the first one, surely, to grab hold of the person next to me and aver in my most jubilant voice that Yes, I did see it coming. Nobody else but me in the whole wide world. Twelve-year-old Douglas Spaulding snaps his finger before a slowly waking Green Town, and thus begins the summer of 1928. A summer of surprises, of mysteries, of If a day ever comes when the patisseries of the world draw back their prized pastries and sweets, and replace them with old and new copies of Dandelion Wine, I would be the first one, surely, to grab hold of the person next to me and aver in my most jubilant voice that Yes, I did see it coming. Nobody else but me in the whole wide world. Twelve-year-old Douglas Spaulding snaps his finger before a slowly waking Green Town, and thus begins the summer of 1928. A summer of surprises, of mysteries, of adventures, of love, and of death. A summer not to be forgotten, but to be relished. A summer to be bottled and put away, safe. Oft, reclining on the bed, after several bouts of breathing in the fragrance from the heart of the book and wool-gathering, I would pull out the bookmark and open the page on which I fell asleep the previous night, and I would wait. The voice inside me would then begin to read a word, and another, then another, popping the beautiful sentences one after the other into my mouth, sucking them like fruit drops*. And I, finding myself with a familiar feeling, would nestle against the fluffy and delicate new found presence under my head, a presence of something incorporeal, a presence summoned by the sheer exquisiteness of the prose, a presence that wraps itself around you, a presence that dabs your eyes with colours of different but vivid hues, so that the next time your eyes dart away from the page, you find the world a tad changed, it’s secrets more limpid and more familiar. With such prose, one needn't rest one’s head on pillows but the sentences, and then dream, and dream, and dream, with open eyes. Dandelion Wine is a celebration of life and death, old and young, dark and light, joy and terror… Bradbury’s love of life, of small joys, of the life of everyday, gambols about the pages and leaps out and grabs hold of you, never to let you go. If Zen in the Art of Writing was a kick in the pants for this reader and sent him rushing to the blank page, Dandelion Wine is a pertinent reminder to find one’s own magic, to salvage those contours and colours of this intractable thing called life, the contours and colours which the clock winds can whiffle down the rugged hills into darkness anytime. A reminder to bottle them, to put them away safely. And then one day, when you feel like it, you can climb down the stairs and walk into the dark cellar, and dip a finger into the bottle, and taste them once again. ---- A gentle turn of the last page, and then blankness, expected but still surprising, announcing the surcease, the cessation of the note, the echoes of its crescendo ricocheting the walls of the ears still, the blankness playing the final tune, a tune so faint you could mistake it for a whisper, a tune that tugs the heart as you close the page and say your silent goodbyes to the people of Green Town. But of course, all it would take is one more flourish and snap of the hands, and the summer of 1928 and Green Town would come alive once again, and with it you, Mr Bradbury, the boy who “finally fell out of trees when he was twelve and went and found a toy-dial typewriter and wrote his first ‘novel’”. Thank you for “falling out”; for emancipating a smile I was oblivious of but had inside me all along; for sprinkling my insides with scintillas of sweet and shimmering snow that tickled and awakened the magic I thought I had lost with words; for all the secrets I felt but cannot name…for all of that, and much more. ---- * Inspired by a quote from Too Loud a Solitude by Bohumil Hrabal

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jen/The Tolkien Gal/ジェニファー

    “Bees do have a smell, you know, and if they don't they should, for their feet are dusted with spices from a million flowers.” I recall reading this book at the start of summer one September, just as the book starts. It was a wonderfully colourful read - one that had a surging presence that sucked me into childhoods past and whet my appetite for the summer to come. “I want to feel all there is to feel, he thought. Let me feel tired, now, let me feel tired. I mustn't forget, I'm alive, I know I'm a “Bees do have a smell, you know, and if they don't they should, for their feet are dusted with spices from a million flowers.” I recall reading this book at the start of summer one September, just as the book starts. It was a wonderfully colourful read - one that had a surging presence that sucked me into childhoods past and whet my appetite for the summer to come. “I want to feel all there is to feel, he thought. Let me feel tired, now, let me feel tired. I mustn't forget, I'm alive, I know I'm alive, I mustn't forget it tonight or tomorrow or the day after that.” The writing felt like flowers whirling around at my feet while I greedily slurped down my grandmother's lemonade; colourful, rich, ambient and so clear in my memory. Just like these crisp and fresh summers of a long gone childhood, I may not remember all that happened, but I certainly remember how wonderful and infinite I felt reading this. “Lilacs on a bush are better than orchids. And dandelions and devil grass are better! Why? Because they bend you over and turn you away from all the people in the town for a little while and sweat you and get you down where you remember you got a nose again. And when you’re all to yourself that way, you’re really proud of yourself for a little while; you get to thinking things through, alone. Gardening is the handiest excuse for being a philosopher. Nobody guesses, nobody accuses, nobody knows, but there you are, Plato in the peonies, Socrates force-growing his own hemlock. A man toting a sack of blood manure across his lawn is kin to Atlas letting the world spin easy on his shoulder.” Our childhoods are like a Dandelion Wine - Sweet, warm and vibrant, but fleeting and easily wished away. Only now does the title resonate so warmly with me. Courtesy of Jen's mini review

  26. 5 out of 5

    shakespeareandspice

    Review originally posted on A Skeptical Reader. Some people turn sad awfully young. No special reason, it seems, but they seem almost to be born that way. They bruise easier, tire faster, cry quicker, remember longer and, as I say, get sadder younger than anyone else in the world. I know, for I'm one of them. In a serendipitous moment, I discovered this quote on my friend Sookie’s favorited quotes page and instantly began craving the book. I was left pondering over these words for days and wee Review originally posted on A Skeptical Reader. Some people turn sad awfully young. No special reason, it seems, but they seem almost to be born that way. They bruise easier, tire faster, cry quicker, remember longer and, as I say, get sadder younger than anyone else in the world. I know, for I'm one of them. In a serendipitous moment, I discovered this quote on my friend Sookie’s favorited quotes page and instantly began craving the book. I was left pondering over these words for days and weeks afterward, just knowing I would love this. And when I finally got my copy in mail, I devoured the whole novel and was still left wanting more. Dandelion Wine is a fictionalized story of Ray Bradbury’s own childhood growing up in Waukegan, Illinois in 1920s. We follow Douglas, a young boy, growing up in Green Town, IL and the novel centers around the events of a summer in his childhood. This is a breathtakingly poignant, melancholic novel. The phrase ‘all the feels’ may be a bit clichéd but it has never suited a reading experience this perfectly. Dandelion Wine took me on a journey into my own consciousness and I experienced emotions ranging from sadness to frustration to pure joy. Throughout the course of the novel I kept flashing back to my own childhood and I saw that part of my life in a way I had never done so before. While this is an emotional read, it’s not one where I found myself deeply attached to a lot of characters. Perhaps it’s because I simply wasn’t paying attention but for me the joy of the novel within it’s themes. It explores memory, adulthood, growing up, and the process of aging in the most deceptively simple but profoundly ways. The novel also excels incredibly well at maintaining the balance of the real and the surreal. If you ever want to experience the perfection fusion of magic into the heart of realism, this is the place to start. I cannot recommend this book enough. I love it, I adore it, I want the whole world to read it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Janz

    This is my favorite novel. I haven't written a review for it yet because I feel too much pressure to capture in words how I feel about this magical book. So for now let's just say I'll expand this short review at a later date. If I don't say that now, I might never write the review. So why is this my favorite book? Here are just a few reasons: 1. It captures the complex and wonderful relationship a child can have with his grandparents. My own grandma and grandpa helped raise me and are still two This is my favorite novel. I haven't written a review for it yet because I feel too much pressure to capture in words how I feel about this magical book. So for now let's just say I'll expand this short review at a later date. If I don't say that now, I might never write the review. So why is this my favorite book? Here are just a few reasons: 1. It captures the complex and wonderful relationship a child can have with his grandparents. My own grandma and grandpa helped raise me and are still two of the most important people in my life. They're both eighty-eight and both in good health. No words can describe how special a grandparent can be. No words can describe my grandma and grandpa, and I suspect some of you feel similarly about yours. The grandparents in Dandelion Wine are the perfect blend of warmth, intelligence, experience, and deep love. For that alone, I love the book. 2. The novel is amazingly diverse. There are funny vignettes (the stuff with the artificial turf is both hilarious and passionate), heartbreaking moments, scenes of sheer terror, and relationships so realistic that we find ourselves experiencing the characters' emotions as powerfully as though they are our own. 3. Speaking of heartfelt...have you ever had a friend move away? Or moved away from a friend? No writer has more astutely captured that helpless, hollowed-out, heartrending moment of goodbye. When Douglas must say farewell to a friend, I feel every ounce of his sorrow. 4. The book contains the most unlikely and perhaps most beautiful romance in literature. If I told you about it, you'd think me a weirdo. So read the book and learn about a youngish reporter and his relationship with an "older" woman. Their scenes will very likely transport you, move you, and make you choke up--all within about fifteen incredible pages. So if you've never read Dandelion Wine, I hope you do soon. Simply put, it's love on paper. I love Bradbury and am deeply thankful he left us this and other gifts.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stewart

    I enjoyed reading this book when I was in my early 20s, but only re-reading it in my 50s have I realized what a wonderful novel "Dandelion Wine" is, what an amazing evocation of summer in a small town. The summer evoked is 1928, but it could almost as easily be 1948 or 1968 as well. The book paints a picture of a time when one walked or took a trolley around town, talked with friends and family on a large front porch, had a soda or ice cream at a drugstore fountain, and listened to grandfathers I enjoyed reading this book when I was in my early 20s, but only re-reading it in my 50s have I realized what a wonderful novel "Dandelion Wine" is, what an amazing evocation of summer in a small town. The summer evoked is 1928, but it could almost as easily be 1948 or 1968 as well. The book paints a picture of a time when one walked or took a trolley around town, talked with friends and family on a large front porch, had a soda or ice cream at a drugstore fountain, and listened to grandfathers and grandmothers tell tales of other worlds and earlier eras. The book, visiting many of the residents of Green Town, Ill., is a mixture of colorful writing, nostalgia and -- not really "magical realism." Rather, realistic magic, the literary display through the eyes of childhood wonder of the miracles of everyday life that we almost always overlook as adults.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rachelle

    "Some people turn sad awfully young. No special reason, it seems, but they seem almost to be born that way. They bruise easier, tire faster, cry quicker, remember longer, and, as I say, get sadder younger than anyone else in the world. I know, for I'm one of them." 🥰 Oh my! I truly love this story, while I am by no means a summer person, this book encompasses all that it is to be a child and have a fierce love for that season of freedom. Ray Bradbury just has this beautifully magical way of writi "Some people turn sad awfully young. No special reason, it seems, but they seem almost to be born that way. They bruise easier, tire faster, cry quicker, remember longer, and, as I say, get sadder younger than anyone else in the world. I know, for I'm one of them." 🥰 Oh my! I truly love this story, while I am by no means a summer person, this book encompasses all that it is to be a child and have a fierce love for that season of freedom. Ray Bradbury just has this beautifully magical way of writing that really gives life to his stories. Highly recommend this book 🖤

  30. 4 out of 5

    Werner

    Note, Jan 1, 2015: I've just updated this to correct a minor typo --a misspelling of the author's name in one place. Bradbury is best remembered as a writer in the speculative genres, especially science fiction; but that wasn't all he wrote. This gem of American general fiction has no Martians or space ships, no vampires or ghosts; it's just the story of a typical summer in the life of a 12-year-old boy, growing up in a small town in Illinois in the 1920s. Bradbury (b. 1920) grew up in Waukegan, Note, Jan 1, 2015: I've just updated this to correct a minor typo --a misspelling of the author's name in one place. Bradbury is best remembered as a writer in the speculative genres, especially science fiction; but that wasn't all he wrote. This gem of American general fiction has no Martians or space ships, no vampires or ghosts; it's just the story of a typical summer in the life of a 12-year-old boy, growing up in a small town in Illinois in the 1920s. Bradbury (b. 1920) grew up in Waukegan, Illinois, north of Chicago, which serves as the model for Greentown, the setting of this novel and of some of his other fiction. Young Douglas Spaulding, our preteen protagonist here, also reappears in other Bradbury fiction, and is in many ways the author's own alter ego (Bradbury's middle name was Douglas, and his father's middle name was Spaulding). But for all its prosaic setting, ordinary events, and grounding in reality, Bradbury manages to infuse it with a profound sense of wonder and "magic" --not the magic of supernatural fiction, but the magic of a normal kid looking at a world that's full of excitement and possibilities, mystery and adventure, where the familiar doesn't mean humdrum. Adults tend to become jaded and lose much of this; but we don't automatically have to, just because we temper it with experience and wisdom. (Bradbury, who wrote this book the year he turned 37, apparently held on to much of it into his 90s; and that's part of the secret of his writing success.) Despite the child protagonist, this isn't really a book that would be most appreciated by kids, IMO; it's more one that's aimed at adults, who can approach it with an adult's perspective --and learn from it to adjust their perspective. Primarily a writer of short fiction, Bradbury gives this novel a very episodic structure; and a few of the chapters actually appeared first as short stories, or were lifted out later and published as short stories. (As a kid, I read one in particular that way in an anthology, and didn't like it; but when I read it as part of the book, along with the following chapter that clarifies what really happened, the effect is 180 degrees different!). His trademark lyrical and evocative prose style, rich with details that appeal to all of the senses, is on display here too. The outward events can be deceptively simple; interpreted at a deep level, they're often rich with metaphor that expresses truths about life and the world. Not all of the book is sweetness and light; even the bucolic world of 1928 Greentown could hold the macabre and menacing that's part of reality, too (and one chapter very clearly brings out the human psychological need for scary mythology). But mostly, what we experience here is beautiful and wondrous. Any reader younger than 86 was not yet born in the time when this book is set. It's not historical fiction, as such; but for most of us it evokes a world and way of life that's vanished into the past; and not all the changes have been for the better. (Contrary to the optimistic connotations ideologically-blinkered pundits invest it with, the word "progress" really just means "movement in some direction" --not always a good direction. :-( ) This is hammered home when we read episodes like Douglas' negotiation with a shoe store owner for a pair of sneakers; that kind of human interaction ain't gonna happen at your "(un)friendly" local mega-corporation super-store outlet. :-( But many of the events here, and all of the underlying human nature depicted, are timeless. This is a book that I can highly recommend!

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