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"No One Helped": Kitty Genovese, New York City, and the Myth of Urban Apathy

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In "No One Helped" Marcia M. Gallo examines one of America's most infamous true-crime stories: the 1964 rape and murder of Catherine "Kitty" Genovese in a middle-class neighborhood of Queens, New York. Front-page reports in the New York Times incorrectly identified thirty-eight indifferent witnesses to the crime, fueling fears of apathy and urban decay. Genovese's life, In "No One Helped" Marcia M. Gallo examines one of America's most infamous true-crime stories: the 1964 rape and murder of Catherine "Kitty" Genovese in a middle-class neighborhood of Queens, New York. Front-page reports in the New York Times incorrectly identified thirty-eight indifferent witnesses to the crime, fueling fears of apathy and urban decay. Genovese's life, including her lesbian relationship, also was obscured in media accounts of the crime. Fifty years later, the story of Kitty Genovese continues to circulate in popular culture. Although it is now widely known that there were far fewer actual witnesses to the crime than was reported in 1964, the moral of the story continues to be urban apathy. "No One Helped" traces the Genovese story's development and resilience while challenging the myth it created. "No One Helped" places the conscious creation and promotion of the Genovese story within a changing urban environment. Gallo reviews New York's shifting racial and economic demographics and explores post World War II examinations of conscience regarding the horrors of Nazism. These were important factors in the uncritical acceptance of the story by most media, political leaders, and the public despite repeated protests from Genovese's Kew Gardens neighbors at their inaccurate portrayal. The crime led to advances in criminal justice and psychology, such as the development of the 911 emergency system and numerous studies of bystander behaviors. Gallo emphasizes that the response to the crime also led to increased community organizing as well as feminist campaigns against sexual violence. Even though the particulars of the sad story of her death were distorted, Kitty Genovese left an enduring legacy of positive changes to the urban environment."


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In "No One Helped" Marcia M. Gallo examines one of America's most infamous true-crime stories: the 1964 rape and murder of Catherine "Kitty" Genovese in a middle-class neighborhood of Queens, New York. Front-page reports in the New York Times incorrectly identified thirty-eight indifferent witnesses to the crime, fueling fears of apathy and urban decay. Genovese's life, In "No One Helped" Marcia M. Gallo examines one of America's most infamous true-crime stories: the 1964 rape and murder of Catherine "Kitty" Genovese in a middle-class neighborhood of Queens, New York. Front-page reports in the New York Times incorrectly identified thirty-eight indifferent witnesses to the crime, fueling fears of apathy and urban decay. Genovese's life, including her lesbian relationship, also was obscured in media accounts of the crime. Fifty years later, the story of Kitty Genovese continues to circulate in popular culture. Although it is now widely known that there were far fewer actual witnesses to the crime than was reported in 1964, the moral of the story continues to be urban apathy. "No One Helped" traces the Genovese story's development and resilience while challenging the myth it created. "No One Helped" places the conscious creation and promotion of the Genovese story within a changing urban environment. Gallo reviews New York's shifting racial and economic demographics and explores post World War II examinations of conscience regarding the horrors of Nazism. These were important factors in the uncritical acceptance of the story by most media, political leaders, and the public despite repeated protests from Genovese's Kew Gardens neighbors at their inaccurate portrayal. The crime led to advances in criminal justice and psychology, such as the development of the 911 emergency system and numerous studies of bystander behaviors. Gallo emphasizes that the response to the crime also led to increased community organizing as well as feminist campaigns against sexual violence. Even though the particulars of the sad story of her death were distorted, Kitty Genovese left an enduring legacy of positive changes to the urban environment."

30 review for "No One Helped": Kitty Genovese, New York City, and the Myth of Urban Apathy

  1. 5 out of 5

    l.

    - the newspapers ignoring that she was a lesbian living with her girlfriend - how Genovese's girlfriend was questioned by the police re how lesbians have sex right after having to identify Genovese's body - the NYT blaming bystanders and removing responsibility from the police for community distrust of them, not being easily contactable due to the lack of a centralized emergency number (which did exist in other jurisdictions including winnipeg, randomly enough), and for not capturing Genovese's - the newspapers ignoring that she was a lesbian living with her girlfriend - how Genovese's girlfriend was questioned by the police re how lesbians have sex right after having to identify Genovese's body - the NYT blaming bystanders and removing responsibility from the police for community distrust of them, not being easily contactable due to the lack of a centralized emergency number (which did exist in other jurisdictions including winnipeg, randomly enough), and for not capturing Genovese's murderer earlier for having murdered Anna Mae Johnson - newspaper coverage of the fact that Genovese was white and her murderer was black, ignoring that the murderer's first victim, Anna Mae Johnson was a black woman - that the NYT editor who wrote the article was conservative leaning and used her death to yell at people about individual responsibility, randomly attacking liberals and civil rights activists as not really caring about others (????). Also that he disliked "queers" - the NYT diminishing the role of the murderer when he was known to be a serial rapist and murderer - the killer escaped from prison and committed a number of violent crimes against women while he was out. the crowns office decided to prosecute one of the women - a black woman - he sexually assaulted for aiding a felon as she didnt come forward about her experience and where he was. one of the crowns - a black female lawyer - refused to prosecute the case and was fired for her refusal. the charges were eventually dropped. - the witness is a really good documentary made by kitty's brother on her life and death. would really recommend it as well as this book for more context about the time period and effects.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    REVIEW of NO ONE HELPED by Marcia M Gallo This book should be compulsory reading for every student of psychology, social psychology and journalism. The good news is that it is a well-written and easy to read narrative. Existing students will be aware of the Kitty Genovese murder in New York in 1964. It led to research and the development of the Bystander Effect which states that it is better to be attacked or come to harm in front of a few than in front of many as when there are many, no one REVIEW of “NO ONE HELPED” by Marcia M Gallo This book should be compulsory reading for every student of psychology, social psychology and journalism. The good news is that it is a well-written and easy to read narrative. Existing students will be aware of the Kitty Genovese murder in New York in 1964. It led to research and the development of “the Bystander Effect” which states that it is better to be attacked or come to harm in front of a few than in front of many as when there are many, no one acts. The tragic murder of the young woman in the early hours of the morning produced many column inches and several books. The myth of her murder as reported (especially in the New York Times) was that 38 of her neighbours “witnessed” her murder and did nothing, that they ignored her screams despite her being attacked 3 times and that the apathy of her fairly well to do area led to her death because no one called the police. These “facts” have been picked up in textbooks for years and are rarely corrected. This is where Ms Gallo takes up the story in light of the 50th anniversary of the horrendous crime. And Ms Gallo tells a totally different story – as do many others including the editor of the New York Times at the time who has somewhat recanted from his position that “38 witnesses did nothing”. The truth of the circumstances of Kitty Genovese’s horrible death is that she was stabbed outside the building where she lived and her screams were heard and acted upon. Several people phoned the police but her attacker followed her into the lobby of her apartment and stabbed her a second time in the throat to stop her screams. A neighbour who was a nurse came to her aid and held her until the police and ambulance came but Kitty died on the way to the hospital. So she was stabbed twice, people did phone the police, someone came to her aid and most of the 38 (or 37 or 39) people who lived in the block heard nothing, as it was 3:30 in the morning. Hardly witnesses. But the real story isn't as exciting as the one created by the media. Also interesting was how Ms Genovese became a cypher and stopped being “herself” or being “real”. She was a lesbian living with her girlfriend who is still also haunted by the thought that maybe she could have “done something” that fateful night, despite the fact that no one could have saved Kitty. Her murderer (subsequently caught and found to have murdered previously who then escaped and attacked again) was intent on killing her. Also there was no easy method of phoning the police at the time. By 1937 the 999 service was in use throughout England. Australia and New Zealand introduced it the following year and Winnipeg in North America adopted it in 1959. But in New York there was confusion about how to call police. For example Gallo shows that the telephone for Staten Island police is SAint George 7-1200 yet the police department official roster at the time showed it as ST George 7-1200. When NY did introduce a single number after the Genovese murder it was 440-1234 which as many commented isn't easy to call when panicked or in the dark. The book goes through the social and cultural changes in New York at the time and over the subsequent years showing the opposite of apathy. There were huge movements for change and at times concerns about tipping into vigilantism – Curtis Sliwa started the Guardian Angels in 1979 and Bernard Goetz (the Subway vigilante) pulled a gun on people trying to rob him on a train and shot one of them. More recent psychologists noted that – “Thus the three key features of the Kitty Genovese story that appear in social psychology textbooks (that there were 38 witnesses, that the witnesses watched from their windows for the duration of the attack and that the witnesses did not intervene) are not supported by the available evidence.” Ms Gallo has done the memory of Kitty Genovese a great service as well as the many activists at the time – the New York Times editor who was largely responsible for the inaccuracies in the murder reporting was heard to ask at an editorial meeting “Where did all these…. these queers come from” and this led to a front-page story on how “Problem of Homosexuality in City Provokes Wide Spread Concern” in December 1963 shortly before Ms Genovese’s death in 1964. The city of New York had many residents who were organizing and getting involved, defying the myth of urban apathy. This book is clearly written, easy to read and the footnotes are kept separate allowing further study if required without interrupting the flow. It raises many questions about motives and methods within journalism and politics and is a sobering read. Ms Genovese deserves no less. I was sent a copy of this book free by NetGalley in return for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    Overall I found "No One Helped" a thorough, impressive read. It not only dispelled the long lasting myth of Kitty Genovese's death, but provided insight to why said rumors stood the test of time, despite making a lick of sense.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Darcia Helle

    This is an interesting read, though not as compelling as I'd expected. Gallo takes Kitty Genovese's murder and, rather than putting it under a microscope as with a typical true crime book, instead takes a much broader look. This story does not focus on Genovese, but more uses her as a central point in which various threads connect. For the most part, this approach works well. I would have liked more information on Kitty Genovese, so I could know her as a person. The details here are scant, which This is an interesting read, though not as compelling as I'd expected. Gallo takes Kitty Genovese's murder and, rather than putting it under a microscope as with a typical true crime book, instead takes a much broader look. This story does not focus on Genovese, but more uses her as a central point in which various threads connect. For the most part, this approach works well. I would have liked more information on Kitty Genovese, so I could know her as a person. The details here are scant, which I find particularly odd since one of Gallo's complaints throughout this book is that Genovese was overlooked, with all the focus being on the 37 silent witnesses. Here Genovese is not as much overlooked as she is overshadowed. The writing is good, straightforward, and easy to follow. The content and, perhaps, lack of writing is where I stumbled. First, much of this story is told through various quotes taken from numerous sources. Gallo's voice is often lost or altogether absent within other people's words. The result feels more like a compilation of facts, rather than a cohesive book. I also feel like Gallo occasionally lost her way, providing far too much content on unrelated issues. For instance, we learn more than I'll ever need (or want) to know about Abe Rosenthal, who at the time worked for the New York Times newspaper. While his stories certainly were a heavy influence on the type of coverage Genovese's murder received, at times I felt I was reading a biography of the man's life. We're given excessive detail on matters in his past that could have been handled with a few paragraphs. This often myopic view of Rosenthal also has the misfortune of portraying him as the central figure, a man able to twist stories to his liking, while ignoring the complicity of all those around him. For me, this book's strength is in the attention it brings to the power and bias of media. This has not changed since Genovese's murder. If anything, the problem has grown worse. Stories the media chooses to cover, how those stories are portrayed, and what the media chooses to ignore all shape our view of the world. The media is dominated by a select few. They decide what is newsworthy. They take their own biases into each story, and their coverage is, intentionally or not, a reflection of those biases. The majority of people only have one or two main sources for their news, and so what they learn is based upon what someone else wants them to know. This book encompasses a vast amount of sociological information surrounding the Genovese's murder, and for me the appeal came in those surrounding details. If your interest is mainly the story of Kitty Genovese's murder, this book probably won't hold the same appeal for you. *I was provided with a free ebook copy by the publisher, via Netgalley, in exchange for my honest review.*

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    A little repetitive, but still an interesting angle to an incredibly intriguing episode in American history.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Vince Darcangelo

    http://ensuingchapters.com/2015/05/11... From an early age, I longed for the big city life. Growing up in a sleepy township that didnt even have sidewalks will do thatNo One Helped to a kid. To dissuade me from fleeing the Rust Belt for bright lights and tall buildings, my parents served up the tale of Kitty Genovese, the New York woman who, in 1964, was famously murdered on a Long Island street while everyone just stood back and watched her die. It terrified me. In my mind, I envisioned a crowded http://ensuingchapters.com/2015/05/11... From an early age, I longed for the big city life. Growing up in a sleepy township that didn’t even have sidewalks will do thatNo One Helped to a kid. To dissuade me from fleeing the Rust Belt for bright lights and tall buildings, my parents served up the tale of Kitty Genovese, the New York woman who, in 1964, was famously murdered on a Long Island street while everyone just stood back and watched her die. It terrified me. In my mind, I envisioned a crowded street, broad daylight, pedestrians having to sidestep this dying stranger as she pleaded with them for help. It wasn’t difficult to imagine. Though not the best time for New York City, the 1970s and early ’80s was a fruitful period for dystopian cinema set in the metropolis. My impression of the city was shaped entirely by Escape from New York and Fort Apache, the Bronx. Though the story of a woman left to die on the sidewalk stayed with me, I never actually learned her name until college, when we studied the case in psychology class. Many psychology classes, actually. At the time, the prevailing narrative was still treated as gospel: 38 neighbors watched and did nothing as Winston Moseley assaulted Genovese, left, assaulted her a second time, left, and came back a third time to finish the job. It’s hard to fathom how this could happen, and of course, it didn’t. At least, not the way it was reported in 1964, and certainly not the way it had been mythologized by the time it reached my ears as a cautionary tale. A more accurate telling was done by Kevin Cook in 2014’s Kitty Genovese: The Murder, the Bystanders, the Crime that Changed America. The focus of Marcia M. Gallo’s “No One Helped”: Kitty Genovese, New York City, and the Myth of Urban Apathy is not so much on the murder as the social incubator in which the narrative of urban apathy was spawned and evolved — and how, by focusing on the witnesses rather than the victim or perpetrator, Genovese “had been flattened out, whitewashed, re-created as an ideal victim in service to the construction of a powerful parable of apathy.” The biggest omission from Genovese’s story, writes Gallo, a history professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, is that she was a lesbian. Being young, pretty and white made her the perfect media martyr, so details of her romantic preference would have been inconvenient to the “ideal victim” narrative in 1964. As the story of her murder took on a life of its own, she became a nameless victim of urban decay — more of a plot device than a character in her own horror show. “No One Helped” is on the shorter side, but Gallo deftly packs in a lot of information — and unpacks five decades of history. The chapters are like linked short stories, exploring in turn the history of Kew Gardens and the racial tensions of the time, the changing media landscape and the marketability of an erroneous New York Times article that fumbled the facts but resonated with “white flight” suburbanites. As for Genovese, Gallo writes, the article “rhetorically reduced her to the chalk outline left on the sidewalk at a crime scene after a body has been removed.” About those 38 witnesses? Only four were actually called to testify at the trial, and even fewer were aware that Genovese had been stabbed. The Times failed to mention the fact that Moseley’s initial assault was interrupted by a neighbor’s intervention, and his second assault took place in a darkened back hallway beyond the vantage point of any neighbors. Gallo writes, “In all of the accounts that have followed in the story’s wake, what has rarely been noted is that there is only one actual eyewitness to Genovese’s death. That person is her killer, Winston Moseley.” In reclaiming Genovese’s identity, Gallo reveals her personal connection to the case. She does so in a tasteful, informative manner, steering clear of navel gazing and drawing attention instead to the resonating significance of the story. For all the horror of the Genovese murder, and its aftermath, it also gave birth to the 911 emergency response system and community policing efforts. It furthered the movement to reexamine our societal acceptance of intimate partner violence (some witnesses had dismissed the assault as a “lover’s quarrel”). And it exposed racial bias in crime reporting. Just two weeks earlier, Moseley had assaulted another woman, murdered her and set her on fire. “Significantly, no photographs of Moseley’s earlier victim, Anna Mae Johnson, a young black woman, ever appeared. Within weeks she would fade from most popular versions of the story, as would her killer,” the author writes. Most of all, for Gallo, the legacy of the Genovese murder still matters “because it raises the central question of how we engage with those around us, individually and collectively, when they need our help.” Digging beyond the murder and the myth, Gallo has penned a remarkable portrait of Genovese and her enduring legacy a half-century later. Her murder inspired an entire branch of psychology, but perhaps her lasting impact on social science will be the study of media myth-making. No matter the fables and fallacies that have emerged, the impact of Genovese has endured. I’ve been on the Long Island Railroad, and at the Kew Gardens stop, it’s impossible not to look down at the nondescript parking lot and the neighboring houses, all crammed together, and wonder how this could have happened. After 50 years, we know it happened differently than we’ve believed, but the true story of the assault is still as brutal and horrifying, if different, than we imagined. Gallo succeeds in redirecting our attention from the “witnesses” to the victim, who became a footnote to the fable. “No One Helped” restores the individual who existed before the chalk outline.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Vincent DiGirolamo

    A public service. Rights a wrong. Changes our thinking about a tragic event of great consequence. Definitely a contribution to NYC history, but also the history of women, sexuality, and journalism.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Beverly

    Some of us remember and many of us have heard the story of Kitty Genoveses rape and murder in New York in 1964. I remember as a young woman hearing about her murder and being terrified to go to New York City. I also believed that New Yorkers were an uncaring bunch. Most of what we have heard is wrong. This is an important re-telling of the notorious incident. The author points out flaws and biases in the original, reported narrative. Non-fiction. Some of us remember and many of us have heard the story of Kitty Genovese’s rape and murder in New York in 1964. I remember as a young woman hearing about her murder and being terrified to go to New York City. I also believed that New Yorkers were an uncaring bunch. Most of what we have heard is wrong. This is an important re-telling of the notorious incident. The author points out flaws and biases in the original, reported narrative. Non-fiction.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Grace Cohen

    This is an absolutely fantastic text. Gallo utilizes an incredible breadth of research to discuss the myth of Kitty Genovese in an interesting and emphatic manner. I would love to see more true crime books to learn from this text. She attempts to shed light of Kitty as someone other then a victim, a flaw in the true crime genre, describing instead an independent gay woman. She also provides a nuanced overview of the myth of the murder. How did the 38 witness story become constructed, and how did This is an absolutely fantastic text. Gallo utilizes an incredible breadth of research to discuss the myth of Kitty Genovese in an interesting and emphatic manner. I would love to see more true crime books to learn from this text. She attempts to shed light of Kitty as someone other then a victim, a flaw in the true crime genre, describing instead an independent gay woman. She also provides a nuanced overview of the myth of the murder. How did the 38 witness story become constructed, and how did it spread over 50 years? She examines not just the New York Times article, but articles across the nation over decades which cite Kitty Genovese and the Bystander Effect over a variety of topics as a powerful and ultimately inaccurate metaphor. She constructs an interesting parallel around the rhetoric of the “innocent bystander” during the AIDS crisis (i.e. hemophiliac children) and the media rhetoric surrounding Kitty’s murder, though I struggled seeing that argument work beyond a superficial analysis. She also provided nuanced analysis of race in this case, discussing Winston Moseley’s other female victims, who were black and ignored by media. Referencing activists such as Alice Walker, Gallo takes the time to discuss the question of race in true crimes cases, especially as even today media focuses mainly on white victims. This book feels very necessary right now, discussing race, feminism, and false new stories, and I highly recommend to everyone, even those who aren’t necessarily interested in true. I personally loved the chapter on the history of Queens, and tracing the history of the neighborhood, looking at the population growth, ethnic diversity, and civil rights activism.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michi

    While this book provided an interesting (re-)contextualisation of the murder of Kitty Genovese, it occasionally lost focus a bit - in my opinion, it tried to handle far too many topics, some of which were only marginally related to Kitty Genovese and her death.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Em

    A lot of interesting threads in this book, but they're slightly knotted in parts and too loosely woven. Needed more editing to tighten it up. Still worth reading, but just be prepared.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jenni V.

    **I received an electronic copy of this book via NetGalley and would like to thank the author and/or publisher for the opportunity to read and honestly review it** As a psychology major, this case is one often discussed and cited when discussing "bystander syndrome" but as the author intended, I learned much more than the surface details (not all of which were even correct) I knew before. " 'For more than half a hour 38 respectable, law-abiding citizens in Queens watched a killer stalk and stab a **I received an electronic copy of this book via NetGalley and would like to thank the author and/or publisher for the opportunity to read and honestly review it** As a psychology major, this case is one often discussed and cited when discussing "bystander syndrome" but as the author intended, I learned much more than the surface details (not all of which were even correct) I knew before. " 'For more than half a hour 38 respectable, law-abiding citizens in Queens watched a killer stalk and stab a woman in three separate attacks in Kew Gardens.' With this sentence, on March 27, 1964, the New York Times introduced its account of one of the city's most notorious murders." Sounds shocking but the number of bystanders has always been exaggerated. Also, two neighbors actually did call the police plus a neighbor came out to physically help her but it wasn't as easy to reach the police as it is now (the development of the "911" emergency system got a big boost in response to the publicity and pressure on leaders to take action and may be the only good thing to come from this tragedy). I've heard about Kitty's death many times but knew nothing about her life before reading this. To quote the author, "I realized that [Kitty] had been flattened out, whitewashed, re-created as an ideal victim in service to the construction of a powerful parable of apathy. It seemed to me that Kitty Genovese's personhood had been taken from her, first by her murderer and then by the media, in order to serve a greater good." I wish that this quote about apathy wasn't still relevant: "I think the German people might have shown rather more reaction than they did (to put it politely) to the evil portended by Hitler when he first began to climb to power. It seems that most of them welcomed him to power and then excused their inaction on the basis of the power they had given to him." I'm not saying our current president rises to Hitler-level evilness but I do think there are things his supporters are excusing so they don't have to examine their choices. A Few Quotes from the Book "They asked themselves and one another: Who had we become if we could stand by silently and ignore someone's cries for help?" "Coming at the start of a rapid rise in violent crimes in New York City, the killing of Kitty Genovese served as both a symptom of the disintegration of communities as well as a catalyst for change and activism." Find all my reviews at: https://readingatrandom.blogspot.com

  13. 5 out of 5

    J Earl

    As the complete title alludes to, this book is not about the sexual assault/murder as much as it is about Kitty Genovese the person and the ways in which she was erased for various political and cultural goals. This is a very well researched work that not only points out the flaws in the media portrayal but also contextualizes the murder and the subsequent handling of the story. The context(s) are treated both individually (sexuality, gender, race, etc) as well as collectively in the places they As the complete title alludes to, this book is not about the sexual assault/murder as much as it is about Kitty Genovese the person and the ways in which she was erased for various political and cultural goals. This is a very well researched work that not only points out the flaws in the media portrayal but also contextualizes the murder and the subsequent handling of the story. The context(s) are treated both individually (sexuality, gender, race, etc) as well as collectively in the places they collided. Like many readers I was familiar with the case from various courses and perspectives but this book brings together the information with an eye toward both giving Genovese her personhood back (in a sense) while also explaining (and criticizing many of) the reasons for appropriating this tragedy for other purposes. This book is accessible for anyone interested in crime, media, gender, race, and the various intersections where these dialogues meet. While certainly suitable as a textbook it is also wonderful for non-academics who want more than the surface of this episode presented to them.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    When the NYT wrote that 38 witnesses watched Kitty Genovese being brutally beaten, raped and murdered outside her Queens apartment building in March, 1964, it sent a collective shiver down the spine of every New Yorker (especially teenage girls and young women daring to live on their own). Though A.M. Rosenthal wrote little about Genovese herself, her name became a metaphor for everything that was wrong with the city and for the apathy of strangers and especially neighbors. That trope persisted When the NYT wrote that 38 witnesses watched Kitty Genovese being brutally beaten, raped and murdered outside her Queens apartment building in March, 1964, it sent a collective shiver down the spine of every New Yorker (especially teenage girls and young women daring to live on their own). Though A.M. Rosenthal wrote little about Genovese herself, her name became a metaphor for everything that was wrong with the city and for the apathy of strangers and especially neighbors. That trope persisted for decades -- popularized in a myriad of magazine and newspaper articles, songs and even comic books. Problem was -- the NYT version was not completely true. Now, 50 years later, author Marcia Gallo -- with deep compassion and clear political insight, dissects the story, gives us a real picture of what happened, and paints a very different picture of New York and (non-apathetic New Yorkers) at the moment of rising activism in the civil rights, women's and LGBT communities.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Winner of the Publishing Triangle's 2016 Judy Grahn Award for Lesbian Nonfiction and also the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Nonfiction. In March 1964 I was ten years old and I can remember hearing about the murder of Kitty Genovese--how her neighbors witnessed the crime and did nothing to help her. I had a vivid imagination and saw the scene in my mind, even though I lived in Havertown, PA and had never been to Kew Gardens, Queens, NY. In "No One Helped," Marcia M. Gallo examines how the press Winner of the Publishing Triangle's 2016 Judy Grahn Award for Lesbian Nonfiction and also the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Nonfiction. In March 1964 I was ten years old and I can remember hearing about the murder of Kitty Genovese--how her neighbors witnessed the crime and did nothing to help her. I had a vivid imagination and saw the scene in my mind, even though I lived in Havertown, PA and had never been to Kew Gardens, Queens, NY. In "No One Helped," Marcia M. Gallo examines how the press told the story of what happened, and reveals some of the inaccuracies of the reporting. She looks at the effect on Genovese's neighbors, the neighborhood of Kew Gardens, and perhaps most important, she shows us who Catherine ("Kitty") Genovese really was. A very interesting read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Injoy

    I received a free kindle copy of "No One Helped" Kitty Genovese, New York City, and the Myth of Urban Apathy by Marcia M. Gallo, published by Cornell University Press from NetGalley in exchange for a fair review. I gave this comprehensive historical account of the true crime Kitty Genovese story only three stars. I was able to read only forty percent of the book. It is documentary dry writing & reminded me of a doctoral dissertation. It is well researched & covers a lot of the social I received a free kindle copy of "No One Helped" Kitty Genovese, New York City, and the Myth of Urban Apathy by Marcia M. Gallo, published by Cornell University Press from NetGalley in exchange for a fair review. I gave this comprehensive historical account of the true crime Kitty Genovese story only three stars. I was able to read only forty percent of the book. It is documentary dry writing & reminded me of a doctoral dissertation. It is well researched & covers a lot of the social mores of the time but is often repetitive & difficult to read. It did correct many of the 'myths' about the event. Link to purchase: http://www.amazon.com/No-One-Helped-G...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bexa

    This was okay, but not what I was expecting when I had read the reviews. I was expecting more to the actual story, but a lot of this focused on other people's histories and very little on Kitty. Also, while I can understand the comparison to Nazi Germany, it felt like too much time was dedicated to it and Rosenthal's history. I was just hoping that there would be more discussion about how the people of Kew Gardens actually tried to help since it talks about the myth of urban apathy, but there's This was okay, but not what I was expecting when I had read the reviews. I was expecting more to the actual story, but a lot of this focused on other people's histories and very little on Kitty. Also, while I can understand the comparison to Nazi Germany, it felt like too much time was dedicated to it and Rosenthal's history. I was just hoping that there would be more discussion about how the people of Kew Gardens actually tried to help since it talks about the myth of urban apathy, but there's few stories far between. considering this is under 200 pages, I feel like Gallo didn't focus on what she actually planned to talk about.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lectus

    Very well researched. The book is also a history of how Queens have become the diverse borough it is today. Pictues and newspaper clippings support the book throughout. I live in Queens and had heard of that crime. It was interesting reading how we, New Yorkers, let crimes to be committed because "we don't want to get involved." People in New York, as a whole, display a high degree of apathy. I think it has been decreasing since 9/11, though.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Schauer

    A powerful re-telling of a 1964 murder. Not only does Gallo re-interpret the event itself while making its victim much more than a "cipher". She explores the meanings it came to possess for New Yorkers and Americans, and places it in multiple national, local, and cultural contexts. As a piece of writing and of scholarship, this was an enjoyable and timely read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Constanza

    Con toda la aventura que fue conseguir este libro me dio pena que no me gustara tanto. Es un buen libro, bien investigado y que otorga complejidad y vida a una situación que antes era vista de forma muy unidimensional. Sin embargo, no me logra atrapar y ratos la investigación parecía repetitiva y dándose vueltas sobre lo mismo.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Schulman

    Fascinating and complex psychological and social history of the Kitty Genovese case and its representations. Highly recommended, especially for those interested in the history of New York City.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Adan Ramie

    While the story is fascinating, unfortunately I could not get through this book. It was just too repetitive, and focused on some aspects surrounding the crime that just did not engage me.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Trent

    The winner of the Publishing Triangle's 2016 Judy Grahn Award for Lesbian Nonfiction.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Naman Mukesh Chaudhary

  25. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

  26. 5 out of 5

    Allison Kaefring

  27. 4 out of 5

    Robert Natale

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kerry

  29. 5 out of 5

    j

  30. 5 out of 5

    ari

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