counter create hit The Culture Map: Breaking Through the Invisible Boundaries of Global Business - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Culture Map: Breaking Through the Invisible Boundaries of Global Business

Availability: Ready to download

Whether you work in a home office or abroad, business success in our ever more globalized and virtual world requires the skills to navigate through cultural differences and decode cultures foreign to your own. Renowned expert Erin Meyer is your guide through this subtle, sometimes treacherous terrain where people from starkly different backgrounds are expected to work Whether you work in a home office or abroad, business success in our ever more globalized and virtual world requires the skills to navigate through cultural differences and decode cultures foreign to your own. Renowned expert Erin Meyer is your guide through this subtle, sometimes treacherous terrain where people from starkly different backgrounds are expected to work harmoniously together. When you have Americans who precede anything negative with three nice comments; French, Dutch, Israelis, and Germans who get straight to the point (“your presentation was simply awful”); Latin Americans and Asians who are steeped in hierarchy; Scandinavians who think the best boss is just one of the crowd—the result can be, well, sometimes interesting, even funny, but often disastrous. Even with English as a global language, it’s easy to fall into cultural traps that endanger careers and sink deals when, say, a Brazilian manager tries to fathom how his Chinese suppliers really get things done, or an American team leader tries to get a handle on the intra-team dynamics between his Russian and Indian team members. In The Culture Map, Erin Meyer provides a field-tested model for decoding how cultural differences impact international business. She combines a smart analytical framework with practical, actionable advice for succeeding in a global world.


Compare
Ads Banner

Whether you work in a home office or abroad, business success in our ever more globalized and virtual world requires the skills to navigate through cultural differences and decode cultures foreign to your own. Renowned expert Erin Meyer is your guide through this subtle, sometimes treacherous terrain where people from starkly different backgrounds are expected to work Whether you work in a home office or abroad, business success in our ever more globalized and virtual world requires the skills to navigate through cultural differences and decode cultures foreign to your own. Renowned expert Erin Meyer is your guide through this subtle, sometimes treacherous terrain where people from starkly different backgrounds are expected to work harmoniously together. When you have Americans who precede anything negative with three nice comments; French, Dutch, Israelis, and Germans who get straight to the point (“your presentation was simply awful”); Latin Americans and Asians who are steeped in hierarchy; Scandinavians who think the best boss is just one of the crowd—the result can be, well, sometimes interesting, even funny, but often disastrous. Even with English as a global language, it’s easy to fall into cultural traps that endanger careers and sink deals when, say, a Brazilian manager tries to fathom how his Chinese suppliers really get things done, or an American team leader tries to get a handle on the intra-team dynamics between his Russian and Indian team members. In The Culture Map, Erin Meyer provides a field-tested model for decoding how cultural differences impact international business. She combines a smart analytical framework with practical, actionable advice for succeeding in a global world.

30 review for The Culture Map: Breaking Through the Invisible Boundaries of Global Business

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    A practical guide for navigating cultural complexity while conducting global business. Interesting examples of everyday failures to communicate and work around solutions. Implements personal changes sounds like a challenge, but that is the way things are. While strong cultural expression makes for good stories, it can impede effective communication with people from different traditions. Of course, downgraders are used in every world culture, but some cultures use them more than others. The A practical guide for navigating cultural complexity while conducting global business. Interesting examples of everyday failures to communicate and work around solutions. Implements personal changes sounds like a challenge, but that is the way things are. While strong cultural expression makes for good stories, it can impede effective communication with people from different traditions. Of course, downgraders are used in every world culture, but some cultures use them more than others. The British are masters of the art, with the result that their communications often leave the rest of us quite bewildered. Take the announcement made by British Airways pilot Eric Moody in 1982, after flying through a cloud of volcanic ash over Indonesia: “Good evening again, ladies and gentlemen. This is Captain Eric Moody here. We have a small problem in that all four engines have failed. We’re doing our utmost to get them going, and I trust you’re not in too much distress, and would the chief steward please come to the flight deck?” Fortunately, the plane was able to glide far enough to exit the ash cloud, and the engines were restarted, allowing the aircraft to land safely at the Halim Perdanakusuma Airport in Jakarta with no casualties. Moody’s recorded announcement has since been widely hailed as a classic example of understatement. The “Anglo-Dutch Translation Guide” (Figure 2.1), which has been anonymously circulating in various versions on the Internet, amusingly illustrates how the British use downgraders and the resulting confusion this can create among listeners from another culture (in this case, the Dutch). Awareness should be a step in the right direction.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Adina

    This book can be an excellent tool for any person that works or even just interacts with different cultures. The author has an extensive experience as a cultural trainer and she shares interesting and educational events from her many years working with different people from all over the world. The focus is on European countries (UK, France, Scandinavia, Russia, Germany), USA and Asia (Japan, India, China, South Korea) and South America (Brazil, Colombia, Mexico) and Oceania. Africa is not This book can be an excellent tool for any person that works or even just interacts with different cultures. The author has an extensive experience as a cultural trainer and she shares interesting and educational events from her many years working with different people from all over the world. The focus is on European countries (UK, France, Scandinavia, Russia, Germany), USA and Asia (Japan, India, China, South Korea) and South America (Brazil, Colombia, Mexico) and Oceania. Africa is not covered, probably because of her lack of experience on that continent. Each chapters covers a specific aspect of the business interaction: Communication, persuasion, leadership, performance evaluation and negative feedback, decision making, trust, disagreement and scheduling. We are given plenty of example to illustrate cultural misunderstandings and ways to deal with them. Moreover, in each chapter there is a figure who show on a line, from one extreme to other, where each main country stands from a variable point of view. For example, in terms of communication there are two extremes: low-context cultures and High Context ones. In low-context countries such as the US, Australia, people usually say what they think whereas in high-context ones, China and Japan, people tend to only suggest between the lines the real meaning of what they are saying. As I work almost exclusively with clients from outside Europe, the differences between what we consider normal business behavior and theirs are quite significant. I recognized myself in many of the situations presented in the book and maybe I would have dealt better with some problems if I had read this book in advance. I highly recommend this book, I find it extremely useful and enjoyable to consult from time to time.

  3. 4 out of 5

    HBalikov

    There is a minefield out there for anyone who steps from their own familiar territory into foreign turf. The consequences might only be embarrassment or they could be a lost client or you might never know what you did or did not do. Cultural patterns of behavior and belief frequently impact our perceptions (what we see), cognitions (what we think), and actions (what we do). If Meyers goal is to help you improve your ability to decode these three facets of culture and to enhance your effectiveness There is a minefield out there for anyone who steps from their own familiar territory into foreign turf. The consequences might only be embarrassment or they could be a lost client or you might never know what you did or did not do. “Cultural patterns of behavior and belief frequently impact our perceptions (what we see), cognitions (what we think), and actions (what we do).” If Meyer’s goal is “to help you improve your ability to decode these three facets of culture and to enhance your effectiveness in dealing with them”, the book definitely falls a bit short. However, the book, and Meyer’s methodology is a great success at raising the reader’s level of consciousness, and thus better able to perceive where an issue may arise. Meyers sees “eight scales” as defining any specific culture’s dimensions: - Communicating: “low-context vs. high context” - Evaluating: “direct negative feedback vs. indirect negative feedback” - Persuading: “principles-first vs. applications first” - Leading: “egalitarian vs. hierarchical” - Deciding: “consensual vs. top-down” - Trusting: “task-based vs. relationship-based” - Disagreeing: “confrontational vs. avoids confrontation” - Scheduling: “linear-time vs. flexible-time” Aside from the anthropological-speak, the distinctions are easy to perceive. But are they always evident? Are they useful? Fortunately, if you are like me, you don’t have to answer the questions. Just go for the gestalt. Meyer provides anecdotes. (In fact, one could argue that the book is not much more than a collection of anecdotes.) - Read the anecdote. - Ask yourself what you would do. - Try to recall if you have ever been in a similar situation. - Repeat. For me that was a methodology that got me out the other side feeling that I had learned something of value and had also preserved most of my self-esteem. I will save those eight “scales” for another day.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Camie

    I picked up this book at Schiphol airport while traveling in Holland, on a vacation that included London, Germany, and a cruise of the Baltic Sea to Russia, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, and Denmark. It was highlighted as a " must read" and though it is a book written about the complexity of people from different cultures working together in the business world, I found it a very interesting read which maps out the general social customs of people from different countries. I kept thinking of my I picked up this book at Schiphol airport while traveling in Holland, on a vacation that included London, Germany, and a cruise of the Baltic Sea to Russia, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, and Denmark. It was highlighted as a " must read" and though it is a book written about the complexity of people from different cultures working together in the business world, I found it a very interesting read which maps out the general social customs of people from different countries. I kept thinking of my brother-in -law who is Dutch but working in Shanghai, China as these two countries are almost diametrically opposite in all 8 mapped areas the book discusses in the way the people communicate, react to authority, and approach business situations. 4.5 stars for me, even though I'm a very non-business oriented person these days.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tarek Amr

    Being a person who is born and raised in Egypt, then moved to work in the Netherlands a couple of years ago, this book is an eyeopener for me regarding cultural differences I used to notice but wasn't able to articulate very well. Erin Meyer's books focuses on 8 aspects where cultures differ; how are people from different cultures communicate, evaluate, persuade, lead, decide, trust, disagree and schedule. The author maps culture differences onto those 8 scales, and funny enough, the Middle East Being a person who is born and raised in Egypt, then moved to work in the Netherlands a couple of years ago, this book is an eyeopener for me regarding cultural differences I used to notice but wasn't able to articulate very well. Erin Meyer's books focuses on 8 aspects where cultures differ; how are people from different cultures communicate, evaluate, persuade, lead, decide, trust, disagree and schedule. The author maps culture differences onto those 8 scales, and funny enough, the Middle East and the Netherlands fall almost always on the two opposite ends of each scale. When it comes to communication, the scale goes between low context vs hight context cultures. Anglophones and Dutch/Germans are on one end, while Japanese are on the other end. Arabs and Indians slightly lower context than Japanese, and French among other Latin cultures are in the middle. High context read between the lines, looks for layers and hidden meanings. They use irony and don't need to explicitly say "just kidding" after joking. Brits are higher context compared to Americans, thus the latter seldom get the former's humour. Low context cultures tend to have broader vocabulary in their languages. And, I understand, high context ones use metaphors more. Low context culture tend to have stuff written while high context tend to express things verbally. Thinking of Egyptian Arabic, we have just one word for leg and foot; however we have different word for each in traditional Arabic, and maybe we move to a slightly lower context when we write, as we write in traditional Arabic most of the time. When evaluation each other, Dutch are direct and low context, Americans/Brits are indirect and while still having low context. Israelis and Russians direct and high context. Arabs indirect and high context. The French stress on negative feedback and give positive feedback subtly, while Americans are just the opposite. I wouldn't go on and summarise all 8 aspects, of course. I recommend you read the book, but let me mention some things I notices. I used to think Germans and Dutch should be very similar in everything, especially after seeing them showing close to each other on many scales, then later on, I discovered that when it comes to leadership, the Dutch are more egalitarian and the Germans and hierarchal. When I stumbled upon the term, egalitarian, I didn't know exactly its meaning, but since I know what the national motto of France (liberté, égalité, fraternité) means, I could easily deduct its meaning in English, then came the irony that the French are more hierarchal than egalitarian. Imagine being in a queue, and the person in front of you is asking a teller a question that sparks a 30 minutes discussion, while you just have a 2 seconds question, should I go from this gate or that one. In Egypt, it is understandable that you can interrupt their discussion to ask your question, and when I came to Europe, one of the shocking moments to me was that in linear-time cultures, that's a big no no! Similar to my initial perception of German and Dutch cultures, I also thought Israelis would be very similar to Arabs, in the end of the day, they all are Middle-Easterns, till I read that people Israel, Germany, France and the Netherlands are confrontational; while Japan, China, Saudi Arabia, Ghana and Peru avoid confrontation. Arabs and Israelis are kinda similar on 50% of the scales here, and dissimilar on the other 50%. Societies may base their trust on relations, or be task-oriented. Societies with relationship-oriented business attitude are most likely ones with weak legal systems, where relationships provide better safety nets than contracts. In the end, I am not a big fan of the post modernist approach of seeing all cultures are equal, and considering any criticism to be a form of racism. I see empirical evidences that some cultures are more economically successful that the others, and I think it is good for individuals and societies to learn about those differences and learn to adapt to what is best.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Hyperion

    The book was OK. It offers a good overview of differences between cultures. Sometimes we may assume that 2 cultures are similar, but in the end there is a possibility of conflict, because they have different "mentality" on a certain point (trust or time perception, for instance). But Erin often limits herself to personal stories and doesn't cite almost any researcher or study. Where did she take her scales from? What indicators did she use? Hunch? Gut feeling? Statistical analysis? Sometimes The book was OK. It offers a good overview of differences between cultures. Sometimes we may assume that 2 cultures are similar, but in the end there is a possibility of conflict, because they have different "mentality" on a certain point (trust or time perception, for instance). But Erin often limits herself to personal stories and doesn't cite almost any researcher or study. Where did she take her scales from? What indicators did she use? Hunch? Gut feeling? Statistical analysis? Sometimes stories end at the most interesting point, do not specify essential details, and serve just to act as a "proof" for the previous idea to give it credibility that it was lacking. "The Culture Map" is a collection of interesting points on different cultures, but I wouldn't say that it is a best cross-cultural book out there. If you want fundamental research - Hofstede. If you want to work with a particular nation, try looking precisely at books relevant to that nation. Nevertheless, this book is an interesting introduction to cross-cultural management so if you are a novice in the field it might interest you.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Wen

    When you offer a drink to a guest, and she says no, thank you. Would she be expecting you to ask her again or she really meant what she said? The answer depends on if shes from a high-context culture like China or a low-context culture like America. Erin Meyer used many enlightening real-life examples like this to illustrate the cultural differences around the world. I particularly like Erin Meyers approach of using 8 self-standing yet interconnected scales, communicating, evaluating, persuading, When you offer a drink to a guest, and she says “no, thank you”. Would she be expecting you to ask her again or she really meant what she said? The answer depends on if she’s from a “high-context” culture like China or a “low-context” culture like America. Erin Meyer used many enlightening real-life examples like this to illustrate the cultural differences around the world. I particularly like Erin Meyer’s approach of using 8 self-standing yet interconnected scales, communicating, evaluating, persuading, leading, deciding, trusting, disagreeing, and scheduling, to map cultural differences. She position each country on the scales for visual comparison. This systematic method and the abundant real-life examples together made the book very easy to follow. The book mainly targets business managers leading multi-cultural teams. I think some of the examples and conclusions are also enlightening to an everyday reader enjoying international travel and curious about different cultures. Being an immigrant from China who lives and works in the U.S, I experienced a number of aha moments in the book. Remember when my very first U.S boss told someone I was her life saver after I finished , to myself, a trivial task, I felt being put on the spot. People in America do ten to over-use words like “excellent” and “thrilled” (chapter 2), which strikes people from some other cultures as fake and insincere. Indeed It took me a while to recalibrate and adapt., Luckily for me, Americans and Chinese are both confrontation-averse chapter 7). Putting accounting standard in the cultural context as Meyer described in chapter 3 Why versus How, I came to a realization why IFRS is principle-based, and U.S GAAP is rule/application-based. That said, I had my reservations in seeing America and China as single cultures. Meyer did include some qualifiers regarding to this point, however with only moderate conviction. For example, she pegged American leadership approach as egalitarian (chapter 4) , but to me the financial and public sectors are leaning more toward hierarchical. As Chinese major cities increasingly westernized, linear time (chapter 8) has become more of a norm in both corporate and social settings. There are plenty of funny moments; I found myself chuckling from time to time. Overall a wonderful read; the best culture self-help book I have read so far.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cic il ciclista stanco

    Well, I would rate this book 4 stars, but it was the first time I read something about trying to "measure" differences among different cultures and I found it fascinating and rather helpful for anyone who has to deal with people from all around the world.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Asif

    Candidate for the best book I have read in 2016 unless another one can beat it. The author made is fun to read with great examples that I could easily relate to.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Maciej Kuczyński

    Cool, cool. Now I just need to become a manager of an international team in order to see if all this is true. :D

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Meh. It started off really good but the generalisations got annoying towards the end.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jake Goretzki

    This one came heavy with praise from various colleagues. Strong concept, but profoundly tedious and slow-going in its execution. As per the form with very many business books (this happens nearly every time), it's making points that could easily be condensed into a short essay. Somewhere in there, there are a handful of useful dimensions to think about (e.g. high context vs low context communication). But successive dimensions feel narrower and narrower - to the extent where I'm not sure 'giving This one came heavy with praise from various colleagues. Strong concept, but profoundly tedious and slow-going in its execution. As per the form with very many business books (this happens nearly every time), it's making points that could easily be condensed into a short essay. Somewhere in there, there are a handful of useful dimensions to think about (e.g. high context vs low context communication). But successive dimensions feel narrower and narrower - to the extent where I'm not sure 'giving negative feedback' deserves its own axis. As with a lot of it, you could probably make some more universal, multi-behavioural generalisations (I'd probably start by looking again at Hofstede actually). What I found most grinding about it though was the high corporate tone of it all, and the heavy reliance on dreary anecdote populated by dreary business lounge dullards - being, no doubt, ultimately pitched at Americans, who buy 97% of the world's business books. Every faithfully named and job-titled character is slightly wet behind the ears and in for a big surprise that the half self-aware reader has seen a mile off. And then you start to notice the writer's tic of picking out one element of an appearance ('a lady with a neat bob', 'with smiley eyes', 'with snowy white hair'). At intervals I wanted to yell "Look, sod Geoff Tipple. Just sum the point you're making up in two lines". And as with many a business book too, we're never far away from a pitch for consultancy work or conference speech opportunities. Thus: 'While providing leading edge consultancy for a lot of money at a range of major businesses across Western Europe, I was approached recently by Jens Kugelschreiber, a London-based VP from Amsterdam who was working with a team across Indonesia and Legoland. Kugelschreiber, who sported a jet black moustache, explained that he had been experiencing tensions with Chinese colleagues after exposing his private parts during meetings. 'I don't understand it. I do this all the time at HQ'. I told him to read my book, and stop exposing his private parts during meetings. 'It worked! Now I only expose them to Germans', said Jens. Lesson: don't expose your private parts during meetings in China. And maybe everywhere else. Actually, just don't be a prick'.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Philippe Le Grand

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I imagine many readers have a basic understanding of cultural behaviours and differences. I also imagine that many think, due to their understanding, they are able to grasp its impact and find solutions. However, we forget our own cultural behaviour and its impact on others across different cultures. Erin Meyer helps not only to understand other cultural behaviours but also to place yourself on a cultural map. With it, the reader gains insights on coping better and quicker with cultural I imagine many readers have a basic understanding of cultural behaviours and differences. I also imagine that many think, due to their understanding, they are able to grasp its impact and find solutions. However, we forget our own cultural behaviour and its impact on others across different cultures. Erin Meyer helps not only to understand other cultural behaviours but also to place yourself on a cultural map. With it, the reader gains insights on coping better and quicker with cultural differences. Erin Meyer carefully picks up the reader at the very point the reader starts to understand the own impact with and within cultural interactions. Erin Meyer combines theory with personal experiences and helps the reader to translate the academic content quickly and comprehensibly. Clearly arranged around 8 core topics, the complexity of the cultural differences is shown and possible ways of dealing with them proposed. Each page is entertaining and educational at the same time. Erin Meyer helped me understand cultural diversity as much as she helped me to understand my very own cultural background and acting within its boundaries given by it. It opens a door to new possibilties.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Aayla

    I found this book to be fascinating, enlightening, important, and highly relevant. Erin Meyer talks about culture in a way that is respectful and also relative, so that we can understand cultural differences by contrast and comparison. Even though this book is designed to help business-people, I would argue that it is relevant and useful to all people. Everyone could benefit from reading it. Even if you don't agree with everything she has to say (though I personally can't say that I found her to I found this book to be fascinating, enlightening, important, and highly relevant. Erin Meyer talks about culture in a way that is respectful and also relative, so that we can understand cultural differences by contrast and comparison. Even though this book is designed to help business-people, I would argue that it is relevant and useful to all people. Everyone could benefit from reading it. Even if you don't agree with everything she has to say (though I personally can't say that I found her to be wrong), she brings up many great points that will probably get you thinking, and that's an important start.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Moh

    Eye opening introduction into how cultures affect work relationships I was quite impressed with how much Ive learnt from this book. The book talks in detail about how culture manifests itself at work and how it can sometimes cause clashes. It was really interesting to learn about low context and high context cultures which differ in the level of directness of communication, and how that can cause issues in the workplace. It was also super enlightening to see a map of how various cultures rank on Eye opening introduction into how cultures affect work relationships I was quite impressed with how much I’ve learnt from this book. The book talks in detail about how culture manifests itself at work and how it can sometimes cause clashes. It was really interesting to learn about ‘low context’ and ‘high context’ cultures which differ in the level of directness of communication, and how that can cause issues in the workplace. It was also super enlightening to see a ‘map’ of how various cultures rank on a scale on matters like: confrontation, decision making, loyalty, trust earning, and timeliness. I always assumed that the American way of doing business is the righ way, but now I realize that it’s just simply ‘different’ than how business is done elsewhere, which does not necessarily mean that it’s wrong. I will certainly be more aware of these cultural differences from now on. The only thing I wish the book did better is diving into the reasons that led to the stark difference in cultural at the workplace. I would have loved to understand the historical events that led to this divergence between the western and eastern world. Great learnings overall!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bredo Erichsen

    This is the book I should have read 20 years ago when starting to work abroad! @erinmeyerinsead gives the background and the examples. I will recommend this book for all people working abroad or working with foreigners back home. Understanding and respect differences are a good start for a successful collaboration.

  17. 5 out of 5

    SatanIsLove

    A book full of oversimplifications, generalisations and self-contradiction. Plus many of the examples felt simply made up. Although it had one or two good ideas thrown in there, I am honestly not sure if this book can hardly help anyone. I guess if one has never heard words "culture" or "team" before?

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kamil Goungor

    I saw this book in a store at the Brussels airport, and, since I work on international, multicultural environment, I thought it might be useful to check it out, so I bought it. Often this kind of books disappoint me, but not this one. The 'Culture Map' is a really great read for all those that work or act in a multinational setting (and for everyone else too). Even if your work is going great and you don't have any issues with your colleagues from other countries, you will still find the book I saw this book in a store at the Brussels airport, and, since I work on international, multicultural environment, I thought it might be useful to check it out, so I bought it. Often this kind of books disappoint me, but not this one. The 'Culture Map' is a really great read for all those that work or act in a multinational setting (and for everyone else too). Even if your work is going great and you don't have any issues with your colleagues from other countries, you will still find the book interesting. You will realise that many actions and behaviors (even your own) are based on our cultural background. You will see that things like sending emails, disagreeing, giving feedback, being on time etc are perceived quite differently, depending on the norms of where you come from. The numerous examples Erin Meyer uses are helping even more, and make the reading process entertaining. I definitely recommend this book!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Herve Tunga

    Excellent! Clear concepts, illustrative examples, without falling for easy stereotyping. A reference on the subject.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gopal Sadagopal

    good observations of cultural differences and practical guide to interpret and navigate them

  21. 5 out of 5

    Karen Chung

    Unlike many books or discussions on culture, which often tend to be rather abstract, vague and impressionistic, this one covers many of the solid, verifiable differences between people who grew up in different cultures, including how direct or indirect they tend to be, how they provide and react to negative criticism, how to build trust, what it takes to get them to respond to an email quickly or at all, and perceptions of time and punctuality. Indispensable for anybody interacting with or Unlike many books or discussions on culture, which often tend to be rather abstract, vague and impressionistic, this one covers many of the solid, verifiable differences between people who grew up in different cultures, including how direct or indirect they tend to be, how they provide and react to negative criticism, how to build trust, what it takes to get them to respond to an email quickly or at all, and perceptions of time and punctuality. Indispensable for anybody interacting with or managing people coming from more than one single culture – highly recommended.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andy Moore

    Wish I had this to read (at least) 13 years ago. Insightful and practical, with great additional resources available online.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sera

    I was required to read this book for a program that I am involved in through work. I thought that the author did a great job describing the nuances of working with people from other countries and the differences among cultures when it comes to among other things, leading, persuading and trusting. We had a great conversation regarding these activities, how they vary by country or region, and then we shared examples of how we had each by impacted by these differences within our company. Meyer also I was required to read this book for a program that I am involved in through work. I thought that the author did a great job describing the nuances of working with people from other countries and the differences among cultures when it comes to among other things, leading, persuading and trusting. We had a great conversation regarding these activities, how they vary by country or region, and then we shared examples of how we had each by impacted by these differences within our company. Meyer also plots out on a graph where each country lies on the scale of behaviors so that the reader can identify where on the scale for the particular behavior each country sits to determine how pervasive the behavior is. Meyer uses her first hand experience supplemented by research to support her points, which from the consensus of my group were spot on across the board. I highly recommend this book and consider it mandatory for anyone who works or interacts with others on a global basis.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andreea Lucau

    I feel that the book is written for managers handling multicultural teams, but it can be extremely useful for everyone working and even living in a multicultural environment. I read it as a team exercise and it forces us to reflect about ourselves and to also know the team better. The author proposes 8 scaled for measuring a culture and dedicates a chapter to each one. I don't know if this is the most comprehensive way to dissect cultural differences, but at least for business settings it fits I feel that the book is written for managers handling multicultural teams, but it can be extremely useful for everyone working and even living in a multicultural environment. I read it as a team exercise and it forces us to reflect about ourselves and to also know the team better. The author proposes 8 scaled for measuring a culture and dedicates a chapter to each one. I don't know if this is the most comprehensive way to dissect cultural differences, but at least for business settings it fits pretty good.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Safaa

    The book talks about the differences between cultures. It consists of eight chapters. Each chapter represents one aspect of a cultural difference and compares on a scale some countries to each other. Also the book is filled with examples from the authors Erin Meyer own experience in working with different cultures. The chapters discusses the following aspects : 1. Communication: low-context vs. High context 2. Evaluating: Direct negative feedback vs. Indirect negative feedback 3. Persuading: The book talks about the differences between cultures. It consists of eight chapters. Each chapter represents one aspect of a cultural difference and compares on a scale some countries to each other. Also the book is filled with examples from the author’s “ Erin Meyer” own experience in working with different cultures. The chapters discusses the following aspects : 1. Communication: low-context vs. High context 2. Evaluating: Direct negative feedback vs. Indirect negative feedback 3. Persuading: application-first vs. principle-first 4. Leading: Egalitarian vs. hierarchal( how different cultures look at the boss and what are their exception from the manager) 5. Decisions: big d vs. D 6. Trusting: Head vs. heart (Peach vs coconut), Task-based vs. relation based 7. Disagreeing: Confrontational vs. avoids Confrontation (seeks harmony) 8. Scheduling: Linear time vs. Flexible time I enjoyed reading this book and learned a lot and tried to reflect what I read on my previous/current experiences where i worked with people from different cultures. It explains a lot. It's very important to have that in mind while dealing with others. People think and behave differently. That can be very challenging and bring a lot of a misunderstanding between team members or with clients. What works in your country may not work in other countries. What you consider rude is totally normal in other places. However, agreeing from the start with your team and having your "ways of working" stated and written down in a clear way to every team members; from making decisions to scheduling, can solve lots of problems ahead and bring harmony and productivity to your projects. Even though the author mentioned in the beginning and ending of the book, that individuals are different and one can't stereotype behaviours based on a geographical origin, I could not see that in the book. I'm aware that cultures shape the way we see and analyse the world, but it's way more complicated than that. Books we read, people we met, problem we faced and many other factors change our perspectives towards the world and our own cultures. And especially for people who immigrate to other countries, like myself, which are totally different from their original homes. My original country "Syria" is not mentioned in the book. So I tried to map myself to the aspects. I worked in Syria for only two years and spent most of my adulthood in Germany, working here for 5 years. I found that I combine both Germany and middle-east ways of working. I recommend this book to anyone who manages/work in an international team or with international clients. The following photo shows how to put the culture map in practice for an international team:

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    My non-fiction reading "spree" continues.. a little explanation on my perspective before going into the book: I work at a pretty international company and we have scaled up quite a bit during the past few years and whereas I am not in a management position, I am still curious about how and why things work in a business environment. Since last fall, I am participating in a 1 year talent and leadership program which has really opened my eyes about a lot of things and when The Culture Map was My non-fiction reading "spree" continues.. a little explanation on my perspective before going into the book: I work at a pretty international company and we have scaled up quite a bit during the past few years and whereas I am not in a management position, I am still curious about how and why things work in a business environment. Since last fall, I am participating in a 1 year talent and leadership program which has really opened my eyes about a lot of things and when The Culture Map was started to be floated around our management, I got interested. This book is a great and very accessible read - the author uses very direct language to explain concepts which are simple yet work in complex settings. How you implement change or decode your environment is still up to you but this book gives you great tools for understanding why things sometimes are the way you experience them. Meyer also does a good job at emphasising that although people might be from one certain culture, they still might behave differently personally - and that's okay too. I like that she does not paint people with a broad brush but still allows for her work to stand in a general enough setting. I have also recognised several behaviour structures that I fall into and that some of my colleagues from one group have come to expect, whereas others would act differently or have other expectations. I really recommend this book, even if you are not management or involved in business, it is really cool to see how international communication works.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alexandru

    For me, the main takeaway from this book is to try to explain what you are doing and why; make it an exercise in empathy. The problem then becomes the fact that you don't really know when and where theres potential for trouble due to cultural differences. Surprisingly, its the anecdotes in this book helped the most in building an intuition on this. The author starts with common scenarios in a business/work environment, then derives, through induction, the general rules. One of the things I found For me, the main takeaway from this book is to try to explain what you are doing and why; make it an exercise in empathy. The problem then becomes the fact that you don't really know when and where there’s potential for trouble due to cultural differences. Surprisingly, it’s the anecdotes in this book helped the most in building an intuition on this. The author starts with common scenarios in a business/work environment, then derives, through induction, the general rules. One of the things I found valuable, it’s something I’ve always struggled with myself, is convincing people of my ideas or solutions. This book suggests there are two ways to persuade: you start off hard, straight with the point, then present your arguments, or the other way around, you build up the context needed, then finally you present you application. The trick is that you need to know which one to use depending on the expectations of the person you’re talking to. The idea that people in general want to be persuaded was interesting. In a business context people want what is best for the company they work at. Thus, it’s more important for them that the company moves forward with a good plan of action, rather than pushing their own unilateral solution. The confrontational scale was interesting, the author makes a point that sometimes arguing about a decision is very important for exploring all the possible solutions. For example, french people “view dissonance and conflict as bringing hidden contradictions to light and stimulating fresh thinking. With confrontation you reach excellence”. I couldn’t agree more. I want and expect decisions to not be final, to encourage debate. On the other hand, if we did that on all the decisions the company makes, we would loose time and end up in a local optimum.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Esmay

    Trust is like insuranceits an investment you need to make up front, before the need arises. 3,5 stars. This is a book I had to read for my University course, however I never expected to enjoy it as much as I did. Obviously it's radically different from what I usually read, but the way in which Erin Meyer explains the cultural differences in many different aspects, such as trust, leadership, and decision making it becomes clear that a misunderstanding can happen very quickly. I think this book “Trust is like insurance—it’s an investment you need to make up front, before the need arises.” 3,5 stars. This is a book I had to read for my University course, however I never expected to enjoy it as much as I did. Obviously it's radically different from what I usually read, but the way in which Erin Meyer explains the cultural differences in many different aspects, such as trust, leadership, and decision making it becomes clear that a misunderstanding can happen very quickly. I think this book really helped me establish how to go about conversing with people from different cultures and I think this will probably really benefit me in the future.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hanson Ho

    Ostensibly a book about work with people from other countries, it is actually a great framework for communicating across cultures. You'll get immediate value if you work with folks from cultures outside your own, but even in your personal life, it gives you perspective about why certain folks communicate the way they do. Highly recommended for anybody who wants to understand human communication better.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lukas Vermeer

    Excellent introduction to some of the challenges you may encounter when working across cultures. Lots or real life examples and very practical guidance. No book on this topic can ever be completeand this one explicitly doesn't try to bebut The Culture Map is still pretty comprehensive for such a short and easy read. Excellent introduction to some of the challenges you may encounter when working across cultures. Lots or real life examples and very practical guidance. No book on this topic can ever be complete—and this one explicitly doesn't try to be—but The Culture Map is still pretty comprehensive for such a short and easy read.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.