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Undeath and Taxes

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The sequel to the Amazon bestseller THE UTTERLY UNINTERESTING AND UNADVENTUROUS TALES OF FRED, THE VAMPIRE ACCOUNTANT. After discovering just how filled with magic, intrigue, and adventure the parahuman world of being an Undead American can be, Fredrick Frankford Fletcher did exactly what was expected--he became a certified parahuman accountant. Myths and legends, as it The sequel to the Amazon bestseller THE UTTERLY UNINTERESTING AND UNADVENTUROUS TALES OF FRED, THE VAMPIRE ACCOUNTANT. After discovering just how filled with magic, intrigue, and adventure the parahuman world of being an Undead American can be, Fredrick Frankford Fletcher did exactly what was expected--he became a certified parahuman accountant. Myths and legends, as it turns out, are not so great at taking appropriate deductions and keeping their receipts, and Fred is more than happy to return to a life others view as woefully dull, expanding his accounting business to cater to various monsters and their respective financial needs. Said monsters are, unfortunately, still spectacular at pulling Fred into trouble, though. And despite merely wanting to stick with simple paperwork, Fred once again finds he is going to have to deal with enchanted weaponry, government agents, possessed houses, and one enigmatic dragon’s interest. In the parahuman world, any business can turn deadly, even one as mundane as accounting.


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The sequel to the Amazon bestseller THE UTTERLY UNINTERESTING AND UNADVENTUROUS TALES OF FRED, THE VAMPIRE ACCOUNTANT. After discovering just how filled with magic, intrigue, and adventure the parahuman world of being an Undead American can be, Fredrick Frankford Fletcher did exactly what was expected--he became a certified parahuman accountant. Myths and legends, as it The sequel to the Amazon bestseller THE UTTERLY UNINTERESTING AND UNADVENTUROUS TALES OF FRED, THE VAMPIRE ACCOUNTANT. After discovering just how filled with magic, intrigue, and adventure the parahuman world of being an Undead American can be, Fredrick Frankford Fletcher did exactly what was expected--he became a certified parahuman accountant. Myths and legends, as it turns out, are not so great at taking appropriate deductions and keeping their receipts, and Fred is more than happy to return to a life others view as woefully dull, expanding his accounting business to cater to various monsters and their respective financial needs. Said monsters are, unfortunately, still spectacular at pulling Fred into trouble, though. And despite merely wanting to stick with simple paperwork, Fred once again finds he is going to have to deal with enchanted weaponry, government agents, possessed houses, and one enigmatic dragon’s interest. In the parahuman world, any business can turn deadly, even one as mundane as accounting.

30 review for Undeath and Taxes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jen/The Tolkien Gal/ジェニファー

    3.4 stars Review to come once I've written a review for the first book. This book felt more like a filler with a scattered bunch of short stories than a follow up, but the characters were as enjoyable as always. What people think vampires look like What Fred the vampire is like I absolutely love how this series turns the trope of supernatural creatures on their head but still makes a fun, action-packed series.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Fangs for the Fantasy

    Fred has come a long way since becoming a vampire. He's gone into business for himself as an accountant, found a girlfriend and has made a circle of dependable friends. That's not bad for a socially awkward person who used to spend most of his time alone. Now if only he could stop finding himself in positions which force him to brave - something Fred most certainly is not, then things could be perfect. Just like The Utterly Uninteresting and Unadventurous Tales of Fred, the Vampire Accountant, Fred has come a long way since becoming a vampire. He's gone into business for himself as an accountant, found a girlfriend and has made a circle of dependable friends. That's not bad for a socially awkward person who used to spend most of his time alone. Now if only he could stop finding himself in positions which force him to brave - something Fred most certainly is not, then things could be perfect. Just like The Utterly Uninteresting and Unadventurous Tales of Fred, the Vampire Accountant, Undeath and Taxes, is told through a series of short stories. This is still not my preferred format for reading and I would have liked one cohesive story from start to finish better. That being said, there was a nice flow to the mini short stories and Hayes took care to add to the meta, even if I am not pleased with what the addition turned out to be. Hayes also gave us a great sense of the hierarchy in the parahuman world and how it is policed by agents. My largest complaint with Undeath and Taxes is the predatory child molesting tone it took in terms of Sally's relationship with Gideon the centuries old Dragon. From the beginning, Fred wonders why Gideon would chosse to cloak himself in a child's body and become Sally's playmate. In Undeath and Taxes, we learn that Sally is a Tiamet, quite literally the mother of dragons. (Go ahead and let your mind channel Daenerys Targaryen for a moment and then stroll on back.) This means that when Sally reaches maturity, she will be able to give birth to a dragon and given that the dragon birth rate is exceedingly low, this is a huge deal. Gideon has therefore struck a deal with Richard, Sally's father to grow up with Sally as her playmate and then marry her when she becomes an adult. There's only one word for this kind of scenario and it's grooming. Even if Gideon doesn't touch Sally sexually until she's and adult it's still catfishing. Hayes treats the betrothal between Gideon and Sally as a huge secret but not because of how problematic their relationship is but because of Sally's potential to breed dragons. First off, making a female character important because of her potential reproductive ability reduces her to nothing but a womb and it's sexist and wrong. To then have Gideon grow up alongside her, sharing in her confidences, playing the role of friend and shaping who she becomes only to set himself up as a suitor once she reaches maturity is straight out of a pedophiles playbook. There's simply no other way of looking at it. It took some of enjoyment out of Undeath and Taxes for me, even if it only accounts for a small part of the book. No matter how much Fred dislikes violence and being placed into situations where has to be brave, he always seems to end up in some sort of confrontation. Because Undeath and Taxes is written in the form of multiples short stories, it quickly becomes at least somewhat sort of repetitive. The situations vary but inevitably, Fred finds a way to out smart each story's particular antagonist, or is saved by a stronger friend. The only thing that changes from beginning to end is that with each new situation Fred becomes less and less likely to panic, resigned to the fact that this is his life now. At the end, he is even willing to sacrifice himself to save his friends, having determined that they have become a family. That's a long way from the vampire who tried to run away from the werewolves in The Utterly Uninteresting and Unadventurous Tales of Fred, the Vampire Accountant. Read More

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Burns

    4 Stars Review: This was another sweet, light, funny, enjoyable audiobook in the series. Fred is a great, easily likeable character---I especially love how honest he is; no subterfuge, no manipulation, no hiding anything. He's just honest and trustworthy, and I love him for it. And he's so oblivious to how brave and caring he is and how everyone else sees him. I also like how sweet his relationship with Crystal is. They're so different, but they balance each other, and they respect and love each 4 Stars Review: This was another sweet, light, funny, enjoyable audiobook in the series. Fred is a great, easily likeable character---I especially love how honest he is; no subterfuge, no manipulation, no hiding anything. He's just honest and trustworthy, and I love him for it. And he's so oblivious to how brave and caring he is and how everyone else sees him. I also like how sweet his relationship with Crystal is. They're so different, but they balance each other, and they respect and love each others' differences. The whole series has a really sweet friendship/found family aspect too that I like. Fred's social circle is a motley crew of characters, and it's really sweet how Fred spent his whole life being kind of alone but now has these people he cares about and who care about him. But, at the same time, I also liked how this book had more scenarios when Fred was without his friends and/or took more initiative, even being the one to save the day in one case. Last but not least, I highly recommend the audio for this series. I make no secret that I'm not a fan of audiobooks, but it works so well for this series since the story is told as a series of memoirs, and the narrator really brings the characters to life. Overall, this was another set of stories I enjoyed listening to! Original Review @ Metaphors and Moonlight

  4. 4 out of 5

    Annery

    Well this is what happens when I go scrolling around in Audible. *sigh* I'm not mad at all. I'm loving this series, but there goes my "reading plan" and my credits and we're barely in January! And yet ... I wholeheartedly recommend this series. This second installment surprised me. In a good way. While it continues in the same vein of "individual" comic adventures, somewhere along the line it goes deeper. The characters grow in emotional depth, and concepts like "chosen family", love, or what it Well this is what happens when I go scrolling around in Audible. *sigh* I'm not mad at all. I'm loving this series, but there goes my "reading plan" and my credits and we're barely in January! And yet ... I wholeheartedly recommend this series. This second installment surprised me. In a good way. While it continues in the same vein of "individual" comic adventures, somewhere along the line it goes deeper. The characters grow in emotional depth, and concepts like "chosen family", love, or what it even means to be alive are broached artfully and without preachiness. I don't want to spoil anything but I'll just say that Albert and Gideon are characters in completely opposite ends of the spectrum but just as compelling. Quite a feat. Let's hear it for the B-Team, accountants, beta heroes, unbreakable bonds of friendship, and finding your tribe. I'm forging ahead, broke, but happy.

  5. 5 out of 5

    C.T. Phipps

    I enjoyed DEATH AND TAXES as a decent sequel to the original FRED THE VAMPIRE ACCOUNTANT novel. Fred is a character who wouldn't be very interesting to read about if he wasn't a vampire (as he constantly insists) but is hilarious in his deadpan reaction to things like kidnappings, sentient Overlook-esque hotels [who are really nice], superhuman conventions, sinister tests, and evil plots overthrow the dragon king of the West. I don't think much changed characterization or plot-wise but it was a I enjoyed DEATH AND TAXES as a decent sequel to the original FRED THE VAMPIRE ACCOUNTANT novel. Fred is a character who wouldn't be very interesting to read about if he wasn't a vampire (as he constantly insists) but is hilarious in his deadpan reaction to things like kidnappings, sentient Overlook-esque hotels [who are really nice], superhuman conventions, sinister tests, and evil plots overthrow the dragon king of the West. I don't think much changed characterization or plot-wise but it was a solid and dependable book. I really like Fred's relationship with Krystal even if it feels a bit sexless. They're adults, they can allude to having a bit more spice than your average Victorian-era relationship. This is a good "comfort food" fiction and worth an afternoon's read. I'm also going to be picking up the next in the series. 8/10

  6. 4 out of 5

    Krista D.

    Solid fun. Such a different concept, too. I mean, "accountant vampire and friends" isn't a common idea! Love Albert's new job.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    My review and an extended sample of the audiobook are posted at Hotlistens.com. An Accountant in the Warehouse Fred has gotten certified as a Certified Public Parahuman Accountant. He is now your official guy to find you all of those paranormal tax deductions. His first client with his new credentials is king of the therians (were-creatures) in the area. We met Richard and his daughter Sally in the first book. There is also Gideon, who is a very old, very powerful dragon who likes to disguise as a My review and an extended sample of the audiobook are posted at Hotlistens.com. An Accountant in the Warehouse Fred has gotten certified as a “Certified Public Parahuman Accountant”. He is now your official guy to find you all of those paranormal tax deductions. His first client with his new credentials is king of the therians (were-creatures) in the area. We met Richard and his daughter Sally in the first book. There is also Gideon, who is a very old, very powerful dragon who likes to disguise as a playmate for Sally. When someone tries to kidnap Sally, and Fred since he was there, things go awry. An Agent at the Convention In this story, Krystal, Fred and Bubba go to setup at the convention, which is the paranormal’s version of ComicCon. In this story, we meet Krystal’s ex-fiance’s sister is already setting up the booth. We learn more about mages, witches, therians and other creatures. When someone steals some of the weapons of destiny, the gang needs to hunt them down before the Con officially starts. What I loved most in this story, was how they kept normal humans from finding out about this Con. Parahumans tried to keep the “veil of disbelief” about themselves. “Red tape usually,” Krystal said. “Lost applications, extra fees piled on top of extra fees, constantly changing dates, and overall horrendous customer service. We make the experience so terrible, no one wants to come. Let alone, try again the next year.” “I think my cable company has been stealing plays from your book,” Bubba remarked as he set a fourth box on the pile. “Other way around. Every couple of years, we have someone set up a Castcom account, just to see if they’ve come up with any new tactics. They never fail to disappoint.” Krystal replied. A Sword in the Catacombs I can’t say a huge about this story as it could spoil the previous story. I’ll just say that someone finds out that they are to become the new wielder of the Blade of the Unlikely Champion. The Agency has Krystal bring the gang in so that this new wielder could be tested and likely recruited to the Agency. A Lawyer in the Manor When Fred is asked to come to a meeting at the Charlotte Manor, which is now a bed and breakfast, to basically interview for the job of accountant for investment firm. When the person from the investment firm starts talking about buying this B&B, the “employees” decide this is not want they want and take matters into their own hands. Fred solves this problem in a way that truly suits Fred. A Dragon in the Office When Fred goes to “gala” at Richard’s home, Fred notices that Gideon is not what it seems. Fred goes on the hunt to try to figure out what is going on. Once again, I really enjoyed this story. It is a light-hearted read with plenty of laugh out loud moments. If you’re looking for a paranormal read that is funny with some action and less romance, this is the story for you. The story format of several small stories that build on each other is different, but I find it works really well with this series. Narration Now when I listened to the first book, I mentioned that Kirby Heyborne didn’t do a very good job with female characters. I’m not 100% sure what changed, but I found that his narration with female voices didn’t bother me as much in this story. I think he is a great voice for Fred. He sounds exactly what I think Fred would sound like. He does a really good job of the big trucker and werebeast, Bubba.

  8. 4 out of 5

    ZOEY

    I love LOVE Fred <3 (would like to see more of him and Gideon-*fingers crossed*) Can't wait for the next installment!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melyna

    I adore this series. Told as a series of memoirs, Fred recounts his adventures (not that he was looking for any) of his not so mundane, undead life. The narration is wonderful, the cast of characters continue to grow as we get to know more about Fred and his friends who have become his family.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chip

    If you know Drew Hayes (NPCs), you know exactly what you are going to get with this book. This book was a fun romp that gently pokes fun at some stereotypes of this type of story. Characters: 4.5* Universe: 4.2* Plot: 3.8*

  11. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    I enjoyed this sequel quite a bit. I listened to the audiobook, and I loved how the narrator did the voices. The overall story was fantastic. I loved listening to the relationships between the characters grow and flourish. I loved the new additions to the cast as well. I liked the episodic nature of the book. However, it was hard to stop listening to the tales of Fred and his friends. The audiobook is around 9 hours long, so pretty short. If anyone is looking for a quick read that is I enjoyed this sequel quite a bit. I listened to the audiobook, and I loved how the narrator did the voices. The overall story was fantastic. I loved listening to the relationships between the characters grow and flourish. I loved the new additions to the cast as well. I liked the episodic nature of the book. However, it was hard to stop listening to the tales of Fred and his friends. The audiobook is around 9 hours long, so pretty short. If anyone is looking for a quick read that is entertaining, then this is the book for you. I have really enjoyed the series so far, and I am looking forward to starting this next one. I can't wait to listen to more of Fred's adventures.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kat Lebo

    Undeath and Taxes (Fred, the Vampire Accountant Book 2) by Drew Hayes Fred, the Vampire Accountant, is back with his friends, Bubba, the werehorse, Neil, the budding necromancer, Amy, the weird but wonderful mage and Neil's current tutor, Albert, Fred's Zombie assistant and Neil's best friend, and, of course, Krystal, the demon agent of "The Agency," Fred's former high school friend and his current girlfriend. Add into the mix Richard, the head therian (were folk) of his area, his daughter, Sally, Undeath and Taxes (Fred, the Vampire Accountant Book 2) by Drew Hayes Fred, the Vampire Accountant, is back with his friends, Bubba, the werehorse, Neil, the budding necromancer, Amy, the weird but wonderful mage and Neil's current tutor, Albert, Fred's Zombie assistant and Neil's best friend, and, of course, Krystal, the demon agent of "The Agency," Fred's former high school friend and his current girlfriend. Add into the mix Richard, the head therian (were folk) of his area, his daughter, Sally, and, his houseguest, Gideon, the dragon, plus a couple of Krystal's co-workers, June, the sister of Krystal's former fiance, and the mysterious Arch. We also get to meet a sentient house, another dragon, and a couple of Fred's former co-workers from before his life -- or death -- transformation. Buckle up, Buttercup, the ride gets bumpy from here! Fred is certainly putting a new twist on the "nothing is certain but death and taxes" cliche, as it seems the undead, and other paranormal sorts, must still pony up to Uncle Sam at tax time. Fred has just completed his training and received his CPPA certificate (Certified Public Parahuman Accountant). He is expanding his already growing business by specializing in doing the complicated taxes of other parahumans, and his first client is none other than Richard Alderson, head therian (short for therianthropes) in Winslow, Colorado. His adventures in this book will take him into the good graces of a very scary dragon, into the deeper workings of the therian bookkeeping process, to a paranormal convention, encounters with several different "Swords of Destiny," one in particular of which will result in a gladiator-like trial for Albert. He will spend some time with former co-workers in a pissed-off sentient house, and engage in a battle between two warring dragons. Yes, try as he might to stay "utterly uninteresting and unadventurous," Fred simply can't seem to avoid trouble. Once again Hayes has crafted an exciting, action filled novel that still manages to be full of his trademark brand of humor. For instance, this timely contemporary remark made by Krystal. She's been asked how the Agency keeps non-parahumans from applying to the convention the Agency hosts. As she explains the tactics, Bubba remarks that it sounds like his cable company and he wonders if they copied from the Agency. Krystal responds, "Other way around. Every couple of years, we have someone set up a Castcom account, just to see if they've come up with any new tactics." (724 on my Kindle) Yep, last time I had to call my cable company (with a suspiciously similar sounding name), I think I hung up on them. In the two books of this series, Hayes has even coined a new ethnic profiling term for the PC-oriented: Undead American. Think the next time I have to fill out a form where there is a place to write in "other," I'll use that. I did find a couple of proof-reading errors in this one, two for sure and another I questioned. Mr. Hayes, if you'd like to know where, just send me a message. But for the most part, I was simply enthralled with the book. Such great characters, seamless plotting, and fantastic presentation. Yep. Loved it. Kudos, Mr. Hayes -- another great read. Hope Fred will get a third set of adventures!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Candice

    **I received an eARC of Undeath & Taxes from REUTS Publications, in exchange for an honest review.**      Undeath & Taxes was a hilarious sequel to the first book. What's even better, is that you don't really need to read the first 'Fred' book to understand what's happening in Undeath & Taxes.      While I thought this book might end up being really cheesy, or similar to something you'd find in a bargain bin, I was pleasently surprised! The character's were funny, courageous in their **I received an eARC of Undeath & Taxes from REUTS Publications, in exchange for an honest review.**      Undeath & Taxes was a hilarious sequel to the first book. What's even better, is that you don't really need to read the first 'Fred' book to understand what's happening in Undeath & Taxes.      While I thought this book might end up being really cheesy, or similar to something you'd find in a bargain bin, I was pleasently surprised! The character's were funny, courageous in their own ways, and amazingly written. Since Undeath and Taxes is broken down into 4 stories, you could easily just read any or the stories as a standalone, but I definitely recommend reading the whole book! (But if you don't want to read all of it, I recommend you at least read 'An Accountant in the Warehouse'! --- Gideon is my absolute favorite charcater in these books, I'm so glad he showed up in U&T!) My favorite things about Undeath and Taxes were: Gideon (obviously), the way it was broken in to four stories/how readable it was, and basically everything about it!      If you're a fan of the paranormal genres, vampires, and a little bit of action; you should give this 'series' a shot!      Have a great day! About the author, Drew Hayes:      Drew Hayes is an aspiring author from Texas who has written several books and found the gumption to publish a few (so far). He graduated from Texas Tech with a B.A. in English, because evidently he’s not familiar with what the term “employable” means. Drew has been called one of the most profound, prolific, and talented authors of his generation, but a table full of drunks will say almost anything when offered a round of free shots. Drew feels kind of like a D-bag writing about himself in the third person like this. He does appreciate that you’re still reading, though.       Drew would like to sit down and have a beer with you. Or a cocktail. He’s not here to judge your preferences. Drew is terrible at being serious, and has no real idea what a snippet biography is meant to convey anyway. Drew thinks you are awesome just the way you are. That part, he meant. Drew is off to go high-five random people, because who doesn’t love a good high-five? No one, that’s who.       See Drew talk about himself in first person on his website and twitter.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Wiebke (1book1review)

    I like Fred, he is such a fun character. I also like how this is another collection of his adventures, good choice to keep them short and in diary style. Also listening to the audiobook was a pleasure Kirby Heyborne does a marvelous job at narrating it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cloak88

    A continuation of what came before. The second installment continues on the same track as the first novel. Fred & Friends slowly make their way into the world of the parahumans. You learn a bit more about each character and see them develop, reveal strengths and weaknesses while remaining well written fun to read. If you liked the first book, Read the second book and you won't be dissapointed

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bekah the Awesome

    Best part about finishing this book? Realizing by stalking the authors blog that I could stalk his Facebook, and discovering that book 3 is going to exist!!!! WOOOOOOOOOO! Also, omg gloriously awesome.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kandice

    I really like Fred and these books are fun, but I am finding it more irksome in this second installment that Hayes feels the need to recap before each new "story." I don't mean each new book, but, literally, each new story. These books are divided into different adventures, and I can only imagine they were published individually first because Hayes gives you the broad outline before each section. I thought I would skip over that, but he introduces it in such a way that if you skip, you miss the I really like Fred and these books are fun, but I am finding it more irksome in this second installment that Hayes feels the need to recap before each new "story." I don't mean each new book, but, literally, each new story. These books are divided into different adventures, and I can only imagine they were published individually first because Hayes gives you the broad outline before each section. I thought I would skip over that, but he introduces it in such a way that if you skip, you miss the beginning details of this new adventure as well. *sigh* What I like most about these is that Fred is just a guy who becomes a vampire. I love the paranormal, but in most cases those who become paranormal are already extraordinary in some way. Not so here. Fred is just a sweet, unprepossessing young man. It's only when he becomes a vampire and makes new friends that he comes into his own. He cares deeply, and is loyal beyond all belief. That's the wonder of these little tales. The fact that everyone is special, not just those that pretend to be ordinary!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    These are just wonderfully funny books.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    funny, light, cute and well written.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mary Catelli

    Book 2. In which a vampire accountant become a Certified Public Paranormal Accountant. . . . Fred's job matters more in this than in book 1. But we have more episodic (though connected) adventures. Getting kidnapped while doing a werelion's taxes; helping his girlfriend set up the booth at the paranormal convention; the wielder of a Weapon of Destiny; and more -- involving a chimera, a business Fred should have heard of, that never-alive spirits nevertheless have the same rights and protections Book 2. In which a vampire accountant become a Certified Public Paranormal Accountant. . . . Fred's job matters more in this than in book 1. But we have more episodic (though connected) adventures. Getting kidnapped while doing a werelion's taxes; helping his girlfriend set up the booth at the paranormal convention; the wielder of a Weapon of Destiny; and more -- involving a chimera, a business Fred should have heard of, that never-alive spirits nevertheless have the same rights and protections under the law as ghosts, the problem that Weapons of Destiny may conduct escapes if not allowed to find their wielders, and more.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gareth Otton

    Yes, now that's more like it. Though I rated the 1st book 4-stars, I did have a big complaint which was mainly that the book didn't deliver on the promise of the title. I was expecting a book about an unusual vampire who turns his skills with accountancy into a way to deal with the supernatural world. What I received, while enjoyable, was a pretty generic geek/loser made vampire book. It wasn't so much that I wanted less action or adventure, just more that I wanted something a bit more creative Yes, now that's more like it. Though I rated the 1st book 4-stars, I did have a big complaint which was mainly that the book didn't deliver on the promise of the title. I was expecting a book about an unusual vampire who turns his skills with accountancy into a way to deal with the supernatural world. What I received, while enjoyable, was a pretty generic geek/loser made vampire book. It wasn't so much that I wanted less action or adventure, just more that I wanted something a bit more creative that stuck with the premise of a Vampire Accountant. This book delivered just that. I won't go far into spoiler territory here, but I will say that a number of stories in this book focused on the unique nature of a vampire accountant. Each adventure was deadly in its own right, but this time, rather than fall back on familiar vampire/supernatural tropes to get out of danger, Fred found a way to turn his own unique skills to his advantage. There was one story in particular where he and a few other people are trapped in a house where his skill set and unique way of thinking was the only thing that saved them. To me, this was the highlight of the book. It was the hook that brought me to this series in the first place and it was a breath of fresh air in a genre that has been so overused it's becoming stale. It didn't matter that it was a little slower than some all out action adventures, it was well thought out, creative and I could happily read a whole book built up of similar adventures. However, even in this book that kind of story was not the norm which is why if I could I would rate this book 4.5-stars instead of 5. However, even in the other stories, Fred's unique position as a non-normal vampire stood out as he had to creatively use what strengths he had to succeed and the book was all the better for it. Add on top of that a sense of a bigger story building in the background, and what you have is a really good book that gets you excited for the next in the series. The episodic nature of the writing makes this build up subtle, but I am sure it is all leading somewhere and I'm excited to see where it goes. Overall this was definitely a step in the right direction for this series. Like the first, it is well written and filled with likeable characters that you can't help but grow attached to. Couple that with the interesting hook that is more fully explored in this novel and you have the first book with vampires at the core of it that I can recommend since I discovered The Demon Accords by John Conroe last year. Basically what I'm saying is... Great book, bring on the next!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    Were back with Fred and the gang. He and Krystal are still going strong. We get more about Amy and Neil in this. Fred has learned a lot about himself in the first book, he learned that he has what it takes to be a hero, even if it is reluctant. That doesnt change in this book, only hes more willing to put himself out there than he was before. In this book, Krystal doesnt really get him into trouble. Fred does that mostly on his own, but Albert seems to get himself into a pickle as well. But Id We’re back with Fred and the gang. He and Krystal are still going strong. We get more about Amy and Neil in this. Fred has learned a lot about himself in the first book, he learned that he has what it takes to be a hero, even if it is reluctant. That doesn’t change in this book, only he’s more willing to put himself out there than he was before. In this book, Krystal doesn’t really get him into trouble. Fred does that mostly on his own, but Albert seems to get himself into a pickle as well. But I’d say the biggest pickle comes from Gideon. And I’m pretty sure the tidbits of info that we’ve picked up might be crucial information in the next book, because surely there will be a next book! I really enjoyed this book, as much as the first one. This is a group of absolute misfits, not one of them are like their stereotypes and that is what makes this book refreshing and delightful. But this book just goes to show that heroes aren’t the obvious choice, but rather in the hard choices that someone makes. Oh and I will say that there is a reference to NPCs in this book! :D So, Fred ties to NPCs, as does Super Powereds (if only Hershel and Alex KNEW what the rules were!!!), and NPCs ties to Pears and Perils. ;) I’m loving this finding the tie-ins with the other books. Just another cool thing to read and see if I can find them all. (I doubt it.) Mr. Hayes loves taking the stereotype and pulling it on it’s side and then rolling it around and standing it on its head and giving it a few shakes before reshaping it into his own creature of his own design. I love that about his books. And his Fred books are no exception to the rule. So, would I recommend this book, oh yes! You can’t read the first one without continuing on with this one! Fred leads a very exciting life for a boring, socially awkward accountant vampire. ;)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Undeath and Taxes by Drew Hayes Hayes second in his fantastic Fred the Vampire accountant Urban Fantasy series is just as funny and just as inventive as the first. Readers know Fred and his cohorts a bit better but the action and the antics are still fresh and funny and still very unique. The 5 stories/novellas/chapters are still told from Freds front seat, 1st person a Point of View that really works for his diary like plot line. If youre looking for something new in a overrun genre Fred is just Undeath and Taxes by Drew Hayes Hayes second in his fantastic Fred the Vampire accountant Urban Fantasy series is just as funny and just as inventive as the first. Readers know Fred and his cohorts a bit better but the action and the antics are still fresh and funny and still very unique. The 5 stories/novellas/chapters are still told from Fred’s front seat, 1st person a Point of View that really works for his diary like plot line. If you’re looking for something new in a overrun genre Fred is just what you might be looking for. Books read better in order. The fabulous all-creature perfect narration of Kirby Heyborne is still the best way to get the full monty enjoyment of this one-of-a-kind gem of a read! Fredrick Frankford Fletcher has just passed his CPPA test and is now a Certified Paranormal Public Accountant so he can grow his fledgling business to better serve the parahuman community. He also continues, along with his Government agent girlfriend, Crystal and his group of friends, his fantastical adventures in paranormal perils.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Meran Rhodes

    Okay, at the risk of this review sounding trite or whatever, this was just a fun book. I devoured this series in a week or so and really enjoyed it. Hayes really nailed it with this one. Kirby Heyborne also did an amazing job with the narration. I wasn't sure Hayes could have gotten a better narrator than Kyle McCarley but for this cast of characters Heyborne did an truly amazing job.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mark A. Gravitt

    More of Fred's adventures This one leaves us with a few more puzzles, but still a rip-roaring good tale. We learn more of why 1 is so interested in 2, that 3 and 4 have A Destiny, and we meet 5 who scares and impresses everyone....

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    Just as fun as the first I have to say...I am quickly becoming a fan of Drew Hayes. His stories are written in such a way as to keep you both interested and entertained even when the action is chapters away. Another success!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    This book was just as entertaining as the first one. The plot is thickening, with things that were hinted at in the first book clarified, new characters introduced, and new complications arising.

  28. 4 out of 5

    GaiusPrimus

    Everything just as good as the first.

  29. 4 out of 5

    stormin

    So, I had to take a break during Death's End and read something a little lighter. The Utterly Uninteresting and Unadventurous Tales of Fred, the Vampire Accountant was a shockingly funny book when I read it a year or two back and--despite never seeing it advertised, or reviewed, or talked about anywhere since then--I checked to see if there was another one in the series. And there is! (Three so far, in fact: I'm going to read Bloody Acquisitions next!) The premise of these books is very simple: So, I had to take a break during Death's End and read something a little lighter. The Utterly Uninteresting and Unadventurous Tales of Fred, the Vampire Accountant was a shockingly funny book when I read it a year or two back and--despite never seeing it advertised, or reviewed, or talked about anywhere since then--I checked to see if there was another one in the series. And there is! (Three so far, in fact: I'm going to read Bloody Acquisitions next!) The premise of these books is very simple: what if a nerdy, introverted accountant got (semi-accidentally) turned into a vampire? The good ole revenge-of-the-nerds style plot is tried but--in this case, at least--also true. What sells the books are two things. First, Hayes's commitment to follow-through on the basic premise. We don't just get a vampire accountant, we get a vampire accountant who takes pains to get certified as a CPPA (certified paranormal public accountant) and plots that revolve around legal technicalities when it comes to disposition of sentient real-estate. Now that's follow-through, and it takes the premise from being kind of a cheesy joke to an actually interesting, fleshed-out urban fantasy landscape. Second, the solid characterization and relationships. One of my favorite things, for example, is that the villain from the first book (a precocious necromancer who brought back his dead best friend as an unusually articulate zombie) is one of the inner circle of protagonists in the second book. Turning enemies into friends (after you defeat them) is both funny and warm. The books are written in an extremely episodic style, as a series of interlocking stories that basically have self-contained plots but also advance larger plot arcs. The larger plots stories don't always work continuously, however. For example, in one of the stories in this book someone (I won't say who) is chosen by the Sword of the Unlikely Champion and we got a whole plotline about testing that individual out to see if they can wield the sort without massive collateral damage. Turns out, they can! So there's definitely going to be some kind of major plot point where they wield that sword against bad guys, right? Well, probably, but the story after that made no mention of it whatosever, and in fact at the end of the book we still have no idea where that particular plotline is going to go. I suppose that might bug some people. It definitely doesn't read as a single, cohesive novel, but for me it works just fine. It's a lot like binge-watching your favorite show on Netflix. Each episode has to stand alone, but you still get the payoff from multi-episode and even multi-season story lines. There were several hints about those in this book (not just the sword, other stuff too) and it's easily enough to keep me interested and reading. As a final note, I checked out Drew Hayes' site and there's almost no reference whatsoever to this series. You can find the first two of the books for sale, but the third isn't even listed there. (It's on Amazon and Goodreads, however.) Instead, everything is geared towards what I guess is his main series (Super Powereds) and then random other stuff (like "Authors and Dragons" which is a "A Podcast Where A Party Of Fantasy Authors Try To Make It Through A Game Of Pathfinder Without Dying"). It just reminds me again of how sometimes the things that an author likes / wants to write / believes are going to be great and the things that an audience actually wants to read are totally different. Reminds me of Jim Butcher and his Codex Alera books (like Furies of Calderon.) I have basically zero interest in typical high fantasy (knights, horses, elves, and basically everything else you'd expect from D&D and every other wannabe since Tolkien) so for years and years I ignored the little author's notes he placed in the Dresden File books until--finally--I hopped over and read the entire Codex Alera series. And... didn't really like it at all. There were massive editing problems (e.g. repeated paragraphs and obvious typos you wouldn't expect from a traditionally published book) and--while the spark of Butcher genius was there--I just couldn't get into them. Contrast that with how Butcher talks about the Dresden Files. Storm Front, the way he tells the story, was basically written to try and prove to a writing teacher that following all the formulas was dumb. Instead, Butcher ended up with a beloved fantasy series on his hands that--as the gaps between installments gets larger and larger--his audience can't help but suspect he wishes he had never started. Or, if that's overstating it, at least secretly resents for being more successful than his actual first love. Who knows? But Butcher is basically stuck with Harry Dresden now, because millions of fans have embraced it in a way that they never did with the Codex Alera books. (His most recent escape attempt, The Aeronaut's Windlass, is much more promising for all concerned.) I wonder if something similar is going on with Drew Hayes. I have zero interest in super hero stories. I've tried Brandon Sanderson's Reckoners series (starting with Steelheart) and I read one or two of Peter Clines's Ex-Heroes (and one of the sequels, I think) and even a story or two from the George R. R. Martin-edited Wild Cards and the feeling I have with all of them is exactly the same: it's like eating off-brand versions of your favorite cereal. You can see what they're going for, but it's really just like a bad imitation of something good. I think the primary problem is that all the good abilities are taken by iconic characters. When Marvel or DC have to start going down-list to find superheroes, things go downhill really, really fast. When you're going even further off-brand than that, it's almost invariably kind of sad and pathetic. On top of that, all the really major superhero plotlines (e.g. "with great power comes great responsibility" or "weaknesses/imperfections are what make us human") have been done to death already. So, if the comparison isn't off-brand cereal, I guess it would instead have to be those direct-to-DVD movies that imitate the titles and cover art of real hits and do nothing at all except muck up your Netflix search results when you're trying to find a legitimate book. On the other hand: what do I know? Maybe Drew Hayes's "Super Powereds" series is selling like hotcakes. (I hope it is, because I wish success and fulfillment for all authors.) All I know is that it's odd, having so much interest in one thing an artist has done and so little interest in something else they've done, and yet feeling that their priorities are exactly the opposite of my tastes. Oh well. All I can do is try to get more people to read about Fred the Vampire Accountant and hope that the sales #s are good enough that Hayes decides to give us all a few more. You can do your bit to help! Buy one today and give it a read!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Birkette

    Five stars, even though... This series about Fred is really not the style of book that I usually read. I honestly don't know why I even bought the first one. But I'm really glad I did. (Actually, I think I bought the first one on a whim just because I really liked the title.) I usually read epic fantasies that delve deeply into characters and preferably contain some moral ambiguity and difficult decisions and deep morals and... that isn't this book. This isn't the sort of book that makes me Five stars, even though... This series about Fred is really not the style of book that I usually read. I honestly don't know why I even bought the first one. But I'm really glad I did. (Actually, I think I bought the first one on a whim just because I really liked the title.) I usually read epic fantasies that delve deeply into characters and preferably contain some moral ambiguity and difficult decisions and deep morals and... that isn't this book. This isn't the sort of book that makes me desperate to turn pages. I am capable of going to sleep at the end of a chapter and I don't go to work tired because I was up all night reading it. It hasn't changed my life. It hasn't made me a better person. I don't spend time between the release of each book desperate for the next one to come out. But I can pick up each new book and just start where I left off with the last one. The series is really enjoyable. It makes me smile. It makes me laugh. It makes me happy. I've read the first three and enjoyed them all equally, and I'll cheerfully recommend them to anyone. They're light reading, but that doesn't mean they aren't great books. And I just realised that, when I wasn't looking, book four AND FIVE were released! I'm glad to hear it, and I'll get onto those soon :)

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