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Crossing Rivers: An African Historical Fiction (The Agikuyu Book 1)

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Crossing Rivers: A young Maasai girls world is turned upside down when she is traded to an old Gikuyu woman in exchange for food, by her starving parents. Compelled to become a Gikuyu she goes through adoption and initiation rituals. She falls in love but soon after her marriage her world, once again, changes forever. Crossing Rivers is Book One in The Agikuyu Series Crossing Rivers: A young Maasai girl’s world is turned upside down when she is traded to an old Gikuyu woman in exchange for food, by her starving parents. Compelled to become a Gikuyu she goes through adoption and initiation rituals. She falls in love but soon after her marriage her world, once again, changes forever. Crossing Rivers is Book One in The Agikuyu Series "Brilliantly written and uncompromising in its perspective, Crossing Rivers by Skeeter Wilson delivers us into the hands of the peoples of pre-colonial eastern Africa allowing us to learn at their fires, listen to a voice most have never heard, and appreciate a way of life all too often misrepresented." T.L. O’Hara


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Crossing Rivers: A young Maasai girls world is turned upside down when she is traded to an old Gikuyu woman in exchange for food, by her starving parents. Compelled to become a Gikuyu she goes through adoption and initiation rituals. She falls in love but soon after her marriage her world, once again, changes forever. Crossing Rivers is Book One in The Agikuyu Series Crossing Rivers: A young Maasai girl’s world is turned upside down when she is traded to an old Gikuyu woman in exchange for food, by her starving parents. Compelled to become a Gikuyu she goes through adoption and initiation rituals. She falls in love but soon after her marriage her world, once again, changes forever. Crossing Rivers is Book One in The Agikuyu Series "Brilliantly written and uncompromising in its perspective, Crossing Rivers by Skeeter Wilson delivers us into the hands of the peoples of pre-colonial eastern Africa allowing us to learn at their fires, listen to a voice most have never heard, and appreciate a way of life all too often misrepresented." T.L. O’Hara

30 review for Crossing Rivers: An African Historical Fiction (The Agikuyu Book 1)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jean Carlson

    A detailed and flowing lyricism moves through Mr. Wilson's novel, creating a fascinating and engaging narrative of livid beauty. I found myself captivated by the honesty and heart of the complex family and tribal interactions, and the incredible precision with which Mr. Wilson knows his subject and weaves the world so thoroughly. From the use of specific Maasai and Gikuyu sayings worked seamlessly into conversations, to the details of the landscape and trade-routes, to the precise social systems A detailed and flowing lyricism moves through Mr. Wilson's novel, creating a fascinating and engaging narrative of livid beauty. I found myself captivated by the honesty and heart of the complex family and tribal interactions, and the incredible precision with which Mr. Wilson knows his subject and weaves the world so thoroughly. From the use of specific Maasai and Gikuyu sayings worked seamlessly into conversations, to the details of the landscape and trade-routes, to the precise social systems and tribal beliefs, this novel is a gem! For anyone who wants to immerse themselves in a slice of history, this is a must-read!

  2. 5 out of 5

    James

    Skeeter has a talent for taking a Western reader and guiding them into the foreign, vibrant Africa of his imagination. Where his last book, Worthless People, focused on the complex inner struggle of its protagonist, Crossing Rivers works from the outside in, slowly peeling away layers of plot to reveal the inner strength of its main character. The Africa that Skeeter portrays in this book is mysterious and mythic. Since the entire story is told from an African point of view (and 1860's Africa at Skeeter has a talent for taking a Western reader and guiding them into the foreign, vibrant Africa of his imagination. Where his last book, Worthless People, focused on the complex inner struggle of its protagonist, Crossing Rivers works from the outside in, slowly peeling away layers of plot to reveal the inner strength of its main character. The Africa that Skeeter portrays in this book is mysterious and mythic. Since the entire story is told from an African point of view (and 1860's Africa at that), a Western reader might find themselves struggling to decipher the cryptic imagery. I don't want to give spoilers, so just imagine how a local African woman from 150 years ago might describe Western tools and vehicles that she's never seen before. The effect is compelling but sometimes confusing, but if the reader trusts the author then all will be clear by the end of the book, and the journey is very rewarding.

  3. 4 out of 5

    John Benson

    The author of this book, Skeeter (Tim) Wilson, and I were in high school together while we were growing up as missionary kids in East Africa. In this book, Skeeter explores the history of the Gikuyu people who lived around the place where we went to high school. He takes a Maasai/Gikuyu woman and brings out her life as she tries to figure out this new culture she has become a part of as a child. Skeeter writes in an engaging and very thoughtful style as he brings out her story in chapters that The author of this book, Skeeter (Tim) Wilson, and I were in high school together while we were growing up as missionary kids in East Africa. In this book, Skeeter explores the history of the Gikuyu people who lived around the place where we went to high school. He takes a Maasai/Gikuyu woman and brings out her life as she tries to figure out this new culture she has become a part of as a child. Skeeter writes in an engaging and very thoughtful style as he brings out her story in chapters that jump through time. Her story will continue to be told in future books. There are few books like this one that delves so completely into the lives of a people at a particular point in time.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Summary: This story is based in pre-colonial eastern Africa and centers around the culture of Gikuyu and Maasai people. The story begins with the main character, Ma'Muriuki crossing a river with her three children as she travels back to her birth place among the Maasai. Throughout her journey she reflects on the events that led her to her current situation. As a little girl living among the Maasai her people experienced a shortage of food due to disease spreading in their livestock. Her family Summary: This story is based in pre-colonial eastern Africa and centers around the culture of Gikuyu and Maasai people. The story begins with the main character, Ma'Muriuki crossing a river with her three children as she travels back to her birth place among the Maasai. Throughout her journey she reflects on the events that led her to her current situation. As a little girl living among the Maasai her people experienced a shortage of food due to disease spreading in their livestock. Her family resorts to trading her to the Gikuyu people in exchange for food. From there her world changes and she creates a new life for herself among the Gikuyu. As the story progresses you learn more and more about Ma'Muriuki's past and how she ended up in her current situation. Struggling to safely travel with her three young children across a great distance. Review: I enjoyed this book very much. While it took me a long time to get around to reading, once I picked it up I couldn't put it down. This story is not only an insight on pre-colonial history in eastern Africa, but a look into an entirely different culture that existed before colonization. Admittedly, I had to stop reading the story and read the notes in the back of the book quite a few times. There is a lot that might be hard to understand if you know nothing of East African culture, but thankfully the author had some good notes to go with the story. I don't know much about African history but after reading this book I really do want to learn more. Final thoughts: -The story has a good pace -Great symbolism -This book kept me really engaged -Being about 160 pages it was a quick read -I really look forward to its sequel. I highly recommend reading this book if you're interested in historical fiction, adventure, and African history/culture.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jacque Baker

  6. 5 out of 5

    Angela

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sara Davitashvili

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lloyd R. Iverson

  10. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne Wilson

  11. 5 out of 5

    Vittoria Belloni

  12. 5 out of 5

    Java

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stravo Lukos

  14. 5 out of 5

    Judi Langholz

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jackie Weger

  16. 5 out of 5

    John Reed

  17. 5 out of 5

    Liz

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael Mary Nolan

  19. 4 out of 5

    Deborah aka Reading Mom

  20. 5 out of 5

    Phyllis Confer

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christy Gibbon

  22. 4 out of 5

    Christine M. Audia

  23. 4 out of 5

    cdscott

  24. 5 out of 5

    Edwin

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jaide

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shauna Bean

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joanne Hooks

  28. 4 out of 5

    Laura Rice

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rungumzee

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karen

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