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Photobooth: A Biography

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For almost a century chemical photobooths have occupied public spaces; giving people the opportunity to quickly take inexpensive, quality photos. In the last decade these machines have started to rapidly disappear, causing an eclectic group of individuals from around the world to come together and respond. Illustrator, writer and long-time photobooth lover, Meags Fitzgeral For almost a century chemical photobooths have occupied public spaces; giving people the opportunity to quickly take inexpensive, quality photos. In the last decade these machines have started to rapidly disappear, causing an eclectic group of individuals from around the world to come together and respond. Illustrator, writer and long-time photobooth lover, Meags Fitzgerald has chronicled this movement and the photobooth's fortuitous history in a graphic novel. Having traveled in North America, Europe and Australia, she's constructed a biography of the booth through the eyes of technicians, owners, collectors, artists and fanatics. Fitzgerald explores her own struggle with her relationship to these fleeting machines, while looking to the future.


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For almost a century chemical photobooths have occupied public spaces; giving people the opportunity to quickly take inexpensive, quality photos. In the last decade these machines have started to rapidly disappear, causing an eclectic group of individuals from around the world to come together and respond. Illustrator, writer and long-time photobooth lover, Meags Fitzgeral For almost a century chemical photobooths have occupied public spaces; giving people the opportunity to quickly take inexpensive, quality photos. In the last decade these machines have started to rapidly disappear, causing an eclectic group of individuals from around the world to come together and respond. Illustrator, writer and long-time photobooth lover, Meags Fitzgerald has chronicled this movement and the photobooth's fortuitous history in a graphic novel. Having traveled in North America, Europe and Australia, she's constructed a biography of the booth through the eyes of technicians, owners, collectors, artists and fanatics. Fitzgerald explores her own struggle with her relationship to these fleeting machines, while looking to the future.

30 review for Photobooth: A Biography

  1. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    I read this because I had just read Darkroom, am interested in photography, and well, I am of an age to recall photobooths being everywhere, and myself and my sister getting these strips of improvised goofiness. I was unprepared for the intensity of this project from Fitzgerald, whose passion for photobooths changed her life in many ways. I was reminded of Susan Orleans's The Orchard Thief. When I began reading it I had no interest in orchids, and essentially never did develop any real interest, I read this because I had just read Darkroom, am interested in photography, and well, I am of an age to recall photobooths being everywhere, and myself and my sister getting these strips of improvised goofiness. I was unprepared for the intensity of this project from Fitzgerald, whose passion for photobooths changed her life in many ways. I was reminded of Susan Orleans's The Orchard Thief. When I began reading it I had no interest in orchids, and essentially never did develop any real interest, but that book is really more about an obsession with a person and his passion more than orchids per se. In Photobooth, Fitzgerald is a little crazy about photobooths in a constructive and slightly destructive way (maybe). The book is a kind of multi genre project: a memoir of her life long relationship to photo booths, a cultural history of them, a scholarly and somewhat esoteric treatise, and what she calls a "biography" of photobooth. Biography, you say?! For instance, at one point, talking with her sister about the loss of half of Montreal's photobooths, including some she has a close personal history with, some of there favorites, she illustrates herself sobbing uncontrollably. She tells us she ends relationships with boyfriends and cuts herself off from friends at various points just to spend time with her passion. Thus: a biography, since it has become, in a sense, her "lover." As an academic, I am familiar with this malady. Lenny Davis wrote a book about Obsession in which he acknowledges that academics get praised for what is essentially OCD behavior. This is also true for my own experience with Goodreads in the past year: I always have read a lot, but in the past year I wrote reviews for more than 600 books. This is clearly crazy OCD behavior, and yet in the context of book lovers, and all People of the Book (including academics and teachers), it is (largely) admired behavior. By you all, maybe, but not the non-readers in my life, who think I should do something more productive with my time. Fitzgerald also has this OCD thing, which she turns into a book that would be of interested to lovers of memoirs, cultural history, and, uh, photobooths, natch. I wasn't a fan of the artwork, which is not a comic but is really an illustrated history/memoir/biography. My biggest problem with it is this: In a book about photos and photobooths, one that already is a kind of unique mashup of genres, WHY NO PHOTOS? NO actual photos! NONE! Just--and this just seems bizarre to me--multiple illustrations of photobooth strips of photos! This IS a big deal to me, as you can tell from the CAPS and exclamation points, but on the whole I still liked this book quite a bit. It captures Fitzgerald's passion, and is enigmatic and nostalgic and sort of sweet as it is honest about some of the obsessive-compulsive aspects of her passion. Very interesting book, on the whole.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Raina

    Totally fascinating history of a technology/niche culture/phenomenon, woven with the personal connections of the author. Timely, as the author cites that chemical (as opposed to digital) photobooths are expected to go extinct in 2015 (THIS YEAR!), as the chemicals required to make them work are going to run out. One required chemical is illegal in Europe, which complicates the issue further. We have one of these rare chemical photobooths in Olympia at the Brotherhood bar downtown. Fitzgerald inclu Totally fascinating history of a technology/niche culture/phenomenon, woven with the personal connections of the author. Timely, as the author cites that chemical (as opposed to digital) photobooths are expected to go extinct in 2015 (THIS YEAR!), as the chemicals required to make them work are going to run out. One required chemical is illegal in Europe, which complicates the issue further. We have one of these rare chemical photobooths in Olympia at the Brotherhood bar downtown. Fitzgerald includes illustrations of specific models of photobooths, as well as illustrations of many different types of strips. She talks about her connections with the photobooth community, and muses as to why she's interested in photobooths in the first place. She includes stories about traveling around the world (teaching improv), using photobooths to make art, and tracking down photobooths all over the planet for photobooth.net. As far the execution goes, I found her drawing style engaging, and she used a wide variety of page layouts, although much of the book eschews panels and speech bubbles in favor of more freeform combinations of text and images. One thing that niggled at me: I REALLY wanted PHOTOS in this book about photobooths. Photos of the strips, of the models... But I imagine rights on this kind of thing is a bigger monster than Fitzgerald wanted to tackle. And I'm sure it had to have been an intentional (maybe aesthetic?) decision not to mix illustrations and photos. Timely, enjoyable, accessible. Read with Syncopated: An Anthology of Nonfiction Picto-Essays Extra star bc of the rareness of this kind of blend of heavy nonfic content with personal memoir, and the urgent timeliness.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Photobooth: A Biography is a unique history of a machine and of a woman. From a young age, Meags Fitzgerald enjoyed snapping personal photos in the photobooths in and around Edmonton, Alberta. Her interest moves into passion, then obsession with photobooth and their history, and even a kind of activism to save them from "extinction". Fitzgerald charts the story of Anatol Josepho, the inventor of the photobooth, melding this with her own biography. She traces her time in art school when instructo Photobooth: A Biography is a unique history of a machine and of a woman. From a young age, Meags Fitzgerald enjoyed snapping personal photos in the photobooths in and around Edmonton, Alberta. Her interest moves into passion, then obsession with photobooth and their history, and even a kind of activism to save them from "extinction". Fitzgerald charts the story of Anatol Josepho, the inventor of the photobooth, melding this with her own biography. She traces her time in art school when instructors told her that photobooth photography was not serious art and worth the time, and her later vindication when she meets a dedicated group of other photobooth enthusiasts who use photobooths in their "serious" art. Fitzgerald travels through North America and Europe documenting photobooths, working with other artists, photo technicians, and general enthusiasts. She laments her beloved chemical photobooths slow demise in favor of the quicker and easily serviceable digital models, and this leads to many tears and soul-searching in spending so much time and energy on something that is ephemeral. We see Fitzgerald mature through the pages of the book - as a frequent model in her own art of photos, she shows herself in many lights, vulnerable, naive, angry, and exhausted. She closes the book in an intriguing way, and it makes me curious to see what she has done since this book was published in 2014.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Book Riot Community

    Once again I have evidence that Meags Fitzgerald and I are living parallel lives. This book began with a love for photobooths that started when she was a teenager, and that’s something I can certainly identify with, although I dare say my love didn’t turn into a full on obsession which fueled Meags to travel Europe and North America and change the direction of her career for years. The end result of all that research, travelling, and life experience is this book, which is the oddest amalgamation Once again I have evidence that Meags Fitzgerald and I are living parallel lives. This book began with a love for photobooths that started when she was a teenager, and that’s something I can certainly identify with, although I dare say my love didn’t turn into a full on obsession which fueled Meags to travel Europe and North America and change the direction of her career for years. The end result of all that research, travelling, and life experience is this book, which is the oddest amalgamation of history, memoir, cultural exploration, and thoughts about art and photography that somehow works to make this delightful book about a very unlikely subject. The graphic format works great here as she does an amazing job illustrating all the different models of photobooths as well as all the different people who created and love them. If you loved photobooths when you were a teen and you and your friends brought crazy props with you to enact weird elaborate performances you’ll love this book and also feel a bit sad and nostalgic. I did. But I think this is also a fascinating exploration of one piece of technology and cultural phenomenon that will interest even readers who’ve never given photobooths much thought. –Casey Stepaniuk from The Best Books We Read In August 2016: http://bookriot.com/2016/08/31/riot-r...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    This book was amazing! I bought a copy from Strange Adventures Comics in Halifax, Nova Scotia. I love film photography and super 8 filmmaking myself, so photobooths fascinate me as well but as this book points out, the digital age is slowly pushing them "out of the picture". Photobooth was brilliant and definitely worth reading.

  6. 4 out of 5

    CaseyTheCanadianLesbrarian

    Once again, Meags Fitzgerald appears to be writing about my own life, although her interest in, and dare I say obsession with, photobooths went much farther than mine ever did. But this did feel very nostalgic for me, as my friends and I were super into photobooths in high school and our early twenties, doing the same kind of things Meags did, bringing props to orchestrate these elaborate performances. My fridge is full of them to this day. A fascinating exploration of the history of photobooths Once again, Meags Fitzgerald appears to be writing about my own life, although her interest in, and dare I say obsession with, photobooths went much farther than mine ever did. But this did feel very nostalgic for me, as my friends and I were super into photobooths in high school and our early twenties, doing the same kind of things Meags did, bringing props to orchestrate these elaborate performances. My fridge is full of them to this day. A fascinating exploration of the history of photobooths, full of juicy historical/cultural/technical details, personal stories, and beautiful drawings. Totally captivated me. It's a mix of genres I don't think I've read before, and I thought it worked brilliantly. My only complaint is that the text needed better copy editing. Clearly the editor has no idea what a comma splice is, the book is full of them. [See what I did there]. I don't mind a few of those, especially if they're used for effect, but really some other punctuation would have been better in most cases. Also, let's remember the difference between "whose" and "who's." A few other grammar things like missing articles were also a bit distracting for me.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Garconniere

    An absolute essential read for anyone who has appreciated the quality of drawing back the curtain in a dip-and-dunk photobooth over the years. A lovely personal journey of a lovely and talented person with a real passion for photobooths. The fact that this is Fitzgerald's first foray into the world of graphic novels (after working as an illustrator and designer for years) makes the great storytelling all the more striking. I love, love, love this book. I say all of this from a completely biased p An absolute essential read for anyone who has appreciated the quality of drawing back the curtain in a dip-and-dunk photobooth over the years. A lovely personal journey of a lovely and talented person with a real passion for photobooths. The fact that this is Fitzgerald's first foray into the world of graphic novels (after working as an illustrator and designer for years) makes the great storytelling all the more striking. I love, love, love this book. I say all of this from a completely biased perspective - I interviewed Meags as part of a radio documentary I made about photobooths in Canada back in 2012 and she mentions this in the book. I may have squealed with joy upon seeing it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    lucy black

    I thought this would be one of those non fiction in-depth books that although I’m not that interested in the subject the writing and art would be sufficient to keep me interested. It wasn’t one of those. I got bored. It was too in-depth, the side stories weren’t compelling enough either. I got sick of her love for photobooths and didn’t have sympathy for her sadness that they are going away. She came across as really privileged and whiney at times. Her art is amazing and her layouts are interesti I thought this would be one of those non fiction in-depth books that although I’m not that interested in the subject the writing and art would be sufficient to keep me interested. It wasn’t one of those. I got bored. It was too in-depth, the side stories weren’t compelling enough either. I got sick of her love for photobooths and didn’t have sympathy for her sadness that they are going away. She came across as really privileged and whiney at times. Her art is amazing and her layouts are interesting and well done. I’d read more of her stuff just for that, hopefully she writes about stuff I like sometime.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    I had never really thought anything about photo booths. This graphic novel changed that. I had never pondered their history, their place in the world, or how chemical changes and the advent of digital photography threatened their existence. The author tells a compelling story full of research, passion, and a dynamic picture of a unknown subculture.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anna Bunce

    Fitzgerald's passion shines through and is infectious. A delightful read that reminded me of all the reasons I loved going to photobooths in high school.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Katy

    Photobooth: A Biography is a dense, beautifully constructed history and love letter to photobooths. Informational, contemplative, thorough, devoted. I am amazed by all that this was. On a personal note, I was really excited that the author spent time in Halifax, my heart skipped a beat seeing the illustration of old photobooth at Scotia Square mall. I don't claim to be nearly as passionate on the topic as the author, but I am nostalgic for the photobooths of the 90s and the excitement of taking Photobooth: A Biography is a dense, beautifully constructed history and love letter to photobooths. Informational, contemplative, thorough, devoted. I am amazed by all that this was. On a personal note, I was really excited that the author spent time in Halifax, my heart skipped a beat seeing the illustration of old photobooth at Scotia Square mall. I don't claim to be nearly as passionate on the topic as the author, but I am nostalgic for the photobooths of the 90s and the excitement of taking a strip of pictures with my friends 'back in the day.' Photobooth: A Biography not only sheds light on the history and science behind these artful designs, but captures an array of emotions these machines can bring on. "When you love something, you can't just choose not to feel that way anymore." -Meags Fitzgerald

  12. 5 out of 5

    KWinks

    I needed a microhistory and a Canadian author for a book challenge, so score! Fitzgerald's illustrations are gorgeous. I like the historical parts better than the person memoirs, but that was just my personal preference. At times, I felt a little bogged down. I don't share Fitzgerald's passion for photobooths and it began to feel like I was stuck listening to a Star Wars fan go on and on and on about Clone Wars for too long. But I appreciate her passion. I get it and I learned more than I expect I needed a microhistory and a Canadian author for a book challenge, so score! Fitzgerald's illustrations are gorgeous. I like the historical parts better than the person memoirs, but that was just my personal preference. At times, I felt a little bogged down. I don't share Fitzgerald's passion for photobooths and it began to feel like I was stuck listening to a Star Wars fan go on and on and on about Clone Wars for too long. But I appreciate her passion. I get it and I learned more than I expected to about photobooths.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    A tad overlong by the end (in part because it had some repetitive moments -- I knew Meags's birthday by the second time she said it and didn't need it mentioned ten more) but a totally wonderful graphic biography of photo booths. It's part social history and part memoir about a love affair with the booth and what they came to mean for the artist who loved them. There's a lot of travel in this one, and in a lot of ways the marrying of a passion with the personal journey reminded me of Lucy Knisle A tad overlong by the end (in part because it had some repetitive moments -- I knew Meags's birthday by the second time she said it and didn't need it mentioned ten more) but a totally wonderful graphic biography of photo booths. It's part social history and part memoir about a love affair with the booth and what they came to mean for the artist who loved them. There's a lot of travel in this one, and in a lot of ways the marrying of a passion with the personal journey reminded me of Lucy Knisley. And also, I need to hunt down a real, not digital, photo booth. The art is excellent. I loved seeing the graphic rendering of photographs so much more than I thought I would.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Darlene Stericker

    I learned so much from this book! I used a photobooth once when I was 9 (1969) to get a ski membership at Chicopee in Kitchener, ON. I really have never given photo booths much thought before reading this book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tan

    A really fun history of photobooths!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Trey Piepmeier

    I discovered this book on a visit to [Quimby's Bookstore](http://www.quimbys.com/) in Chicago. They had a photo booth in the store that I found out (after Livie and I used it) was a real, "chemical" booth. The photos took several minutes to come out of the machine and they were still a little wet when they did. Considering I'm currently in the depths of an obsession with film photography, this was fascinating to me. On the outside of the booth was an advertisement for this book. On first look, yo I discovered this book on a visit to [Quimby's Bookstore](http://www.quimbys.com/) in Chicago. They had a photo booth in the store that I found out (after Livie and I used it) was a real, "chemical" booth. The photos took several minutes to come out of the machine and they were still a little wet when they did. Considering I'm currently in the depths of an obsession with film photography, this was fascinating to me. On the outside of the booth was an advertisement for this book. On first look, you would think this is a comic, but there's very little sequential storytelling happening here. It's just juxtaposed illustrations and text. It occurred to me when I would occasionally see a word balloon and it seemed out of place—that's when I realized that this wasn't really a comic but an illustrated book. And that's fine, it's just not what I expected. The book is part memoir and part (mind-numbingly detailed) history of photo booths including biographical detail of the people who invented, ran, and continue to run them. The memoir part of it goes into the obsession people have over preserving and continuing to use "chemical" booths when nearly everything has moved on to digital. I can empathize with that. But I'm not sure how well it relates to being into analog photography in general. In some situations/formats film is actually *better* than its digital counterparts (medium and large formats). But film photo booths are only better in that they *might* offer a more archival print than a digital booth. That was one of the arguments the book made for them, but it's unclear if that's actually true. If a digital booth uses archival paper and ink, I don't see how that's any worse than an analog print for the sake of longevity. And I don't think typical photo booths make a very high quality / sharp photo to begin with. I understand and appreciate the social phenomenon that was the photo booth and how it allowed people to present a more private aspect of themselves behind the booth curtain than they could to a more public photographer. But now we're all photographers with our cell phones. It had its place and it's definitely an important one in the history of photography/the world. And I think the importance of having print photos is underestimated, but I don't think it needs to involve caustic chemicals and outdated, hard to maintain wooden photo booths. Anyway, that it's how I stopped feeling bad about their demise as I read the book. All that being said, I do want to start to seek out these old booths in my travels from now on while they still exist.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Near the start of Photobooth: A Biography, Meags Fitzgerald talks about taking photobooth pictures with a friend in 2003 to celebrate the last day of classes of tenth grade, and how, after that day, she got very into photobooths: taking photobooth pictures, learning about the history of the booths themselves, and collecting photobooth pictures taken by others. The rest of the book talks about Fitzgerald's experience with all those things, and also about various photobooth-related travels she's t Near the start of Photobooth: A Biography, Meags Fitzgerald talks about taking photobooth pictures with a friend in 2003 to celebrate the last day of classes of tenth grade, and how, after that day, she got very into photobooths: taking photobooth pictures, learning about the history of the booths themselves, and collecting photobooth pictures taken by others. The rest of the book talks about Fitzgerald's experience with all those things, and also about various photobooth-related travels she's taken, including a trip to California for the International Photobooth Convention and visits to photobooth warehouses in Montréal and Holland. I am really fond of this kind of book in general—I find it easier to find "graphic memoirs" or illustrated travel journals or nonfiction comics that I like than I do to find graphic novels I'm excited about—and also, I like photobooths. So it's not surprising that I really liked this book. Fitzgerald's drawings of photobooths, photobooth pictures, herself, and various people she met on her travels are really satisfying, and pair well with the text. I liked reading about various different angles of photobooth history/production/art/culture, including but not limited to: how chemical photobooths work and what their charms are, and how they're largely being replaced by lower-maintenance digital ones; the precursors to the photobooth and various inventors and companies whose work shaped the photobooth landscape; why photobooths appealed to Fitzgerald in high school, and how her relationship to them has changed over time, along with the art she's made in them; how photobooths have been used by various artists and ordinary people throughout their existence. (Speaking of Fitzgerald's photobooth art, I like it, and you can see more of it here and here.)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    As a third generation camera store employee I thought I knew it all. Nope. I had the pleasure of meeting Meags and hearing her talk about this medium she feels so passionately about-- a subject so close yet so far from what I know of photography. A must read for lovers of vintage, of photos and of stories about crazy writers in over their heads.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    A really nicely written history of the mechanical photobooth, drawing on Fitzgerald's own personal experiences with them. There are a lot of comma splices, which is annoying, but forgivable due to the fantastic art.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    A lot of information and beautiful drawings of photobooths - the story wasn't that interesting to me.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I was digging it for the first hundred pages but its just too esoteric a subject to hold my interest for the whole book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael Smith

    I’m old enough to remember when nearly every dime store, bus station, and amusement park had a coin-operated photobooth. Close the curtain, take a seat, feed in a couple of quarters, and smile -- or, more likely, if you were a teenager, make faces. And out would come a strip of six black-and-white wallet-size portraits. Because the image was printed directly to paper and there was no negative, each shot was unique and non-repeatable -- a tiny time capsule of a single moment in your life. I posed I’m old enough to remember when nearly every dime store, bus station, and amusement park had a coin-operated photobooth. Close the curtain, take a seat, feed in a couple of quarters, and smile -- or, more likely, if you were a teenager, make faces. And out would come a strip of six black-and-white wallet-size portraits. Because the image was printed directly to paper and there was no negative, each shot was unique and non-repeatable -- a tiny time capsule of a single moment in your life. I posed for photos with my buddies in high school and with my girl friend in college. Those images are all long lost now, but I did keep most of them for many years, because you don’t casually throw away the person you once were. The author got hooked on photobooths when she was in an arts high school in Alberta, and as her talents in the visual arts and in improv theater evolved, her interest in the history and artistic possibilities of photobooths grew. She’s now one of the leading experts in that small community and the first half of this intriguing graphic volume traces the history of the machines from their invention in the 1880s (really) to the shift from chemical to digital photography in the 1990s and the photobooth’s near disappearance. The second half shares highlights of her own experience in chasing down surviving booth locations during her travels all over the world and her artistic experiments. If you have any interest at all in 20th-century social history, I can enthusiastically recommend this one.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kate Stericker

    I've read both graphic memoirs and non-fiction comics in the past, but this book combines those genres in a way that's original and utterly captivating. Although I had never heard of Fitzgerald or been particularly interested in photobooths before picking up this book, I became deeply invested in both subjects within a few pages. I also loved that, although Fitzgerald's work features historical documents and detailed renderings of significant places on almost every page, she never incorporates s I've read both graphic memoirs and non-fiction comics in the past, but this book combines those genres in a way that's original and utterly captivating. Although I had never heard of Fitzgerald or been particularly interested in photobooths before picking up this book, I became deeply invested in both subjects within a few pages. I also loved that, although Fitzgerald's work features historical documents and detailed renderings of significant places on almost every page, she never incorporates scans or photos--it's really fascinating to see her hand-drawn recreations of old newspaper articles, identification papers, and photobooth strips of every description. My only complaint would be that the text is peppered with fairly conspicuous spelling and grammar errors, which I found distracting.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bryan

    I purchased this book after enjoying (immensely) the author's short story "Waxing Moon" in the Secret Loves of Geek Girls anthology. WOW! This book is absolutely gorgeous and filled with fascinating information about photobooths. A topic I never thought I'd enjoy learning about so much. It made me think back to my photography classes I took in high school and wonder why we never covered the topic of the photobooth. The design/layout and artwork in this book is just visually hypnotizing. Last nigh I purchased this book after enjoying (immensely) the author's short story "Waxing Moon" in the Secret Loves of Geek Girls anthology. WOW! This book is absolutely gorgeous and filled with fascinating information about photobooths. A topic I never thought I'd enjoy learning about so much. It made me think back to my photography classes I took in high school and wonder why we never covered the topic of the photobooth. The design/layout and artwork in this book is just visually hypnotizing. Last night I spent more than an hour just slowly turning the pages and taking in the drawings. Books like these always bring me to tears when I can just sit and slowly admire their beauty. Thank you Meags Fitzgerald. I Cannot wait to read/check out your other material! Also, I let out a loud cheer of some sorts with the inclusion of Quimby's located in Chicago.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Natasha Penney

    I am in awe of the artists' (author, illustrator, collector and curator's) passion for chemical photo booths. The book was warm and generous, and Fitzgerald was highly successful in translating her love to her text and illustrations. I'm glad I picked up this book based on the cover art. I'll be headed to Scotia Square tomorrow to locate one of the many photo booth she highlighted in her quest to preserve the medium before they expire.

  26. 5 out of 5

    vanessa

    3.5. A history of the photobooth, with some personal memories from the author. I especially liked the way it is illustrated and organized/designed. My only real criticism is that I wanted a little bit more of a connection to the author as the history (while new and informative) wasn't that captivating to me.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stef

    This was a thorough, well-done tribute to photobooths. I was surprised by the research and detail that went into this. Although I can't identify with this obsession, this book was clearly an well-enacted act of love.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jewelia Howard

    i'd never really thought about photobooths before but this book opened my eyes to them. it was wonderful and interesting and beautiful and a very good read. i now want to track down a photobooth and make art

  29. 5 out of 5

    ZepysGirl

    At times it jumped back and forth between the history of photobooths and the creator’s personal story seemingly at random. It did make me want to go try a photobooth, though, so I guess it’s achieved its goal!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Susie Steadman

    enjoy both the history of photo booths and the artist's thought process and creative development in one book.

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