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How Can I Develop A Christian Conscience?

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In this booklet, Dr. R. C. Sproul shows that this development involves learning and mastering the many principles God has laid down in His Word, and even in creation itself. In other words, we must know and understand God’s law. As we gain a firmer grasp of what God expects and requires, we are increasingly able to make decisions that please Him.


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In this booklet, Dr. R. C. Sproul shows that this development involves learning and mastering the many principles God has laid down in His Word, and even in creation itself. In other words, we must know and understand God’s law. As we gain a firmer grasp of what God expects and requires, we are increasingly able to make decisions that please Him.

30 review for How Can I Develop A Christian Conscience?

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ted

    Short little book. Sproul is invariably far more conservative than I am. But he does not come across as a fire and brimstone preacher either. He's somewhere in between and I'm that sense he strikes a good balance. I will probably have to re-read the books in this series as they are somewhat dense. He appears to enjoy philosophical underpinnings and arguments. I like that. But with all questions of existence, one needs time for the cancel and argument to sink in. I am in that period of steeping. Short little book. Sproul is invariably far more conservative than I am. But he does not come across as a fire and brimstone preacher either. He's somewhere in between and I'm that sense he strikes a good balance. I will probably have to re-read the books in this series as they are somewhat dense. He appears to enjoy philosophical underpinnings and arguments. I like that. But with all questions of existence, one needs time for the cancel and argument to sink in. I am in that period of steeping.

  2. 4 out of 5

    David DeFazio

    Conscience transformation better than conformity I love how Sproul challenges us to rethink the lens we view sin, the law, and our need to have our conscience shaped by the Holy Spirit through the word of God. The chapter on legalism was a good challenge for me to ask the Lord to search my heart and know my ways. In the end, I praise God for His grace is sufficient for a sinner desperate in need.

  3. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    This is a very difficult question in our Jiminy Cricket age in which we think out conscience can be our guide, when in reality, our consciences are often calloused by sin; and R.C. Sproul elegantly addresses this issue and explains how it can be dealt with in a godly manner.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Isaac Butterworth

    No name deserves greater trust in explaining the Christian faith than that of the late Dr. R. C. Sproul. This volume on developing a Christian conscience is brief but nonetheless thorough and clear. Drawing distinctions between ethics and morality, carefully explaining legalism and antinomianism, and highlighting the difference in severity of certain kinds of sin, Dr. Sproul lays a firm foundation for developing a Christian conscience. I recommend this book to anyone interested in a brief but cl No name deserves greater trust in explaining the Christian faith than that of the late Dr. R. C. Sproul. This volume on developing a Christian conscience is brief but nonetheless thorough and clear. Drawing distinctions between ethics and morality, carefully explaining legalism and antinomianism, and highlighting the difference in severity of certain kinds of sin, Dr. Sproul lays a firm foundation for developing a Christian conscience. I recommend this book to anyone interested in a brief but clear treatment of Christian ethics. You will want to read further and more deeply, but this book will give you a sturdy frame on which you can begin building your understanding.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jefferson

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. When I reached the end of the book, I considered that Sproul had not answered the question in the title at all. Nevertheless, still enjoyed, though sometimes initially confused, by his world-class philosophical expositions on the definition of “conscience”, the creation ordinances, the gray area between the absolutes of right and wrong, two extremes that a Christian conscience must avoid (legalism and antinomianism), and degrees of sins.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tim Zornes

    Sproul does an excellent job of exploring what it means to live God's way specifically in your heart and mind. Conscience is often a tricky subject to describe, Sproul gives a good definition as well as explaining how razor thin the line actually is between legalism and antinomianism. Several very memorable quotes. As a part of his "Crucial Questions" series, this title is not particularly in-depth or technical on any one aspect of Christian conscience. If you want a thorough examination of the s Sproul does an excellent job of exploring what it means to live God's way specifically in your heart and mind. Conscience is often a tricky subject to describe, Sproul gives a good definition as well as explaining how razor thin the line actually is between legalism and antinomianism. Several very memorable quotes. As a part of his "Crucial Questions" series, this title is not particularly in-depth or technical on any one aspect of Christian conscience. If you want a thorough examination of the subject, this will wet your appetite, but not satisfy your hunger.

  7. 5 out of 5

    David Pulliam

    Disappointing at points I think I care with different expectations because I thought the focus would be the Christian mind and how we can develop its conscience. Sprout focuses on more theological ideas and hardly at all on how an individual can work to grow a biblical conscience.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nderitu Pius

    Sproul does not waste time with this one. He speaks about ethics and morals. A wonderful explanation of the difference between the two. The book goes on to also explain about liberty and antinomianism. There are different types of these two as well. Oh this is a welcome book to the Christian on Christian ethics not just in class but in life. Do not overlook this beautiful piece of work.

  9. 4 out of 5

    William

    This is my least favorite book in Dr. Sproul's series so far. It does not actually answer the question its title poses. We get pictures of Christian character and missteps to avoid, but no practical advice. It's a good book; it just doesn't deliver on what it promises.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Short

    This is a brief, but helpful book on the conscience. Sproul wrote in a practical, engaging, and accessible style. This is not a deep-dive textual study, but more of a practical discussion of the concepts involved with the conscience. It is a good introduction to the subject.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Seth

    I wish this book was longer. Some very excellent, sound teaching. It wasn’t what I was expecting. Didn’t talk as much about the aspect of weaker/stronger or causing others to stumble. A lot of good history and philosophical background.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    The content is mediocre, but useful in that it is aimed at contemporary rejections or distortions of the conscience. Unfortunately, this edition has terrible editing in that the editors placed pages 29-31 between page 24 and 25!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    A really good summary. Sproul explains what we mean by a Christian conscience, how we work with it and also how it connects with our reading of Scripture. Simple. Clear. Enjoyable.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Emmanuel Danso

    Brief Exposè on Christian conscience Another good manuscript of Dr. R C Sproul. It's a great read for every Christian who seeks to develop a mind grounded in biblical ethics.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Andy Bintoro

    Moralism and soteriology A short read about moralism and its connection with soteriology. This is a short book but deeply written to answer justification in salvation issue.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Romero

    Great place to start.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    Well said!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Steve Campbell

    This booklet gives a helpful overview of what it means to have a distinctively Christian conscience. It discusses the limitations of the general view of conscience and shows how some Christians can abuse the conscience by drifting toward one of two extremes--legalism and libertinism. Sproul offers a helpful distinction between ethics and morality.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Logan

    Solid book that should spur one to critically interact with how the Bible fleshes itself out in one's life. Sproul touches on several different aspects of a Christian conscience, while even touching on the varying degrees of sin. It's a brisk read that raises great questions but does not resolve itself well. Though, I suppose that's the trick of the Christian conscience: our convictions between one another will be different in varying degrees.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jacob James

    Valuable advice for all Crhistians for the most part Most points offered by Sproul in this book I agree with, except for his last chapter on the "degrees of sin." While I'm no theologian, I feel that the outlook in this case given to us by Sproul can lead to a dangerous legalism that Sproul refutes early on in the book! If there is varying rewards/punishments in heaven/hell, some people may come to the conclusion that "I want to get a better position in heaven, so I'll follow Jesus's teachings to Valuable advice for all Crhistians for the most part Most points offered by Sproul in this book I agree with, except for his last chapter on the "degrees of sin." While I'm no theologian, I feel that the outlook in this case given to us by Sproul can lead to a dangerous legalism that Sproul refutes early on in the book! If there is varying rewards/punishments in heaven/hell, some people may come to the conclusion that "I want to get a better position in heaven, so I'll follow Jesus's teachings to be better off in the afterlife," rather than "I love God, so I'll do what he asks, since I love him." It is similar to holding a carrot in front of a horse so he will come forward, rather than the horse moving forward because he wants to do as his master asks. This I believe to be dangerous thinking that can lead to legalism. That being said, this is a helpful book overall for Christians eager to learn more about how to honor God.

  21. 4 out of 5

    C.H.E. Sadaphal

    The bottom line: Clear, focused answers to the book’s central question with many actionable nuggets. Every human being has an awareness of God written on the conscience. Some embrace this awareness and are led to the truth. Others suppress this awareness and are led astray. In the latter case, following your conscious leads to a suppression of the truth and a subjective form of morality that is tainted by sin. In the former case, the human conscience is very important because it strives to turn a The bottom line: Clear, focused answers to the book’s central question with many actionable nuggets. Every human being has an awareness of God written on the conscience. Some embrace this awareness and are led to the truth. Others suppress this awareness and are led astray. In the latter case, following your conscious leads to a suppression of the truth and a subjective form of morality that is tainted by sin. In the former case, the human conscience is very important because it strives to turn away from evil and conform to the external objective truth of God. In How can I develop a Christian conscience?, R.C. Sproul clearly explains ... http://www.chesadaphal.com/how-can-i-...

  22. 5 out of 5

    AlegnaB †

    4.5 -- The whole booklet was good, but the last chapter, "The Degrees of Sin," was especially good. I guess I think that because I've had to explain my beliefs on that very issue in a Sunday School class when someone said that all sins are equal and the others agreed with her. I was able to explain my agreement/disagreement with that statement in class fairly well, but it would have been good to be able to also recommend this free downloadable booklet as something the women could read for a bett 4.5 -- The whole booklet was good, but the last chapter, "The Degrees of Sin," was especially good. I guess I think that because I've had to explain my beliefs on that very issue in a Sunday School class when someone said that all sins are equal and the others agreed with her. I was able to explain my agreement/disagreement with that statement in class fairly well, but it would have been good to be able to also recommend this free downloadable booklet as something the women could read for a better explanation.

  23. 5 out of 5

    John

    Reading R.C. Sproul always leaves me respecting how well learned he is, while appreciating his ability to make complicated subjects understandable to the layman. This book is no exception to that. I often wish he would take subjects deeper than he does, but much of his writing is geared toward the layman, and so it is easy to understand and respect his ability to deliver. This is one of his better introductory books, demonstrating to his readers the importance of submitting to God's law, and mold Reading R.C. Sproul always leaves me respecting how well learned he is, while appreciating his ability to make complicated subjects understandable to the layman. This book is no exception to that. I often wish he would take subjects deeper than he does, but much of his writing is geared toward the layman, and so it is easy to understand and respect his ability to deliver. This is one of his better introductory books, demonstrating to his readers the importance of submitting to God's law, and molding one's conscience to the Word of God.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Watkins

    Very good. Most of the topics (guilt, legalism, antinomianism, degrees of sin) were covered in prior books from R.C. Sproul's Crucial Questions series What Can I Do With My Guilt? and How Should I Live in this World?. If you've read the aforementioned books you won't read much new here besides the parts about creation ordinances and conscience. Otherwise it is a very good.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Isaiah Jesch

    A good philosophical introduction... Yet, it was lacking in the practical out workings I would have expected from Dr. Sproul. I really enjoyed this work, but I don't know that it actually answered the questions it posed well enough to be considered definitive on the subject.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Billie Saunders

    Really important reading for every christian RC Sproul does an amazing job of outlining the need for a christian conscience and a biblically accurate idea of God's "law." Love this whole series (so far)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Steve Gregory

    An excellent discussion on how to develop a Christian conscious. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. An excellent guide for developing a Christian conscious. I would recommend it to anyone as a book to study.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andrew S.

    Read only a little by R.C. Sproul but have heard some of his sermons and speeches on Ligonier Ministries, YouTube, etc. But this is some of the best I've seen by him. Has some very good points and riffs in the book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel

    Very good for a starter book on the Christian conscience.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sandi Houghton

    It was like 15 questions to answer and help but it didn't explain the answers well.

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