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Fables Vol. 2: Animal Farm (Fables

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Ever since they were driven from their homelands by the Adversary, the non-human Fables have been living on the Farm—a vast property in upstate New York that keeps them hidden from the prying eyes of the mundane world. But now, after hundreds of years of isolation, the Farm is seething with revolution, fanned by the inflammatory rhetoric of Goldilocks and the Three Little Ever since they were driven from their homelands by the Adversary, the non-human Fables have been living on the Farm—a vast property in upstate New York that keeps them hidden from the prying eyes of the mundane world. But now, after hundreds of years of isolation, the Farm is seething with revolution, fanned by the inflammatory rhetoric of Goldilocks and the Three Little Pigs. And when Snow White and her sister Rose Red stumble upon their plan to liberate the Homelands, the commissars of the Farm are ready to silence them—by any means necessary! Collecting the second story arc of creator and writers Bill Willingham's acclaimed series Fables, Animal Farm feature the stunning artwork of penciller Mark Buckingham and inker Steve Leialoha, and includes a special sketchbook section of preliminary artwork from Willingham, Buckingham, and cover artist James Jean. Collecting: Fables 6-10


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Ever since they were driven from their homelands by the Adversary, the non-human Fables have been living on the Farm—a vast property in upstate New York that keeps them hidden from the prying eyes of the mundane world. But now, after hundreds of years of isolation, the Farm is seething with revolution, fanned by the inflammatory rhetoric of Goldilocks and the Three Little Ever since they were driven from their homelands by the Adversary, the non-human Fables have been living on the Farm—a vast property in upstate New York that keeps them hidden from the prying eyes of the mundane world. But now, after hundreds of years of isolation, the Farm is seething with revolution, fanned by the inflammatory rhetoric of Goldilocks and the Three Little Pigs. And when Snow White and her sister Rose Red stumble upon their plan to liberate the Homelands, the commissars of the Farm are ready to silence them—by any means necessary! Collecting the second story arc of creator and writers Bill Willingham's acclaimed series Fables, Animal Farm feature the stunning artwork of penciller Mark Buckingham and inker Steve Leialoha, and includes a special sketchbook section of preliminary artwork from Willingham, Buckingham, and cover artist James Jean. Collecting: Fables 6-10

30 review for Fables Vol. 2: Animal Farm (Fables

  1. 4 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    I'm trying to get through this series, but it isn't getting any better. The dialogue is so wooden, and everyone has the same personality and tells the same lame jokes. There's no character to these characters, and the art isn't helping. I'm getting the distinct impression that Willingham doesn't have a very good grip on his world and as such, there's no gradual reveal of details. The conflict in this arc is painted in broad strokes, dividing good guys and bad guys cleanly, but Willingham never re I'm trying to get through this series, but it isn't getting any better. The dialogue is so wooden, and everyone has the same personality and tells the same lame jokes. There's no character to these characters, and the art isn't helping. I'm getting the distinct impression that Willingham doesn't have a very good grip on his world and as such, there's no gradual reveal of details. The conflict in this arc is painted in broad strokes, dividing good guys and bad guys cleanly, but Willingham never really sells any of it to us. And that's his problem in general: he's giving us archetypes and conflicts, but doesn't do anything with them. It's a basic story written without elegance. There are no surprises or insights here. Pick an X-Comic at random off the shelf and you'll probably get more vivid characters and engaging dialogue than we're getting here. This is Syfy made-for-TV quality here, but without the relief of flashy action, gratuitous sex, and so-bad-it's-fun CG monsters. This one does have more action than the first arc, but still less action than the average Fairy Tale. Those issues showed that Willingham was perfectly capable of name-checking fairy tales without seeming to know anything about them. In this arc, he does the same thing with Animal Farm. It reminds me of reading Millar. The guy seems to recognize that, as an author, he's meant to kind of smoosh different ideas together, and have a conflict and some attractive people doing stuff in the forefront, but beyond that, it's a wash. I'm not getting a vision or a philosophy or even an original voice on the other side, just an inexpert rehash of what they think writers are supposed to do. It just makes me think of all the great series that have been canceled, all the great writers who are out there struggling, and yet this gets a hundred issues? I know popular tastes are never a sign of quality, but most at least deliver a thrill, if only a cheap one. I don't get the success here, at all. I guess I'll keep going and see if I can find some redemption, but there isn't any piece of characterization, plot, or writing that isn't put to shame by any other Vertigo title. Maybe this a Rob Liefeld thing. Everyone on the internet makes fun of Rob for his laughable anatomy, ripoff characters, and endless iterations of 'base attack' plots, but I've heard that Rob is a perfectly nice guy and gets work done on time. Maybe Willingham's success is just a case of an upbeat attitude and meeting a schedule? I'm reminded of straight-A students who didn't seem to have an original thought in their heads but nevertheless did all their work and turned it in on time. I guess I always imagined them toiling happily in middle management, not making a go in a creative field. It's not even that it's insulting or stupid, like most one-star books, it's just unremarkable. It never even musters enough energy to be inadvertently funny. The art is more varied with the switch in penciller, but Buckingham seems to be dulling down his style to better match with the series, which is a shame. Maybe Willingham will get his feet under him as things go along. I sure hope so, because otherwise I'm just banging my head against a wall for no reason. My Suggested Reading In Comics

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sh3lly

    The second volume is about a revolution on the Fable farm, started by the non-human looking fairy-tale characters. They are sick of being stuck on the farm and want to be free to live among the "mundys" (humans). We get to see The Three Little Pigs, characters from The Jungle Book, and Goldilocks - who is a villain and was raised by Papa and Mama Bear and has a weird relationship with Baby Bear. Snow White is sent to the farm to find out what is going on when the administrator goes missing. She t The second volume is about a revolution on the Fable farm, started by the non-human looking fairy-tale characters. They are sick of being stuck on the farm and want to be free to live among the "mundys" (humans). We get to see The Three Little Pigs, characters from The Jungle Book, and Goldilocks - who is a villain and was raised by Papa and Mama Bear and has a weird relationship with Baby Bear. Snow White is sent to the farm to find out what is going on when the administrator goes missing. She takes Rose Red with her. I liked this one, maybe even better than volume one. Snow White was much more likable and wasn't a damsel in distress. Rose Red is infuriating and such a brat. I hope now that she has something to do, she will grow up, and stop being bitter. Even though she does actually help, she was still really annoying. :P I enjoyed the illustrations, there was humor, it's a bit twisted... pretty much everything I like in a graphic novel. Definitely continuing the series.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    This is Fables take on Animal Farm. Snow and Rose head up to the upstate farm to have some bonding time. When they get there they encounter a secret meeting taking place. Things are a little off and Weyland, the care taker, is no where to be seen. All the animals from stories are up here on the farm. The animals from the Jungle Book, nursery rhymes. Rose figures out what is happening. It's a nicely told tale and the giants are in this one as well. There are lots of moments of whose side is this c This is Fables take on Animal Farm. Snow and Rose head up to the upstate farm to have some bonding time. When they get there they encounter a secret meeting taking place. Things are a little off and Weyland, the care taker, is no where to be seen. All the animals from stories are up here on the farm. The animals from the Jungle Book, nursery rhymes. Rose figures out what is happening. It's a nicely told tale and the giants are in this one as well. There are lots of moments of whose side is this character really on? Goldilocks is living at the farm and she is one of the ring leaders. I enjoyed the art and the story. There are many issues forward and I am into reading the next few for certain.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlin

    I'm finally continuing with the Fables Series and I have to say I am very excited to be doing so! I have had the next couple since September and just never got around to them last year, but I knew I would enjoy them when i did and this was certainly one I did enjoy. Fables is a story following all sorts of fairytale, storybook and fable characters from all sorts of cultures and tales. We have a few major character so far including Snow White, Rose Red and Bigby the Wolf, but there's a lot of diff I'm finally continuing with the Fables Series and I have to say I am very excited to be doing so! I have had the next couple since September and just never got around to them last year, but I knew I would enjoy them when i did and this was certainly one I did enjoy. Fables is a story following all sorts of fairytale, storybook and fable characters from all sorts of cultures and tales. We have a few major character so far including Snow White, Rose Red and Bigby the Wolf, but there's a lot of different cameo moments from all sorts of characters. This story mostly focused on a play on the Animal Farm idea (hence the title) by Orwell and although I haven't actually read Animal Farm myself I definitely got the references and felt it was an exciting adaptation. The artwork of this series isn't my favourite at times but it works well enough to communicate the story and get the drama and intensity across and that's certainly important in this issue where there are some pretty dramatic moments! On the whole definitely a great read which didn't take me long and which I really enjoyed so I will soon be continuing on with the series. 4*s overall :)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sara *~The Loquacious Lassie~*

    Damn, do I love this series. Have you ever read a book that made you feel that bone-deep euphoria? The feeling that the author somehow crawled into your mind and picked out the things you love the most to craft a novel just for you? That is what the Fables series does for me. I grew up in the 80's/90's, so naturally I was obsessed with Disney movies as a child. I am still halfway convinced that I am meant to be Belle. When my husband is at all beastly, I often think "If you're going to be a beas Damn, do I love this series. Have you ever read a book that made you feel that bone-deep euphoria? The feeling that the author somehow crawled into your mind and picked out the things you love the most to craft a novel just for you? That is what the Fables series does for me. I grew up in the 80's/90's, so naturally I was obsessed with Disney movies as a child. I am still halfway convinced that I am meant to be Belle. When my husband is at all beastly, I often think "If you're going to be a beast, the least you could do is give me a fucking library." *grumble, grumble* In this volume, Snow White and Rose Red take a trip to The Farm (this is where all of the animal fables must go- SEE, even Fables are racists). Unbeknownced to Snow, the animals are plotting to overthrow her for her support of their segregation and then to attempt to re-take their homelands by force. Many animals from favorite fairy tales/novels including Shere Khan and Bagheera from The Jungle Book, The Three Little Pigs, and even Reynard the Fox (trickster and apparent horn-ball) are featured. Snow proves that she's got some grit and kicks some serious ass in this one. She has certainly learned a lot since that whole apple incident. This series perfectly meshes my childhood love of fairy tales and princesses, with my very grown-up love of raunchy and dark humor. If you have ever dreamed of reading about how Baby Bear is hung like a horse and how he and Goldilocks do the nasty, this is the book for you! From now on, when I have a bad day, I am going to imagine The Little Old Lady Who Lived in a Shoe holding an assault rifle while one of her children screams about busting a cap in their enemy's ass. I mean- comic fantasy doesn't get much better than this. I absolutely adore this series! Up until now, I have only borrowed these from my library (both to keep my wallet padded and to continue my patronage to the single most important building in my town) but I am confidently buying them from now on as I am quite sure that this is a series that I will read and re-read many times in my life. Can I give 6 stars? No? Well, shit. 5 then...*harumph*

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    THE SERIES What if fairy tale characters existed in our world? And what if they had ways of not revealing themselves to us per their magic? This popular series focuses on such a concept. It has the usual archetypes and characters taking some liberties but always trying to make things interesting. Note that the focus is typically upon European fairy tales with a smidgen from other regions. As of 2012 this series has won 14 Eisner Awards, most notably Best Writer, Best Short Story and Best Series. T THE SERIES What if fairy tale characters existed in our world? And what if they had ways of not revealing themselves to us per their magic? This popular series focuses on such a concept. It has the usual archetypes and characters taking some liberties but always trying to make things interesting. Note that the focus is typically upon European fairy tales with a smidgen from other regions. As of 2012 this series has won 14 Eisner Awards, most notably Best Writer, Best Short Story and Best Series. There was talk of turning this into a TV series but instead ABC decided to go with “Once Upon A Time”. Bad move. Telltale Games announced the making of a video game in February 2011. Recommended for mature readers. BOOK TWO As part of her punishment Rose Red (the bad sister of Snow White) has been sent up the The Farm with Snow White. The Farm is where all the Fables who cannot pull off looking human are residing. Truth is that some of them feel like second class citizens and are taking extreme measures to change things. What ensues is a full fledged rebellion (and they're serious as they have stocked up with modern weaponry) which forces the inhabitants of the Farm to take sides. During this period Rose Red and Snow White work out some of their sibling differences. Appearances by a number of fairy tales. My favorites not mentioned above were: Shere Khan, Reynard, the Three Little Pigs, Goldilocks (totally different as you would imagine), Weyland Smith and Chicken Little. This covers issues 6-10 of the trade paperbacks. Written by Bill Willingham and artwork by Mark Buckingham. It arguably was intended to link itself with “Animal Farm” (“Some animals are more equal than others”) ARTWORK PRESENTATION: B to B plus; CHARACTERS/DIALOGUE: B plus to A minus; STORY/PLOTTING: B to B plus; FABLE FOCUSES: B plus; WHEN READ: 2010 (reviewed early October 2012 after a reread); OVERALL GRADE: B plus. (view spoiler)[ SPOILERS: the showdown between Shere Khan and Snow White was fun a la cat and mouse and then rat a tat tat with the special gun on a helmet. Nice take on Goldilocks sleeping with the youngest of the bears and having turned into a revolutionary terrorist hot wench. I like the way Jack treated her in the Jack Fables series. He had the right ideas in not trusting her. Well, that was a different story so I'm digressing. Heh. Nice idea that Fables are almost impossible to kill until humans (called Mundies in this series) forget about them. (hide spoiler)]

  7. 5 out of 5

    destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]

    In this issue of Fables, Snow White and Rose Red take a trip upstate to the Animal Farm to check on the non-human-passing Fables. Upon arriving, they find that Weyland Smith has gone missing, and two of the pigs have taken over the farm in leading an uprising revolution to take back the Homelands. This volume was a lot more dramatic than the first, and I really enjoyed seeing the Farm and the less human Fables! As usual, the artwork is beautiful and the plot was fully fleshed out within the confi In this issue of Fables, Snow White and Rose Red take a trip upstate to the Animal Farm to check on the non-human-passing Fables. Upon arriving, they find that Weyland Smith has gone missing, and two of the pigs have taken over the farm in leading an uprising revolution to take back the Homelands. This volume was a lot more dramatic than the first, and I really enjoyed seeing the Farm and the less human Fables! As usual, the artwork is beautiful and the plot was fully fleshed out within the confines of this one issue, which is a method I love in a graphic novel/comic book series.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    I will start this review with a confession. I've never read Animal Farm or Lord of the Flies, two literary classics that this volume of Animal Farm alludes to. However, even in my casual acquaintance with both books, I can see some parallels in the story. Animal Farm is more serious than Legends in Exile, the first volume. It deals with the question of the Fables who cannot blend into society like their more human counterparts. Snow White takes her sister Rose Red up to the farm to do her twice y I will start this review with a confession. I've never read Animal Farm or Lord of the Flies, two literary classics that this volume of Animal Farm alludes to. However, even in my casual acquaintance with both books, I can see some parallels in the story. Animal Farm is more serious than Legends in Exile, the first volume. It deals with the question of the Fables who cannot blend into society like their more human counterparts. Snow White takes her sister Rose Red up to the farm to do her twice yearly visit to find that it is in upheaval. A very grisly murder has taken place, and it was done to send a deliberate message. Many of the inhabitants of the Farm are ready to rebel and take back their rightful place in Fable society, eventually to go back to their Lands and overthrow the Adversary. Snow White's life is in great danger, and Rose Red is forced to choose between familial loyalty and self-interest. Will some of the Farm's fables stay on Snow's side, or will they all heed the call of revolution? This novel tackles heavy subjects, but there is still some good humor, most of it on the wry side. Some well known figures from the fairy tales come out as quite vicious and heinous in thought and deed. Some act true to form if you have read their origin books. I was quite surprised at the fate of some fairy tale characters that I never would have thought to meet such an end. Willingham reminds us that while he writes about fairy tales, this is very adult subject matter (although arguably the fairy tales have always included darker themes and content). Snow White has to wise up and get a game plan pretty fast, and fortunately, she does turn out to have strong allies. I have to say that I am pretty impressed with this graphic novel series. Yeah, I know I'm halfway there when it comes to most fairy tale adaptations. But I don't like all of them, just the good ones. And this is very well done. While Snow White is a flawed character (as well she should be), I really like and admire her. She understands duty and has integrity. She's an independent woman with a snarky mouth, but also a kind heart. Rose Red is growing on me, although the girl has some issues. Bigby Wolf doesn't have as big a part in this one, but I'm glad he showed up. I give a shoutout to Reynard Fox for being a very unlikely hero. I won't say more in fear of 'spoilers' (a side joke to River Song fans), but I am mourning a character for their sad demise as well. Different from the first volume, but just as good. Some dark imagery and disturbing content, but still in a strange way cheerful and diverting. So, 4.5/5.0 stars.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jonnie

    Ah! I have an intense, borderline creepy love for this series *heavy breathing* … Animal Farm is one solid story arc in the Fables series (issues 6-11) and if you've read Animal Farm by George Orwell, it will come as no surprise to know that this particular arc is about a revolt at the Farm: a property in upstate New York where non-human fables live, and ones who can't afford a glamour to disguise themselves as human beings are sent. Contrary to the light, fluffy fairytales we are read as childre Ah! I have an intense, borderline creepy love for this series *heavy breathing* … Animal Farm is one solid story arc in the Fables series (issues 6-11) and if you've read Animal Farm by George Orwell, it will come as no surprise to know that this particular arc is about a revolt at the Farm: a property in upstate New York where non-human fables live, and ones who can't afford a glamour to disguise themselves as human beings are sent. Contrary to the light, fluffy fairytales we are read as children, Bill Willingham's take on our favourite fables are dark, gritty and fascinating. Heroes -> Villains, Villains -> Heroes and everything else inbetween, Bluebeard notwithstanding (seriously that guy is a total jackass). Fables is a comic book series that deals with various characters from fairytales and folklore. After being forced out of the Homelands by the Adversary, they travel to our world and establish a secret community in New York known as Fabletown. If Fables aren't able to blend into the mundy world (i.e. trolls, giants, little people etc.) they get sent to the Farm. Animal Farm is equal parts hopeful and terrifying. I am SO glad I purchased it as a whole and not as individual issues because I swear some of the endings had me audibly gasping, flopping on the bed, frothing from the mouth…you know…normal reactions. What I liked the most was those "a-ha" moments when I realized who the character was, which story they belonged to, and how they differed from their storybook personas. I'm a Grimms lover through and through, so I found this darker take on fairytales particularly fascinating. Yeah, Prince Charming is a douchebag and Boy Blue brings out a slightly perverted version of myself I'd rather not admit to, but the premise of this entire series is so brilliant it scares me. This series deserves to be read through until the end.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Celise

    It says "For Mature Readers" on the back cover but I definitely want to emphasize that. This may be about the fable characters we loved as children (and adults, who am I kidding), but some of them are downright violent and cruel creatures in this. There were executions performed by Jack Ketch (which I thought was cool in a really disturbing way), who was an executioner back in the 1600s famous for botching his work. So picture that in coloured illustrations, as he beheads animals. As caught off g It says "For Mature Readers" on the back cover but I definitely want to emphasize that. This may be about the fable characters we loved as children (and adults, who am I kidding), but some of them are downright violent and cruel creatures in this. There were executions performed by Jack Ketch (which I thought was cool in a really disturbing way), who was an executioner back in the 1600s famous for botching his work. So picture that in coloured illustrations, as he beheads animals. As caught off guard as I was by the unexpected gore, I loved this volume. I especially liked that characters from The Jungle Book were featured. Great opportunity for some amazing artwork of Shere Khan and Bagheera. Reynard the fox was also a highlight! Rose Red bothers me, I just have to say that. I'm definitely on Snow's side.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ronyell

    Animal Farm… In comic form! Brief Introduction: After reading the first volume in Bill Willingham’s popular “Fables” series, I was a bit interested in reading the second volume of this series, hoping to find out more about the Adversary who took the Fables’ land from them. But in “Fables: Animal Farm,” we are actually introduced to a revolution on the Animal Farm where Fable characters who are not human or cannot maintain a human form reside. “Fables: Animal Farm” is a great follow up t Animal Farm… In comic form! Brief Introduction: After reading the first volume in Bill Willingham’s popular “Fables” series, I was a bit interested in reading the second volume of this series, hoping to find out more about the Adversary who took the Fables’ land from them. But in “Fables: Animal Farm,” we are actually introduced to a revolution on the Animal Farm where Fable characters who are not human or cannot maintain a human form reside. “Fables: Animal Farm” is a great follow up to the first volume that will have you wanting to find out what happens next! What is the story? Ever since the Fables were forced out of their homeland by an evil being called the Adversary, the Fables who were non-humans were forced to live on the Farm so that way they would not be under the suspicious eyes of the mundane world. Unfortunately, a revolution seems to take place on the farm as the non-human fables decided to take back their land from the Adversary and then try to rule both Fabletown in New York and the Farm itself and it is up to Snow White to stop this crazy revolution before it is too late! What I loved about this comic: Bill Willingham’s writing!: If you have seen the title of this volume entitled “Fables: Animal Farm,” then you will definitely know that this story is pretty much similar to George Orwell’s classic novel, “Animal Farm.” To be honest, I never would have thought that Bill Willingham would include a novel that is a satire on the Russian Revolution into his “Fables” series which mainly includes fairy tale and folktale characters, but I will admit that I was really impressed with the direction he took this story! I loved the way that Bill Willingham included famous animal characters from fairy tales and folktales such as Shere Khan from “The Jungle Book,” Brer Rabbit, Goldilocks and the Three Bears and the Three Little Pigs and wove them into a sort of satirical tale that is based on the animals of the farm forming a revolution against the people who rule over the Fables. It was also interesting seeing how Goldilocks and the Three Little Pigs were leading the revolution, which put an insane spin on our favorite fairy tale characters. Bill Willingham did a great job at portraying the relationship between Rose Red and Snow White and it was quite shocking seeing how Rose Red treated Snow White although Snow White tried to make amends on their relationship and once it is revealed about why Rose Red hated Snow White so much, you cannot help but feel a little sorry for her throughout the two volumes of the “Fables” series. The artwork: Mark Buckingham’s artwork is truly brilliant to look at as the characters look truly realistic and I love the facial expressions on the characters, especially whenever Snow White is upset, you can actually see the tears and the frightened expressions on her face which made me truly feel for her throughout this book. I also loved Daniel Vozzo’s coloring on the artwork as the artwork has dark coloring that truly reflects the dark atmosphere of this story. What made me feel uncomfortable about this book: Now, I did have a couple of issues with this volume that mainly revolves around the plot of this volume. Now, I understand that this story is about the animals and the non-human characters having a revolution on the Farm because they felt they were being treated unfairly compared to the fables who live in the city, but I felt that this story just came out of nowhere since it was never mentioned in the first volume about there being problems on the Farm. Also, I felt that there was not enough focus on Snow White and Rose Red’s relationship since the bulk of the volume was focused on the non-human fables fighting against the fables from the city and I wanted to see more from Snow White and Rose Red’s relationship throughout this ordeal. Also, the ending felt like it lost some steam after the first half of the volume was pretty exciting with the revolution going on and then suddenly, the story starts to slow down towards the end. ~A bit of a warning~ This volume is definitely more violent than the first volume as there is a lot of gore and violence regarding the revolution. Anyone who is not a fan of violence in graphic novels might want to skim over the violent scenes in this volume. Final Thoughts: Overall, despite my gripes with this volume and the fact that this volume and the volume before it has not answered my question (WHO IS THE ADVERSARY?), “Fables: Animal Farm” was a great read and I am still excited to see what will become of the fables after the ordeal in this volume. Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

  12. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    A golden cage is still a cage. Freedom is always a goal for witch we are ready to do anything. And i like the idea that the fables are half immortal with the level of the masses awareness determining who can survive and who will die. Nice touch.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    This second volume of Fables deals with the Farm that was already mentioned in the previous volume. The Farm is the place they keep all the fairy tale characters that cannot pass as humans (like the three pigs, all the animals from Jungle Book and so on). It's quite big, remote, protected by spells and not just a farm but has individual housing for every character there. Nevertheless, there are tensions since the Fables are not allowed to leave the Farm (there's a law about the Fables not making This second volume of Fables deals with the Farm that was already mentioned in the previous volume. The Farm is the place they keep all the fairy tale characters that cannot pass as humans (like the three pigs, all the animals from Jungle Book and so on). It's quite big, remote, protected by spells and not just a farm but has individual housing for every character there. Nevertheless, there are tensions since the Fables are not allowed to leave the Farm (there's a law about the Fables not making themselves known to us "Mundys"). Colin the pig however runs off often and lives with Bigby (yes, the Wolf, it's hilarious) when he's in town. There's a story to that too (nothing is ever random it would appear, the writers have thought about every detail). So this book, much like the story the title is referring to, is about a revolution of those Farm Fables. It's definitely not a nice story, not as "harmless" as the murder mystery of book #1. It's much grittier and introduces a character I truly loathe: Goldilocks. I never liked that story anyway, but the girl in this comic ... let's just say I wouldn't mind if Bigby went all Big-Bad-Wolf on her. However, most annoying was the revelation why Snow White and Rose Red are such enemies. We got one side of the story (Rose Red seducing and sleeping with Prince Charming) in book #1 but I never understood why Rose Red hated her sister so much. Neither did Snow White apparently and I swear, once we finally know why, I was ready to strangle Rose Red myself. Such a self-obsessed, whiney, stupid and petty bitch (excuse my French)! Honestly! (view spoiler)[Sleeping with her sister's husband just because she's jealous about her fame and then still not being happy and continuing with this "punishment" of Snow White at every turn. She doesn't deserve running the Farm, she deserves a sound beating! (hide spoiler)] Anyway, it was nice to see that this comic did not just include classic fairy tale characters from the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Anderson but also from more exotic fairy tales such as The Jungle Book. It was just sad that there was no room for development for many of said animals so that (view spoiler)[Shere Khan is still the bad guy and ends up dead much like in the original tale. (hide spoiler)] Again, a wonderful story with great art and wit. I will definitely continue reading this series and can't wait to finally find out more about the Adversary.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Terrington

    Fables has to be one of the most inventive ideas to have been created in terms of comics and graphic novels in recent years. Thanks to the recommendations of university friends reading the series on my trip to the States I picked up the second book (who begins at the beginning these days?) and thoroughly enjoyed the concept. So of course I have to go through and read the rest now that I enjoyed this first foray into the graphic novels. The real problem for me, coming in when plenty has already b Fables has to be one of the most inventive ideas to have been created in terms of comics and graphic novels in recent years. Thanks to the recommendations of university friends reading the series on my trip to the States I picked up the second book (who begins at the beginning these days?) and thoroughly enjoyed the concept. So of course I have to go through and read the rest now that I enjoyed this first foray into the graphic novels. The real problem for me, coming in when plenty has already been written, is trying to catch up when there's so much else to read... The premise of the Fables series is simple and from what I understand each novel is something of a stand alone, based on the overall premise and with some connection to previous stories. This overall premise is that in our modern day world Fables exist. These are characters from books, legends and stories that have gained some kind of cultural mythology from Rudyard Kipling's Jungle Book to the story of Snow White. These Fables have been driven from their story worlds and now live in a special area in real life called Fabletown. This particular volume takes its cues from the story by Orwell: Animal Farm. Snow White has to head up to the Farm where the less human looking Fables are kept, basically the talking animals, some giants and a dragon. Things go in an Orwell type of direction and everything ends up interestingly. Interestingly enough for me to want to read more of the graphic novels... There are adult ideas behind these books. But then fairytales have always featured a hidden sense of adult themes and morals. What the writers and artists in this series do is to expose those adult ideas and write them into the contemporary side of their story. As a result the story becomes a mix of fantasy fairytale set in the real world and grappling with real adult issues. I fully recommend this book at least and I intend to become a fan and to read into the future. The idea of fairytales intersecting with real life is something that's interested me for a while now and seeing a graphic novel deal with that is doubly intriguing.

  15. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Fable town isn't all that it seems. This time we head to the Farm where the unhuman type Fables reside. Oh shit, who's ready for some Animal Farm type shit? This volume really focuses on Snow white and Red Rose. They go to the farm to check up on all the other fables. However, things aren't what they seem. Soon after we are shown a lot of the animals are building a army to go back and fight the adversary. However, anyone who gets in their way, will pay the consequences. Who will make it out of t Fable town isn't all that it seems. This time we head to the Farm where the unhuman type Fables reside. Oh shit, who's ready for some Animal Farm type shit? This volume really focuses on Snow white and Red Rose. They go to the farm to check up on all the other fables. However, things aren't what they seem. Soon after we are shown a lot of the animals are building a army to go back and fight the adversary. However, anyone who gets in their way, will pay the consequences. Who will make it out of this one? Good: I really enjoyed the snow white and red rose stuff. It was really well done and kind of get enough past to understand why they are where they are. Also how great was Snow White wrecking shit? So nice to see strong women in here. Bad: Bigby whole section felt kind of odd and out of place. I get it had to happen to build towards the end, but took away from the tension of the rest. Also the betrayal is telegram like a mofo. Overall this is another solid volume. I think I like it more than even 1. It still lacks the character connection to me but I'm getting more into it. I'm hoping next volume we really get into the meat of it. It's a 3.5 out of 5 for this one!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    2.0 to 2.5 stars. I feel pretty much the same way about this installment as I did about Volume 1 of this series. I really like the concept (characters from fables "outside of their stories" and in modern times) but the story itself is just not very interesting and the execution not very compelling. For example, I liked the concept of the character of Goldilocks as a radical revolutionary (and married to the grown up Baby Bear) but after her introduction her character never became compelling. Any 2.0 to 2.5 stars. I feel pretty much the same way about this installment as I did about Volume 1 of this series. I really like the concept (characters from fables "outside of their stories" and in modern times) but the story itself is just not very interesting and the execution not very compelling. For example, I liked the concept of the character of Goldilocks as a radical revolutionary (and married to the grown up Baby Bear) but after her introduction her character never became compelling. Anyway, I already own Volume 3 of the series and so will read that at some point. However, if that one doesn't grab my interest more, I will likely not buy any more of the series.

  17. 5 out of 5

    توفيق عبد الرحيم

    its beautiful there is nothing much to discuss in the review really there is only tons of spectacular story telling to enjoy but it looks like our fables are godly they get their energy from people who believe in them just like gods in every pantheon of gods

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cheese

    This was much better than the first one. I suppose the first one was a bit slow because they had to introduce the story world and many different characters. This volume set the action going. Snow White takes her sister rose red into fable town, the country outskirts where all the "non-human fables" live, i.e. The three little pigs, the three bears etc. as part of her community service punishment. However, when they get there they discover a revolution being conducted. This means Snow White is stu This was much better than the first one. I suppose the first one was a bit slow because they had to introduce the story world and many different characters. This volume set the action going. Snow White takes her sister rose red into fable town, the country outskirts where all the "non-human fables" live, i.e. The three little pigs, the three bears etc. as part of her community service punishment. However, when they get there they discover a revolution being conducted. This means Snow White is stuck in the middle of it and things start to get hairy. Here we are introduced to many different characters and I must say it was a treat to read, because it reminded me of all the characters I read about as a child. This has sparked my interest to read further volumes.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sotiria

    Fables is quickly turning into one of my all time favourite graphic novel series. The second installment focuses on the animal farm, the home of the non human Fables, and the beginning of a revolution. It is packed full of action, drama and secret motives. You will find yourself surprised by the way certain characters are and behave in this volume and you will experience new found respect for others (prince Charming is seriously the best love-to-hate kind of character!). Totally recommended!

  20. 4 out of 5

    RJ

    Since all of my friends seemed to love this, I think it's possible I'm having trouble doing the whole separating the artist from the art thing after hearing an interview with Bill Willingham that left me with a bad impression. But it could also be that his themes were just more novel and exciting when this came out, and now that "fairytales in the real world" is so worn, the flaws are too clear. I really didn't like this! The clunky dialogue that made the first volume a just-ok read is mixed in v Since all of my friends seemed to love this, I think it's possible I'm having trouble doing the whole separating the artist from the art thing after hearing an interview with Bill Willingham that left me with a bad impression. But it could also be that his themes were just more novel and exciting when this came out, and now that "fairytales in the real world" is so worn, the flaws are too clear. I really didn't like this! The clunky dialogue that made the first volume a just-ok read is mixed in volume two with poor character development, bad pacing and a totally inconsistent sense of ethics. Goldilocks as a militant revolutionary was so promising! I really wanted to see her in a tête-à-tête with Snow, but instead, Goldy got watered down to a power-hungry trigger-happy caricature and Snow (or Bigby, or Boy Blue, or Weyland, or any of the supposed good guys) never offers any clear counter-argument or compromise. (view spoiler)[The bad guys get a grisly capital punishment, a human gets re-instated as head of the animals, and the good guys only address the concerns of the revolutionaries by basically saying "sorry, no new rights or privileges, but we will keep arming you so you may die in an inevitable war". The allusion to Lord of the Flies seemed contrived- perhaps on purpose, to make the characters seem shallow, but it read to me more like Willingham just wanted that image in his book. (hide spoiler)] I was ready to give this whole thing the benefit of the doubt - maybe the ethical gray area gets addressed in future volumes, maybe the characters that seemed so flat here will be rounder soon, maybe this dull fairy-tale world will be injected with some whimsy next time around. But the very last panel tried to pull an emotional moment that was so undeserved that I'm comfortable dismissing this as a case of bad writing and tuning out.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Misty

    I had to push myself through this, to be honest. I want to continue with the story/world, but I could have done without this volume, I think. I said in the last one that my tolerance for unlikable, horrible characters is at an all-time low, and that's basically all this volume was. I get the allusions to Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies, and all that, and I even get why this was an aspect of the Fables that needed to be explored, but I just felt very anxious reading it, and wanted to be done. A I had to push myself through this, to be honest. I want to continue with the story/world, but I could have done without this volume, I think. I said in the last one that my tolerance for unlikable, horrible characters is at an all-time low, and that's basically all this volume was. I get the allusions to Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies, and all that, and I even get why this was an aspect of the Fables that needed to be explored, but I just felt very anxious reading it, and wanted to be done. Also, I hate Rose Red. I don't care how it turns out in the end, she's the worst. (Aside from maybe Goldilocks.)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    This next volume to Fables was interesting to say the least. I liked the new characters. I think it’s cool reading about them in the original fairytales but then to see them differently in another’s work makes it even more fun and engaging. I was cracking up when I saw Rabbit holding an AK-47. The image of rabbits and chickens holding guns bigger than they are for the revolution was pretty entertaining. The only thing that doesn’t make sense to me is why the three little pigs are still pigs but This next volume to Fables was interesting to say the least. I liked the new characters. I think it’s cool reading about them in the original fairytales but then to see them differently in another’s work makes it even more fun and engaging. I was cracking up when I saw Rabbit holding an AK-47. The image of rabbits and chickens holding guns bigger than they are for the revolution was pretty entertaining. The only thing that doesn’t make sense to me is why the three little pigs are still pigs but the big bad wolf is a human? There are some things in these comics that make you scratch your head but overall it’s really fun.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Snow White, the Deputy Mayor of Fabletown, and her wayward sister Rose Red venture out of the city and into the country to visit the Farm. This is where all of the Fable creatures who don’t look humanoid – the various talking animals, three giants and a dragon – are kept and whose presence is masked through enchantments. However this means they’re unable to leave the land without being seen by the mundys (slang for humans – as in “mundane”, ie. “normal”). This limiting of their freedom for hundr Snow White, the Deputy Mayor of Fabletown, and her wayward sister Rose Red venture out of the city and into the country to visit the Farm. This is where all of the Fable creatures who don’t look humanoid – the various talking animals, three giants and a dragon – are kept and whose presence is masked through enchantments. However this means they’re unable to leave the land without being seen by the mundys (slang for humans – as in “mundane”, ie. “normal”). This limiting of their freedom for hundreds of years has led to widespread discontent among as the Farm Fables as Snow and Rose are about to find out – the animals are revolting! Like the first volume which was a murder mystery, the second volume of Fables is a self-contained five-issue story arc, though less generic and unfortunately less interesting. It’s a bit like a horror mystery as Snow and Rose find out the idyllic land harbours poisonous intentions that boils over into murderous actions kind of like in The Wicker Man (NOT the Nic Cage version which was a comedy. “HOW’D IT GET BURRRRNNNNEDD?!?!??!”). Bill Willingham references well-known literary works like Lord of the Flies and of course Orwell’s Animal Farm though they only bear a superficial resemblance to this book as Willingham’s story doesn’t explore the same themes or in quite the same level of depth and thoughtfulness. Fables remains a straightforward series. It’s enjoyable to see well known characters playing against type like the militant Goldilocks as she leads a communist-esque revolution as the female Che Guevara and Snow fighting Shere Khan from Kipling’s Jungle Book is exceedingly good (hehe!). And Willingham continues to explore the concept of the Fables themselves by establishing that they can live hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years yet retain youthful appearances, and how the more popular Fables can’t die no matter what injuries they sustain due to their popularity with the mundys. The more who believe in you, the more powerful you are – it’s not an original idea that I remember seeing for the first time in Terry Pratchett’s Discworld books years ago. Except the second book still feels like setup. I get that this is a complex world so Willingham needs more time to lay the groundwork of who the Fables are and how they live in our world, but the whole faux-revolution thing just didn’t work for me. Mostly because we know the real enemy of the series is the mysterious Adversary and not the talking pigs/Goldilocks, so they were never going to succeed thus defusing the tension of the story, but also because a chase plot isn’t that interesting. They run, they fight, they run some more, yeah ok. And the ending itself felt anticlimactic and drawn-out. Snow and Rose are fairly interesting characters but shouldn’t really have books centred around them as they’re just not compelling enough. Snow is a goody-two-shoes and Rose is predictably rebellious – the stereotypical good sister/bad sister combo we’ve seen a million times before. Here, the more engaging characters like Bigby, Bluebeard and Jack were supporting players at best while Snow ran around a forest. The others, like the talking animals, are barely characters at all – they’re just interactive background really. Animal Farm isn’t a terrible book and hasn’t put me off the series but it’s not terribly compelling either. It sets out some important information, it’s got some great art, and if you like Snow then you’ll enjoy this. But it’s also pretty dull quite often and predictable too. It’s ok, not great.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sud666

    Fables: Animal Farm is the second volume of the acclaimed Fables series. In a play on words the second Fable community of the Farm descends into the idiocy of communist revolution in order to cause the invasion of their original home. Not all the residents of the Farm are involved, but with communist-revolutionary idiot Goldilocks leading the group that consists of the Three Pigs and other notable famous animals they take over the farm. But Snow White is not without her skills and recruits allie Fables: Animal Farm is the second volume of the acclaimed Fables series. In a play on words the second Fable community of the Farm descends into the idiocy of communist revolution in order to cause the invasion of their original home. Not all the residents of the Farm are involved, but with communist-revolutionary idiot Goldilocks leading the group that consists of the Three Pigs and other notable famous animals they take over the farm. But Snow White is not without her skills and recruits allies who help to rout the communist idiots. The tale itself seems simple, but Willingham's ability to use fable's characters is what makes this a unique vision. From the Bears to Sre-Khan the Tiger to Chicken Little, many of our beloved characters make a showing in this tale. Their interesting quirks take on a new meaning in light of communist idiocy. Fables combines good storytelling and combines it with good art and compelling characters. The interplay of common fables into a modern telling is what really makes this a fascinating read. It is also interesting that certain Fables are nearly immortal due to their popularity such as Snow White. If you liked reading fables as a child or just enjoy a good story this one is for you.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    This was a very weak 3 star rating for me. I liked the first book (a compilation of the first four comics) a lot. I thought that the fables that were introduced showed a lot of depth to their characters and an appealing edginess. The story was engaging, and even if the mystery wasn't much in the end, it did keep me curious throughout. But this book was really very different. None of the new characters showed any depth to their characters, they were all either who they were in their fables or a t This was a very weak 3 star rating for me. I liked the first book (a compilation of the first four comics) a lot. I thought that the fables that were introduced showed a lot of depth to their characters and an appealing edginess. The story was engaging, and even if the mystery wasn't much in the end, it did keep me curious throughout. But this book was really very different. None of the new characters showed any depth to their characters, they were all either who they were in their fables or a typical reactionary revolutionary. And the revolution story was done with such a heavy hand, it wasn't interesting or exciting or scary, it was just frustrating. I get that those people were isolated on the farm, but they were really old, yet they were portrayed almost like little kids playing at war with their lack of any kind of sophistication in their actions or rhetoric. It was either too literally Animal Farm or too literally a satire of something, but what it wasn't was fun. The only good parts were Snow and Red, Snow and Reynard, the giants and dragon before the change, and of course Snow and Bigby.

  26. 5 out of 5

    [Name Redacted]

    Wherein we are introduced to the "Other" Fable community, learn the real reason for the falling out between Snow White & Rose Red, witness a violent upheaval, discover that Goldilocks is a Socialist furry-fancier, and I am made desperately homesick for Upstate New York! With the key elements of the series' mythology established in the first volume, this volume is a marked improvement. The pacing is brisk, the dialogue contains little in the way of hamfist exposition, and a number of new, interes Wherein we are introduced to the "Other" Fable community, learn the real reason for the falling out between Snow White & Rose Red, witness a violent upheaval, discover that Goldilocks is a Socialist furry-fancier, and I am made desperately homesick for Upstate New York! With the key elements of the series' mythology established in the first volume, this volume is a marked improvement. The pacing is brisk, the dialogue contains little in the way of hamfist exposition, and a number of new, interesting characters are introduced. This series is growing on me!

  27. 5 out of 5

    seak

    This was better than the first with better hints of things to come. Even though I'm sure it will be good after all these hints come to light, I don't know if I can hold out that long. Pigs and farm animals are just not the coolest of action heroes, although Shere Khan and Baghera were pretty awesome.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Afro Madonna

    And they lived happily ever after. Or not!!!! Goodness I liked this volume wayy better than the previous.Dying to know what other crazy shenanigans the creatures of fabletown will come up with next. This volume had a very nice blend.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bec (becklepanda)

    3.75 stars.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Melanie (TBR and Beyond)

    This one was still cool but it wasn't my favorite storyline ever. I'm still pumped about reading this series though.

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