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Is Your Job Making You Stupid? Adam Smith, author of The Wealth of Nations, once wrote that a person who spends his life performing the same repetitive tasks generally becomes as stupid and ignorant as it is possible for a human creature to become. Wow! Now thats not a pretty picture. Unfortunately, much of our work today consists of those boring, repetitive tasks. But maybe Is Your Job Making You “Stupid”? Adam Smith, author of The Wealth of Nations, once wrote that a person who spends his life performing the same repetitive tasks “generally becomes as stupid and ignorant as it is possible for a human creature to become.” Wow! Now that’s not a pretty picture. Unfortunately, much of our work today consists of those boring, repetitive tasks. But maybe you’re one of the many who have gotten caught up in thinking work is just something you do to support your weekends. Work is that necessary evil, a means to an end, or just a curse from God. You probably take your role of providing for yourself and those depending on you seriously. But you don’t expect to enjoy your work—you just do what has to be done. Only now you’re seeing that even loyalty and dependability bring no guarantees. Lately you’ve seen coworkers who have been let go after years of faithful service. Perhaps your entire industryhas been shaken by outsourcing or changing technology. Maybe you’re tired of the long commute and being tied to your desk when you know you could make your own hours and still be productive. You may have ideas stirring that you think could create new income and time freedom. But here comes another Monday. Maybe feeling trapped is just the reality of the way things are. Doesn’t everyone dread Mondays? Doesn’t every responsible person just bury their dreams and passions in exchange for getting a paycheck? Absolutely not! All of us, no matter how old we are or what kind of work we’re doing, can learn to bring the same excitement to our jobs that we bring to whatever we love to do on our days off. I believe that each one of us can pursue work that is a reflection of our best selves—a true fulfillment of our callings. No More Mondays will show you that meaningful work really is within your grasp. And once you’ve opened the door and seen all the exciting career opportunities that await you—whether you decide to revolutionize your current job or launch a new career altogether—you’ll find you can’t go back to the old way of working.” From No More MondaysFor everyone who dreads going to work on Monday mornings, inspiring advice on how to find fulfilling work in an uncertain age. Do you hate Mondays? If so, what's keeping you at your current job? If you said a steady paycheck and the promise of a secure retirement, then you're in for a big disappointment. In today's volatile economy, there is nothing safe about punching the clock for a job you hate. As beloved talk-show host and bestselling author Dan Miller reveals, the only way to find true security is by following your calling and then finding or creating work that matches that calling and passion. No More Mondays’s practical, inspirational advice speaks to people looking for guidance on how to launch a new career or business, those who want to stay in their current jobs and give the old 9-to-5 model a twenty-first-century makeover, and managers desperate to understand the way people want to work today. For all of them, Dan Miller's message is loud and clear: If you're one of those people who dread going to work on Mondays, do something about it!


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Is Your Job Making You Stupid? Adam Smith, author of The Wealth of Nations, once wrote that a person who spends his life performing the same repetitive tasks generally becomes as stupid and ignorant as it is possible for a human creature to become. Wow! Now thats not a pretty picture. Unfortunately, much of our work today consists of those boring, repetitive tasks. But maybe Is Your Job Making You “Stupid”? Adam Smith, author of The Wealth of Nations, once wrote that a person who spends his life performing the same repetitive tasks “generally becomes as stupid and ignorant as it is possible for a human creature to become.” Wow! Now that’s not a pretty picture. Unfortunately, much of our work today consists of those boring, repetitive tasks. But maybe you’re one of the many who have gotten caught up in thinking work is just something you do to support your weekends. Work is that necessary evil, a means to an end, or just a curse from God. You probably take your role of providing for yourself and those depending on you seriously. But you don’t expect to enjoy your work—you just do what has to be done. Only now you’re seeing that even loyalty and dependability bring no guarantees. Lately you’ve seen coworkers who have been let go after years of faithful service. Perhaps your entire industryhas been shaken by outsourcing or changing technology. Maybe you’re tired of the long commute and being tied to your desk when you know you could make your own hours and still be productive. You may have ideas stirring that you think could create new income and time freedom. But here comes another Monday. Maybe feeling trapped is just the reality of the way things are. Doesn’t everyone dread Mondays? Doesn’t every responsible person just bury their dreams and passions in exchange for getting a paycheck? Absolutely not! All of us, no matter how old we are or what kind of work we’re doing, can learn to bring the same excitement to our jobs that we bring to whatever we love to do on our days off. I believe that each one of us can pursue work that is a reflection of our best selves—a true fulfillment of our callings. No More Mondays will show you that meaningful work really is within your grasp. And once you’ve opened the door and seen all the exciting career opportunities that await you—whether you decide to revolutionize your current job or launch a new career altogether—you’ll find you can’t go back to the old way of working.” From No More MondaysFor everyone who dreads going to work on Monday mornings, inspiring advice on how to find fulfilling work in an uncertain age. Do you hate Mondays? If so, what's keeping you at your current job? If you said a steady paycheck and the promise of a secure retirement, then you're in for a big disappointment. In today's volatile economy, there is nothing safe about punching the clock for a job you hate. As beloved talk-show host and bestselling author Dan Miller reveals, the only way to find true security is by following your calling and then finding or creating work that matches that calling and passion. No More Mondays’s practical, inspirational advice speaks to people looking for guidance on how to launch a new career or business, those who want to stay in their current jobs and give the old 9-to-5 model a twenty-first-century makeover, and managers desperate to understand the way people want to work today. For all of them, Dan Miller's message is loud and clear: If you're one of those people who dread going to work on Mondays, do something about it!

30 review for No More Mondays: Fire Yourself -- and Other Revolutionary Ways to Discover Your True Calling at Work

  1. 5 out of 5

    David

    What I learned from this book: 1. That in the next 5 years 50% of the U.S. workforce will be employees and the other 50% will be contract workers, temp, outsourced, etc. 2. It will be up to the individual to furnish their own - health insurance, 401k, dental insurance, etc. 3. Generation X (1965-1981) people most likely seen their parents work for one company for 25 years and then lose their job (i.e. through buyout of the company, downsize, etc.). My thought: This book is very well done. In some What I learned from this book: 1. That in the next 5 years 50% of the U.S. workforce will be employees and the other 50% will be contract workers, temp, outsourced, etc. 2. It will be up to the individual to furnish their own - health insurance, 401k, dental insurance, etc. 3. Generation X (1965-1981) people most likely seen their parents work for one company for 25 years and then lose their job (i.e. through buyout of the company, downsize, etc.). My thought: This book is very well done. In some ways it is similar to the "4-Hour Work Week", but better. I also heard Dan Miller on the Dave Ramsey Show and he said that the average work stay for Gen X person is 14 months. Change is on the way for the workforce, which can be kind of scary, but also great. So if you lose your job, you are suppose to look at as a new opportunity in life.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    I have often heard Dave Ramsey tout Dan Miller (the author) as having written some great books. Well, here was one of his great books, expanded edition. (While this book has Scriptural references, Im not sure if the original, un-expanded version does or not.) I began reading it hesitantly not sure what to expect. Not sure if I would like the book. And not sure if I would ever finish reading it. Fortunately, the first chapter broke some of those mental barriers I had. He doesnt promote a college I have often heard Dave Ramsey tout Dan Miller (the author) as having written some great books. Well, here was one of his “great books,” expanded edition. (While this book has Scriptural references, I’m not sure if the original, un-expanded version does or not.) I began reading it hesitantly… not sure what to expect. Not sure if I would like the book. And not sure if I would ever finish reading it. Fortunately, the first chapter broke some of those mental barriers I had. He doesn’t promote a college education; he emphasizes determining what your passions and skills are and effectively using them to contribute to the marketplace. No need to be tied down to a 9-to-5 job sitting behind a computer, “dreading Mondays,” when you could be doing something you love. He addresses common concerns like “Won’t I lower my income if I do that?” and “That’s too uncertain for me” both directly and through examples. His examples aren’t obscure ones either; he uses both everyday people he has interacted with as well as famous people, those we all recognize when we hear their names (like Thomas Edison). Another great thing about the book is the format variety. He has small “Revolutionary Insight” tidbits as well as quotes from a variety of people throughout the book. This breaks up the monotony; it’s enjoyable to read because it is not simply 12 point Times New Roman text on a page. I had several qualms throughout the book though. As I read through it, the book as a whole focused on “you.” What “you” can do, how “you” can succeed, steps “you” can take to break out of “your” mold. And this book is advertised as Christian? Yes, there are Christian cliches sprinkled throughout (“As a man thinketh in his heart, so is he” and “God-given” to name a couple), but the book it not overtly Christian. This bothered me. For example, in a sentence on page 74 talking about whether choosing not to have a victim, “life happens to me” mentality, Miller says, “You’ll know you are in the driver’s seat.” Another example on page 98 where he talks about changing your perspective on the situation so you can see new opportunities, he says, “I choose to believe that everyone is out to bring me happiness and help me reach my goals.” Whoa! A bit of egotism, selfishness, and just plain error in that sentence – man is sinful from birth, and no one is “out to bring me happiness” – each seeks his own (Rom. 3:10-12)! So, while I have benefited from this book in many ways, from his perspective about what a “job” can look like to how to create a plan for developing a home business (as I begin to brainstorm about post-graduation home businesses and adoption fundraisers), I cannot recommend this book. It’s too fluffy and “me” centered. I suppose most business books are that way (though I wouldn’t know, since this is my first book to read in this category), but if that’s the case, I guess I won’t be reading much of that genre. It’s not all about me or even about what I can accomplish for God. It’s about what HE chooses to accomplish through me – the glorification of Himself.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This book is supposed to be about helping you start your own business doing something you love. It gets off to a slow start because the first half is all inspirational (You can do it! Don't be afraid to quit your job and follow your dreams!) rather than practical. Starting with chapter 7, he has some good, practical things to say. He discusses how business builds on other business, how different kinds of businesses grow in different ways, and how to tell which business types (freelance, This book is supposed to be about helping you start your own business doing something you love. It gets off to a slow start because the first half is all inspirational (You can do it! Don't be afraid to quit your job and follow your dreams!) rather than practical. Starting with chapter 7, he has some good, practical things to say. He discusses how business builds on other business, how different kinds of businesses grow in different ways, and how to tell which business types (freelance, franchising, licensing, etc.) fit your personality and comfort with risk. There are also stories and brain-storming exercises to help you come up with business ideas. If you've ever though about being self-employed or owning your own business, I'd suggest chapters 7 & 8 for practical advice, and chapters 9-11 for suggestions on overcoming the usual barriers to starting your own business. You can forget the rest, unless you really need some encouragement.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Young

    If you're questioning your line of work, Dan Miller does a great job at giving you options for your future. In this book, he gives ideas for starting your own business or becoming a freelancer or contractor, but he doesn't ever tell you exactly what you should do. He makes it clear that everyone's answer to "what should I do for a living?" will be a little different depending on their wants, desires, skills and passions. There are plenty of ideas throughout the book for passion seekers to If you're questioning your line of work, Dan Miller does a great job at giving you options for your future. In this book, he gives ideas for starting your own business or becoming a freelancer or contractor, but he doesn't ever tell you exactly what you should do. He makes it clear that everyone's answer to "what should I do for a living?" will be a little different depending on their wants, desires, skills and passions. There are plenty of ideas throughout the book for passion seekers to explore their ideas and at the end of each chapter their is a list of things you should have learned from the chapter and some questions to ask yourself. Miller also explains that while many people believe being an employee is the safest route, it, in fact, is not. Some of the reasons he gives is that many businesses are using cost-cutting measures to eliminate giving some of the benefits people are used to in a position, that many businesses are eliminating employee positions to save money and that if you lose your job you must replace 100 percent of your income, rather than losing one client of many, where you would only be losing a percentage of your profits. I think even those who are not thinking about leaving a job in the next year or so should look into this book and begin exploring ideas in the future about what measures they could take to rely less on their 9-to-5 job. I think it's a great career exploration book as well as get you thinking about alternate ideas and using your imagination to find a passionate career that is likely to bring in more money than what you are making working for someone else.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Hoan

    This book is truly inspiring for anyone who wants to take the unconventional route in life. It's really motivated me to start a business where I enjoy what I do. I think it's definitely helped me pursue my true calling and helps with the process of self discovery as well as doubts along the way and quotes to inspire. What helped the most - was the authors examples of real life success stories and how people may criticize your passions. Great read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Desiree

    I will forgive him for being a little extra in-your-face Christian and at one point QUOTING BILLY GRAHAM (on the subject of money of all things!) because this was otherwise an excellent little tome that really got me thinking, even more than I was already and with some excellent new ideas, about how to create the life that I want.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jolanta

    This is just the kick in the pants that some people need if they've ever been thinking about starting something on their own. Dan writes in easy to understand terms and states it how it is, which is really eye-opening and easy to follow. I feel energized and ready to take on THE WORLD!!!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Good book. Really made me look at my job and how I connect my job with my calling. Also, good information for me professionally since I am in the same business as Dan Miller, just a different clientele

  9. 5 out of 5

    Darrin Holst

    Excellent motivational book. I thought it was way better than his previous book even if it did have a lot of duplicate content. If this book doesn't get you excited to quit your corporate job then go back to bed.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Del

    One of my best reads this year. Inspirational, outside-the-box and nearly every page had a flash of brilliance for me. I highly recommend it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Another great book from Dan Miller. This one is more geared to those with an entrepreneurial bent and would be interested in creating a business around the work they love.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    At times more uplifting than practical -- the approach taken here to find your true calling is definitely painted with rose-colored glasses. The information contained in the book is all great, and it makes you feel good, but some of the faults and failures are glossed over as "just things that happen," and nevermind how bad you feel or how much it sucks to fail. On the plus side, though, he's not wrong, and maybe could help you get out of a failure rut to get back to doing work you love.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    While this was likely revolutionary when it came out 20 years ago, it could probably use an update or 2, especially since Dave Ramsey still recommends it so much. Interesting ideas, but i didnt care for the inserted stories, they often caused me to lose my place. Good intro, less good if you have already done some soul searching in this area.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Rochester

    This was not my typical book...but something about the title made me pick it up. Who doesn't want a life without Mondays? It was full of a lot of good ideas and gave me many ideas to think over when it comes to my future.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Good insights, Biblical basis, and practical things that might help me get going. This is one of the best business books I've read so far.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Earl Runcan

    If you have an entrepreneurial mindset and have been thinking about starting your own business, this book is a must read!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    Motivational book to inspire people toward entrepreneurship. Not sure it is completely realistic in its vision, but this book can motivate someone to attempt a new venture.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brenten Gilbert

    It took me two hours to get to work the other day. I only live 23.8 miles from the office but still, there I was, between the hours of seven and nine AM, stuck in the daily northern Virginia rush hour. Fortunately, this is not my normal routine. About a year ago, my work environment changed such that I can work from home most days and only go into the office for meetings, appointments, and the occasional stir crazy day, when Im so out of my mind that it seems like it might be a good idea to It took me two hours to get to work the other day. I only live 23.8 miles from the office but still, there I was, between the hours of seven and nine AM, stuck in the daily northern Virginia rush hour. Fortunately, this is not my normal routine. About a year ago, my work environment changed such that I can work from home most days and only go into the office for meetings, appointments, and the occasional “stir crazy” day, when I’m so out of my mind that it seems like it might be a good idea to drive in. Looking around at the stressed out masses of commuters reminded me all too well of how blessed I am and how many others out there need to improve their circumstances. Therein lies the rub. Most of us don’t think we actually have the ability to affect our work situation. Too many of us believe it’s out of our control and it’s just something we have to deal with to get enough money to pay for all the pleasures of life. We punch in and out every day, putting in our work hours, hoping to make it to the weekend, where we can actually live. The trouble is, schedules are getting so full these days that the line between work and “life.” It doesn’t have to be this way. It can be better. As Dan Miller discusses in his reissued and updated book, No More Dreaded Mondays, we can take control over our employment. It’s not only possible to improve your circumstances, it’s essential to find the right work environment to suit your interests, goals, and passions. It starts with a change of perspective – from that of a victim to one who is empowered. Beyond that, change stems from understanding yourself and adapting each of your daily tasks to ensure you’re performing meaningful work that enriches your life and aligns with who you want to be. Some of these changes may require drastic measures – quitting your job, starting your own business, or reworking your schedule – but the results are certain to inspire your very best and most fulfilling work. For all the benefits I enjoy by working from home a lot, I’m still not at my ideal working environment. Working from home saves me on average 3 hours each day, but I still have a lot of work to do if I’m going to break through the limitations placed on my full potential. The advice in this book (and others) is helping me take the next steps to shaping my career in the direction it should be going. -from trudatmusic.com/raw

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jasonlylescampbell

    a friend suggested it ... in keeping with my theory "while looking for work, read business books to stay fresh." I could almost give this book three stars even though I was annoyed with it much of the time ... it has a ton of the positive thinking feel and doesn't seem to be realistic at all with the possibility of failure and anything like the danger and messyness of striking out on your own. (That is what the book is all about, by the way ... a short, pop version of the changes in the work a friend suggested it ... in keeping with my theory "while looking for work, read business books to stay fresh." I could almost give this book three stars even though I was annoyed with it much of the time ... it has a ton of the positive thinking feel and doesn't seem to be realistic at all with the possibility of failure and anything like the danger and messyness of striking out on your own. (That is what the book is all about, by the way ... a short, pop version of the changes in the work world and the shift toward subcontractor/free lance work and how that can be a good thing). Typical is statements like "I believe the world is plotting to do me good." I don't follow such comments so well. BUT it challenge me to think about what kind of work I would love to do, be good at and fit my personal tendencies ... I really don't mind structure and working with a team, so striking out on my own as an independent doesn't necessarily sound good to me. And my favorite quote is Dan Miller quoting Buechner: "The place God calls you to is the place where your deep gladness and the world's deep hunger meet."

  20. 4 out of 5

    Olinselot

    The theme behind this book seems founded on good ground, but the reality of it's suggestions only apply to a select few. After reading the first several chapters I certianly had a desire to leave my job and pursue my "true calling". So, to this extend it did the job. The only problem is that it doesn't account for the fact that most of us are surrounded by our spouse and children. To cut yourself off from your current job just because it isn't your "calling" neglects the concept of a struggling The theme behind this book seems founded on good ground, but the reality of it's suggestions only apply to a select few. After reading the first several chapters I certianly had a desire to leave my job and pursue my "true calling". So, to this extend it did the job. The only problem is that it doesn't account for the fact that most of us are surrounded by our spouse and children. To cut yourself off from your current job just because it isn't your "calling" neglects the concept of a struggling economy and a lack of realistic professions to match that "calling" in your head. Aside from what the book suggests, I would rather work the rest of my life in a dead end job that doesn't satisfy my dreams and ambitions so long as I am able to provide a stable environment for my family. Ultimately the book supports a selfish drive to fulfil individualistic motivations.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bill Corbett

    I loved Dan's book. I bought the book to refer to on my desk, and downloaded the audio version to listen to on a few long drives. It was so inspirational for him to rattle off all of the possibilities we've all been given to find our purpose, give back to this awesome world, and make a lucrative living. After reading this book, no one should have trouble finding the work to live a great life. He offers tons of examples of how others have done it, with simple ideas. He says that when we look I loved Dan's book. I bought the book to refer to on my desk, and downloaded the audio version to listen to on a few long drives. It was so inspirational for him to rattle off all of the possibilities we've all been given to find our purpose, give back to this awesome world, and make a lucrative living. After reading this book, no one should have trouble finding the work to live a great life. He offers tons of examples of how others have done it, with simple ideas. He says that when we look closely around us and identify a need, we can create a business around it. But we're not going to get that done sitting on the couch watching reality TV or complaining. We have to take action and make it happen. Want to get rid of the depressing Monday mornings that you hate going to work? Get this book and change your life. Stop complaining to do something about it!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mel

    A friend of mine put this book in my hand and told me to read it. I wasn't interested. You see, I am not a dreading Mondays kind of gal. :) I'm on the other side of this. I learned some time back that working for someone else was not for me. This book was specifically marketed (see description in Amazon) to people stuck in jobs wanting something better. Well, they should have gave it a different title and marketed it to the masses of people who just feel stuck in their lives and strive for A friend of mine put this book in my hand and told me to read it. I wasn't interested. You see, I am not a dreading Mondays kind of gal. :) I'm on the other side of this. I learned some time back that working for someone else was not for me. This book was specifically marketed (see description in Amazon) to people stuck in jobs wanting something better. Well, they should have gave it a different title and marketed it to the masses of people who just feel stuck in their lives and strive for something better. I loved his Revolutionary Insights spread throughout the book as well as his Entrepreneur / Eaglepreneur chart! He's got great vision for success in life and how it's an individual path to achieve it! Loved the book. So much I bought my own copy after returning the borrowed one to my friend!

  23. 4 out of 5

    John Ausmus

    I recently received a free review copy of the book No More Dreaded Mondays by Dan Miller from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group. This book questions the very basis for many peoples perspective on work, job and our higher calling. It asks the question When did we start thinking that our work is only a means to getting a paycheck?, and Why do so many people just endure their job so they can get to the weekend when they get to do what they love? Dan Miller helps the reader identify why you feel I recently received a free review copy of the book “No More Dreaded Mondays” by Dan Miller from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group. This book questions the very basis for many people’s perspective on work, job and our higher calling. It asks the question “When did we start thinking that our work is only a means to getting a paycheck?”, and “Why do so many people just endure their job so they can get to the weekend when they get to do what they love?” Dan Miller helps the reader identify why you feel the way you do toward your job and gives you some suggestions to merging your passions and ‘calling’ with your means of getting a paycheck. I would recommend this book to anyone that wants to simply evaluate the “why” in their current work experience.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Valerie J K

    Dan Milller has a very inspiring message--if you hate your job and it's keeping you from loving your life, he inspires you to change it up and start doing what you were meant to do. His stories are motivating and interesting, and one thing I appreciate is that he bases his advice on belief in God and following your "calling" in life. This was motivating for me as my husand and I are currently launching our "No Monday" business together, doing something we love. I would recommend this book to Dan Milller has a very inspiring message--if you hate your job and it's keeping you from loving your life, he inspires you to change it up and start doing what you were meant to do. His stories are motivating and interesting, and one thing I appreciate is that he bases his advice on belief in God and following your "calling" in life. This was motivating for me as my husand and I are currently launching our "No Monday" business together, doing something we love. I would recommend this book to anyone who feels the desire to break away from a stable, secure job that they hate to pursue a risky but satisfying career that they love.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Christine Pia

    I first knew about Dan Miller when I saw his TED talk on Youtube. It was one of the best and honest talks ever. When I saw his book on sale, I had to pick it up. He is a bestseller for a reason. In this book, he encourages the readers to pursue their calling and not succumb to the trends of society. Had I read this book during my first year in college, I would not have gone through with engineering and instead pursued my true passion. But then again, as Dan said in the book, it is never too I first knew about Dan Miller when I saw his TED talk on Youtube. It was one of the best and honest talks ever. When I saw his book on sale, I had to pick it up. He is a bestseller for a reason. In this book, he encourages the readers to pursue their calling and not succumb to the trends of society. Had I read this book during my first year in college, I would not have gone through with engineering and instead pursued my true passion. But then again, as Dan said in the book, it is never too late. I love the anecdotes and the slight humor that the author used to bring home his points. A truly good read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tamra

    Interesting discussion. Baby boomers born 1946-1964 have been groomed for the go to work-get paid model but those born into generation X (1965-1981) have seen their parents lose jobs after decades of faithful service through no fault of their own, so they see work life differently. I liked the author's dedication (to his dad)"who taught [him] that work was not something to be avoided, but rather something to be done with wholehearted effort, character, and integrity. Your model of believing that Interesting discussion. Baby boomers born 1946-1964 have been groomed for the go to work-get paid model but those born into generation X (1965-1981) have seen their parents lose jobs after decades of faithful service through no fault of their own, so they see work life differently. I liked the author's dedication (to his dad)"who taught [him] that work was not something to be avoided, but rather something to be done with wholehearted effort, character, and integrity. Your model of believing that we are temporary stewards of animals, tools, land and friendships continues to call me to a daily accountability of those resources."

  27. 4 out of 5

    Eric Soelberg

    Ok, but it was very heavy on the motivational stories and the like. More than a book with something you walk away with knowing how to do or steps to take, this is a book that will motivate you to want to quit your job or to be self-employed. However, rather than focusing on building healthy, thriving companies he mostly talks about knick-knack things like mowing lawns, network marketing (sorry to any of you network marketers out there), etc. All in all, I'm not sad I read it but it wasn't Ok, but it was very heavy on the motivational stories and the like. More than a book with something you walk away with knowing how to do or steps to take, this is a book that will motivate you to want to quit your job or to be self-employed. However, rather than focusing on building healthy, thriving companies he mostly talks about knick-knack things like mowing lawns, network marketing (sorry to any of you network marketers out there), etc. All in all, I'm not sad I read it but it wasn't anything I'd recommend unless you just got fired and you're looking for a pick-me-up.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sonda

    This books looks at our perspective on our work, our job, and what we believe is our higher calling. Question - When did we start thinking that our work is only a means to and end? it pays the bills, and Why do we endure our job during the week and wish it away for the weekend when just to do what we really love doing? The author helps the reader identify why we feel the way we do towards our job, and then provides suggestions to cobine our passions with a means of getting a "just a paycheck." I This books looks at our perspective on our work, our job, and what we believe is our higher calling. Question - When did we start thinking that our work is only a means to and end? it pays the bills, and Why do we endure our job during the week and wish it away for the weekend when just to do what we really love doing? The author helps the reader identify why we feel the way we do towards our job, and then provides suggestions to cobine our passions with a means of getting a "just a paycheck." I recommend this book to anyone.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Right on the mark for work in the 21st century. Dan Miller presents a variety of options and opportunities that focus on how you work best, your strengths, and how you can leverage those to serve others. Grounded in reality, peppered with practical step-by-step actions to take. Now I know why a man I met who read this book was able to change his career, work environment, move his family across the country, and make it stick - back in 2011, he told me he read this book, and took action on what he Right on the mark for work in the 21st century. Dan Miller presents a variety of options and opportunities that focus on how you work best, your strengths, and how you can leverage those to serve others. Grounded in reality, peppered with practical step-by-step actions to take. Now I know why a man I met who read this book was able to change his career, work environment, move his family across the country, and make it stick - back in 2011, he told me he read this book, and took action on what he learned.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Clay Mabbitt

    Pretty good stuff here. Miller's flagship book, 48 Days to the Work You Love is written for someone who is in the middle of a job transition. This book was more useful to me because it takes a much more general approach. How can you figure out what inspires you? Can you bring that into your current job or do you actually need to seek it somewhere else? If you're not in a job crisis, I think this is a much more useful read.

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