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"Hunter S. Thompson is to drug-addled, stream-of-consciousness, psycho-political black humor what Forrest Gump is to idiot savants."—The Philadelphia Inquirer Since his 1972 trailblazing opus, Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail, Hunter S. Thompson has reported the election story in his truly inimitable, just-short-of-libel style. In Better than Sex, Thompson hits the "Hunter S. Thompson is to drug-addled, stream-of-consciousness, psycho-political black humor what Forrest Gump is to idiot savants."—The Philadelphia Inquirer Since his 1972 trailblazing opus, Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail, Hunter S. Thompson has reported the election story in his truly inimitable, just-short-of-libel style. In Better than Sex, Thompson hits the dusty trail again—without leaving home—yet manages to deliver a mind-bending view of the 1992 presidential campaign—in all of its horror, sacrifice, lust, and dubious glory. Complete with faxes sent to and received by candidate Clinton's top aides, and 100 percent pure gonzo screeds on Richard Nixon, George Bush, and Oliver North, here is the most true-blue campaign tell-all ever penned by man or beast. "[Thompson] delivers yet another of his trademark cocktail mixes of unbelievable tales and dark observations about the sausage grind that is the U.S. presidential sweepstakes. Packed with egocentric anecdotes, musings and reprints of memos, faxes and scrawled handwritten notes...Memorable."--Los Angeles Daily News "What endears Hunter Thompson to anyone who reads him is that he will say what others are afraid to....[He] is a master at the unlikely but invariably telling line that sums up a political figure....In a year when all politics is—to much of the public—a tendentious and pompous bore, it is time to read Hunter Thompson."—Richmond Times-Dispatch "While Tom Wolfe mastered the technique of being a fly on the wall, Thompson mastered the art of being a fly in the ointment. He made himself a part of every story, made no apologies for it and thus produced far more honest reporting than any crusading member of the Fourth Estate....Thompson isn't afraid to take the hard medicine, nor is he bashful about dishing it out....He is still king of beasts, and his apocalyptic prophecies seldom miss their target."—Tulsa World "This is a very, very funny book. No one can ever match Thompson in the vitriol department, and virtually nobody escapes his wrath."—The Flint Journal


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"Hunter S. Thompson is to drug-addled, stream-of-consciousness, psycho-political black humor what Forrest Gump is to idiot savants."—The Philadelphia Inquirer Since his 1972 trailblazing opus, Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail, Hunter S. Thompson has reported the election story in his truly inimitable, just-short-of-libel style. In Better than Sex, Thompson hits the "Hunter S. Thompson is to drug-addled, stream-of-consciousness, psycho-political black humor what Forrest Gump is to idiot savants."—The Philadelphia Inquirer Since his 1972 trailblazing opus, Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail, Hunter S. Thompson has reported the election story in his truly inimitable, just-short-of-libel style. In Better than Sex, Thompson hits the dusty trail again—without leaving home—yet manages to deliver a mind-bending view of the 1992 presidential campaign—in all of its horror, sacrifice, lust, and dubious glory. Complete with faxes sent to and received by candidate Clinton's top aides, and 100 percent pure gonzo screeds on Richard Nixon, George Bush, and Oliver North, here is the most true-blue campaign tell-all ever penned by man or beast. "[Thompson] delivers yet another of his trademark cocktail mixes of unbelievable tales and dark observations about the sausage grind that is the U.S. presidential sweepstakes. Packed with egocentric anecdotes, musings and reprints of memos, faxes and scrawled handwritten notes...Memorable."--Los Angeles Daily News "What endears Hunter Thompson to anyone who reads him is that he will say what others are afraid to....[He] is a master at the unlikely but invariably telling line that sums up a political figure....In a year when all politics is—to much of the public—a tendentious and pompous bore, it is time to read Hunter Thompson."—Richmond Times-Dispatch "While Tom Wolfe mastered the technique of being a fly on the wall, Thompson mastered the art of being a fly in the ointment. He made himself a part of every story, made no apologies for it and thus produced far more honest reporting than any crusading member of the Fourth Estate....Thompson isn't afraid to take the hard medicine, nor is he bashful about dishing it out....He is still king of beasts, and his apocalyptic prophecies seldom miss their target."—Tulsa World "This is a very, very funny book. No one can ever match Thompson in the vitriol department, and virtually nobody escapes his wrath."—The Flint Journal

30 review for Better Than Sex: Confessions of a Political Junkie

  1. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Sobieck

    There are two kinds of Hunter S. Thompson fans: Those who get Gonzo tattoos over spring break and those who read his political stuff, like this book. It's the former who embrace the drug-addled mythology of the man. The latter can appreciate the brilliant writer and social commentator the world lost to suicide in 2005. Although I was just a young lad in '92, I still find his letters and essays fascinating. He knew how the real political process worked better than anyone else. Those who want Gonzo There are two kinds of Hunter S. Thompson fans: Those who get Gonzo tattoos over spring break and those who read his political stuff, like this book. It's the former who embrace the drug-addled mythology of the man. The latter can appreciate the brilliant writer and social commentator the world lost to suicide in 2005. Although I was just a young lad in '92, I still find his letters and essays fascinating. He knew how the real political process worked better than anyone else. Those who want Gonzo madness should stick to "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas." If you want to know why Hunter S. Thompson remains a huge name in politics and social commentary, start with "Better than Sex."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    Hunter S. Thompson's brain on drugs circa 1966 - 1980s Hunter S. Thompson's brain on drugs - 1990s - 2005 I'm going to go out on a limb here and predict that Hunter S. Thompson's reputation won't hold up. In fairness, I did go back and read sections of Hell's Angels and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and will acknowledge that he could often write well. Whether he ever wrote well enough to merit the adulation he's been given is questionable. However, I was stymied by the number of reviewers who Hunter S. Thompson's brain on drugs circa 1966 - 1980s Hunter S. Thompson's brain on drugs - 1990s - 2005 I'm going to go out on a limb here and predict that Hunter S. Thompson's reputation won't hold up. In fairness, I did go back and read sections of Hell's Angels and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and will acknowledge that he could often write well. Whether he ever wrote well enough to merit the adulation he's been given is questionable. However, I was stymied by the number of reviewers who gave this Godawful mess of a book 4 or 5 stars. There's nothing here. Thompson provides endless faxes, doodled upon/brainless notes, and unexplained pictures, which pretty much dominate a book long on opinions and short on explanations. We're told, for example, that Bill Clinton is both dumb and humorless. Those are provocative assertions. Does Thompson provide any examples? No. We're also told endlessly that Richard Nixon was a monster and Thompson prefaces the obituary he published in the Rolling Stone with the comment "we have lost our Satan. Richard Nixon has gone home to hell." Again, just telling us Nixon was evil incarnate, a beast, etc. seems to suffice. Ending his wildly organized coverage of the 1992 election with the Nixon obituary seems an odd choice, even if Nixon did conveniently die just as Thompson was throwing this book together. I am a political junkie. I remember the 1992 election and found the dynamics among George Bush, Ross Perot, and Bill Clinton fascinating. If you're seeking to discover what made that election interesting in Thompson's book, you've gone to the wrong place. Instead, you'll get pages of re-hash from Thompson's book on the 1972 presidential election (Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail '72) and zillions of pointless anecdotes, featuring - of course, of course - Thompson, who can't seem to get enough of himself. Although I read Hell's Angels many years ago I remember its often vivid description, and Thompson's explanation of how an "Angel" earns his red wings is still seared into my brain. So yes, Thompson can write, but that's not in evidence here. When you really like an author, it can be hard to remain objective. You/I want to view everything this author writes as genius. ...But it just ain't so.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Re-reading this during election years fills me with a treacherous combination of bitterness, mirth and borderline-hysterical fear. Some things never change. R.I.P. Hunter. I wish you could be here right now to witness this circus.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mark Victor Young

    "No wonder the poor bastards from Generation X have lost their sense of humor about politics. Some things are not funny to the doomed..." Though he tried desperately to avoid it, Hunter S. Thompson in this book again casts himself into the pit of despair that is modern politics. It is "Fear and Loathing" all over again, but this time on the Campaign Trail '92. He was lured in partly by his hatred of Bush and the hope that he could be beaten, and partly because of his addiction to politics; the "No wonder the poor bastards from Generation X have lost their sense of humor about politics. Some things are not funny to the doomed..." Though he tried desperately to avoid it, Hunter S. Thompson in this book again casts himself into the pit of despair that is modern politics. It is "Fear and Loathing" all over again, but this time on the Campaign Trail '92. He was lured in partly by his hatred of Bush and the hope that he could be beaten, and partly because of his addiction to politics; the quick highs, the cheap rush that is better than sex. Luckily for us, Hunter S. hadn't lost any of the weirdness, the paranoid edge, the rabid fervour and passion that made his "gonzo" journalism so different. He may have done a few less drugs, shot a few less typewriters, but he hadn't lost his anger. Better Than Sex is the account of a desperate man trying "to control his environment" the only way he knows how. His mission: get rid of Bush at all costs. To accomplish this, he reverses his initial support of Clinton in favour of Ross Perot's campaign after Clinton claims "he never inhaled" (a plain outrage to an admitted "inhaler" like H.S.T.) only to return to support of Clinton when he was asked to sign an undated letter of resignation for Mr. Perot, whom he later referred to as a "wretched, shit-eating little swine." It was plainly a case of wanting to vote for the "not-Bush" candidate, or, as the author puts it, "The enemy of my enemy is my friend." And so in a barrage of faxes, articles, memos to editors, and intoxicated diatribes in campaign stop bars, Thompson perpetrates his war on Bush, never stopping to contemplate whether Clinton will be any better. There are some hilariously ill-advised faxes to the Vice-President of CNN, the campaign manager for Clinton, one to Hillary herself--Hunter S. is a faxaholic, and he generally just sends off the first thing that comes to mind, often faxing again later to apologize for the outrage of the previous fax. It is funny stuff, often hand-written, and all are included in their original form. After the euphoria of the Bush loss wears off, the author is given to brooding about the times to come, even musing that the Republicans might have deliberately chosen to take Bush down so as to avoid responsibility for the death throes of the American economy which are surely to come; let Clinton take the fall for Reaganomics and have a new man ready for '96. Not very far-fetched. But then again, Hunter S. was always a political doom-sayer. The original Fear and Loathing was that of Nixon, whose death was cause for a brutal eulogy in the last section of this book. Hunter digs him up and stomps on his corpse. The original gonzo journalism sprung out of a hatred for Nixon. On the campaign trail in '72, all he could think about was getting rid of him. Then with The Great Shark Hunt, Thompson lamented the fact that there were no Great Leaders left. Not the kind of career politicians who run for office today, but the kind of man who was elected to office by a swell of popular support, because of his strength of character, his integrity, ingenuity, and ability to lead. So Gonzo journalism comes full circle, with an intense fear and loathing of Bush and everything he stands for, and a farewell to his old nemesis Richard Nixon. He got rid of both, and yet he still despairs for the future. The "Great Shark Hunt" continues... "Historians do not call the final ten years of any century 'the Decadence" for no reason. It is always a doomed and dissolute time, and the end of the American Century will be no different... Generation X got off easy compared to the hideous fate of the poor bastards in Generation Z. They will be like steerage passengers on the S.S. Titanic, trapped in the watery bowels of a sinking 'unsinkable ship.'" In retrospect, those were prophetic words.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dustin Reade

    This wasn't bad. I mean, it is HST, so it is bound to be at least as good as his other, later books, which basically all read like someone trying to write like Hunter S. Thompson. My problems with it were many, and here are a few: 1. This book is completely outdated, and not in the cool sort of retro-y way that old sci-fi gets after its projected "future date" has come and gone. No. Dated in a way that makes it almost impossible to care about half of what he is talking about. Clinton. Ross This wasn't bad. I mean, it is HST, so it is bound to be at least as good as his other, later books, which basically all read like someone trying to write like Hunter S. Thompson. My problems with it were many, and here are a few: 1. This book is completely outdated, and not in the cool sort of retro-y way that old sci-fi gets after its projected "future date" has come and gone. No. Dated in a way that makes it almost impossible to care about half of what he is talking about. Clinton. Ross Perot...and so on. 2. The memo parts were kind of stupid, and those that weren't stupid were almost impossible to read. Seriously, bad copies of hand-scrawled faxes from people with doctor-style handwriting? Bad move. Bad move. 3. Again, this book sort of reads like it was written by someone trying to write like Hunter S. Thompson.All of the "Swine" and "Rat Bastard" stuff, along with the "Ho, ho, Bubba" makes this seem like it was ghost written by a parrot that just sat there spouting out the same handful of catch-phrases over and over again. However, I liked it. I wouldn't read it again. But I liked it. If you like Hunter S. Thompson, you will like it too. It is exactly like everything else he wrote before he killed himself.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nikhil

    The most hilarious book on American politics, bubba. Ye gods! I am convinced that journalism is the career for me. Either that or I'm a clueless bastard heading into the heart of the enemy camp, ready to commit South Indian jihad for reasons flimsier than bollywood's sense of plotting.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kent Winward

    Thompson's romp through the 1992 Presidential campaign was as enjoyable as the title of the book is misleading, since Thompson's conclusion is that sex is actually better than being a political junkie.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Aria

    Well, this was fun. Intelligence, sarcasm, & well-done absurdism as only Thompson can offer.

  9. 4 out of 5

    M.J.L. Evans

    This is the first political book I’ve read and I quite enjoyed it. Being a fan of Fear and Loathing, I enjoy Thompson’s writing style.

  10. 5 out of 5

    David

    Some say that the high obtained from a successful political campaign is “better than sex,” but not Hunter S. Thompson. He was certainly a political campaign junkie, but even Thompson couldn’t place politics above carnal pleasure. And he would know a thing or two about politics, having ran for Sheriff (on the “Freak Power” vote - losing by a slim margin) in Pitkin County, Colorado and closely following and reporting on the 1972 Presidential Campaign. I have almost completed reading the Thompson Some say that the high obtained from a successful political campaign is “better than sex,” but not Hunter S. Thompson. He was certainly a political campaign junkie, but even Thompson couldn’t place politics above carnal pleasure. And he would know a thing or two about politics, having ran for Sheriff (on the “Freak Power” vote - losing by a slim margin) in Pitkin County, Colorado and closely following and reporting on the 1972 Presidential Campaign. I have almost completed reading the Thompson canon, and this was one of the last titles that I have read. (Although I have only reviewed three of his works, I have read most of them.) And it is one of his most unique works. Why? Because it has a lot of clarity, and not so much wackiness as works like Fear in Loathing in Las Vegas and The Rum Diary. Better Than Sex: Confessions of a Political Junkie was written in the 1990s, and a lot of the book centers around the 1992 Presidential Campaign. I have a feeling that Thompson may have been living a slightly saner life in the 90s than he did in the 50s through the 80s. It certainly shows in his writing style. And that made this book extremely easy to read and quick to finish, although it seemed to lack a certain personality that I enjoy finding in his works. The book consists of magazine articles and essays Thompson wrote about the Clinton election, but also includes a large portion of faxes he sent to various politicians, journalists and celebrities about the subject. These faxes are interesting to read because they are mostly angry scribbles that are nearly as brief as the modern text message. As the fourth volume in The Gonzo Papers, this is only work that is composed of almost entirely new material. Along with the clarity in Thompson’s writing, that makes Better Than Sex a very interesting read for the Thompson junkie, and I highly recommend giving it a try. 4/5 Stars. 247 pages. Published 1994.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Downward

    Thompson's political writing is his best writing, and here we get a good dose of /gonzo/ journalism; that is, fiction that uses the real situations and real characters and draws the emotional truth out of them. This is also interesting because it features contemporaneous faxes and notes written to campaign officials that ends up sort of acknowledging that, yep, this wasn't all in Thompson's head - he really had access to powerful people and really dug in. He's lost some of the manic energy that Thompson's political writing is his best writing, and here we get a good dose of /gonzo/ journalism; that is, fiction that uses the real situations and real characters and draws the emotional truth out of them. This is also interesting because it features contemporaneous faxes and notes written to campaign officials that ends up sort of acknowledging that, yep, this wasn't all in Thompson's head - he really had access to powerful people and really dug in. He's lost some of the manic energy that he had while battling Nixon, but his tired and bitter cynicism here shows his age and experience. It's a good collection, and not only for the Thompson completist, but for anyone interested in campaign politics.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Will

    It has been too long, too dry, too boring, back to Gonzo... Aptly sub-labeled "Confessions of a Political Junkie," Hunter delves into the political hysteria of the 1992 presidential race. He dives into the realms of personality and character beyond the generic banter of other reporters and news agencies. His appeal is unsurpassed, whether you agree with him or not, you're consumed by his writing. Reality and fantasy mesh into his reality and shape his perceptions of this political world. The most It has been too long, too dry, too boring, back to Gonzo... Aptly sub-labeled "Confessions of a Political Junkie," Hunter delves into the political hysteria of the 1992 presidential race. He dives into the realms of personality and character beyond the generic banter of other reporters and news agencies. His appeal is unsurpassed, whether you agree with him or not, you're consumed by his writing. Reality and fantasy mesh into his reality and shape his perceptions of this political world. The most intriguing part of the confessions outlines his political agenda when he ran for Sheriff in Aspen, Colorado. Far too funny and entertaining not to read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rich Meyer

    The final days of George Bush and the rise of Bill Clinton is the focus of this volume of Hunter S. Thompson's work. Along with his very special obituary for his (and everyone's) nemesis Richard Nixon, this is definitely not to be missed. Classic Thompson unleashed.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ampersand Inc.

    Weird, but that’s to be expected. Great political and social commentary by HST.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Whyte

    https://nwhyte.livejournal.com/3236064.html One of the classic accounts of American politics, not quite as remarkable as Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72 because the election of 1992 was much less remarkable, and also frankly because Thompson's own style was becoming much more self-indulgent. Thompson's drug-fuelled raging stream of consciousness writing comes over now as rather white and male. He picks up on the importance of Hillary Clinton, but fails to really interview her. The one https://nwhyte.livejournal.com/3236064.html One of the classic accounts of American politics, not quite as remarkable as Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72 because the election of 1992 was much less remarkable, and also frankly because Thompson's own style was becoming much more self-indulgent. Thompson's drug-fuelled raging stream of consciousness writing comes over now as rather white and male. He picks up on the importance of Hillary Clinton, but fails to really interview her. The one African-American who is mentioned in passing is Roosevelt Grier, who he utterly unfairly blames for the death of Robert F. Kennedy. He fumes about the fundamental evil of George H.W. Bush without really proving the case. And yet there are moments of sheer genius. It starts with a flashback to the failed McGovern campaign which is basically the set-up for a punchline: Another thing I still remember from that horrible day in November of ’72 was that some dingbat named Clinton was said to be almost single-handedly responsible for losing 222 counties in Texas—including Waco, where he was McGovern’s regional coordinator—and was “terminated without pay, with prejudice,” and sent back home to Arkansas “with his tail between his legs,” as an aide put it. “We’ll never see that stupid bastard again,” one McGovern aide muttered. “Clinton—Bill Clinton. Yeah. Let’s remember that name. He’ll never work again, not in Washington.” A passing reference brought me to H.L. Mencken's obituary of William Jennings Bryan, which makes it clear how much Thompson's style owed to Mencken's writing: Bryan was a vulgar and common man, a cad undiluted. He was ignorant, bigoted, self-seeking, blatant and dishonest. His career brought him into contact with the first men of his time; he preferred the company of rustic ignoramuses. It was hard to believe, watching him at Dayton, that he had traveled, that he had been received in civilized societies, that he had been a high officer of state. He seemed only a poor clod like those around him, deluded by a childish theology, full of an almost pathological hatred of all learning, all human dignity, all beauty, all fine and noble things. He was a peasant come home to the dung-pile. Imagine a gentleman, and you have imagined everything that he was not. There is a hilarious passage describing Bill Clinton's supposedly odd behaviour at his first interview with Thompson, later explained by a mutual friend as the effect of Thompson's eerie resemblance to Clinton's childhood nemesis (way too good to be true, alas). I had also completely forgotten that Ross Perot's excuse for dropping out of the 1992 presidential election was that the Republicans were planning to spoil his daughter's wedding by distributing fake compromising photographs of her. Yes, really. The book ends with a postscript written after the death of Richard Nixon, Thompson's old nemesis, in 1994. For all that Thompson says he hated him, there is evidence of some respect between the two: Nixon had the unique ability to make his enemies seem honorable, and we developed a keen sense of fraternity. Some of my best friends have hated Nixon all their lives. My mother hates Nixon, my son hates Nixon, I hate Nixon, and this hatred has brought us together. Nixon laughed when I told him this. “Don’t worry,” he said. “I, too, am a family man, and we feel the same way about you.” Anyway, I should get hold of the better, earlier books of the Gonzo Papers. It's a little sad to get the sense from reading that Thompson's powers were waning, and that he knew it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Rubin

    This is Hunter Thompson's coverage of the 1992 U.S. Presidential campaign and elections, with some flashbacks to his own 1970 campaign for Sheriff of Aspen County in Colorado. As usual, he jumps right in as a participant as well as a reporter, so nothing he writes is even remotely unbiased, an lots of probably fictionalized incidents. In this case, he brings a group of Rolling Stone editors to Little Rock to meet with Bill Clinton and from there on refers to Clinton's campaign as "we" including This is Hunter Thompson's coverage of the 1992 U.S. Presidential campaign and elections, with some flashbacks to his own 1970 campaign for Sheriff of Aspen County in Colorado. As usual, he jumps right in as a participant as well as a reporter, so nothing he writes is even remotely unbiased, an lots of probably fictionalized incidents. In this case, he brings a group of Rolling Stone editors to Little Rock to meet with Bill Clinton and from there on refers to Clinton's campaign as "we" including himself and continually gives them advice on how to beat Bush. The book is filled with written narrative, including many tangents into other subjects, plus lots of pages of faxes sent back and forth between him and his editors and him and Clinton's campaign. Between the middle and the end he contradicts himself, as to whether the Republicans will stop at nothing for Bush to win and later that the Republican leaders threw the election, since the economy was bad and times were bad and they wanted a Democrat in the White House for four years to take the blame so they could come back stronger in 1996. Some things he wrote were certainly dated, knowing now how the 1996 and 2000 elections turned out, and knowing Clinton's later scandal in the Oval Office, although Thompson practically predicted that... At the end is a late addition to the book, Thompson's vicious, nasty obituary of Richard Nixon, who died after he finished the book. Overall it's entertaining, almost like being in the campaign, but not nearly as good as his 60's and 70's work, including his campaign classic "Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail, 1972". The last page of the book is a fake newspaper clipping "Dr. Hunter Thompson announced to a cheering crowd of editors, brokers and elite political professionals in Chicago today that 'politics is not better than sex'".

  17. 4 out of 5

    Quill

    The Basics A non-fiction (well mostly) account of the 1992 presidential election. With emphasis on Thompson’s perspective. My Thoughts I’m not a politically-minded person. I know no one likes to hear that, and I don’t like saying it, but I’ve never really understood having an obsession with politics. Even Thompson, in this book, bemoans the fact that it’s an addiction he’d like to kick. Really it’s because it’s depressing, and I think Thompson got to the root of another reason why politics doesn’t The Basics A non-fiction (well mostly) account of the 1992 presidential election. With emphasis on Thompson’s perspective. My Thoughts I’m not a politically-minded person. I know no one likes to hear that, and I don’t like saying it, but I’ve never really understood having an obsession with politics. Even Thompson, in this book, bemoans the fact that it’s an addiction he’d like to kick. Really it’s because it’s depressing, and I think Thompson got to the root of another reason why politics doesn’t sit well with me: the illusion of control. In so many words, he says that, and I realize that’s some paranoid fodder right there, especially when you take the fact that Hunter said it into account. But it feels true to me. That’s why this book appealed to me. A big part of it anyway. Because I feel like it got to the root of why the subject kind of unnerves me. Also, it was hilarious and very readable. And even the portions where you find yourself asking, “could it have really happened that way?”, and then answer yourself with, “probably not”, it’s so entertaining. Maybe Clinton didn’t howl like a mad beast right before shoving his face into a basket of fries like a starving dog. It still creates a mental image I’ll never unsee, and that’s very funny to me. It’s full of faxes and letters he sent to politicians and celebrities and friends that are all exactly what you’d expect from him. I giggled a lot. If you want a 100% accurate portrait of events as they transpired at that time, read a history book. If you want Thompson’s unique stamp (and if you have a fun bone in your body, you do), then read this. Final Rating 5/5

  18. 5 out of 5

    Greg Strandberg

    This book is a lot of letters and biographic stuff and early 90s mish-mash. It's not really that impressive, especially considering the price. I'd suggest getting it used or at the library. If you're a hard-core Thompson fan, it's worth a look, though I suspect the Gonzo Papers might do you better.

  19. 4 out of 5

    David

    This is the Doc's real stuff here. Thompson's political writing far surpasses his drug-induced rants. Here Thompson reluctantly endorses Mr Bill (Clinton) in the '92 election against Bush. Wish we still had political commenters with a voice like this. Hoo-ey, what sombre fun could have been had in the Clinton/Trump election.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    When it's good it's FEAR AND LOATHING ON THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL repurposed brilliantly for the 1992 election. When it's bad, it's a boring self-parody. The split between the two is about even, but thankfully the opening introduction to the election and the Nixon obit closing are two worthy bookends to the piece, which probably ensure a higher level of satisfaction than BTS: COAPJ actually merits.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dylan Rock

    While not as biting as Fear and Loathing on the campaign trail, hunter was still as sharp as ever in his unique style of taking the guys in power George Bush Senior and Bill Clinton down a peg or several.

  22. 4 out of 5

    James

    Hunter S. Thompson was one hell of a writer. Read this. Substitute “Donald Trump” for “Richard Nixon” and you get the sort of enlightened savagery that we are missing (so far) in today’s political commentary. Long live the dead king.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Known as the "doctor" of Gonzo Journalism, Hunter S. Thompson was the first to combine political activism with snark in the world of political reporting.Better Than Sex: Confessions of a Political Junkie takes us on a ride through Thompson's time on the campaign trail with Bill Clinton during his 1992 presidential run. I think it's very healthy to step back and read about politics from the past. There's enough distance not to take anything personally (today's identity politics has a habit of Known as the "doctor" of Gonzo Journalism, Hunter S. Thompson was the first to combine political activism with snark in the world of political reporting.  Better Than Sex: Confessions of a Political Junkie takes us on a ride through Thompson's time on the campaign trail with Bill Clinton during his 1992 presidential run. I think it's very healthy to step back and read about politics from the past.  There's enough distance not to take anything personally (today's identity politics has a habit of affecting us negatively) and grasp some of the truth about the people and the events. Thompson's writing is humorous (albeit vulgar), with heavy doses of honesty (found between all that vulgar humor).  Here's some of the tidbits HST imparts from this book:  1) In an election, everything is game.  Accuse your opponent of anything (doesn't matter if it's true), and if you get him to deny it, you've won because the public will forever associate him with the thing you've accused him of.  2) Once you've won, all bets are off.  The people who helped you win don't matter. Thompson wasn't impressed with Bill Clinton.  He hated George H.W. Bush and was happy to see him gone.  I got the impression he felt Clinton was becoming another member of the political elite when he took office.  AKA, "Meet the new boss, same as the old boss." Hunter Thompson died in 2005.  I can't help but wonder what he would have thought of the political landscape during the Obama and now the Trump years.  I imagine he would have loathed it, but had endless sources of writing material.  The whole political scene on Twitter would have guaranteed him a huge following.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin

    Hey Bubba, do you want to know what I think about this book? It's a mess. Want to hear about how bad Nixon was? Maybe a little bit about Bill Clinton, James Carville and Ross perot? Ho, ho. Look no further. There are a few quotes in here that bother me, so, I want to list them. "I brood on these things. It is one of those old habits, like date-rape, and cigarettes, which I like too much to quit." Page 33 "I had plenty of time and all the roadside privacy I needed to pull over and slap her around Hey Bubba, do you want to know what I think about this book? It's a mess. Want to hear about how bad Nixon was? Maybe a little bit about Bill Clinton, James Carville and Ross perot? Ho, ho. Look no further. There are a few quotes in here that bother me, so, I want to list them. "I brood on these things. It is one of those old habits, like date-rape, and cigarettes, which I like too much to quit." Page 33 "I had plenty of time and all the roadside privacy I needed to pull over and slap her around for awhile and get some answers. It was wonderful." Page 224 "Because there will be a certain resemblance. And you know how those sand-n****** are about body doubles. Hell, they all look alike anyway..." Page 133

  25. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    Hunter S. Thompson on politics, what more really need to be said? Not as iconic as "Fear and Loathing '72" and some of the Republican bashing seems quaint in our current Trump nightmare, as does the Bill Clinton defense, but man some of it was really prescient. Wish we still had the good doctor around for his observations today.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joel

    Certainly original in style. It was an interesting take on politics and I really liked how he mixed insanity together with reality to create a narrative. Overall though, it wasn't worth the read. The few elegant one liners weren't worth the overall crassness.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Pike

    Not his best, but even mediocre Hunter is better than everything else. Always a fun ride.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kaylin Evans

    I hate to rate an HST book so low, but this is not one of his better works. It's very disjointed and lackluster. I think I'll stick with HST in his prime.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Oliver Bateman

    another early love i'm done with 4eva (4eva eva?). so be it

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Mclaughlin

    The Gonzo papers are legendary. That is all i have to say.

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