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/Grant Morrison /Howard Porter and John Dell Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Flash, Green Lantern Aquaman, and the Martian Manhunter--the world's greatest heroes, together again! This new story by some of comics' hottest talents finds the public turning against the JLA in favor of a new group of champions: alien superbeings called the Hyperclan. Faced with powers that /Grant Morrison /Howard Porter and John Dell Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Flash, Green Lantern Aquaman, and the Martian Manhunter--the world's greatest heroes, together again! This new story by some of comics' hottest talents finds the public turning against the JLA in favor of a new group of champions: alien superbeings called the Hyperclan. Faced with powers that rival even Superman's and a hidden agenda that threatens the world, how can the new Le


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/Grant Morrison /Howard Porter and John Dell Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Flash, Green Lantern Aquaman, and the Martian Manhunter--the world's greatest heroes, together again! This new story by some of comics' hottest talents finds the public turning against the JLA in favor of a new group of champions: alien superbeings called the Hyperclan. Faced with powers that /Grant Morrison /Howard Porter and John Dell Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Flash, Green Lantern Aquaman, and the Martian Manhunter--the world's greatest heroes, together again! This new story by some of comics' hottest talents finds the public turning against the JLA in favor of a new group of champions: alien superbeings called the Hyperclan. Faced with powers that rival even Superman's and a hidden agenda that threatens the world, how can the new Le

30 review for JLA, Vol. 1: New World Order

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro

    Kickin' butt new beginning! Creative Team: Writer: Grant Morrison Illustrator: Howard Porter RETURN TO GREATNESS For too many time the major super-hero team in DC Comics was been kinda a joke with teams without any of "big guns", a publishing decision to avoid the crossover problems of using characters with their own titles and having to accomodate the team storyline to changes suffered in their individual ones. In paper seemed like a wise decision, but... ...the Justice League isn't inspire the Kickin' butt new beginning! Creative Team: Writer: Grant Morrison Illustrator: Howard Porter RETURN TO GREATNESS For too many time the major super-hero team in DC Comics was been kinda a joke with teams without any of "big guns", a publishing decision to avoid the crossover problems of using characters with their own titles and having to accomodate the team storyline to changes suffered in their individual ones. In paper seemed like a wise decision, but... ...the Justice League isn't inspire the same respect without its "big guns". Also, a change to the title's name is done (once again) to "update" the coolness of the name of the team. Way, way back in the 40s, it was the Justice Society of America, but in the 70s, a society wasn't something to sound cool anymore, so, the super-team became the Justice League of America, but in the 90s, the acronyms was the cool thing so... ...the JLA is born! Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, The Flash, Green Lantern, Martian Manhunter and Plastic Man! The "Big Guns" are back! SOME OLD, SOME NEW, SOME UNEXPECTED Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman and Martian Manhunter are the original ones. The Flash is Wally West and Green Lantern is Kyle Rayner. And yes, you aren't mistaken... ...Plastic Man is here! And honestly I don't see anything wrong about it, since Plastic Man is way more useful than Elongated Man and also he can be the comic relief of the team without having to mess with the status of another member in the team. FALLEN TEAM, RISING TEAM A mysterious incident provoked the fall of the Justice League Satellite disbanding the then-current team. The "Big Guns" in DC universe got together again (after too many years without being in the same team) along with brand new headquarters: The JLA Watchtower located in the Moon, with transporters able to unite the team and sending it to wherever there is an emergency on Earth with a response time of 4 minutes! Heck, yeah!!! ENTER HYPERCLAN Earth got strange new visitors in the way of a team called themselves "The Hyperclan" offering to end climatic crisis, to solve world hunger, to cure terminal diseases, to eliminate deadly villains... ...and they are having the approval and support by Earth's populace! Also, the Hyperclan is hiding more than anyone can imagine... ...good thing that we have again... ...the JLA!!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sr3yas

    After terrible sales of old JLA titles, DC revamped the team in 1997 by bringing back all the A-list players for facing a brand new threat to humanity. Alas, I wish this title had a better artist. The volume starts with the introduction of an unfamiliar Alien Superpeople gang called Hyperclan, which is led by their golden leader Protex to our world and they wish to turn Earth into utopia. The moment I heard Protex, I thought it sounded like one of those Protein supplement brands for bodybuilders, After terrible sales of old JLA titles, DC revamped the team in 1997 by bringing back all the A-list players for facing a brand new threat to humanity. Alas, I wish this title had a better artist. The volume starts with the introduction of an unfamiliar Alien Superpeople gang called Hyperclan, which is led by their golden leader Protex to our world and they wish to turn Earth into utopia. The moment I heard Protex, I thought it sounded like one of those Protein supplement brands for bodybuilders, but I was totally wrong about that. It's a brand for soaps. The Hyperclan turns Sahara into an Oasis to prove the point that Superheros could change the world for better, which leads people to turn against Superman and others. Just after that, JLA's Watchtower gets attacked by mysterious forces which put most of the old members of C-list JLA out of commission. This brings the big gang back in action: Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, Flash, Aqua Man and Martian Manhunter. At first, I thought Grant Morrison has dropped the ball with this title. Hyperclan was poorly introduced and the whole thing felt rushed. The writing was poor in the first issue, but once the new JLA got together, Morrison really pulled the story together. The plotting was good, and the dialogues were good enough although there were some duds. One of the best parts was the hilariously bitter chemistry between Wally and Kyle. Another favorite part of the portrayal of Batman who is, after all, just a human. Apart from the first issue's writing, the consistently bad character sketches by Artists Porter and Dell makes this volume far from perfect. Porter and Dell's version of Wonder Woman is disturbingly bad and feels like a Barbie doll rejects in many panels. It's not all bad, the artists are pretty good with wider shots. But when it comes to getting all the faces together in one short, they find a way to screw it up. For Example, the writing here is pretty good. Superman is delivering an iconic punchline, but every member of Justice League looks like "Did Superman just say something is falling?" and starts looking around like a bunch of idiots. smh. 4 Stars for the story, 2 stars for terrible art, 3.5 Stars overall because I'm bad at maths.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Sicoli

    Score: 3.88 out of 5 Grade: 78% (B+) | Good The JLA face their first big test when the mysterious Hyperclan come to Earth and win the affection of the human population. Here is my review of JLA Vol. 1: New World Order: The Good: Oh the 90’s, what a time to be alive… This story definitely looks and feels dated, but I mean that in a good way. Superman with a mullet, hell-ya I’m in! Lots of vibrant colours, big bold lettering, and larger than life art. Even certain plot points were so extra, but I Score: 3.88 out of 5 Grade: 78% (B+) | Good The JLA face their first big test when the mysterious Hyperclan come to Earth and win the affection of the human population. Here is my review of JLA Vol. 1: New World Order: The Good: Oh the 90’s, what a time to be alive… This story definitely looks and feels dated, but I mean that in a good way. Superman with a mullet, hell-ya I’m in! Lots of vibrant colours, big bold lettering, and larger than life art. Even certain plot points were so extra, but I found them to be a fun change of pace from the more serious and gritty comics. The roster of the JLA is absolutely stacked! You have the Man of Steel rockin’ a kickass mullet. Batman being…well, Batman. Flash and Green Lantern not playing nice. Plus much more! There’s a lot of little moments between the heroes which were fun to see. Every hero got their moment to shine, but Batman stole the show for me. I really liked the idea of the Hyperclan. This super team from space comes out of nowhere and does what the JLA does, but better. I love the whole, “Why doesn’t the JLA be proactive rather than reactive.” It’s an idea that I wish Morrison expanded on some more. The Bad: I wasn’t a huge fan of the ending. Sure, there are parts of it I enjoyed, but the whole Superman message to Earth thing…it was just so lame. I understand what it represents, but I feel like there was a better way of handling this. I would have preferred the JLA laying the smack down on the invaders and showing them not to f*** with Earth. If you really wanted to, you could nitpick the sh** out of this book. There’s a fight between Flash and Züm that is soooo drawn out and takes forever to get to the punchline. There’s a revelation about what Martian Manhunter has been up to which just fell flat for me. Some things happen off-page with the Flash and Green Lantern that I would have liked to see. And then there’s Superman’s face… The Hyperclan was a good idea, but as a team of bad guys, I barely remember who they were, what they did, or why I should even care. I felt like it was Protex versus the JLA…then all his little Hyperclan minions were just an afterthought. The supporting villains were forgettable and were just there for the JLA to fight. Conclusion: In the end, I still had a lot of fun with this. The execution wasn’t as smooth as I would have liked, but the first cosmic outing for the JLA was entertaining. I’d recommend this for DC/Justice League fans, but it may feel too campy for some. Or, if you wanted to see Superman with a mullet , knock yourself out!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    Didn't finish. Some really interesting concepts, like why have superheroes never utopianized society and culture with all their power, instead of just punched each other and brought about apocalypse? But I was so bored by the dialog and everything else. And Wonder Woman looks like a crack whore. Will try again later.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    This was pretty great. Bringing the team back together without spending too much time on where they've been and what they've been doing. Easy to jump in on and new reader friendly. Morrison also juggles around the team well so it feels like a team book and doesn't focus too much on one character.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Eli

    3.75 stars Well, Superman has a mullet or something just as god-awful. Gotta love the '90s. Plot summary: So a group of Martians known as the Hyperclan come to Earth and talk the human population into believing they are superior to the JLA and that they can save the world. I know, I know. Smells like trouble. And a whiff of unoriginality...? But hey, at least it doesn't stink. So the JLA gets suspicious, and their suspicions are proven to be correct. The Hyperclan is in fact a clod of 3.75 stars Well, Superman has a mullet or something just as god-awful. Gotta love the '90s. Plot summary: So a group of Martians known as the Hyperclan come to Earth and talk the human population into believing they are superior to the JLA and that they can save the world. I know, I know. Smells like trouble. And a whiff of unoriginality...? But hey, at least it doesn't stink. So the JLA gets suspicious, and their suspicions are proven to be correct. The Hyperclan is in fact a clod of megalomaniacal Martians. So the JLA battles them, but they are momentarily bested. Until Batman does his thing, and then Superman does his thing. Then they all do their things and live happily ever after... Except there's a gentle cliffhanger at the end. What I liked about this was that it was simple without being too bland. The artwork was a little cringe-worthy at times just because of the hairstyles and outfits, but the art representation itself was great! The characters were funny and had depth. My favorite thing about this is that the Hyperclan underestimated Earth. And they underestimated Batman and Aquaman, which is a violation of what should be the first rule of the DCU: don't underestimate Batman or Aquaman. Good, classic JLA. Can't wait to continue this series.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Virginia

    The story itself was interesting, but I found myself constantly distracted by Wonder Woman. What was she wearing? How did it stay on? I mean, really! The bustier was seriously LOW and the underwear - SO HIGH!! How could she possibly fight without being incredibly uncomfortable or worried about flopping out or flossing herself? (Is that TMI?) At any rate, good story.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sud666

    JLA Vol 1: New World Order by Grant Morrison covers the 1997 3rd Version run of the Justice League. We have Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Flash, Green Lantern (Kyle Rayner) and Martian Manhunter as the JLA. In the New World Order storyline a new group of superheroes known as the Hyperclan show up on Earth and propose to solve all of Earth's problems. They start by re-seeding the Sahara desert and end with executing supercriminals. While controversial and definately getting on the JLA's bad JLA Vol 1: New World Order by Grant Morrison covers the 1997 3rd Version run of the Justice League. We have Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Flash, Green Lantern (Kyle Rayner) and Martian Manhunter as the JLA. In the New World Order storyline a new group of superheroes known as the Hyperclan show up on Earth and propose to solve all of Earth's problems. They start by re-seeding the Sahara desert and end with executing supercriminals. While controversial and definately getting on the JLA's bad side, they draw a lot of praise and support from the everyday people who see them as being far more proactive than the JLA, which is more of a reactive group. This does bring up some interesting moral dilemmas of what exactly the role of a supergroup ought to be. However, underneath it all there is something nefarious going on here. Who are the Hyperclan and what exactly are they up to? The rest I shall not say since it would spoil the story for you. This is a story from the late 1990's. It shows in the artwork. We have the overly muscled Superman with the weird late '90's long hair that was a staple of most comic titles. The rest of the characters remind me of Rob Liefields artwork. I didn't hate it, but at best I would say the artwork is not bad to sometimes good. What saves this book is Grant Morrison. His story has a lot to offer. The JLA is just coming into being. Aquaman is not really a part of the team yet and they don't even know if batman will join. In the end it turns out both are indeed involved. I liked GM's take on the JLA and how they are viewed by the society around them (they story about more proactive and "hard-edged" superheroes has been done in recent times with the Superman vs the Elite storylines-so I was glad to see where the original idea might have come from). I also truly enjoyed GM's Batman. He is wearing a darker all-black suit with a yellow oval bat symbol as opposed to his standard blue/gray suits that were more common during the 80's and 90's period. I also like that Batman is a darker and grimmer character as when he talks about why he wears a dark suit as opposed to a lighter suit like Superman and it shows why he is to be considered a superhero even though he is only a normal human. The Hyperclan consistently underestimates him due him being "only human". I also like the fact that Superman refers to him in one scene as "The most dangerous human on earth". So factoring in the time in which it was written and the time when the artwork was done-I thin this is deserving a 4/5. If you are a Morrison fan or a fan of the JLA pick this one up and give it a read. Non-fans of the JLA or Morrison may not care for this as much as some of the 90's gloss has faded and you might not appreciate the tale for what it is in relation to when it came out. I did and I quite liked it-I think fans of GM and/or JLA will too.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nick Smith

    Grant Morrison reinvents the mainstream superhero comic book. Ten years later, the rest of them are still catching up. As the inaugural volume of Morrison's justly lauded run on the Justice League, this story of a Martian invasion (with chapter titles taken from old Martian invasion movies) doesn't exactly possess the most original plot. What it does have is a willingness to go faster and bigger than just about any comic that came before it. Wally West and Kyle Rayner begin a great Grant Morrison reinvents the mainstream superhero comic book. Ten years later, the rest of them are still catching up. As the inaugural volume of Morrison's justly lauded run on the Justice League, this story of a Martian invasion (with chapter titles taken from old Martian invasion movies) doesn't exactly possess the most original plot. What it does have is a willingness to go faster and bigger than just about any comic that came before it. Wally West and Kyle Rayner begin a great friendship/rivalry; Aquaman displays an interesting new facet of his powers; Batman kicks more ass than you ever thought possible; and everyone is reminded of why Superman, even with the mullet, is still the greatest superhero ever created. While this is sadly one of the few JLA stories featuring just what came to be known as the "magnificent seven," that also makes it a nice little gem of a book. No continuity concerns, no unrecognizable heroes, no pointless bickering. Just good heroics ushering in a new era for DC.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jack Herbert Christal Gattanella

    Some decent writing and clever dialog at times between some of the characters, notably Flash and Kyle Rainer as Green Lantern, the drawing was just too BIG in that 90's style that has now oddly become kinda dated (no, it's not Rob Leifeld or something, don't get nervous, but... everything is just OFF in some way in how some of the drawings are done - and to have to introduce the characters TWO ISSUES into the book once more, WTF man). Some cool moments with Batman though, one can see what would Some decent writing and clever dialog at times between some of the characters, notably Flash and Kyle Rainer as Green Lantern, the drawing was just too BIG in that 90's style that has now oddly become kinda dated (no, it's not Rob Leifeld or something, don't get nervous, but... everything is just OFF in some way in how some of the drawings are done - and to have to introduce the characters TWO ISSUES into the book once more, WTF man). Some cool moments with Batman though, one can see what would make Grant Morrison the wild-fuck-nut king of Batman years to come. It's not a bad comic, just not very good either. I'm generous with my star rating; I had some enjoyment while reading it, but I won't remember it the way I do Batman and Son or, of course, Allstar Superman when it comes to memorable Morrison DC work.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Interesting to re-read this early Morrison work after becoming such a fan of the mind-bending stuff he's written after the millennium. I'm having a difficult time not evaluating it from the perspective of what was available back in 1997 (when this was a new way of writing/illustrating/inhabiting these characters). Nowadays I'm feeling a little shortchanged compared to what I can get from current Morrison, even though the philosophical thoughts in this book are beyond what you get from 90% of any Interesting to re-read this early Morrison work after becoming such a fan of the mind-bending stuff he's written after the millennium. I'm having a difficult time not evaluating it from the perspective of what was available back in 1997 (when this was a new way of writing/illustrating/inhabiting these characters). Nowadays I'm feeling a little shortchanged compared to what I can get from current Morrison, even though the philosophical thoughts in this book are beyond what you get from 90% of any writer today. Perhaps a little of my disappointment stems from the fact that this plotline has been done better since in both The Authority and The Ultimates. However, no amount of retroactive context can forgive Superman with a mullet.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Chaitra

    Not really impressed enough to continue with this, and it's Grant Morrison too - I've mostly liked what he's involved with. There are aliens, and they act like they are extremely good but surprise! They're evil. I'm reading the Injustice arc along with this, and it seems like the same story with different aliens (Supes & WW). And that's impressing me just as little as this one. (Unfortunately it's 5 whole years of Injustice vs. 93 pages of this one).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dan Weiss

    Standard 90s superhero stuff, launching a new run. Big splash pages with absurd posing, ridiculous anatomy, etc. Superman has a mullet. Yep. Story is decent, but too small for a big team like the JLA.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tony Laplume

    DC seems to have sort of lost Grant Morrison's seminal JLA in the shuffle over the years, what with his later work like the long Batman run or All Star Superman (considered by many to be his definitive superhero comic) or Final Crisis, and Geoff Johns' later New 52 Justice League relaunch, which heavily inspired the 2017 movie. Seems crazy to anyone who remembers just how impactful Morrison's JLA was, and was for years. Now, a little over twenty years later, reading the first collection DC seems to have sort of lost Grant Morrison's seminal JLA in the shuffle over the years, what with his later work like the long Batman run or All Star Superman (considered by many to be his definitive superhero comic) or Final Crisis, and Geoff Johns' later New 52 Justice League relaunch, which heavily inspired the 2017 movie. Seems crazy to anyone who remembers just how impactful Morrison's JLA was, and was for years. Now, a little over twenty years later, reading the first collection again...Wow! Wow all over again! The biggest surprise is actually Morrison's Aquaman. I don't particularly remember Aquaman having a huge role in later stories, and he doesn't really have one here, either, but the dude's all bad-ass posturing as he debuts in this collection. It's very safe to say that even in the midst of stuffing the League with the big guns again, Morrison also single-handedly redeemed Aquaman's reputation, starting him on the path to being taken, once and for all, seriously. But the real showcase belongs to Batman. This is a Batman, at last, who truly belongs to his famed reputation as "the most dangerous man on the planet" (what someone calls him in New World Order). It's no wonder that Morrison later revisits the Dark Knight in a big way. More than Aquaman, obviously, Morrison's repositioning of Batman had a huge impact, including later stories by other writers that exploited the idea that the dude has a way to defeat his allies, not to mention his enemies, an idea that may have originated in Frank Miller's Dark Knight Returns (also an inspiration for the recent movies, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice), in which he can legitimately tackle the awesome power of Superman. In terms of storytelling, Morrison's big idea is that superheroes shouldn't be expected to solve all the world's problems. Post-Cold War Americans, especially in the age of Iraq and Afghanistan, can easily see what modern observers view nation-building, even if it just looks like nation-building, as an increasingly controversial idea. If someone comes along claiming the ability to solve all your problems, it's probably too good to be true. (And it's not really exclusive to one political party, folks.) Not groundbreaking, maybe, but always a relevant message. A bigger revelation for 2018 eyes is Howard Porter's art. Porter was largely responsible for what was called Morrison's "widescreen" adventures, and rightly so, but his art can look sloppy at times. In the years following his run on JLA, Porter all but drifted into obscurity. He's resurfaced recently, and reclaimed his previous reputation, thanks to high profile work in the pages of the Rebirth era Flash, and that's been good to see. It's just funny to see that his most famous work is not actually his best. But it certainly has its moments. His Superman can look incredibly super, and his Batman is Kelley Jones levels of intimidating. No wonder the guy helped Morrison pump up the League to new levels.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alex E

    So I finally got around to reading what is generally known in comic circles, as not only one of the best runs on JLA, but one of the best writing runs for Grant Morrison. And being huge Morrison fan, I couldn't wait to see what the hub bub was all about. As expected, this was awesome. This is more than just the Justice League in my opinion, its the core of the DC universe boiled down to one team of the heaviest hitters (at the time) and reminding us of why they are so great and why they work so So I finally got around to reading what is generally known in comic circles, as not only one of the best runs on JLA, but one of the best writing runs for Grant Morrison. And being huge Morrison fan, I couldn't wait to see what the hub bub was all about. As expected, this was awesome. This is more than just the Justice League in my opinion, its the core of the DC universe boiled down to one team of the heaviest hitters (at the time) and reminding us of why they are so great and why they work so well alone and together. In this volume, the threats range from alien invasion, to existential deities, to an updated, and far deadlier version of a golden age villain. And all work to such great affect. The stories are thrilling in a way that they remind me of reading comics when I was younger. The action is visceral, but there is also a sense of Justice and bravery that subtly highlight underlying themes hidden in comics. I wouldn't be surprised if books like "the Authority" and more mid modern "Avengers" titles took inspiration from this run. Because like those books, the plots in this are huge, to the point where they are almost ideas come to life which then the JLA have to out think in order to fully defeat. I can really see the idea of "widescreen" comics originating from this run. And of course Morrison's explanation of things, his twists, his surprises are classic Morrison but without the elevated LSD-induced plots that he is more known for. Not that any of that is bad, but its nice to see a more grounded, back to roots superhero book written by Morrison. And I say back to roots, but really, the themes, villains and surprises in this book are really well thought out and well written. The art is solid, and helps cement that 90's/2000's aesthetic of heroic ambition that was lost in the 80's and early 90's. I like how Porter can focus in on one character at a time, or can draw a big swatch of scenery into smaller panels as well as giant splash pages which serve to illustrate the big ideas of this book. I definetley recommend this to anyone who is a fan of DC heroes and what they do best.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Roy

    After sales were down in the current JLA book, the team was sadly overlooked, a one shot called a Midsummers Nightmare introduced the A team back. The big 7. Superman, Batman, Flash(Wally West), Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Martian Manhunter, and Green Lantern (Kyle Rayner) as they faced a threat of Guardian level power and got they first hint of a huge threat coming. That leads to Morrisons run on JLA. In the first outing they discover the Hyperclan. A group of Supers who claim to have lost there After sales were down in the current JLA book, the team was sadly overlooked, a one shot called a Midsummers Nightmare introduced the A team back. The big 7. Superman, Batman, Flash(Wally West), Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Martian Manhunter, and Green Lantern (Kyle Rayner) as they faced a threat of Guardian level power and got they first hint of a huge threat coming. That leads to Morrisons run on JLA. In the first outing they discover the Hyperclan. A group of Supers who claim to have lost there homeworld to pollution and ignorance. They turn the people against the JLA both by performing amazing feats and treachery. We discover they are not who they seem and get a new villain and a major threat. Great start for this team. They were "new" and had not worked together long and had to face an enemy set to one up them and having power to go toe to toe with this league. Some great moments from Superman asking Flash to use his speed and experience to help keep the team together to Flash Facts. Batman being Batman and Supermans scene when he figures it all out.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    Written before Morrison became The Grant Morrison of the following decade, this is a pretty good book that serves as something of a reboot of the JLA without being all retcon and pedantic about it. Kyle with his weird mask is the Green Lantern, Wally is the Flash, Superman's got a weird mullet going on, and Diana's suit is about three sizes too small. So... yeah, late '90s, check. The art is pretty good, too, with the balloon style and high gloss that were all the rage then. I especially liked Written before Morrison became The Grant Morrison of the following decade, this is a pretty good book that serves as something of a reboot of the JLA without being all retcon and pedantic about it. Kyle with his weird mask is the Green Lantern, Wally is the Flash, Superman's got a weird mullet going on, and Diana's suit is about three sizes too small. So... yeah, late '90s, check. The art is pretty good, too, with the balloon style and high gloss that were all the rage then. I especially liked the use of the titles of '50s films for the four section titles: Them, The Day the Earth Stood Still, War of the Worlds, and (spoiler!) Invaders From Mars. And at the end they get a cool new clubhouse on the moon.

  18. 4 out of 5

    NGV22

    Art: 4 Story: 5 Action: 4 I read this JLA by Grant Morrison but that was ages before so I forgot the story and all. Now I get why they called this series epic. This is way different than the modern comics we have currently. I like how GL and Flash bickering each other, and I have no complains on Batman being the 'God-man' like how other readers complained. The only thing I dislike in this arc is the lack of Aquaman and his importance. I am so used to new52 and Rebirth badass Aquaman. Hopefully the Art: 4 Story: 5 Action: 4 I read this JLA by Grant Morrison but that was ages before so I forgot the story and all. Now I get why they called this series epic. This is way different than the modern comics we have currently. I like how GL and Flash bickering each other, and I have no complains on Batman being the 'God-man' like how other readers complained. The only thing I dislike in this arc is the lack of Aquaman and his importance. I am so used to new52 and Rebirth badass Aquaman. Hopefully the next arc focuses on him more. Martian Manhunter is basically the main character for this arc. The art is great for that era.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mario Mikon

    So bad that it's actually good. How? The penciler... how did he get this gig? I mean... he's actually good at building a world, but horrible, HORRIBLE at drawning humans! Some faces are just... not anatomically correct! We are talking about the fucking trinity here! You just can't give some of this enormous brands to some unkown guy! Nonetheless...it was bad drawning, with a very, VERY normal Grant Morrison. It's... nice. Not incredible...not even an 4/5... maybe 3,5 /5 .

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jason Tanner

    God, the Morrison League was a lot of fun. This volume is still one of my favorites. It perfectly captured the tone and scope of what Grant Morrison wanted to do with the Justice League. Big ideas, big action, and over-the-top heroic moments from start to finish.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Maythavee

    This was not the most impressive start to the JLA. I appreciated the interactions between the members of the League and the plot-twist of the villains true identities but the rest was pretty mediocre. I also didn't like the art especially the way Wonder Woman was drawn.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sandrine Plastre

    My first one of JLA. I feel like I am missing some background stories or even in between stories. Superman is also going back and forth between two costumes and I am not sure why... But, I still had fun reading it and the drawings are pretty and colorful.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    Some fun Morrison philosophizing, but the sloppy art and really retrograde treatment of Wonder Woman take it down a notch.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kireth

    Solid invasion story. Good questioning of the efforts of superheroes. Nailed the characterisation of pretty much all 7 JLA members. Interesting villain match-ups. Batman is the coolest.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Calvinist Batman

    Yeah, Batman is awesome. Martians suck. As a sidenote, I enjoyed how each chapter's title was taken from an alien invasion movie title. Lol

  26. 5 out of 5

    Fizzgig76

    Reprints JLA #1-4 (January 1997-April 1997). Earth has a new group of heroes! The Hyperclan have come to the planet and begin to show how they are willing to take a proactive approach to helping the world…something that the Justice League has never done. When the Justice League is attacked at their base and the world begins to turn on them, a new JLA must form to fight the Hyperclan and expose their true intent! Written by Grant Morrison and illustrated by Howard Porter, JLA 1: New World Order Reprints JLA #1-4 (January 1997-April 1997). Earth has a new group of heroes! The Hyperclan have come to the planet and begin to show how they are willing to take a proactive approach to helping the world…something that the Justice League has never done. When the Justice League is attacked at their base and the world begins to turn on them, a new JLA must form to fight the Hyperclan and expose their true intent! Written by Grant Morrison and illustrated by Howard Porter, JLA 1: New World Order restored the Justice League to DC’s premiere super team. The series quickly became a best seller and provided a spark to the book. This collection contains the first storyline of the series and has also been collected as part of JLA Deluxe Edition Volume 1. Growing up, the Justice League to me was the Super Friends. All the heavy hitters, Wonder Woman, Superman, Batman, Aquaman, and Flash (plus those Super Friends created for the series). If you grew up on Super Friends, picking up a Justice League book in the ‘’90s must have been rather confusing. With members like Green Flame, Ice, Guy Gardner, and Metamorpho, new readers were probably scratching their heads and wondering where the real Justice League was. Grant Morrison followed up the Mark Waid and Fabian Nicieza Justice League: A Midsummer’s Nightmare limited series with a much more solid core team that most people expected from the JLA. I remember that this series outsold expectations and JLA #1 and JLA #2 quickly became collectibles. The JLA was back! The only problem with this volume of the JLA is that the story feels really rushed. It feels like this should be a six issue story crammed into four issues. I would have loved to see more of the Hyperclan before they were exposed as White Martians and seen how they manipulated the Earth to turn on the JLA. The six issue format of stories was just picking up at this point in comic books so it is understandable to have a quick opening story. If you are a big fan of Grant Morrison, don’t expect much of the twisted Grant Morrison in JLA. His story is well developed through his issues of the series, but it is much, much more mainstream than his writings on Doom Patrol or Animal Man. He is also backed by the solid art by Howard Porter who just presents a very classic version of the heroes that you loved as a kid. JLA 1: New World Order picks up here and once you read this volume, you’ll probably want to read more. The JLA just should be the ultimate super team for DC much like the Avengers should be the team for Marvel…here Morrison makes it so. JLA 1: New World Order was followed by another short volume in JLA 2: American Dreams.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Scott Lee

    Here is the Grant Morrison that I love. The only Grant Morrison that I love. Everywhere else that Morrison has worked in mainstream comics he seems intent on blowing up the status quo to the point of destroying any connection to legitimate serial storytelling creating some bizarre hodgepodge that is entirely his own, yes, but that cuts off all connection with the past in spirit or fact. Such revolutionary stories can work, but they should develop over time and in some reasonable fashion rather Here is the Grant Morrison that I love. The only Grant Morrison that I love. Everywhere else that Morrison has worked in mainstream comics he seems intent on blowing up the status quo to the point of destroying any connection to legitimate serial storytelling creating some bizarre hodgepodge that is entirely his own, yes, but that cuts off all connection with the past in spirit or fact. Such revolutionary stories can work, but they should develop over time and in some reasonable fashion rather than as arbitrary fiats imposed suddenly by creators. Here Morisson does a Geoff Johns like job of pulling up traditional material and while true to it in spirit, develops and tells his own stories and his own take on the characters. I know Batman was respected etc. before this, but I don't know that he was quite the world conquering mastermind he is often portrayed as now before Morrison used him that way in this run. This kind of gradual development and building on a character is what works effectively in serial storytelling. Growth over time coming in some logical fashion from what has gone before over the years--not sudden change of character and theme by authorial fiat as Morrison did when writing X-Men years later. I loved what happens here. The art isn't perfect, but it's consistently high quality throughout the run, and these stories are historically classic now for a reason--and it's not just because they pre-date the New 52 reboot. As much as I LOVE Jim Lee's justice League (as he has done on every book he's ever touched he puts all previous work on the title to shame), the book as a whole is at best approaching how good this is. Wonderful, wonderful stuff. I think Morrison is more interested in stirring up controversy/pissing off traditional readers than he is writing good comics.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    This trade collects issues 1-4 of JLA. In recent years the Justice League has featured many of DC's premiere heroes, but when 1997 arrived it had been become home of the second stringers. Some of this was very well done, such as Giffen and DeMatteis' JLI, but readers were ready for a return of the concept of the Justice League being a collection of the biggest heroes tackling the biggest threats. So Grant Morrison assembled the "big 7": Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Flash (Wally West), Green This trade collects issues 1-4 of JLA. In recent years the Justice League has featured many of DC's premiere heroes, but when 1997 arrived it had been become home of the second stringers. Some of this was very well done, such as Giffen and DeMatteis' JLI, but readers were ready for a return of the concept of the Justice League being a collection of the biggest heroes tackling the biggest threats. So Grant Morrison assembled the "big 7": Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Flash (Wally West), Green Lantern (Kyle Rayner), Aquaman and the Martian Manhunter. New World Order is a complete story told over four issues and features the team's first challenge in the form of a group of aliens that land on Earth and proclaim they are here to save the world. There are some nice surprises as they try to unearth the strangers' motives. The mere existence of the line-up is obviously not as remarkable as it was 15 years ago, but Morrison still makes the formation of the team feel significant. The team members are fairly well developed for such a large cast over so few issues, and the banter between them captures their characters nicely. New World Order is in some ways a stereotypical 90s action comic, and being on the short side moves very quickly, so look elsewhere for deep themes and layered meanings. However it is a fun read and has held up pretty well over time.

  29. 5 out of 5

    John Mccubbin

    This was a good book, but not quite as good as I'd have expected. I've been a fan of Grant Morrison for some time now, and have enjoyed most of his work, but mainly his run on Batman. His Action Comics run also started good, but has went a bit inconsistent of recently, and his All Star Superman series was also brilliant, so I always expect big things from him. Although I expected the same here, it was actually a very decent story to start a series, but still nothing brilliant. The story overall This was a good book, but not quite as good as I'd have expected. I've been a fan of Grant Morrison for some time now, and have enjoyed most of his work, but mainly his run on Batman. His Action Comics run also started good, but has went a bit inconsistent of recently, and his All Star Superman series was also brilliant, so I always expect big things from him. Although I expected the same here, it was actually a very decent story to start a series, but still nothing brilliant. The story overall was a bit slow, but I kind of expect that from opening stories, but due to that it just felt a bit dull. It did however pick up pace in the last issue, and a half, and was very exciting after that. The thing I liked most about Morrison's writing on this book was the interaction between the characters, but I'll talk more about that a little later. I do however think that the rest of Morrison's run on JLA will be brilliant, as this story did get very good, but just a little too late. Read the rest of my review here: http://imaginationcentre.blogspot.co....

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marc Jentzsch

    After reading this I have come to the conclusion that Morrison is 1 part genius and 1 part hyper-caffeinated squirrel. The story moves at breakneck pace, sometimes losing me in the transitions, but it always comes back around. The topics are almost prescient and it makes for a timeless story. The rest of the run is similar in its willingness to tackle big ideas sometimes one issue at a time. It's not as sweeping and living in the id the way some of Morrison's Action Comics run was, but you can After reading this I have come to the conclusion that Morrison is 1 part genius and 1 part hyper-caffeinated squirrel. The story moves at breakneck pace, sometimes losing me in the transitions, but it always comes back around. The topics are almost prescient and it makes for a timeless story. The rest of the run is similar in its willingness to tackle big ideas sometimes one issue at a time. It's not as sweeping and living in the id the way some of Morrison's Action Comics run was, but you can see the seeds of it here. Single issue and short arc stories are fun and sorely missing in many of today's comics (I appreciated the 2010 Zatanna series in part due to this same element), just be prepared to wrap your head around the compressed storytelling techniques. It's not always appropriate, but it really works well here. It's full of great villains and great superheroics and does not disappoint as a superhero book. I'd have rated this higher if I liked the art better. It hasn't aged as well as the writing. I consider this required reading for DC fans, regardless, particularly fans of the Justice League.

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