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Other Victims: A Historical Fiction about the "Other Victims" of the Holocaust. A Biracial Child Experiences Prejudice and Persecution During the Nazis' Occupation of Berlin

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[Alternate cover edition for ISBN 9781492188902] The story is seen through the eyes of the main character Namib Mushelenga, the daughter of a White German woman named Lody Mushelenga and a Black Namibian man named Omir Mushelenga, who just so happens to be a World War I veteran who fought with the French against Germany. The book starts with Namib at the age of three in [Alternate cover edition for ISBN 9781492188902] The story is seen through the eyes of the main character Namib Mushelenga, the daughter of a White German woman named Lody Mushelenga and a Black Namibian man named Omir Mushelenga, who just so happens to be a World War I veteran who fought with the French against Germany. The book starts with Namib at the age of three in 1933. Her parents suffer huge consequences as a result of their marriage and having a biracial child. In order to escape the Death or Divorce Law, they all go into hiding in a home where a Jewish family once lived. Determined to have a better, safer place for his family to live in, Omir surprises his wife and daughter with the news that they will flee Nazi Germany to live in Amsterdam. But this does not go as planned. The years roll by to 1944 and Namib is now fifteen-years-old. Omir had made a big mistake in choosing to leave Nazi Germany alone and then send for his family later. Faithfully and patiently, Namib has still clung to the belief that her family will someday be safe in a better place if only her father would finally send for them. Namib has also befriended a Jewish boy named Aven Beneluz and his family. For reasons that Namib does not yet know, her mother is determined to keep them apart. On the night that Omir is getting ready to leave for Amsterdam, Namib reveals to her father that her mother has been physically abusive to her to the point of leaving bruises on her body. In response to his daughter’s accusations, Omir does nothing because he believes in keeping the family together at all costs. He knows that he must do something about it, but chooses not to. This will cause horrific consequences. To make matters much worse, her mother has been acting strangely and secretly having strong Nazi leanings. Will she abandon her family and turn them in to the Nazis or will she stand with her family in a united front against Hitler and the Nazis?


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[Alternate cover edition for ISBN 9781492188902] The story is seen through the eyes of the main character Namib Mushelenga, the daughter of a White German woman named Lody Mushelenga and a Black Namibian man named Omir Mushelenga, who just so happens to be a World War I veteran who fought with the French against Germany. The book starts with Namib at the age of three in [Alternate cover edition for ISBN 9781492188902] The story is seen through the eyes of the main character Namib Mushelenga, the daughter of a White German woman named Lody Mushelenga and a Black Namibian man named Omir Mushelenga, who just so happens to be a World War I veteran who fought with the French against Germany. The book starts with Namib at the age of three in 1933. Her parents suffer huge consequences as a result of their marriage and having a biracial child. In order to escape the Death or Divorce Law, they all go into hiding in a home where a Jewish family once lived. Determined to have a better, safer place for his family to live in, Omir surprises his wife and daughter with the news that they will flee Nazi Germany to live in Amsterdam. But this does not go as planned. The years roll by to 1944 and Namib is now fifteen-years-old. Omir had made a big mistake in choosing to leave Nazi Germany alone and then send for his family later. Faithfully and patiently, Namib has still clung to the belief that her family will someday be safe in a better place if only her father would finally send for them. Namib has also befriended a Jewish boy named Aven Beneluz and his family. For reasons that Namib does not yet know, her mother is determined to keep them apart. On the night that Omir is getting ready to leave for Amsterdam, Namib reveals to her father that her mother has been physically abusive to her to the point of leaving bruises on her body. In response to his daughter’s accusations, Omir does nothing because he believes in keeping the family together at all costs. He knows that he must do something about it, but chooses not to. This will cause horrific consequences. To make matters much worse, her mother has been acting strangely and secretly having strong Nazi leanings. Will she abandon her family and turn them in to the Nazis or will she stand with her family in a united front against Hitler and the Nazis?

39 review for Other Victims: A Historical Fiction about the "Other Victims" of the Holocaust. A Biracial Child Experiences Prejudice and Persecution During the Nazis' Occupation of Berlin

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gregory Booker

    While WWII has always brought out the gross injustices against the Jewish people, many smaller groups of minorities suffered as well. And the author makes a noble attempt at sharing that pain through the eyes of a young African /German mixed girl. We know that much of Europe was subject to such cruelty outside of the Aryan race but for people of darker persuasion it could have only been even worse. Called 'Rhineland bastards ' under the Hitler reign, Namib the biracial teenager sees the changes While WWII has always brought out the gross injustices against the Jewish people, many smaller groups of minorities suffered as well. And the author makes a noble attempt at sharing that pain through the eyes of a young African /German mixed girl. We know that much of Europe was subject to such cruelty outside of the Aryan race but for people of darker persuasion it could have only been even worse. Called 'Rhineland bastards ' under the Hitler reign, Namib the biracial teenager sees the changes of Germany through the eyes of her German mother Lody, who loved and married her father Omir a Namibian. The overwhelming propaganda by the German media eventually brings Lody to walk away from that love and instead honor the racial pride of the German concern for purity, even to the loss of her family. Slowly, Namib begins to realize this as she pieces things together with the help of her Jewish friends. Much of the hatred and tragedy is well known and predictable, so there really isn't much shock and awe in WW II story telling no matter who the victims are, for me personally. As a result, the book did not move me to any new greater understanding. However, it showed the fear everyone was under, even the German mother and how the human spirit can be diverted to serve the worse out of fear for their own lives. Namib rises above this and survives being the other victim while never abandoning the love for her mother despite the suspicion of betrayal. While there seem to be some 'lost moments" in the story with it's ebb and flow along with some minor editing miscues, it read pretty well. It's a recommend read….

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette

    It shows just how little I know in regards to the 'other victims' of the Holocaust. I know a fair amount of what went on during the Nazis' Occupation, but I have never really given it any thought about mixed races and biracial children. I have never heard of the expression 'Rhineland's Bastards'. I have seen a few sites where there was once a concentration camp and shall be visiting Auschwitz later this year and will remember what I have learned upon reading this book today, and say a silent It shows just how little I know in regards to the 'other victims' of the Holocaust. I know a fair amount of what went on during the Nazis' Occupation, but I have never really given it any thought about mixed races and biracial children. I have never heard of the expression 'Rhineland's Bastards'. I have seen a few sites where there was once a concentration camp and shall be visiting Auschwitz later this year and will remember what I have learned upon reading this book today, and say a silent prayer to all. Rachael JanLynnette McCormick has written an excellent story about a young girl, Namib. Although a short story, I do recommend to all. I would like to thank the author for sending me an e-copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Connie Arco

  4. 5 out of 5

    Luisa

  5. 5 out of 5

    Liz Ambrose

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ted

  7. 4 out of 5

    Denise Tuggle

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alisha B

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Salant

  10. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

  11. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Fantom

  13. 4 out of 5

    J

  14. 4 out of 5

    Seanna Yeager

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alan

  16. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Stadden

  17. 5 out of 5

    Betty

  18. 4 out of 5

    Skye

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mia Redgrave

  20. 4 out of 5

    Addy Ferguson

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mary Bronson

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sylvie

  23. 5 out of 5

    Callie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Melonie Kydd

  25. 4 out of 5

    Velda

  26. 5 out of 5

    Wendi Dusek

  27. 5 out of 5

    Allison Dutton

  28. 5 out of 5

    Julia Conway

  29. 5 out of 5

    Richard Hicks

  30. 5 out of 5

    Vykki

  31. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty

  32. 4 out of 5

    A.M. Heath

  33. 5 out of 5

    Pam

  34. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  35. 5 out of 5

    Liz

  36. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Hiemstra

  37. 5 out of 5

    Daryl Moad

  38. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

  39. 4 out of 5

    Loraine

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