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We’ve all had those perfect moments when events that could never be predicted, let alone controlled, remarkably seem to guide us along our path. Carl Jung called this phenomena “synchronicity” – “a collaboration between persons and events that seems to enlist the cooperation of fate.” In this book, Joseph Jaworski argues that the right state of mind will make you the kind We’ve all had those perfect moments when events that could never be predicted, let alone controlled, remarkably seem to guide us along our path. Carl Jung called this phenomena “synchronicity” – “a collaboration between persons and events that seems to enlist the cooperation of fate.” In this book, Joseph Jaworski argues that the right state of mind will make you the kind of person who can enlist the cooperation of fate and take advantage of synchronicity, creating the conditions for “predictable miracles.” If you are tired of being the victim of circumstances, this book will teach you to be the kind of person who creates your own circumstances. Jaworski shares the story of his own escape from an inauthentic life and his journey into a world filled with possibility. He maps out the inner path of leadership for those who feel the call to achieve their full potential, using his own life story to teach readers a greater truth. He examines the fundamental shifts of mind that free us to seek out the power of synchronicity. After reading this book, you will discover your own power to help those realities unfold. You will learn to “listen” to realities that want to emerge in this world and acquire the courage to help them be born. "Synchronicity illustrates that leadership is about the release of human possibilities, about enabling others to break free of limits – created organizationally or self-imposed. Although this book describes the author's personal journey, it contains profound messages about organizational learning and effectiveness." – Scientific American


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We’ve all had those perfect moments when events that could never be predicted, let alone controlled, remarkably seem to guide us along our path. Carl Jung called this phenomena “synchronicity” – “a collaboration between persons and events that seems to enlist the cooperation of fate.” In this book, Joseph Jaworski argues that the right state of mind will make you the kind We’ve all had those perfect moments when events that could never be predicted, let alone controlled, remarkably seem to guide us along our path. Carl Jung called this phenomena “synchronicity” – “a collaboration between persons and events that seems to enlist the cooperation of fate.” In this book, Joseph Jaworski argues that the right state of mind will make you the kind of person who can enlist the cooperation of fate and take advantage of synchronicity, creating the conditions for “predictable miracles.” If you are tired of being the victim of circumstances, this book will teach you to be the kind of person who creates your own circumstances. Jaworski shares the story of his own escape from an inauthentic life and his journey into a world filled with possibility. He maps out the inner path of leadership for those who feel the call to achieve their full potential, using his own life story to teach readers a greater truth. He examines the fundamental shifts of mind that free us to seek out the power of synchronicity. After reading this book, you will discover your own power to help those realities unfold. You will learn to “listen” to realities that want to emerge in this world and acquire the courage to help them be born. "Synchronicity illustrates that leadership is about the release of human possibilities, about enabling others to break free of limits – created organizationally or self-imposed. Although this book describes the author's personal journey, it contains profound messages about organizational learning and effectiveness." – Scientific American

30 review for Synchronicity: The Inner Path of Leadership (BK Business)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    I could subtitle this book "a hero's journey for the 1%". It's an interesting read on how the author reacted to a lot of the challenges of his life. That said, was hard for me to be enthusiastic about how he got there, because this is obviously a person born into privilege, who can have immediate access to important people whenever he wants. I was laughing out loud when he wrote about how he "ran into" Fran Tarkington, who immediately shared personal details with him. This book is full of anecdo I could subtitle this book "a hero's journey for the 1%". It's an interesting read on how the author reacted to a lot of the challenges of his life. That said, was hard for me to be enthusiastic about how he got there, because this is obviously a person born into privilege, who can have immediate access to important people whenever he wants. I was laughing out loud when he wrote about how he "ran into" Fran Tarkington, who immediately shared personal details with him. This book is full of anecdotes like this - the average person doesn't just "run into" the rich and famous, and engage in intimate conversation with them.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Annemieke Windt

    Joseph Jaworsky - Synchronicity, The Inner Path of Leadership Well, ehm, I just earlier tonight wrote about how I might sometimes come to read a book by a strange incident or the way I happen to come across it. My choice to read Synchronicity had a direct relation with one of the destinations on my trip to France, Chartres and its medival cathedral. I wanted to visit the cathedral ever since 2001 and once even had already booked a hotel in the town when I had to cancel two years ago. My finances Joseph Jaworsky - Synchronicity, The Inner Path of Leadership Well, ehm, I just earlier tonight wrote about how I might sometimes come to read a book by a strange incident or the way I happen to come across it. My choice to read Synchronicity had a direct relation with one of the destinations on my trip to France, Chartres and its medival cathedral. I wanted to visit the cathedral ever since 2001 and once even had already booked a hotel in the town when I had to cancel two years ago. My finances simply didn't allow me to go away. (Maybe I should be more careful about the books I buy). When before the Summer break I told a colleague of mine that I was going to visit Chartres he told me about the book by Jaworsky, telling me as well that he wants to visit the cathedral ever since reading the book. So at night at home I set about trying to find a copy without have to spend too much money on it. So I found it second hand on Amazon. Determined to read it before coming to Chartres I spend the trip to Paris finishing the book. Now, the book may sound like a self help book, to get all you want without having to work too hard. Well, that's not the case. Jaworsky describes how he came to found the course for the American Leadership Forum, believing that the world needed a new kind of leadership, where personal responsibility and collaboration go together. New leaders aren't dictators, but servants to the people they lead. Drawing on interviews with numerous people, his own pittfalls and challenges he makes a case for new leadership, also writing that when people do something that's in flow, then the next steps and help will show themselves. But don't expect an indepth description of the cathedral, his description only takes up half a page. Mentally getting ready to go back to teaching, it's was a good book to help me thinking about the things I find important in my work. Without the get rich in thirty seconds it was an exercise in the challenges I will face and what would really be the thing to get my 'flow' going. http://whattoreadandwhatnot.blogspot....

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jay Hennessey

    I am trying to reserve 5 Stars for books that were not only written well, but really influenced my perspective — this book sets the bar pretty high. For those that know me, you have likely heard me talk about the concept of Synchronicity for many years. It has been something that I have become increasingly aware. In this book, the author does a great job of sharing his life journey, illustrating along the way the moments where things “seemed to line up” — things that make you say, “wow, what are t I am trying to reserve 5 Stars for books that were not only written well, but really influenced my perspective — this book sets the bar pretty high. For those that know me, you have likely heard me talk about the concept of Synchronicity for many years. It has been something that I have become increasingly aware. In this book, the author does a great job of sharing his life journey, illustrating along the way the moments where things “seemed to line up” — things that make you say, “wow, what are the chances of that....I was just thinking about XXX and I get a call from XXX.” Perhaps even more interesting than the chronology of synchronistic moments, are the contacts with whom the author met and how they influenced him. Being a huge fan of Peter Senge (5th Discipline), that contact really jumped out. Additionally, my curiosity for learning and leadership made this book especially significant as well, as the Jaworski walks through his vision and execution for a leadership “school” - American Leadership Forum. In the final few chapters, Jaworski goes deep into the philosophy of synchronicity - for me, I had to really slow down the read. Finally, my paperback is filled with blue ink, underlining passages, scribbled stars, and 18 “letter B’s” circled in the margins - 1 for every book recommendation from the author. There are others as well, but these are the ones that I have yet to read. I recommend this book to anyone with an open mind who is interested in the topics of Synchronicity, Learning or Leadership. If you are a conventional thinker, you will hate this book, so don’t bother. Last point - if you like this book, I would highly recommend Deepak Chopra’s The Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sky Nelson-Isaacs

    I love Jaworski's application of meaningful coincidences to organizations.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Why this book: I met David Winkelman, a fascinating man who is a ‘Visual Problem Solver’ at a recent networking event. During our discussion, I mentioned that I had just read The Alchemist. He told me that if I liked The Alchemist, I’d like Synchronicity. It is almost a business leader’s handbook to The Alchemist. So I ordered it that day and began to read it. My Impressions: Synchronicity is an autobiographical account of the evolution of Joe Jaworski’s beliefs about himself and the world we liv Why this book: I met David Winkelman, a fascinating man who is a ‘Visual Problem Solver’ at a recent networking event. During our discussion, I mentioned that I had just read The Alchemist. He told me that if I liked The Alchemist, I’d like Synchronicity. It is almost a business leader’s handbook to The Alchemist. So I ordered it that day and began to read it. My Impressions: Synchronicity is an autobiographical account of the evolution of Joe Jaworski’s beliefs about himself and the world we live in. He began life as the son of world renowned Watergate prosecutor Leon Jaworski, then became a successful attorney and partner in a very successful law firm,. Then his life fell apart, and in his recovery, he evolved into something of a guru and change-agent in the world of leadership, and business. I can imagine that some people, especially pragmatic business people, will find Jaworski’s Synchronicity a bit too ‘woo-woo’ for their tastes. Jaworski describes for us a metaphysics which says that with our attitude and openness, we shape the world we live in and create our own lives and opportunities. He gives numerous examples from his own life and regularly calls on insights from his discussions with David Bohm, renowned Quantum theory physicist and colleague of Einstein’s. Bohm’s research and theories point to an inter-dependence of all of us as thinking beings. Bohm argued that our thoughts do not occur independently from others. Rather, our thoughts are connected to other people’s thoughts, influence and are influenced by others people’s thoughts, influence our reality and are part of a ‘system’ of thoughts and thinking. In other words, we are not independent conscious beings, but our consciousnesses are inter-dependent and connected in ways most of us don’t realize. Jaworski then seems to argue not only that we have a destiny, but also that we create our own destiny – there is a path we are on, but we can shape or create our path. There is almost a freedom vs determinism tension in this view, similar to what one finds in Stoicism and other philosophies. Jaworski says that life is really all about our ‘relationships.’ Our lives are defined by our relationships to people, things, our environment, and our society. He takes this idea and expands on its implications for how we live and how we should lead – ourselves, our colleagues, our organizations, and our society. It is an expansion on the theme of The Alchemist –that whatever our heart truly desires and believes in fully, the whole universe conspires to help us achieve it. He makes the case that we attract the events that affect our lives, by ‘tuning in’ to our environment, paying attention to ourselves and what is happening around us, and consciously or unconsciously, sending out the right signals. Many will argue with this, and I could argue against this as well, but I find that in fact, I believe in his views – they seem to fit with my own experience. To read the rest of my review, go to: https://bobsbeenreading.wordpress.com...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Karen Roberts

    Jaworski has had some interesting experiences that have helped to shape his philosophy. He focuses upon "predictable miracles" and attracting people who think differently, thereby creating solutions and innovation. I've had similar experiences, only I have called them miracles and divine appointments. Throughout the book, I expected him to come to the conclusion that God was orchestrating his life. However, he has given the credit to the Source, teasing the reader to read his next book, "The Sou Jaworski has had some interesting experiences that have helped to shape his philosophy. He focuses upon "predictable miracles" and attracting people who think differently, thereby creating solutions and innovation. I've had similar experiences, only I have called them miracles and divine appointments. Throughout the book, I expected him to come to the conclusion that God was orchestrating his life. However, he has given the credit to the Source, teasing the reader to read his next book, "The Source." I read reviews of "The Source," and he writes of God, but according to the reviews never really accepts God as the Creator of the Universe. I pray that Jaworski comes to know the True Source, Almighty God.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Peep Laja

    Synchronicity is meaningful coincidences that cannot be explained by cause and effect. This is a very inspiring book. You should read it before embarking on a journey to achieve your dream. It is about importance of finding your true self, listening to your gut and seizing opportunities. It is not one of those teacher meets pupils kind of books where the guru tells you how to live, it is much more than that. The author tells his life story and wonders about life on the way. If you read "Alchemis Synchronicity is meaningful coincidences that cannot be explained by cause and effect. This is a very inspiring book. You should read it before embarking on a journey to achieve your dream. It is about importance of finding your true self, listening to your gut and seizing opportunities. It is not one of those teacher meets pupils kind of books where the guru tells you how to live, it is much more than that. The author tells his life story and wonders about life on the way. If you read "Alchemist" by Paulo Coelho where he wrote "if you really want something, all the universe will conspire with you", now you will understand what it means.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Janine

    I have probably read this book about three times now and each time I gain something different from it. While some will struggle with the writers journey to self actualization and see it as a narcissistic rant (I did have one client tell me this), I personally found it aspirational. If a successful lawyer living a life of desirable consumerism (he drove one of my favourite cars, a DB9) can give all that up for something more meaningful in life....then there's hope for the rest of us!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    I chose this book for a college leadership class. It is very focused on following your inner path and listening to your intuition. Attracting people into your circle that will help you grow into your full potential. I liken Joe's story to the epitome of Maslow's hierarchy of needs. He is a successful lawyer proceeding to look for his higher purpose. For this reason it is hard for me to relate to, as he travels back and forth across the world seemingly on a whim.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Wooten

    Love, love, love this book. Anyone who is in leadership and who is into the law of attraction will be attracted to this book. Easy read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda Sue

    This is an excellent book, but I would call it a business memoir of sorts as it follows the personal path of the author. If the last name is familiar to you, it's because the author's dad was Leon Jaworski, the special prosecutor during Watergate. There are some fabulous books to read and you can find those in the notes at the end of the book. I've already ordered a bunch. Synchronicity is a meaningful coincidence of two or more events, where something other than the probability of chance is invo This is an excellent book, but I would call it a business memoir of sorts as it follows the personal path of the author. If the last name is familiar to you, it's because the author's dad was Leon Jaworski, the special prosecutor during Watergate. There are some fabulous books to read and you can find those in the notes at the end of the book. I've already ordered a bunch. Synchronicity is a meaningful coincidence of two or more events, where something other than the probability of chance is involved. We start off with Watergate, 1973, Houston, where the author is from. His dad is from a big law firm and they're well to do. The author follows in his dad's footsteps, becomes a trial lawyer, owns some businesses, his marriage dissolves, and he travels to find himself. He's pretty aggressive and works his way into the Grand Prix, among other things. During his journey he reads seminal books from the likes of Robert Greenleaf, David Bohm, Richard Bach, Eric Fromm, Joseph Campbell, and John Gardner (see end notes for titles). From the elements of love to oneness and connecting with the universe we move to servant leadership. The idea is born to create the American Leadership Forum (ALF), which is the author's goal and dream, which he eventually leaves the practice of law for. Part 2 takes us from the law firm to meeting with David Bohm, a huge influence. Now the author is open to all sorts of events in his life and he meets his future wife. Part 3 takes us into the hero's journey and how connections matter and how they happen. All sorts of doors open for Joseph and we're talking big names, influential people in society. He travels a great deal, relocates to London for a few years, and incorporates outward bound/wilderness training into his program. It's about 1981, and he is able to get top dogs to be on the board of ALF, no easy task. Some of the principles in the book or at ALF include: dialogue, collective thinking, being in the flow, the power of commitment, generative order, and implicate order (Bohm). The author ran into traps of course, but he pressed on. Part 4 is the gift and moving forth again. He goes to work with the Shell Group, gets into scenario planning, runs into barricades, develops new frontiers, creating the future, predictable miracles. We need to be open and shift in how we see the world. Be intuitive. Part 5 continues the journey. There are excerpts from letters about the book. Very good stuff. Then there's a chapter on shifting the prevailing belief system. The U Theory, open and emergent, the universe is a domain of undivided wholeness, etc., eastern philosophy takes over here, meditation, mindfulness, and being present. Humans can learn to draw from the infinite potential of the Source by choosing to follow a disciplined path toward self-realization and love, the most powerful energy in the universe. We close with "Invoked or not, God is present." Carl Jung. As I said, there are at least 10 books to read from here. We're dealing with out of the box thinking, global service, how to be the best leader, a servant leader. For regular folks, it may be tough finding connections like the author. It's nice to be in the 1%. However, there are some great concepts here and if you're in a leadership role, I highly recommend this book to you and your team. Your CEO needs to read it too.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Knecht

    The author describes his personal path of spiritual awakening. Through his awakening, he discovered how to use leadership while serving others. The book is written from a personal perspective, starting from the days when he was just a lawyer, married to his high school sweetheart and up to the days when serendipity brought him in touch with a higher aim. Some quotes I liked: -Leadership is about creating a domain in which human beings continually deepen their understanding of reality and become m The author describes his personal path of spiritual awakening. Through his awakening, he discovered how to use leadership while serving others. The book is written from a personal perspective, starting from the days when he was just a lawyer, married to his high school sweetheart and up to the days when serendipity brought him in touch with a higher aim. Some quotes I liked: -Leadership is about creating a domain in which human beings continually deepen their understanding of reality and become more capable of participating in the unfolding of the world. Ultimately, leadership is about creating new realities. -But if we are to participate in the unfolding process of the universe, we must let life flow through us, rather than attempt to control life. -Later in his remarks Dr. Ball mentioned that human life, according to the scriptures, is not a matter of having arrived somewhere, but it’s a matter of being on the road, being on the way, a matter of becoming. -In the Implicate Order, the totality of existence is enfolded within each “fragment” of space and time—whether it be a single object, thought or event. Thus everything in the universe affects everything else because they are all part of the same unbroken whole. -I had a sense of destiny as though my life was assigned to me by fate and had to be fulfilled. This gave me an inner security. . . . Often I had the feeling that in all decisive matters, I was no longer among men, but was alone with God. -All matter and the universe are continually in motion. At a level we cannot see, there is an unbroken wholeness, an “implicate order” out of which seemingly discrete events arise. All human beings are part of that unbroken whole which is continually unfolding. One of our responsibilities in life is to be open and learn, thereby becoming more capable of sensing and actualizing emerging new realities. -The ability to perceive or think differently is more important than the knowledge gained.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kc

    This book details the author's journey to discover synchronicity in the world and apply it to his leadership roles. Several times in the book, the author states that we as humans do not have the language to describe the feeling, the connectivity of a group in dialogue or the oneness of all things. I agree, the author still did not have the right language and many times feel into phrases more common to a hippy spiritual awakening than a book on business leadership. In general, the writing is very This book details the author's journey to discover synchronicity in the world and apply it to his leadership roles. Several times in the book, the author states that we as humans do not have the language to describe the feeling, the connectivity of a group in dialogue or the oneness of all things. I agree, the author still did not have the right language and many times feel into phrases more common to a hippy spiritual awakening than a book on business leadership. In general, the writing is very difficult to read because the words do not flow. I read some of the book out loud to try to hear if there was a flow when read aloud and there was not. I have felt synchronicity within a group and the book tried to explain how to maintain that feeling but by focusing on only the author and how he was either in or out, it did not help with how you can keep the group connected.

  14. 4 out of 5

    pernille

    A central purpose of writing this book is to propose an alternative: if individuals and organisations operate from the generative orientation, from possibility rather than resignation, we can create the future into which we are living, as opposed to merely reacting to it when we get there." A fascinating read into a truly remarkable life. The insights and lessons Jaworski learned along his journey strikes a chord deep within the soul, and is still so relevant today: to sense ourselves and one ano A central purpose of writing this book is to propose an alternative: if individuals and organisations operate from the generative orientation, from possibility rather than resignation, we can create the future into which we are living, as opposed to merely reacting to it when we get there." A fascinating read into a truly remarkable life. The insights and lessons Jaworski learned along his journey strikes a chord deep within the soul, and is still so relevant today: to sense ourselves and one another, to co-create and collectively shape a better future for earth and ourselves. 4.5 stars

  15. 4 out of 5

    Florence Dambricourt

    For whoever has already explored the concept of the "leader as a servant" this is not going to rock your world, rather makes it stronger. Through the writer own story we revisits in portant concept on synchronicity, purpose, listening to one 's own heart. Now synchronicity is good when you take action, if you do not have an active role, do not expect things to come tour way. The actions create the space for the opportunity to happen. Enjoy the reading... And the synchronicity.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Scott Wozniak

    This is the personal story of how the author moved from going through the motions of life to living fully alive and with purpose. I have some differences on the philosophical worldview that he ends up choosing, but I agree with the big ideas of stopping and evaluating your life, of living on purpose and the fundamental role of relationships for even physical matter.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Samuel

    Synchronicity is an intensely personal and compelling book. Jaworski's life demonstrates that the immense cultural and institutional change that a possible future demand can begin anytime, anywhere, in anyone, even those who have benefited greatly from the old order of things. I'm was grateful that Joe Jaworski let us travel with him on this 'the inner path journey of leadership.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Brandt

    A book that talks about relationships and the unfolding of life through them. Among them the coincidences that make us believe in some kind of Synchronicity, well described in the book through the author's personal experiences. My notes on the book are on this website: https://esselivroeuli.blogspot.com/20... A book that talks about relationships and the unfolding of life through them. Among them the coincidences that make us believe in some kind of Synchronicity, well described in the book through the author's personal experiences. My notes on the book are on this website: https://esselivroeuli.blogspot.com/20...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cristina Smith

    This is one of my favorite books on leadership. It approaches it both from the inside out and the outside in. Highly recommended for anyone who has a vision they want to put on the ground, entrepreneurs, authors and those feeling a stirring inside for change.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kate Corsen

    My favorite quote of the book was in the introduction. "Leadership exists when people are no longer victims of circumstances but participate in creating new circumstances."because it sets the stage for the interconnections of life and leadership.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Schaft

    I really liked the first part, but after the ‘oh my god he’s just another upper class white dude’ I totally fell out of touch with the book. I wonder what his ex-wife thinks of him, now that would be a book worth reading.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Drew Clancy

    A powerful story about the author's growth and transformation. Inspiring and thought-provoking.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Marthy Leermans

    One word: Truth

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alexander ter Hark

    An unbiased and candid description of Servant Leadership in practice.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ana Bernardes

    Inspiring book

  26. 5 out of 5

    Merxhan Emini

    Amazing book written in a unique way comparing to other spiritual leadership books I have read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    I struggled a bit with Synchronicity, but on the whole, it was very worthwhile reading. There were times when the author was too "out there" for me, though he might view some of my own beliefs in a similar fashion. At other times, what he learned and conveyed, the points he was trying to get across to his reader, made perfect sense within my own world view. Mostly, I thought it was often thought-provoking, sometimes even inspiring, and well worth the read. In his own way, and as a result of his I struggled a bit with Synchronicity, but on the whole, it was very worthwhile reading. There were times when the author was too "out there" for me, though he might view some of my own beliefs in a similar fashion. At other times, what he learned and conveyed, the points he was trying to get across to his reader, made perfect sense within my own world view. Mostly, I thought it was often thought-provoking, sometimes even inspiring, and well worth the read. In his own way, and as a result of his life experiences, he seems to have come to some very similar conclusions as I. Consider the following: 1. "I discovered that people are not really afraid of dying, they're afraid of not ever having lived." I think that is very true, and sometimes it leads people to good, productive, uplifting behavior, while other times it does not. 2. "...this new understanding if what's missing in how we think about leadership. We're always talking about what leaders do -- about leadership style and function -- but we put very little emphasis on the being aspect of leadership." 3. (Referencing Greenleaf) "The essence of leadership...is the desire to serve another and to serve something beyond ourselves, a higher purpose." 4. "Leadership is all about the release of human possibilities." 5. "Dialogue does not require people to agree with each other. Instead, it encourages people to participate in a pool of shared meaning that leads to aligned action...out of thes new shared meaning, people can and will take coordinated and effective action without necessarily agreeing about the reasons for the action. When people sit in dialogue together, they are exercising leadership as a whole." 6. "When we are in the process of creating something, we must have the flexibility of mind to move with what needs to be done. What allows this to happen is precisely the fact that we're not attached to how things should be done...We get attached to our assumptions about how things should get done, and we lose sight of what we're trying to create. This notion of focusing on the results is a fundamental premise..." 7. "How do you know people are committed? Because they are taking action. They are crossing the threshold of adventure, and this is the necessary first step toward the inner transformation Greenleaf spoke about." 8. "I realized that small changes at just the right place can have a systemwide impact." 9. "To put it another way, we do not describe the world we see, but we see the world we describe." 10. "If individuals and organizations operate from the generative orientation, from possibility rather than resignation, we can create the future into which we are living, as opposed to merely reacting to it when we get there." 11. "...true leadership is about creating a domain in which we continually learn and become more capable of participating in our unfolding future. A true leader thus sets the stage on which predictable miracles, synchronistic in nature, can -- and do -- occur. The capacity to discover and participate in our unfolding future has more to do with out being -- our total orientation of character and consciousness -- than with what we do." 12. "Everything I have studied...has confirmed to me that relationship is the organizing principle of the universe." 13. "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." He (re)told this story at the end of the book: "Tell me the weight of a snowflake," a coal-mouse asked a wild dove. "Nothing more than nothing," was the answer. "In that case, I must tell you a marvelous story," the coal-mouse said. "I sat on the branch of a fir, close to its trunk, when it began to snow -- not heavily, not in a raging blizzard -- no, just like in a dream, without a wound and without any violence. Since I did not have anything better to do, I counted the snowflakes settling on the twigs and needles of my branch. Their number was exactly 3,741,952. When the 3,741,953rd dropped onto the branch, nothing more than nothing, as you say -- the branch broke off. Having said that, the coal-mouse flew away. The dove, since Noah's time an authority on the matter, thought about the story for awhile, and finally said to herself, "Perhaps there is only one person's voice lacking for peace to come to the world." As Jaworski said, "Perhaps there is only one person's voice lacking for peace to come to the world." Or to a person, a family, a neighborhood, a community, or an organization.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Neelesh Marik

    What stands out in this book is the deeply personal nature of the story of the developmental movement of the author over time, narrated through a first person account of second person interactions and third person observations. In summary, it is the flesh-and-bones discovery and enactment of walking the fine edge between letting things happen and making things happen. From Robert Greenleaf’s categorization of servant leaders (called Stage 3 by Scott Peck), Joe paints the evolving nature of Stage What stands out in this book is the deeply personal nature of the story of the developmental movement of the author over time, narrated through a first person account of second person interactions and third person observations. In summary, it is the flesh-and-bones discovery and enactment of walking the fine edge between letting things happen and making things happen. From Robert Greenleaf’s categorization of servant leaders (called Stage 3 by Scott Peck), Joe paints the evolving nature of Stage 4 leaders, who believe that ‘there is an underlying intelligence within the universe that is capable of guiding us and preparing us for the futures we must create.’ A new capacity for accessing tacit knowing is combined with sharpened cognition to shape a personal sense of possibility – the possibility of ‘actualizing hidden potentials lying dormant in the universe’. Building on breakthrough insights from the likes of Joseph Campbell, David Bohm and Francesco Varela, we are made aware of the three traps of modernist thinking: • The trap of responsibility: identifying oneself with the indispensable ‘General Manager’ • The trap of dependency: the obsession with particular individuals as being indispensable • The trap of over-activity: the glorification of the ‘busy’ The latter half of the book introduces the U-process of letting go and letting come, in the context four key shifts in the Newtonian – Cartesian belief system that are so critical to the human journey in the 21st century: 1. There is an open and emergent quality to the universe: what Alfred North Whitehead refers to ‘the creative advance of novelty’ from components at a higher level of self-organization 2. The universe is a domain of undivided wholeness: the holographic principle of the whole subsumed in the part as well the part subsumed in the whole, of which both the material world and consciousness are intertwined 3. There is a creative Source of infinite potential enfolded in the universe: this has been called by various names such as ‘Tao’, ‘qi’, ‘prana’, ‘Akashic record’, ‘implicate order’, ‘zero point vacuum’ among many others 4. Humans can learn to tap into the Source: by direct exposure to, and allowing of the generative processes of nature I use prosaic license to rewrite the concluding line of this narrative of inspiration: ‘Invoked or not invoked, the Source is always present’.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Margie Adler

    This is still one of the best books on leadership that I've ever read. I read the first edition some years ago, and there were times I had to put the book down and just breath. I felt that someone was writing my thoughts, giving them coherence, and by doing so making me feel completely understood. At the same time, Synchronicity gave me inspiration and hope. The second is even better. Why? Jaworski has learned, grown, thought more deeply, lived the learning and applied the principles. He's made This is still one of the best books on leadership that I've ever read. I read the first edition some years ago, and there were times I had to put the book down and just breath. I felt that someone was writing my thoughts, giving them coherence, and by doing so making me feel completely understood. At the same time, Synchronicity gave me inspiration and hope. The second is even better. Why? Jaworski has learned, grown, thought more deeply, lived the learning and applied the principles. He's made more synchronous connection. Jaworski's personal story is a compelling one, although as smart, insightful, intuitive and awake he becomes in his transformative journey, I still wonder about some of the choices that he makes. He is openly vulnerable and his journey demonstrates the power of synchronicity, collective, coherent thinking, and not just using but living the U Theory principles. Jaworski shows us how we go deep inside to connect and give space for what we need to go out into the world. Then we go out there do our work…never alone…always most effectively in collaboration with others within the body of the collective. I keep Jaworski's work beside me at my desk along with a handful of others. It reminds me of what might be possible, and frankly, I need that reminder more often right now.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jean M.

    It took me some time to get into this book as he spends a significant amount of time building up to the magic he offers at the end. It is full of story, but through the story of his life you start to see how the magic of synchronicity works. That idea of committing to something and then as Joseph Campbell said, "doors will open for you where you would have never thought there would be doors and where there would not be doors for anyone else." Or something magnificent along those lines. If you wan It took me some time to get into this book as he spends a significant amount of time building up to the magic he offers at the end. It is full of story, but through the story of his life you start to see how the magic of synchronicity works. That idea of committing to something and then as Joseph Campbell said, "doors will open for you where you would have never thought there would be doors and where there would not be doors for anyone else." Or something magnificent along those lines. If you want to understand why servant leadership makes sense, read this. If you want to believe in the magic of intuition and commitment, read this. If you want to have some hope that people in powerful places have good hearts and positive intentions, read this. Really valuable. I will be sparking on it for months.

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