counter create hit Fable Comics - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Fable Comics

Availability: Ready to download

From classics like "The Tortoise and the Hare" and "The Grasshopper and the Ants" to obscure gems like "The Frogs Who Desired a King," Fable Comics has something to offer every reader. Twenty-eight fables from different cultures and traditions are wonderfully adapted and illustrated in comics format by twenty-six different cartoonists. Edited by New York Times bestselling From classics like "The Tortoise and the Hare" and "The Grasshopper and the Ants" to obscure gems like "The Frogs Who Desired a King," Fable Comics has something to offer every reader. Twenty-eight fables from different cultures and traditions are wonderfully adapted and illustrated in comics format by twenty-six different cartoonists. Edited by New York Times bestselling Fairy Tale Comics' Chris Duffy, this jacketed hardcover is a beautiful gift and an instant classic.


Compare
Ads Banner

From classics like "The Tortoise and the Hare" and "The Grasshopper and the Ants" to obscure gems like "The Frogs Who Desired a King," Fable Comics has something to offer every reader. Twenty-eight fables from different cultures and traditions are wonderfully adapted and illustrated in comics format by twenty-six different cartoonists. Edited by New York Times bestselling From classics like "The Tortoise and the Hare" and "The Grasshopper and the Ants" to obscure gems like "The Frogs Who Desired a King," Fable Comics has something to offer every reader. Twenty-eight fables from different cultures and traditions are wonderfully adapted and illustrated in comics format by twenty-six different cartoonists. Edited by New York Times bestselling Fairy Tale Comics' Chris Duffy, this jacketed hardcover is a beautiful gift and an instant classic.

30 review for Fable Comics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    A collection of 28 Fables about 4 pages each in graphic novel form each by a different author. Some take a modern approach to the story and some are simply telling the story. The art is diverse and different. It was a fun group of stories and many of the tales I did not know. It's a well done collection for anyone wanting to briefly explore fables.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dov Zeller

    This is a super fun book with a great collection of stories and styles. I enjoyed it the whole way through and met a few new graphic artists along the way. Did I have favorites? Sure. A strong start with Fox and Grapes by James Kochalka, as usual enthusiastically and charmingly absurd. Tom Gauld City Mouse and Country Mouse. And Sophie Goldstein Leopard Drums up Dinner. I loved Jaime Hernandez's Boy Who Cried Wolf (you can imagine the acrobatics) and all of George O'connor's cheeky myth-fables. This is a super fun book with a great collection of stories and styles. I enjoyed it the whole way through and met a few new graphic artists along the way. Did I have favorites? Sure. A strong start with Fox and Grapes by James Kochalka, as usual enthusiastically and charmingly absurd. Tom Gauld City Mouse and Country Mouse. And Sophie Goldstein Leopard Drums up Dinner. I loved Jaime Hernandez's Boy Who Cried Wolf (you can imagine the acrobatics) and all of George O'connor's cheeky myth-fables. Graham Annable does a great retelling of the Tortoise and the Hare. Some I loved, some I liked, one or two were meh. This is a book I'd be happy to own or get as a gift.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Abby Johnson

    There's a little something for everyone in this collection of fables interpreted by different graphic artists. Many of the fables included are Aesop's, which kids may be familiar with, but there were definitely some new-to-me stories, as well. The contributors' styles vary and include cartoons and more traditional graphic-novel-style art as well as beautiful paintings (The Fox and the Crow, I'm looking at you!). Our elementary schools do a unit on traditional literature, which includes fables, a There's a little something for everyone in this collection of fables interpreted by different graphic artists. Many of the fables included are Aesop's, which kids may be familiar with, but there were definitely some new-to-me stories, as well. The contributors' styles vary and include cartoons and more traditional graphic-novel-style art as well as beautiful paintings (The Fox and the Crow, I'm looking at you!). Our elementary schools do a unit on traditional literature, which includes fables, and this is a book I'll be excited to share with them next year.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Cyndi

    Adorable comics with some of Aesop’s Fables as fodder. The Turtle and the Hare was especially cute!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    This is the third compilation I've read edited by Duffy (the first two being Nursery Rhyme Comics and Fairy Tale Comics) and I'm sad to say that I enjoyed this one the least. I think what made Nursery Comics so enjoyable was that nursery rhymes are so short that it's easy to represent them (whether faithfully or with a twist) much more easily than something like a fairy tale or fable. Nursery Comics also felt much more like a sampler and curated collection of a variety of artists' work. Fairy ta This is the third compilation I've read edited by Duffy (the first two being Nursery Rhyme Comics and Fairy Tale Comics) and I'm sad to say that I enjoyed this one the least. I think what made Nursery Comics so enjoyable was that nursery rhymes are so short that it's easy to represent them (whether faithfully or with a twist) much more easily than something like a fairy tale or fable. Nursery Comics also felt much more like a sampler and curated collection of a variety of artists' work. Fairy tales and fables are a little too long and have too many variations which made the end-result of this collection feel rushed. I know the intended audience for this comic is kids, but I really wish there had been some kind of intro to each fable. I wasn't familiar with all the fables and having some point of reference would have been nice. It would have also helped in knowing how faithful (or not) the creator was to the original which might have helped me appreciate some of the comics more. The anthology also felt unfocused. Most of the fables presented were by Aesop with a smattering of non-Western fables, some had animals and some didn't, and three of the fables were about Hermes. I appreciate that Duffy was trying to present a variety and to show how diverse fables could be, but I would have appreciated either: a) that the collection focused on just one fable writer (ie. Aesop) or b) were divided more clearly by the "type" of fable (ie. all the Aesop fables together, all the animal fables together, etc.) As it stands now, it's just a random assortment in a random order which felt unorganized. I'm also curious why Hermes got to be featured three times (by the same creator). The quality of the work, as with most anthologies, varied. The only comic that really stuck with me was Eleanor Davis' "The Old Man and Death" but this is mostly due to my love for Davis in general. Despite my confusion over the concentration of Hermes' stories, I did like those as well (though I was curious why Hermes talked like a Valley Girl) and made me want to check out O'Connor's Olympian series. Gauld's "The Two Mouse and the Country Mouse" was decent too, mostly because of the art. Overall, I was quite disappointed with this. It's really too bad because I loved Duffy's first anthology quite a bit.

  6. 5 out of 5

    First Second Books

    We love this graphic novel! It's extremely handsome. Besides that, it's another of our anthology comics collection -- following NURSERY RHYME COMICS and FAIRY TALE COMICS. We're delighted to add FABLE COMICS to that list! It's full of classic fables, with all-new comics adaptations from some wonderful, creative, inspiring cartoonists. (And also adorable animals, because fables are always full of adorable animals.) Yay this!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Allie

    This rating/review is based on an ARC from netgalley. I like this new addition to the Nursery Rhyme Comics & Fairy Tale Comics family. I think these collections are strongest when there are more contributors, and this one was definitely stronger than Fairy Tale Comics. My favorites are my always-favorites: Eleanor Davis (The Old Man and Death) & Tom Gauld (The Town Mouse & the Country Mouse). But there are definitely artists I was unfamiliar with before this that I will definitely look up. Other This rating/review is based on an ARC from netgalley. I like this new addition to the Nursery Rhyme Comics & Fairy Tale Comics family. I think these collections are strongest when there are more contributors, and this one was definitely stronger than Fairy Tale Comics. My favorites are my always-favorites: Eleanor Davis (The Old Man and Death) & Tom Gauld (The Town Mouse & the Country Mouse). But there are definitely artists I was unfamiliar with before this that I will definitely look up. Other favorite stories: Leopard drums up dinner by Sophie Goldstein; The crow & the pitcher by Simone Lia; Lion + Mouse by R. Sikoryak; The demon, the thief, and the hermit by Keny Widjaja; The elephant in favor by Corinne Mucha; The mouse council by Liniers; and The thief & the watchdog by Braden Lamb and Shelli Paroline. These comics are really great to recommend to middle-grade readers and up. And the books all feature artists that we have in the rest of the children's graphic novel section, so recommending follow-up books is really easy and fun. This is also part of my Book Riot Read Harder Challenge! Task 15: A book that is a retelling of a classic story!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Huge thank you to First Second for this ARC! Fables! Fables are pretty rad, and for younger readers, this collection is a great way to learn about fables through much looser and fun interpretations. It also allows readers to get exposed to a variety of different artists and styles, and I generally love collections like this, though some versions of the story worked better for me than others. My favourite stories in the collection were "The Fox and the Grape," "Leopard Drums Up Dinner," "The Hare a Huge thank you to First Second for this ARC! Fables! Fables are pretty rad, and for younger readers, this collection is a great way to learn about fables through much looser and fun interpretations. It also allows readers to get exposed to a variety of different artists and styles, and I generally love collections like this, though some versions of the story worked better for me than others. My favourite stories in the collection were "The Fox and the Grape," "Leopard Drums Up Dinner," "The Hare and the Tortoise", "The Sun and the Wind," and "The Hare and the Pig." These particular stories stood out much more to me than a lot of the others, though if I am being honest, I wasn't as familiar with the group of artists in this collection with the exception of Vera Brosgol (whose work I adore) and those who have worked on the Adventure Time comics. Some of the art in this collection jived with me, and some with it didn't, which I think is the ultimate issue with this collection. Regardless, I think this collection has so much to offer younger readers, especially those who may not be as familiar with the fables in question. I really enjoyed how accessible each author attempted to make the fable they worked on, as well as the twists of humour to keep them interesting and fresh. If you have a younger reader in your life, this is a great and approachable way to expose them to fables.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katie Lawrence

    I think these collections of graphic retellings (fairy tales, fables, nursery rhyme) are brilliant! Not only do they give these classic stories a refreshing look and make the retellings engaging for kids, they also expose readers to a variety of comic/illustrative styles. I found I enjoyed comparing the drawing styles nearly as much as I enjoyed reading the stories and it was interesting reading about the authors at the end to see what their previous work has been. While some of the fables were I think these collections of graphic retellings (fairy tales, fables, nursery rhyme) are brilliant! Not only do they give these classic stories a refreshing look and make the retellings engaging for kids, they also expose readers to a variety of comic/illustrative styles. I found I enjoyed comparing the drawing styles nearly as much as I enjoyed reading the stories and it was interesting reading about the authors at the end to see what their previous work has been. While some of the fables were familiar, many were not which was also great fun. I had no idea Aesop wrote fables about Hermes, for example, George O'Connor does such a great job retelling myth! Really well-done! Thank you NetGalley and First Second for the ebook review copy!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bea

    I think I liked this slightly better than Fairy Tale Comics: Classic Tales Told by Extraordinary Cartoonists, which I read beforehand. One of my favorite things about this is how I read about new fables that I'd never hear of otherwise. It really was a learning experience, I think. That's it. Not really notable, but not to be forgotten either. Also, graphic novel format? Ugh why is it so simple yet so DIFFICULT the speech bubbles I think I liked this slightly better than Fairy Tale Comics: Classic Tales Told by Extraordinary Cartoonists, which I read beforehand. One of my favorite things about this is how I read about new fables that I'd never hear of otherwise. It really was a learning experience, I think. That's it. Not really notable, but not to be forgotten either. Also, graphic novel format? Ugh why is it so simple yet so DIFFICULT the speech bubbles

  11. 5 out of 5

    Quintina

    NetGalley ARC Fable Comics puts a fun and colorful spin on the traditional fable. Kids will be familiar with many of the fables included but there are some interesting lesser known tales. Students will definitely enjoy learning about these fables the graphic novel format.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I'm quite disappointed in this book. I really enjoyed the two previous books in seeing how they would create either the nursery rhyme or fairy tale. This edition with fables was very clunky, some stories seemed like they were not finished, and it just didn't grab me.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    I will start with the fact that I struggle with compilations. There are some of the Fables in here that are amazing and others that I feel are lackluster. I just don't know if I would recommend this as a cover to cover read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Received as an advanced readers copy from NetGalley.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    Better than average anthology of fables retold in creative and humorous ways

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    Mixed bag anthology of fable retellings and reimaginings. Some are good, some are so stripped down and rearranged that they're unrecognizable.

  17. 4 out of 5

    OpenBookSociety.com

    http://openbooksociety.com/article/fa... Fable Comics By Various Authors, Chris Duffy. Ed. ISBN 978-1-62672-07-4 Author’s website: http://comicbooksareinteresting.blogs... Brought to you by OBS reviewer Scott Review A fable is a short narrative usually encompassing a moral. After Aesop, they also usually contain anthropomorphized animals. But different cultures have different catalogues of stories such as these passed down from generation to generation, mostly by word of mouth. Just recently, fables ha http://openbooksociety.com/article/fa... Fable Comics By Various Authors, Chris Duffy. Ed. ISBN 978-1-62672-07-4 Author’s website: http://comicbooksareinteresting.blogs... Brought to you by OBS reviewer Scott Review A fable is a short narrative usually encompassing a moral. After Aesop, they also usually contain anthropomorphized animals. But different cultures have different catalogues of stories such as these passed down from generation to generation, mostly by word of mouth. Just recently, fables have become popular again, and Fable Comics takes full advantage of it. Getting a cross section of some of the best in comic artists, Fable Comics lets the artist go crazy providing there is a moral to the story. This leads to some rather eclectic renditions of these classic narratives. Letting the artist go free spins a fresh post-modern twist on classic fables and allows them to let their creativity shine through and some rather unique endings. Twist endings were allowed providing a moral had to be told. These range from the classical interpretation of the tale, to “Artists are Stupid, Art is Dead, Everyone’s a Critic” (some of my all-time favorites). Maris Wicks uses her biology background to elucidate and educate on sea mammals. In “The Dolphin, The Whale and the Sprat,” and James Kochalka pulls out all the traditional stops in “The Fox and the Grapes.” These twists almost seemed necessary to propel the graphic novel forward, but with the traditional morals mixed in, it turned out to be a refreshing mix (although I would have changed a bit of the ordering of the fables). I have to admit, from personal experience, that letting the artist go wild is not necessarily a good thing. Some of the Fables were cute, but contrived; others left you yawning in boredom, wanting to skip ahead to the next one. It’s a good thing fables are generally short. The roster of artists is also in a distinctly American style, cartoonish with few exceptions. This is not a bad thing, however, I would have preferred a more culturally diverse drawing style, but for what the book was trying to convey, it suited me fine. There are a few gems in the lot. Jaime Hernandez does a spectacular job with “The Boy Who Cried Wolf,” Roger Langridge handles “”Democles and His Fable” with grace and flair, Shelli Pardline gracefully pens “The Thief and the Watchdog,” and George O’Conner renders in a prince Valiant type manner, the various “Hermes” tales. My personal favorite was R. Sikoryak’s Krazy Kat rendition of “The Lion and the Mouse.” It really spoke in the words and depictions of the famous George Harriman cartoon strip. Skillfully rendered in Harriman’s style, the moral at the end left me giggling inanely for minutes, at passing gags, and the stereotypical morphing backgrounds that Krazy Kat was noted for. If you are a fan of Aesop you will not want to miss this collection. Fable Comics has something for everyone, and the diverse art will defiantly have you lustering after any new artists you come across (or already know, there are a few New York Times artists here). With it’s easy to read format, hopefully you will learn yourself a moral or two.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I love it when a collection brings together such a diverse array of artistic styles and interesting fables. Several of them were new to me, which was very cool. My favorite part, though, were the fables including Hermes (adapted by George O'Connor). It was like getting to read good fanfiction for Hermes: Tales of the Trickster.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    Twenty-eight familiar and lesser-known fables get the graphic treatment in this comic compendium. Following on the heels of Nursery Rhyme Comics and Fairy Tale Comics, Duffy has selected well-known cartoonists to put their spin on fables primarily from Aesop and a few from other cultures. Well-known allegories like “The Fox and the Grapes”, "The Hare and the Tortoise" and “The Dog and his Reflection" are here. But the familiar pastoral venues of these traditional fables are replaced by urban set Twenty-eight familiar and lesser-known fables get the graphic treatment in this comic compendium. Following on the heels of Nursery Rhyme Comics and Fairy Tale Comics, Duffy has selected well-known cartoonists to put their spin on fables primarily from Aesop and a few from other cultures. Well-known allegories like “The Fox and the Grapes”, "The Hare and the Tortoise" and “The Dog and his Reflection" are here. But the familiar pastoral venues of these traditional fables are replaced by urban settings, vivid comic forests and the trappings of a modern world. (Even a jet pack can’t help the fox reach the grapes.) In the fractured version, an eagle gives the tortoise a ride to the finish line so he can beat the hare. These versions are unconventional, to say the least, but they are amusing and more relevant to contemporary readers. Astute graphics fans will recognize some of their favorite artists and their artwork. The customary panels and text keep the stories refreshing and original. The “morals” are not overtly listed at the end of each fable, but keen readers can figure them out from context. Some of the comics reflect the stories’ origins, and all are spirited and humorous. Back pages feature editor’s notes with helpful information about fables, a bibliography that includes websites and thumbnail bios of the contributors. It’s a quirky and atypical rendition of traditional fables that readers of all ages can appreciate and enjoy. Graphics fans will find this title enjoyable. Art and ELAR teachers might find it a useful resource. All in all it’s a fun read and a must for any library.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Hudson

    Fables are an age-old way to get a moral across through telling a story. We all know about how the lazy hare tanks in a “can’t-lose race” with a tortoise by being overconfident and neglecting to do the work to win. We may also have learned the lesson about not “crying wolf,” or telling a lie to get attention because people may not believe us when we tell the truth. Prominent graphic artists bring these tales and others to life in Fable Comics, a collection edited by Chris Duffy. Most, though not Fables are an age-old way to get a moral across through telling a story. We all know about how the lazy hare tanks in a “can’t-lose race” with a tortoise by being overconfident and neglecting to do the work to win. We may also have learned the lesson about not “crying wolf,” or telling a lie to get attention because people may not believe us when we tell the truth. Prominent graphic artists bring these tales and others to life in Fable Comics, a collection edited by Chris Duffy. Most, though not all, of the stories are based on fables from Aesop. A note in the back of the book defines a fable as “a story with a lesson, usually—not always—starring animals.” The oldest fables may come from many authors and many sources, but some of the more modern ones come from people who are well known, like the Russian satirist Ivan Krilof or the American author Ambrose Bierce. This collection is accessible for kids as young as six, and should be fun for the whole family. Each tale is reimagined by the artists with both words and graphics, and the origin of the fable is labeled. Because different artists illustrate each fable, many styles and color schemes appear in the book. It could be fun to compare them, and to look for other titles by the artists. It could also be interesting for family members to talk about which styles they like best and why. The publisher provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  21. 4 out of 5

    McKenzie Richardson

    For more reviews, check out my blog: Craft-Cycle A good collection of comics based on various fables. I read Chris Duffy's Fairy Tale Comics right before this, which I think set the standards pretty high for this one. I loved the Fairy Tale collection. The artwork was beautiful (and often hilarious) and the stories were great. I did not enjoy this one as much. The artwork was still awesome, but I think fables just don't always have very interesting plots. After many stories, I had no idea what ev For more reviews, check out my blog: Craft-Cycle A good collection of comics based on various fables. I read Chris Duffy's Fairy Tale Comics right before this, which I think set the standards pretty high for this one. I loved the Fairy Tale collection. The artwork was beautiful (and often hilarious) and the stories were great. I did not enjoy this one as much. The artwork was still awesome, but I think fables just don't always have very interesting plots. After many stories, I had no idea what even happened. Most of the stories come from Aesop with a smattering of other stories from various cultures. There were a decent amount that I had never heard of (apparently I need to catch up on my fables). This may have been why I was often confused by the comic version. I think it is easier to go into the comic at least having a base of the original story. Still a good read with funny pictures, but I suggest having read the original fables first.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Margie

    More than two thousand years ago, as the ancient historians write, a slave may have won his freedom with his storytelling. These tales he told were not long in length but each contained a powerful moral lesson. The slave was Aesop and his stories are called fables. Many fables use animals as characters helping readers to see faults or imperfections which may or may not be a part of their life choices or personality. These short instructions have been a part of our literary history for so long; t More than two thousand years ago, as the ancient historians write, a slave may have won his freedom with his storytelling. These tales he told were not long in length but each contained a powerful moral lesson. The slave was Aesop and his stories are called fables. Many fables use animals as characters helping readers to see faults or imperfections which may or may not be a part of their life choices or personality. These short instructions have been a part of our literary history for so long; they have been assimilated into our everyday lives. With the success of Nursery Rhyme Comics: 50 Timeless Rhymes from 50 Celebrated Cartoonists (First Second, October 11, 2011) and Fairy Tale Comics: Classic Tales Told by Extraordinary Cartoonists (First Second, September 24, 2013) First Second brings to readers another timeless treasury, Fable Comics edited by Chris Duffy (September 22, 2015). My full review and interview: http://librariansquest.blogspot.com/2...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This was a nice little collection of famous fables, told in comic form with each done by a different artist. I liked that while Aesop's were featured heavily, they were not exclusive and it also included fables from other cultures around the world. However, with only a few pages per fable, I felt that some were stripped down past the point of recognition (while we know each one has a moral, I was hard-pressed to understand a few) or were altered so the original moral may no longer apply (the mos This was a nice little collection of famous fables, told in comic form with each done by a different artist. I liked that while Aesop's were featured heavily, they were not exclusive and it also included fables from other cultures around the world. However, with only a few pages per fable, I felt that some were stripped down past the point of recognition (while we know each one has a moral, I was hard-pressed to understand a few) or were altered so the original moral may no longer apply (the most obvious Tortoise and the Hare has the moral of "slow and steady wins the race" but in this re-telling an eagle picks up the tortoise - soooo the Hare would have won if not for the eagle speeding the tortoise along...) But for those that kept their original stories in tact, I enjoyed them very much. I also enjoyed how many were "modernized" with today's slang or modern activities for the old characters.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Payton Simone

    Fable Comics is first noticeable because of its bright cover and fun pictures. The book itself is a graphic novel, assembled the same way as a comic. I liked this book because it wasn't just one story by one author. The book is a series of short comics that were written by different authors. Each one has a different moral and some have no moral at all. Also all the art is different which keeps the book very interesting. Overall this is a great book for middle school kids who enjoy pictures more t Fable Comics is first noticeable because of its bright cover and fun pictures. The book itself is a graphic novel, assembled the same way as a comic. I liked this book because it wasn't just one story by one author. The book is a series of short comics that were written by different authors. Each one has a different moral and some have no moral at all. Also all the art is different which keeps the book very interesting. Overall this is a great book for middle school kids who enjoy pictures more than reading or younger kids like second grade and older. I liked all the little stories and the morals for some of them even resonated with me, I am 19 years old! I look forward to exploring more books like this in the future and would recommend this book for anyone and everyone!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Twenty-eight different fables drawn from various cultures are featured here in comic format, which makes them more accessible for modern audiences. Some of the fables such as "The Fox and the Grapes" by James Kochalka and "The Milkmaid and Her Pail" by Israel Sanchez will be familiar to most readers, but still, they seem fresh and new in this particular format. But others such as "Leonard Drums Up Dinner" by Sophie Goldstein and "The Thief and the Watchdog" by Braden Lamb and Shelli Paroline wil Twenty-eight different fables drawn from various cultures are featured here in comic format, which makes them more accessible for modern audiences. Some of the fables such as "The Fox and the Grapes" by James Kochalka and "The Milkmaid and Her Pail" by Israel Sanchez will be familiar to most readers, but still, they seem fresh and new in this particular format. But others such as "Leonard Drums Up Dinner" by Sophie Goldstein and "The Thief and the Watchdog" by Braden Lamb and Shelli Paroline will be less familiar, yet just as enjoyable. Sporadic appearances from Hermes as channeled by George O'Connor enhance readers' enjoyment of this good collection. While I might prefer the fables in their text form, this collection will introduce and excite many new fable fans.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Iris

    I liked the art styles of the following artists and some of the stories were funny. Tom Gauld - The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse Sophie Goldstein - Leopard Drums Up Dinner Jennifer L. Meyer - Fox and Crow Very pretty but the art style was almost too dreamy and soft. Eleanor Davis - The Old Man and Death The red, yellow, and blue color scheme was great. Simone Lia - The Crow and the Pitcher Vera Brosgol - The Hare and the Pig Succinct and snappy. Liniers - The Mouse Council I liked how the mice drew I liked the art styles of the following artists and some of the stories were funny. Tom Gauld - The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse Sophie Goldstein - Leopard Drums Up Dinner Jennifer L. Meyer - Fox and Crow Very pretty but the art style was almost too dreamy and soft. Eleanor Davis - The Old Man and Death The red, yellow, and blue color scheme was great. Simone Lia - The Crow and the Pitcher Vera Brosgol - The Hare and the Pig Succinct and snappy. Liniers - The Mouse Council I liked how the mice drew the cat. Braden Lamb & Shelli Paroline - The Thief and the Watchdog The dog was awesome. And the stories featuring Hermes by George O' Connor were funny.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Twenty-eight fables are adapted by various graphic artists for this collection. The majority are Aesop's fables, but a few selections come from India, Angola, and Russia. With the exception of a couple of the tales that use a difficult to read text or have unappealing illustrations, these retellings are attractive, energetic, and fun. Many have a modern flair replete with language common to today’s reader. The graphic novel format pairs well with that of the fables’, making them easily accessibl Twenty-eight fables are adapted by various graphic artists for this collection. The majority are Aesop's fables, but a few selections come from India, Angola, and Russia. With the exception of a couple of the tales that use a difficult to read text or have unappealing illustrations, these retellings are attractive, energetic, and fun. Many have a modern flair replete with language common to today’s reader. The graphic novel format pairs well with that of the fables’, making them easily accessible and inviting to young readers. A few selections included are: The Hare and the Tortoise, The Boy Who Cried Wolf, The Fox and the Grapes, and Hermes and Woodsman. An afterword provides more information about each contributor.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    This is a strange little collection of fables told as comics. Some were enjoyable, but most of them didn't really work for me. The graphic format made them a bit too short, and I think they would be confusing to people who are not familiar with the fables before reading this book. Also, a lot of them were made modern and weirdly hipster-y--did I mention this was a strange book? I did like that there were fables from different countries included. I think kids who love graphic novels would probabl This is a strange little collection of fables told as comics. Some were enjoyable, but most of them didn't really work for me. The graphic format made them a bit too short, and I think they would be confusing to people who are not familiar with the fables before reading this book. Also, a lot of them were made modern and weirdly hipster-y--did I mention this was a strange book? I did like that there were fables from different countries included. I think kids who love graphic novels would probably enjoy this, as it was interesting to see all the different art styles. All of the art is amazing; I just overall wasn't blown away by the stories themselves.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    I can't recommend this as a cover-to-cover read. There were too many flops. (And what's up with the whale story???). Still there were a few okay fables here. My biggest problem with this volume was that there are some great fables that were stripped down to almost nothing, really removing that which originally made the fable resonate, and leaving just a hollow shell that feels abrupt and pointless. Tacking a moral onto the end does not give something meaning, people? As for the art, well, some o I can't recommend this as a cover-to-cover read. There were too many flops. (And what's up with the whale story???). Still there were a few okay fables here. My biggest problem with this volume was that there are some great fables that were stripped down to almost nothing, really removing that which originally made the fable resonate, and leaving just a hollow shell that feels abrupt and pointless. Tacking a moral onto the end does not give something meaning, people? As for the art, well, some of it was fine and some of it was basically garbage. So there's that. Overall, I found this book to be a disappointment.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Edmunds

    Fables have an important place in society for they teach lessons on integrity, honesty, cooperation, and more. In this book, many graphic novel authors have contributed modern takes on old fables. Though I enjoyed the illustrations, I was often disappointed in the stories. At times it was difficult to catch the lesson in the fable, like in "The Dog and His Reflection" and "The Dolphins The Whales and The Sprat". Some though, like "The Thief and The Watch Dog", are very good. Overall, the book of Fables have an important place in society for they teach lessons on integrity, honesty, cooperation, and more. In this book, many graphic novel authors have contributed modern takes on old fables. Though I enjoyed the illustrations, I was often disappointed in the stories. At times it was difficult to catch the lesson in the fable, like in "The Dog and His Reflection" and "The Dolphins The Whales and The Sprat". Some though, like "The Thief and The Watch Dog", are very good. Overall, the book offers a new way to introduce fables to children of all ages.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.