counter create hit Poetry as Spiritual Practice: Reading, Writing, and Using Poetry in Your Daily Rituals, Aspirations, and Intentions - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Poetry as Spiritual Practice: Reading, Writing, and Using Poetry in Your Daily Rituals, Aspirations, and Intentions

Availability: Ready to download

"[When we read and write poetry,] it is as if a long-settled cloud in our mind suddenly dissipates, and we are divine once again." -- from the Introduction Poetry is the language of devotion in prayer, chant, and song. Reading and writing poetry creates clarity, deepens and expands spiritual inquiry, and cultivates wisdom, compassion, self-confidence, patience, and love. "[When we read and write poetry,] it is as if a long-settled cloud in our mind suddenly dissipates, and we are divine once again." -- from the Introduction Poetry is the language of devotion in prayer, chant, and song. Reading and writing poetry creates clarity, deepens and expands spiritual inquiry, and cultivates wisdom, compassion, self-confidence, patience, and love. In author Robert McDowell's words, poetry makes you into a tuning fork of the Divine. But poetry has disappeared over the centuries from religious ceremonies, academic curricula, and public discourse. In Poetry as Spiritual Practice, the first inspirational and instructional guide to combine poetry and spirituality, McDowell restores poetry as the natural language of spiritual practice and invites you to recognize poetry as "the pure sound and shape of your spirit." Vividly illustrated with a wide range of poems from all historical eras and poetic traditions, numerous religions and faiths, and McDowell's own and his students' work, Poetry as Spiritual Practice will reintroduce you to the unique pleasure of verse. And meditations throughout will allow you to integrate reading and writing poetry into your spiritual journeys and daily life. Since many of us have long forgotten, or never learned, the mechanics and terminology of poetry -- trochaic feet and tropes trip us up; we can't tell a villanelle from its shorter cousin, rondeau; and a terza rima may as well be a tanka -- this is also an instructional handbook on reading and writing poetry. An engaging guide through the landscape of world poetry, McDowell argues along the way for the many practical benefits of poetic literacy. Making poetry an essential part of daily rituals, aspirations, and intentions will put you on the path to greater meaning, growth, and peace in your life. At once an engaging technical primer, a profound meditation on the relationship between poetry and the Divine, and an inspirational guide for integrating poetry into spiritual practice, Poetry as Spiritual Practice will become a cherished companion.


Compare
Ads Banner

"[When we read and write poetry,] it is as if a long-settled cloud in our mind suddenly dissipates, and we are divine once again." -- from the Introduction Poetry is the language of devotion in prayer, chant, and song. Reading and writing poetry creates clarity, deepens and expands spiritual inquiry, and cultivates wisdom, compassion, self-confidence, patience, and love. "[When we read and write poetry,] it is as if a long-settled cloud in our mind suddenly dissipates, and we are divine once again." -- from the Introduction Poetry is the language of devotion in prayer, chant, and song. Reading and writing poetry creates clarity, deepens and expands spiritual inquiry, and cultivates wisdom, compassion, self-confidence, patience, and love. In author Robert McDowell's words, poetry makes you into a tuning fork of the Divine. But poetry has disappeared over the centuries from religious ceremonies, academic curricula, and public discourse. In Poetry as Spiritual Practice, the first inspirational and instructional guide to combine poetry and spirituality, McDowell restores poetry as the natural language of spiritual practice and invites you to recognize poetry as "the pure sound and shape of your spirit." Vividly illustrated with a wide range of poems from all historical eras and poetic traditions, numerous religions and faiths, and McDowell's own and his students' work, Poetry as Spiritual Practice will reintroduce you to the unique pleasure of verse. And meditations throughout will allow you to integrate reading and writing poetry into your spiritual journeys and daily life. Since many of us have long forgotten, or never learned, the mechanics and terminology of poetry -- trochaic feet and tropes trip us up; we can't tell a villanelle from its shorter cousin, rondeau; and a terza rima may as well be a tanka -- this is also an instructional handbook on reading and writing poetry. An engaging guide through the landscape of world poetry, McDowell argues along the way for the many practical benefits of poetic literacy. Making poetry an essential part of daily rituals, aspirations, and intentions will put you on the path to greater meaning, growth, and peace in your life. At once an engaging technical primer, a profound meditation on the relationship between poetry and the Divine, and an inspirational guide for integrating poetry into spiritual practice, Poetry as Spiritual Practice will become a cherished companion.

30 review for Poetry as Spiritual Practice: Reading, Writing, and Using Poetry in Your Daily Rituals, Aspirations, and Intentions

  1. 5 out of 5

    Misti

    John Keats, the great English poet who died at age 26 in 1821, prepared to write poetry by taking a bath. Afterward, he would dress in his finest clothes, peel and slice an apple, and pour a glass of good red wine. Placing the apple slices and the wine glass just so on his desk, he would sit down, dip his quill and ink pot, and begin to write. (26)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    I guess I sort of hoped that this would be a book on how to making writing one's religion. But actually, it's about adding the practice of practice of writing to one's religion. As a result, I wasn't that interested, but others who would like to write about spiritual experiences might be.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Camellia

    Excellent book for guidance and inspiration

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ronna Jevne & Harold Martin

    This is a book I return to periodically. It is a lovely reminder that poetry touches us at a level that prose does not. McDowell provides the reader with basics and yet engages the reader in experimenting with the genre. Poetry as Spiritual Practice always feels like a one-on-one workshop with the author. The multiple/optional assignments are a delight. I have a particular appreciation for the author's willingness to avoid doctrinal mousetraps. Members of any religious tradition would be This is a book I return to periodically. It is a lovely reminder that poetry touches us at a level that prose does not. McDowell provides the reader with basics and yet engages the reader in experimenting with the genre. Poetry as Spiritual Practice always feels like a one-on-one workshop with the author. The multiple/optional assignments are a delight. I have a particular appreciation for the author's willingness to avoid doctrinal mousetraps. Members of any religious tradition would be comfortable as would someone who is not attached to conventional religion. Each time I read it, I feel like my poetry repertoire increases.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michael Morris

    Finally (okay it was published ten years ago, but it is "new" to me), a book not only making the connection between the spiritual and the poetic, but something seekers of all kinds can benefit from. The book is not an intellectual exercise for a minority of people (poets) who want to justify their existence (though it makes the case), but a gathering of reflective lessons designed to deepen inner lives through active participation, as both writer and reader, in the power of poetry.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Juli Anna

    This book brought together two of my favorite themes and gave me quite a few ideas for my own practice. It was neither as academic nor as mystical as I had hoped, and I found most of the exercises to be too basic and group-oriented to be helpful to me, or else this would have gotten 4 stars.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    The title of this book led me to think that it would have some basic instruction on how to write poetry—you can't assume anyone is familiar with that—but that mostly the book would be on how to integrate poetry into my spiritual practice. But in reality, it's almost entirely a poetry-writing 101 instruction guide, concentrating on the traditional forms, and fairly indistinguishable from other introductory books on the topic. McDowell does talk about spirituality throughout the book, but only in The title of this book led me to think that it would have some basic instruction on how to write poetry—you can't assume anyone is familiar with that—but that mostly the book would be on how to integrate poetry into my spiritual practice. But in reality, it's almost entirely a poetry-writing 101 instruction guide, concentrating on the traditional forms, and fairly indistinguishable from other introductory books on the topic. McDowell does talk about spirituality throughout the book, but only in the most general terms, referring to some generic spirituality that has something to do with mindfulness, meditation, opening the heart, etc. I would have liked at least to have been able to recommend this book as a beginning text on poetry, even if it didn't do much for me personally as a spiritual guide. However, I believe there are some factual errors in the chapter on sonnets. The author appears to confuse the English and Italian sonnet forms, calling the English form "Petrarchan" (Italian sonnets can be called "Petrarchan;" English sonnets are "Shakespearean"). One of his examples of an English sonnet is actually an Italian one—indeed, it's a translation of one of Petrarch's sonnets. Overall, this could be a supplementary book on how to write poetry, but you should probably look elsewhere both for introductions to writing poetry and suggestions of how to bring poetry into your spirituality and vice versa.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Hafidha

    The introduction is vague and at times even sloppy. For example, I could have done without this: "As you hear or speak poetry, the particles in your brain connect and dance, creating physical sensations of lightness, darkness, joy and sorrow. Through poetry's sound and pictures, its cadences and imagery, you achieve greater awareness and more intimate knowledge of things seen and unseen and more abundance in your spiritual life." However, when McDowell starts to become specific about his own The introduction is vague and at times even sloppy. For example, I could have done without this: "As you hear or speak poetry, the particles in your brain connect and dance, creating physical sensations of lightness, darkness, joy and sorrow. Through poetry's sound and pictures, its cadences and imagery, you achieve greater awareness and more intimate knowledge of things seen and unseen and more abundance in your spiritual life." However, when McDowell starts to become specific about his own spiritual practice and that of a friend, I found more meaning in what he had to say. The poem, "Paper Cranes," by Thomas Merton, is very special - I'm glad he shared it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    R.K. Goff

    It was fun, in it's own way. And some of the book had good verse in it. But it wasn't what I was expecting, or hoping for. There was a lot of it which was dedicated to teaching the very formal verse styles that aren't commonly used any more. And there wasn't as much about the spiritual nature of poetry, and one might expect from a book with such a title. I guess the worst of it was how many of the exercises didn't really have any introspection or good contemplation. . . (my own opinion, of It was fun, in it's own way. And some of the book had good verse in it. But it wasn't what I was expecting, or hoping for. There was a lot of it which was dedicated to teaching the very formal verse styles that aren't commonly used any more. And there wasn't as much about the spiritual nature of poetry, and one might expect from a book with such a title. I guess the worst of it was how many of the exercises didn't really have any introspection or good contemplation. . . (my own opinion, of course). But it did get a few poems out of me. I'm grateful for that.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Liam

    This book surprised me because I shouldn't have forgotten how enmeshed poetry and spirituality are. I know this and live this enmeshed existence as I read poetry nearly daily now. Or, in my garden think poetic thoughts. I pray in some form daily. The book reminded me too of the many poetic forms I don't think about. It asked readers to participate in practice exercises within writing groups, and this I didn't do, alas. I have no writing group and need to rectify that this year, but will I?

  11. 4 out of 5

    Satia

    Too many of the exercises require that you either share what you write with another person or the exercises are designed to be done in a group setting. While this might be a good book for a group to read together, for someone who does not have a community of writers with which to share, this book will only be a huge frustration. I recommend you read the full review for other recommendations, ones that I feel will be more fulfilling than this book is. http://satia.blogspot.com/2009/12/poe...

  12. 4 out of 5

    David

    I attended a four day workshop led by the author at Vermillion Community College in Ely, MN, April 2011. It was my first serious entry into poetry writing since 1999. McDowell used techniques from his book, exploring various styles of verse. I want to go back to basic fundamentals, such as meter and form, which are covered in detail in the book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    JaNeal

    This book is a little different, but I really liked it. It has some great poems (though a couple caught me off guard) and a interesting perspective on the value of poetry. This book is not a beginner book, but it does covers a lot of the basics. If you're serious about writing poetry, it is definitely worth a look.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    I expected this book to be more about incorporating poetry into spiritual practice and less about the nuts and bolts of poetry-writing. That said, I’d like to try some of the exercises later on. (This time, I just read the book through.)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    This was a gift and really hit me at the right moment to rediscover poetry. I've set it aside for the moment, but I feel there's more to plumb from the depths :)

  16. 5 out of 5

    John

    The book didn't live up to its title. Which is too bad, because poetry as spiritual practice is a topic which deserves to be done well.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    A wonderful Christmas gift from Tom. Even just the introduction is beautiful.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Olga Hebert

    More about reading and writing poetry than spiritual practice, but interesting and informative.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Foreign

    US: Leslie Meredith

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lynda

    This is a great book. Not a read front-to-end books. Did some of the exercises. Read parts of this 2 or 3 times.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dallas

  23. 4 out of 5

    Christina M.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Melanie Scheller

  25. 5 out of 5

    Allan Andrews

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mary Alice

  27. 4 out of 5

    Robert Stanhope

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

  29. 4 out of 5

    Janavi Held

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lyn Westbrook

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.