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Busted: A Tale of Corruption and Betrayal in the City of Brotherly Love

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In the vein of Erin Brockovich, The Departed, and T. J. English's Savage City comes this shocking true story of the biggest police corruption scandal in Philadelphia history, a tale of drugs, power, and abuse involving a rogue narcotics squad, a confidential informant, and two veteran journalists whose reporting drove a full-scale FBI probe, rocked the City of Brotherly Lo In the vein of Erin Brockovich, The Departed, and T. J. English's Savage City comes this shocking true story of the biggest police corruption scandal in Philadelphia history, a tale of drugs, power, and abuse involving a rogue narcotics squad, a confidential informant, and two veteran journalists whose reporting drove a full-scale FBI probe, rocked the City of Brotherly Love, and earned a Pulitzer Prize. In 2003, Benny Martinez became a Confidential Informant for a member of the Philadelphia Police Department's narcotics squad, helping arrest nearly 200 drug and gun dealers over seven years. But that success masked a dark and dangerous reality: the cops were as corrupt as the criminals they targeted. In addition to fabricating busts, the squad systematically looted mom-and-pop stores, terrorizing hardworking immigrant owners. One squad member also sexually assaulted three women during raids. Frightened for his life, Martinez turned to Philadelphia Daily News reporters Wendy Ruderman and Barbara Laker. Busted chronicles how these two journalists-both middle-class working mothers-formed an unlikely bond with a convicted street dealer to uncover the secrets of ruthless kingpins and dirty cops. Professionals in an industry shrinking from severe financial cutbacks, Ruderman and Laker had few resources-besides their own grit and tenacity-to break a dangerous, complex story that would expose the rotten underbelly of a modern American city and earn them a Pulitzer Prize. A page-turning thriller based on superb reportage, Busted is modern true crime at its finest.


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In the vein of Erin Brockovich, The Departed, and T. J. English's Savage City comes this shocking true story of the biggest police corruption scandal in Philadelphia history, a tale of drugs, power, and abuse involving a rogue narcotics squad, a confidential informant, and two veteran journalists whose reporting drove a full-scale FBI probe, rocked the City of Brotherly Lo In the vein of Erin Brockovich, The Departed, and T. J. English's Savage City comes this shocking true story of the biggest police corruption scandal in Philadelphia history, a tale of drugs, power, and abuse involving a rogue narcotics squad, a confidential informant, and two veteran journalists whose reporting drove a full-scale FBI probe, rocked the City of Brotherly Love, and earned a Pulitzer Prize. In 2003, Benny Martinez became a Confidential Informant for a member of the Philadelphia Police Department's narcotics squad, helping arrest nearly 200 drug and gun dealers over seven years. But that success masked a dark and dangerous reality: the cops were as corrupt as the criminals they targeted. In addition to fabricating busts, the squad systematically looted mom-and-pop stores, terrorizing hardworking immigrant owners. One squad member also sexually assaulted three women during raids. Frightened for his life, Martinez turned to Philadelphia Daily News reporters Wendy Ruderman and Barbara Laker. Busted chronicles how these two journalists-both middle-class working mothers-formed an unlikely bond with a convicted street dealer to uncover the secrets of ruthless kingpins and dirty cops. Professionals in an industry shrinking from severe financial cutbacks, Ruderman and Laker had few resources-besides their own grit and tenacity-to break a dangerous, complex story that would expose the rotten underbelly of a modern American city and earn them a Pulitzer Prize. A page-turning thriller based on superb reportage, Busted is modern true crime at its finest.

30 review for Busted: A Tale of Corruption and Betrayal in the City of Brotherly Love

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bill S.

    The story of how a couple of scrappy chicks at a scrappy (and broke) tabloid won a Pulitzer prize for exposing out of control cops in Philadelphia — a tale which would have worked better had the authors not spent most of it telling you how they were a couple of scrappy chicks at a scrappy tabloid … blah, blah. It would be as if Woodward & Bernstein made AtPM 80% about themselves while only occasionally mentioning Nixon, Liddy, et al. The story of how a couple of scrappy chicks at a scrappy (and broke) tabloid won a Pulitzer prize for exposing out of control cops in Philadelphia — a tale which would have worked better had the authors not spent most of it telling you how they were a couple of scrappy chicks at a scrappy tabloid … blah, blah. It would be as if Woodward & Bernstein made AtPM 80% about themselves while only occasionally mentioning Nixon, Liddy, et al.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michael Flanagan

    **I received an advanced copy of this book by the publisher for review** I went into this book not quite knowing what to expect. Was it going to be a compendium of the newspaper articles that won the authors a Pulitzer or was it going to be the story behind the story? I was happy to find out that it was the latter. The book starts off with a great first chapter that introduces us to all the main players in this real life thriller and sets the tone for the rest of the book. What we get from this bo **I received an advanced copy of this book by the publisher for review** I went into this book not quite knowing what to expect. Was it going to be a compendium of the newspaper articles that won the authors a Pulitzer or was it going to be the story behind the story? I was happy to find out that it was the latter. The book starts off with a great first chapter that introduces us to all the main players in this real life thriller and sets the tone for the rest of the book. What we get from this book is a journalist view of the pressure and danger they put themselves in to chase the truth, a truth that gets scarier the deeper they dig. What start off as an investigation into a narcotics cop inappropriate relationship with his informant and the falsifying of information for search warrants. Soon expands into an investigation of a police squad out of control robbing and sexually harassing citizens to scared to report them. This book tells the story of the lengths that the authors go to expose police corruption and the danger they put themselves in to do so. This story reads like an action thriller and leaves the reader breathless as it tears through the pages.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Only okay - more a story of how they wrote the story rather than what the story was. I was unfamilar with the corruption scandal so really kinda felt like part of the story was missing.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gerry

    I added this book to my list after hearing the author speak (actually, she was interviewing two *other* authors about their book) at the Collingswood Book Festival. A fairly quick read, Busted details the investigation into police corruption in Philadelphia that won Ruderman and her co-author and colleague at the Philadelphia Daily News, Barbara Laker, the 2010 Pullitzer Prize for investigative journalism. Despite the accolades from their peers, and the concurrent investigations launched by the I added this book to my list after hearing the author speak (actually, she was interviewing two *other* authors about their book) at the Collingswood Book Festival. A fairly quick read, Busted details the investigation into police corruption in Philadelphia that won Ruderman and her co-author and colleague at the Philadelphia Daily News, Barbara Laker, the 2010 Pullitzer Prize for investigative journalism. Despite the accolades from their peers, and the concurrent investigations launched by the FBI and the Philadelphia Police Department Internal Affairs bureau, the corrupt cops identified in this book remain on the force, though in some cases limited to "desk duty", still collecting their salaries and buiding pension credits, rather than languishing behind bars where they belong. Apparently, federal and local prosecutors had declined to charge them with any crimes, largely because their victims were unwilling to testify against them.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stinky Girl

    full review later

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kate K. F.

    This is a book that left me with mixed feelings. I picked up my ARC at ALA Midwinter 2014, because it was about Philadephia and I find the how of journalism interesting. In the end, I was left feeling like it was a book that taught me a lot while being in a style that I don't like. Wendy Ruderman and Barbara Laker were two reporters at the Philadelphia Daily News, a newspaper that sees itself as the scrappy underdog to the Philadelphia Inquirer. Busted is about how Ruderman and Laker put together This is a book that left me with mixed feelings. I picked up my ARC at ALA Midwinter 2014, because it was about Philadephia and I find the how of journalism interesting. In the end, I was left feeling like it was a book that taught me a lot while being in a style that I don't like. Wendy Ruderman and Barbara Laker were two reporters at the Philadelphia Daily News, a newspaper that sees itself as the scrappy underdog to the Philadelphia Inquirer. Busted is about how Ruderman and Laker put together the story that ended up being Tainted Justice which one a journalism Pulitzer Prize. Tainted Justice was about corruption within the narcotics department of the Philadelphia Police Department. The story came to them when an informer came to them and they began to go deeper and deeper into what was going in Philadelphia. The chapters are short mainly setting the scene and explaining how they found their major leads plus profiles of some of their major sources and those hurt the most by the corruption. It was obvious how well the two journalists know the city and how to get a story. My issue was the style of writing which felt lurid to me and oddly defensive. As women writers taking on a story about drug users and dealers, there were many points where they explained how they weren't scared of going to such and such dangerous position. It sounded like a lot of what was a major part of their experience as reporters but I found it distracting. Also at points, they relied a lot on the shorthand of stereotypes, often going beyond them to find the people involved but not always. I would recommend this book to readers who enjoy true crime and are interested in the mechanics of an on the edge newspaper. This is a fast read with discussions of violence, drug use, sexual assault, poverty and corruption. It might be the right read for someone but it wasn't for me.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    I very seldom read true crime, but I picked up an advance reader copy of this at the recent American Library Association meeting in Philadelphia and thought I'd give it a whirl and I'm glad I did. I was quite pleased to find the book is not at all a rehash of their newspaper articles; although they won a Pulitzer, I don't care to read the sordid saga again, pieces of which I picked up as a regular reader of the competing Philadelphia Inquirer. Nor is it a reconstruction of the alleged criminal I very seldom read true crime, but I picked up an advance reader copy of this at the recent American Library Association meeting in Philadelphia and thought I'd give it a whirl and I'm glad I did. I was quite pleased to find the book is not at all a rehash of their newspaper articles; although they won a Pulitzer, I don't care to read the sordid saga again, pieces of which I picked up as a regular reader of the competing Philadelphia Inquirer. Nor is it a reconstruction of the alleged criminal careers of this latest bunch of goons masquerading as narcotics detectives terrorizing the citizens of Philadelphia. Instead, the book is really about good solid newspaper reporting as craft and calling in an age when the newspaper industry is on the ropes and a city where hardly anybody reads the paper anymore, at least as paying customers. So after a few pages I found myself engaged with the two reporters' characters and soon began to root for them (and the future of newspaper journalism) in their improbable quest to get real dirt on the bad cop and his comrades in crime. It then becomes a very quick one or two night read. You do not have to have any familiarity with Philadelphia to appreciate the story, but Philadelphians will doubtless savor it most since it is very much of this city, as is the ending note treating the continued apparent failure of justice in this case.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Iren Emma

    This book was a disappointment. I was expecting a good expose on police corruption from journalists, yet all I got was stories about Barbara's eating habbits, her flirting with her neighbor and the editor's office description. The actual part of the expose and the struggles of the reporters was badly written, with a weak prose for the most part, and some awful prose at others. I can only assume that the Pulitzer was awarded for the work and not the writing (weird). Many, many, many pages on the This book was a disappointment. I was expecting a good expose on police corruption from journalists, yet all I got was stories about Barbara's eating habbits, her flirting with her neighbor and the editor's office description. The actual part of the expose and the struggles of the reporters was badly written, with a weak prose for the most part, and some awful prose at others. I can only assume that the Pulitzer was awarded for the work and not the writing (weird). Many, many, many pages on the financial troubles, which would be understandable and even appropriate if it affected the work, but here all the writer(s) did was establish that they did not care much about what was going on on that front. It was in all, a boring read, the story got lost from chapter to chapter, too many useless details. I think the book description and the marketing behind it was misleading. Would not recommend it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Charlene

    Wow! This is journalism at its absolute best. I could have done without the commentary on Barbara's life. She is one of the journalists who helped uncover the police corruption going on in Philly. I really didn't care what she ate, how she dressed, how hung up on her ex she was, or who she dated. That aside, I loved every other word in this book. Extremely well written, gripping, and hard to put down. The story itself is even harder to believe. The authors take the reader through the process of Wow! This is journalism at its absolute best. I could have done without the commentary on Barbara's life. She is one of the journalists who helped uncover the police corruption going on in Philly. I really didn't care what she ate, how she dressed, how hung up on her ex she was, or who she dated. That aside, I loved every other word in this book. Extremely well written, gripping, and hard to put down. The story itself is even harder to believe. The authors take the reader through the process of uncovering robberies (and other crimes) committed by the very police officers citizens trusted to uphold the law. The reporters were extremely fair (great self reflection!), really funny, and down to earth. I would call this a MUST READ!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    It took me three sittings to read Busted, and each time I had to force myself to put it down. Riveting. Gripping. And not just because I'm a huge fan of Wendy Ruderman and Barbara Laker, but because the story itself about police corruption and misdeeds is so outrageous. You feel their anxiety as they knock on doors or wander down streets in the heart Philadelphia's worst neighborhoods. Balanced against their intense investigative work is the plight of the Daily News and their personal lives. I a It took me three sittings to read Busted, and each time I had to force myself to put it down. Riveting. Gripping. And not just because I'm a huge fan of Wendy Ruderman and Barbara Laker, but because the story itself about police corruption and misdeeds is so outrageous. You feel their anxiety as they knock on doors or wander down streets in the heart Philadelphia's worst neighborhoods. Balanced against their intense investigative work is the plight of the Daily News and their personal lives. I am very tempted to read it all over again. Outstanding!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kira

    More than anything, Busted is about journalism, about how the seismic shift in media over the last decade has played out at your average metropolitan daily, and for your average (and increasingly unemployed) newspaper reporter. The book is not so much a call to arms as a window into reality, a frank look at how the real work of reporting—already up against online aggregation and viral cat videos—is doubly challenged by the newspaper industry’s rapid desiccation. [FULL REVIEW] More than anything, Busted is about journalism, about how the seismic shift in media over the last decade has played out at your average metropolitan daily, and for your average (and increasingly unemployed) newspaper reporter. The book is not so much a call to arms as a window into reality, a frank look at how the real work of reporting—already up against online aggregation and viral cat videos—is doubly challenged by the newspaper industry’s rapid desiccation. [FULL REVIEW]

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lily

    I tried, I really did. But way too much time spent going through very mundane details. Perhaps just not really interested in the subject. Kudos to the authors for the Pulitzer though.

  13. 4 out of 5

    K

    This is a solid story about two women investigative reporters who uncover crooked Philadelphia cops. They won a Pulitzer Prize for their work. As with the much more famous story about reporters uncovering the priest molestation scandal in Boston (now movie, "Spotlight"), this is a classic good guy vs. bad guy story that is actually true. The reporters uncover a narcotics unit in Philadelphia that is lying to make arrests, stealing from arrested people and from shop owners, and even committing se This is a solid story about two women investigative reporters who uncover crooked Philadelphia cops. They won a Pulitzer Prize for their work. As with the much more famous story about reporters uncovering the priest molestation scandal in Boston (now movie, "Spotlight"), this is a classic good guy vs. bad guy story that is actually true. The reporters uncover a narcotics unit in Philadelphia that is lying to make arrests, stealing from arrested people and from shop owners, and even committing sexual crimes. The book explains how they got their initial information, built out the story by finding people who would talk, and presented an air-tight case that their editor and publisher bravely backed. Good stuff. But it's a poorly told tale that suffers from a style that is barely more readable than the tabloid for which they worked. The story toggles back and forth between first person (Wendy Ruderman) and third person (Ruderman describing what her colleague Barbara Laker or others are doing), and it just doesn't work well. I found Ruderman's asides about her life to be especially boring or awkward, as well as repetitive. We are told a half-dozen times that she is foul-mouthed and likes sex and likes to tell people she likes sex. We're told an equal number of times that Barbara Laker is much classier, taller and attractive. And we have way too many irrelevant scenes in which Ruderman's husband -- who's cut short his career to take care of their two kids -- is feeling unappreciated at home. It's too bad that the book has the feel of a being written in couple of weekends, because it does give a good window into how hard it is to do original reporting, especially about something that the government or police force wants to hide.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    An absorbing story about two self-described "hillbilly Jews" who write for a Philadelphia tabloid about to declare bankruptcy. The two women win a Pulitzer prize for bringing down the corrupt narcotics division of the Philadelphia police. They suspect that a single narc cop is dirty and find the whole department fairly reeks with corruption. The book includes security photos of cops about to slice the wires to a bodega's security camera system before they pillage the store for money and merchand An absorbing story about two self-described "hillbilly Jews" who write for a Philadelphia tabloid about to declare bankruptcy. The two women win a Pulitzer prize for bringing down the corrupt narcotics division of the Philadelphia police. They suspect that a single narc cop is dirty and find the whole department fairly reeks with corruption. The book includes security photos of cops about to slice the wires to a bodega's security camera system before they pillage the store for money and merchandise. It's a pretty easy, dramatic read. The two reporters are gutsy to a degree that amazed me, including one of them being slapped around by a drug dealer and informant. They are continually watchful for cops trying to follow them, discredit them, or take them out in some way. They also find victims of a notorious cop who fondles women's breasts during what the cops call drug busts but what the women describe as sheer harassment of innocent people, and the reporters eventually get the force to take this cop off the street. The book is kind of a rolling narrative featuring some unusual characters, including the police informant that turns out to be a slick addict to anything you can put up your nose, in your mouth, or through your veins. The author realizes in the end that this informant is a pure sociopath and has perpetually fooled dealers, cops, and any random sympathetic stranger he can find by spinning stories of hardship and desperate need. Even the informant's grown children have virtually disowned him. The book is fun and a rather quick read. Justice triumphs (mostly) in the end.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ronnie Cramer

    Ostensibly about police corruption in Philadelphia, but mostly about the two reporters who authored the book. The sub-plot of their newspaper going broke is okay, and the passages that actually address corruption are interesting, but they are buried in a heaping mound of weird and inappropriate personal minutia. Examples: "I had met (my husband) in a tae kwon do class back in the early 1990s. He was a second-degree black belt and taught classes three nights a week. I spent the entire class watch Ostensibly about police corruption in Philadelphia, but mostly about the two reporters who authored the book. The sub-plot of their newspaper going broke is okay, and the passages that actually address corruption are interesting, but they are buried in a heaping mound of weird and inappropriate personal minutia. Examples: "I had met (my husband) in a tae kwon do class back in the early 1990s. He was a second-degree black belt and taught classes three nights a week. I spent the entire class watching his firm butt as he demonstrated down block, center punch. I could see his navy-blue Fruit of the Loom briefs through his white uniform. He was lanky yet muscular, with a big, beaky nose, a sexy cleft chin, and doelike brown eyes that were so warm and gentle they caught me by surprise." "I breast-fed (my son) until he was two and a half. He’d walk up to me and say, 'I want boob,' and I’d lift my shirt and bring his curly blond head toward me." "(My co-author) got her usual salad—romaine lettuce, tomatoes, egg, cucumbers, mushrooms, grilled chicken, and absolutely no cheese. I almost always ordered a BLT. Back at my desk, I opened a mayo packet with my teeth and squeezed creamy ribbons onto the bread." If you want to read about police corruption, I recommend Mike McLary's BUDDY BOYS or Gerald Clemente's THE COPS ARE ROBBERS.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    I was so excited to read this, but it turned out to be pretty awful. I was hoping for a book version of the actual Tainted Justice story, but instead it was, I dunno, kind of a memoir? But with a lot of weird, borderline-racist descriptions of characters that left such a bad taste in my mouth I couldn't stick with it. The passage that finally got me reads like something out of a white midwestern college student's parody of an urban romance novel: Sonia and Benny went way back. She'd fallen for hi I was so excited to read this, but it turned out to be pretty awful. I was hoping for a book version of the actual Tainted Justice story, but instead it was, I dunno, kind of a memoir? But with a lot of weird, borderline-racist descriptions of characters that left such a bad taste in my mouth I couldn't stick with it. The passage that finally got me reads like something out of a white midwestern college student's parody of an urban romance novel: Sonia and Benny went way back. She'd fallen for him in the late 1990s. She was just seventeen when she saw him hanging on the corner of Howard and Cambria, the heart of Philly's open-air drug market. She was walking to the corner store, a half block from the row house where she lived with her mom. "You have nice hair," she told him in her coarse, seductive way. He smiled impishly and slowly stroked his right hand over coarse black hair that he swept back and gelled to a sticky sheen. ***** I mean, seriously? Yuck.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ida

    Shocking corruption without penalty for those dirty cops who may have saved lives, but also destroyed lives. The fact that they were merely put on desk duty and then returned to the streets, despite the abundance of evidence against them, is an absolute disgrace. The account of this betrayal and corruption is bravely told. In order to get the story, these 2 reporters put themselves in danger from both criminals as well as police officers. I have enormous respect for the police force and their ef Shocking corruption without penalty for those dirty cops who may have saved lives, but also destroyed lives. The fact that they were merely put on desk duty and then returned to the streets, despite the abundance of evidence against them, is an absolute disgrace. The account of this betrayal and corruption is bravely told. In order to get the story, these 2 reporters put themselves in danger from both criminals as well as police officers. I have enormous respect for the police force and their efforts in maintaining a safe environment for the public even in the face of danger, but I am furious that those cops who disregard the law and benefit from illicit/criminal activity go unpunished. This telling should get you riled up. It certainly had that effect on me.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Paisley Princess

    This is a fantastic book. Both Barbara Laker and Wendy Ruderman had the balls to expose the truth and the rampant corruption of some Philadelphia police officers. The women refused to be intimidated or deterred-in fact it only fueled their passion to bring justice to the many victims of rogue policing. "Busted" exposes how the cop/informant relationship can turn toxic, with the lines between cop and criminal becoming indistinguishable. The authors displayed a rare feat not found in journalism tod This is a fantastic book. Both Barbara Laker and Wendy Ruderman had the balls to expose the truth and the rampant corruption of some Philadelphia police officers. The women refused to be intimidated or deterred-in fact it only fueled their passion to bring justice to the many victims of rogue policing. "Busted" exposes how the cop/informant relationship can turn toxic, with the lines between cop and criminal becoming indistinguishable. The authors displayed a rare feat not found in journalism today, which involves taking risks, speaking for the defenseless, and having the guts to do the dirty work i.e., going into the hood. Not surprisingly both Ruderman and Laker won the Pulitzer Prize, which they rightfully deserved. I truly enjoyed reading this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anirvan Ghosh

    This is top drawer investigative journalism. Best part about the book is that the authors, who won Pulitzers for their series of newspaper stories that led to this book, make the reader feel what they went through while reporting: the long days, seeing little of their families, and eventually the toll it took on their personal lives. They uncovered deep-rooted corruption in Philadelphia, but also paid a price for it. This book brilliantly brings out the power of journalism and also paints a real This is top drawer investigative journalism. Best part about the book is that the authors, who won Pulitzers for their series of newspaper stories that led to this book, make the reader feel what they went through while reporting: the long days, seeing little of their families, and eventually the toll it took on their personal lives. They uncovered deep-rooted corruption in Philadelphia, but also paid a price for it. This book brilliantly brings out the power of journalism and also paints a realistic picture of what it takes. Brilliant.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michael Brooks

    Busted is an insightful look at the world of investigative reporting written with a flair that belies a perception of how you might think a book on police corruption or any kind of investigative reporting might be like: boring. It is far from it. Wendy Ruderman and Barbara Laker have written a page-turning book where the players are treated with a humanistic approach peppered with objective reporting and subjective humor and compassion for both perpetrators and victims. It's easy to see why they Busted is an insightful look at the world of investigative reporting written with a flair that belies a perception of how you might think a book on police corruption or any kind of investigative reporting might be like: boring. It is far from it. Wendy Ruderman and Barbara Laker have written a page-turning book where the players are treated with a humanistic approach peppered with objective reporting and subjective humor and compassion for both perpetrators and victims. It's easy to see why they won a Pulitzer Prize.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Terri

    The search for truth, for fairness, for justice, the way newspapers used to investigate and report it, and in a pst not so very long ago, this book is in your face exciting on a non-sensationalized way...probably because it is the cold hard bare truth. I commend their women, who like stubborn tenacious terriers, ferreted out the facts, no matter the danger or the risk, and presented it all for the world to read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    Great research that only a newspaper reporter could discover Been locked into corrupt cop books for a year or so and kindle suggested this book. Glad they did, this story is the reason we need newspapers in the US. A lot of random crimes by cops that only a reporter could weave together. A snitch and a bad cop who made a lot of money and came for selfish reasons. Worth your time to read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alan Caldwell

    It wasn't what I thought it was going to be. It isn't really "A Tale of Corruption and Betrayal in the City of Brotherly Love", but the story OF the story of corruption and betrayal in Philly. It centers on the reporting of the stories and the two reporters of the Philadelphia Daily News, Wendy Ruderman and Barbara Laker. It was an easy read, but I think I would've rather read the Pulitzer prize-winning articles.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Steve McFarland

    Wow this book underlined the corruption in Philly PD...absolute power corrupts absolutely To think these cops still have a pension underlines an endemic problem All cops arent bad, there are good ones but there are ones like the ones describe in this book that make it hard for folks to trust and believe.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Bumiller

    A great read about top-notch journalism and deeply corrupt police officers. Recommended for fans of true crime and fans of Philadelphia!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jane Thompson

    True Crime This book tells the story oof two gutsy women who took on a newspaper story about police corruption in Philadelphia. For this, they won a Pulitzer

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mom2schnauzers

    Didn't exactly read "like a turbocharged thriller," as stated on the front cover. Still an interesting look into the corruption that existed in the narcotics unit of the Philly PD.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sami

    I thought the author was annoying at first, but she grew on me! Was searching for a book about the thin blue line and this didn't quite satiate that hunger, but I was pleased overall.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mary Miller

    I couldn't put this down. I grew up in a suburb of Philly.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ed Ruggero

    Two brave reporters take on corrupt cops in the Philly PD. Wendy Ruderman tells the story in the first person, and she's a hoot.

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