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Moonkind: Survivors of Ebola

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In another Century and a half, the world, as we know it, will be greatly changed. This book foresees changes that most of us could scarcely dream of. It imagines a world where current international tensions have mostly dissolved, where continental solidarity has supplanted most national boundaries, and where global warming has actually abated. It is a time when space explo In another Century and a half, the world, as we know it, will be greatly changed. This book foresees changes that most of us could scarcely dream of. It imagines a world where current international tensions have mostly dissolved, where continental solidarity has supplanted most national boundaries, and where global warming has actually abated. It is a time when space exploration is of prime importance and when robotically operated stations exist on our own Moon and on Mars and Venus.. But several traditional earthly problems have not been resolved. One of these is the periodic emergence of infectious diseases that (by means of insidious mutations) have evaded all modern efforts to prevent or control them. Enter Q-strain, an astoundingly pernicious mutation of Ebola virus which, over the period of a few years, totally wipes out all humans on the Earth. There is time, however, in the interim, to transport the very earliest stage (blastocysts) of the clones from many very accomplished humans to the robotic station on the Moon. (These clones had been acquired years before the epidemic and stored in suspended animation in liquid hydrogen). Roughly a century later, when the “all clear” for absence of the Ebola Q-strain mutant on the Earth has been biologically verified, these “celebrity clones” are given birth on the Moon and raised to adulthood by robotic guides and caretakers. The story then centers on the development of fourteen spirited “celebrity clones” who must find ways to realistically coexist, and then to ultimately return a human presence to our now Ebola-free blue planet. This sounds like quite a challenge, and in fact, that’s just what it is.


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In another Century and a half, the world, as we know it, will be greatly changed. This book foresees changes that most of us could scarcely dream of. It imagines a world where current international tensions have mostly dissolved, where continental solidarity has supplanted most national boundaries, and where global warming has actually abated. It is a time when space explo In another Century and a half, the world, as we know it, will be greatly changed. This book foresees changes that most of us could scarcely dream of. It imagines a world where current international tensions have mostly dissolved, where continental solidarity has supplanted most national boundaries, and where global warming has actually abated. It is a time when space exploration is of prime importance and when robotically operated stations exist on our own Moon and on Mars and Venus.. But several traditional earthly problems have not been resolved. One of these is the periodic emergence of infectious diseases that (by means of insidious mutations) have evaded all modern efforts to prevent or control them. Enter Q-strain, an astoundingly pernicious mutation of Ebola virus which, over the period of a few years, totally wipes out all humans on the Earth. There is time, however, in the interim, to transport the very earliest stage (blastocysts) of the clones from many very accomplished humans to the robotic station on the Moon. (These clones had been acquired years before the epidemic and stored in suspended animation in liquid hydrogen). Roughly a century later, when the “all clear” for absence of the Ebola Q-strain mutant on the Earth has been biologically verified, these “celebrity clones” are given birth on the Moon and raised to adulthood by robotic guides and caretakers. The story then centers on the development of fourteen spirited “celebrity clones” who must find ways to realistically coexist, and then to ultimately return a human presence to our now Ebola-free blue planet. This sounds like quite a challenge, and in fact, that’s just what it is.

47 review for Moonkind: Survivors of Ebola

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dianne

    The salvation of humanity launches for the moon in 3…2…1…and Bruce Merchant takes us into a future where an unbeatable strain of the Ebola virus slowly chokes the life out of all mankind on Earth. The only hope to save humankind lay in a frozen suspension, clones of “great” humans whose DNA was taken long before the virus came. Known for their brilliance, scientific proclivity, whatever it takes to re-create superior humans, the moon will be the birthing ground for their cloned selves. The last The salvation of humanity launches for the moon in 3…2…1…and Bruce Merchant takes us into a future where an unbeatable strain of the Ebola virus slowly chokes the life out of all mankind on Earth. The only hope to save humankind lay in a frozen suspension, clones of “great” humans whose DNA was taken long before the virus came. Known for their brilliance, scientific proclivity, whatever it takes to re-create superior humans, the moon will be the birthing ground for their cloned selves. The last of the humans alive died long before robots would start the sequence that births, raises and educates these clones. Now teens, with only robots for parents, this first “batch” has been taught about everything imaginable- except how to deal with teenage hormones, the concept of “love” and the meaning of “free will,” and compassionate justice. The time is gowing near when they must take over running the moon colony and sending two brave souls back to Earth to learn how to cope and re-build on the ghost planet that was their true home. The catch? It is a one way ticket into uncharted territory, unknown danger and complete isolation from all they have ever known. Will these young adults be ready for the challenges ahead? Can they cope with the current challenges they face? Moonkind: Survivors of Ebola by Bruce Merchant is far from the typical science fiction tale. Moonkind takes us on a sobering journey that amplifies the fact that no matter how well we try to cover all bases, there is still an unknown quantity in the equation, humans, themselves. Did Bruce merchant look into a crystal ball for his tale or is he sharing knowledge from his own scientific background? While creating likable and believable characters and a scenario for Earth’s demise that is not farfetched, there is a depth to this tale that far surpasses simple entertainment. In the end, only one man remained alive long enough to “teach” these kids how to become a community while encouraging them to excel in what interests them. His name is Thompson, and it is his voice that truly becomes a beacon for these fourteen clones. Well written, definitely thought-provoking, I was trapped within this tale, trying to imagine the enormity of the challenge set before this group. There is no fluff, but there are moments of youthful exuberance, puppy love, hormonal defiance and a testing of the waters of sensuality. A fascinating take on life in the future and survival of a species. I received this copy of Moonkind from Smith Publicity And lulu in exchange for my honest review. Publication Date: May 11, 2015 Publisher: Lulu.com ISBN-13: 9781312873988 Genre: Adult Science Fiction Pages: 454 Available from: Amazon | Barnes& Noble For Reviews and More Check out: http://tometender.blogspot.com

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    A bizarre mix of Madmen and Lord of the Flies…on the moon. But where the heck is the plot?! I am flummoxed. This story is set 1,000 years in the future (mostly) dealing with the aftermath of a major epidemic. In order for humanity to survive, they arrange for clones to be raised on the moon by robots (I’m simplifying). However, and this is where it’s always problematic for subject specialists to write fiction, there is zero plot. There is, however, highly technical medical jargon, which is complet A bizarre mix of Madmen and Lord of the Flies…on the moon. But where the heck is the plot?! I am flummoxed. This story is set 1,000 years in the future (mostly) dealing with the aftermath of a major epidemic. In order for humanity to survive, they arrange for clones to be raised on the moon by robots (I’m simplifying). However, and this is where it’s always problematic for subject specialists to write fiction, there is zero plot. There is, however, highly technical medical jargon, which is completely unnecessary. At least, unnecessary to this degree. Please, please, more story, less jargon. The first quarter of the book jumps back and forth in time giving character descriptions and reads more like character sheets for a rousing game of sci-fi D&D. Except we never get the rousing game! Sure, there’s some intrigue in the last quarter of the book, which provides some suspense, but, I say again, no. plot. Now, I could maybe overlook that, except the dialogue is trite, and the characters are horribly old-fashioned tropes. It’s 21-whatever AD and you can create an entirely new society, yet you choose to have the developing clone children discover the opposite sex (problematic anyway for so many reasons) with horribly infantilized language like, oh my gosh she’s just so pretty, she’s a total babe, what are all these strange feelings in my tummy? Blech. And then, the games they play: cowboys & indians? The humans who designed the education system were born 1,000 years from now. Why on Earth (pardon the pun) would they teach children cowboys & indians? And they watch ancient (1940s-1950s era) Disney cartoons? Bizarre. Final complaint: while I personally dislike overly religious fiction, as long as the religious aspect serves a purpose in the novel, I ignore it. The problem, is when a religious outlook is presented as an inevitable fact. I find it even more problematic when the religious dogma is presented to clones, in 2173 AD, by a robotic teacher who was programmed by scientists. Yet, this is the sermon lesson presented to the children: “I should probably make another important distinction. Each of you is a clone, not a robot. Robots are inventions of man. Individual humans are creations of God, and you, as clones of humans, are simply extensions of what humanity has decided were some of the better examples of the Creator’s handiwork.” Seriously? That’s how you choose to describe human beings to clones? As “creations of God”? How about this definition from Merriam-Webster: “A bipedal primate belonging to the genus Homo, especially Homo sapiens. In taxonomy, humans belong to the family Hominidae, of the Primates, under class Mammalia of phylum Chordata. They are identified by the highly developed brain that confers advanced skills in abstract reasoning, articulate language, self-awareness, problem solving, and sapience. They are bipedal primates having an erect carriage. They are skillful in handling objects with their hands. Humans may also be described as social animals capable of showing sympathy with other beings, and living life with (inherent) values and ethics.” That seems much more informative and applicable in a science-fiction novel. Now, if Christian fiction is your bag, and you don’t mind 400 pages of character description, you might like this. I cannot recommend it though. I received a copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Reading Reindeer

    REVIEW: MOONKIND by Bruce Merchant In the Golden Age of Science Fiction, authors evinced a glorious commitment to future industry, technology, and advancement. As humanity would evolve, so would Earth [and space exploration]. The future was rosy and bright. Then, of course, came the Cuban Missile Crisis, the advent of the Cold War, Vietnam [and in some quarters, the terror of expected alien invasion and/or abduction]. No longer was the future the component of dreams: instead, considering the futur REVIEW: MOONKIND by Bruce Merchant In the Golden Age of Science Fiction, authors evinced a glorious commitment to future industry, technology, and advancement. As humanity would evolve, so would Earth [and space exploration]. The future was rosy and bright. Then, of course, came the Cuban Missile Crisis, the advent of the Cold War, Vietnam [and in some quarters, the terror of expected alien invasion and/or abduction]. No longer was the future the component of dreams: instead, considering the future brought only nightmares. Here, in Bruce Merchant's MOONKIND, US something evolved, a theme completely new. Firstly, a healed planet hosting healed humanity. Then, apocalyptic crisis: a planet-wide Ebola rampage. Next, hope again, and an eventual planetary cleansing, followed by a return to Earth with the view of replenishing the human population. The author states that MOONKIND "develops an alternative that bursts with optimism and enthusiasm." Witness the return of the glorious future which shone through science fiction' s Golden Age.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    Moonkind is a fascinating blend of science fiction and sociological fiction, and it's post apocalyptic fiction at its best (think happy future after the doom and gloom). It's a thought-provoking account of how the planet might be repopulated after the extinction of humankind, and how these pioneers of repopulation will be raised from embryos by androids. One of the things I liked most about the novel was knowing that the author is a recognized authority on ebola and epidemiology, so this is a to Moonkind is a fascinating blend of science fiction and sociological fiction, and it's post apocalyptic fiction at its best (think happy future after the doom and gloom). It's a thought-provoking account of how the planet might be repopulated after the extinction of humankind, and how these pioneers of repopulation will be raised from embryos by androids. One of the things I liked most about the novel was knowing that the author is a recognized authority on ebola and epidemiology, so this is a topic that he's an expert on. It made the imagined future seem all that more real. I highly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in science fiction, post apocalyptic fiction, and anyone who has ever wondered about the possibilities of humanity recovering from a major epidemic.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nick Rossi

    There's nothing like a really good, well-researched piece of fiction that has the possibility of actually happening. The author's ability to create a human being's reaction and behavioral changes to a cataclysmic event is key to the book being a success or a big ol' flop. While it doesn't necessarily have to be a discourse on the human condition, it's certainly a great opportunity to speculate. In Moonkind: Survivors of Ebola, author Bruce Merchant takes a speculative event and adds the depths o There's nothing like a really good, well-researched piece of fiction that has the possibility of actually happening. The author's ability to create a human being's reaction and behavioral changes to a cataclysmic event is key to the book being a success or a big ol' flop. While it doesn't necessarily have to be a discourse on the human condition, it's certainly a great opportunity to speculate. In Moonkind: Survivors of Ebola, author Bruce Merchant takes a speculative event and adds the depths of humanity to its portrayal. Set 150 years in the future, a mutation of the Ebola virus has all but wiped out our species as we know it. Before all life is extinguished, science steps in and sends a small group of hyper-intelligent clones to the moon whose primary objective is to colonize before being able to go back and knock up earth again, once it is deemed safe to do so. As is the conflict often depicted in the great works of Science Fiction (i.e. 2001: A Space Odyssey, and more recently, A.I), the robots lack human emotion, and as such, as the rearers essentially of the new humans being bred on the moon, it is that lack of pivotal psychology that the new humans lack, making their transition to adulthood on a new planet difficult and arduous. The author himself is a physical on epidemiology and Ebola itself allows the novel to have layers of depth that are quite evident to the reader. It's a timely, tightly plotted book that screams of the potential warnings of a future human epidemic that no one will be prepared for. Taut and suspenseful, Moonkind is a treatise on a 'what if' that is all but guaranteed to happen. Like this review? Read more like it at www.readingotherpeople.com

  6. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    Answers the question of what happens to our world and how do we save mankind. Definitely a possible scenario. The way the children develop and grow even under those circumstances seems reasonable. Even under such austere conditions, problems, human condition problems develop which have to be worked through and figured out. As always, humans are left with hope.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Received via NetGalley from Smith Publicity in exchange for an honest and completely unbiased review. Also posted on Silk & Serif Merchant weaves a world where in the face of dire circumstances a handful of humanity devises a plan to save us all. The creation of clones who can carry on humanity, a man made branch of human evolution. We learn about the world through Thompson, an astronaut who is ensnared on the Moon while Earth quietly passes on from the Ebola Q-Strain virus. Thompson tasked w Received via NetGalley from Smith Publicity in exchange for an honest and completely unbiased review. Also posted on Silk & Serif Merchant weaves a world where in the face of dire circumstances a handful of humanity devises a plan to save us all. The creation of clones who can carry on humanity, a man made branch of human evolution. We learn about the world through Thompson, an astronaut who is ensnared on the Moon while Earth quietly passes on from the Ebola Q-Strain virus. Thompson tasked with finishing up the educational program for the young clones and his voice is often heard as a final "human expert" throughout the book on various issues such as money, sexuality and religion. The coming of age of the clones reveals their final meaning for creation - to venture down to Earth and restart civilization. Moonkind could have been a portentous book on the final days of humanity, the struggles of those who could not be with those they loved and the emotional turmoil of a failing world - but it fell short. I'm not saying Moonkind isn't a fantastic read. In fact, the opposite is true. It has everything the perfect science fiction novel requires: outer space and future time frame, plausible technology we currently do not have, a change in political or social structures and androids. Moonkind's tone reads like Finches of Mars as an intellectual exercise, but definitely maintains coherence. It utilizes the classical writing structure based on events and facts rather than emotional turmoil. The science was correct and it was brilliantly written. The story was logical and articulate, but the emotional and "human empathy" quotient was missing. As a reader, I find a large part of my experience is through the emotional journeys of the characters and the empathy I feel for them. I didn't feel any of this. The only real response I had emotionally to this book was my hatred for Davontine and my dark delight when karma finally caught up with her. The author weaves a largely academic or conceptual narrative that will definitely appeal to readers who enjoy science fiction that harks the original atmosphere of literature, apocalyptic and post apocalyptic novels and books that make you think rather than feel. I will be reading more of Merchant in the future in hopes of seeing new ideas and tales told by what could be a new best selling science fiction author with some publicity.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    Thank you NetGalley for the free book in exchange for an honest review. I really enjoyed this book. It took me about a third of the book to really get into it and to start enjoying it. But once the book got to the actual clones I really got excited. I would have given this book 5 stars if not for the first third of the book. It was just so hard for me to keep muddling through it. I understand the need for all the medical and back story, it just was a little much for me. I have to admit that I do lo Thank you NetGalley for the free book in exchange for an honest review. I really enjoyed this book. It took me about a third of the book to really get into it and to start enjoying it. But once the book got to the actual clones I really got excited. I would have given this book 5 stars if not for the first third of the book. It was just so hard for me to keep muddling through it. I understand the need for all the medical and back story, it just was a little much for me. I have to admit that I do love a good apocalypse book though so I am a little biased. If you have read any of Nick Sagan’s books you will really enjoy this book. I love how the author didn’t just do some research and then write a book, he actually works in this field. It was great to see a crazy outbreak through his eyes with all his knowledge to back it up. This book was written alright, could have been better, but by no means bad. The biggest problem that I had with the novel was that there were places that could have been skimmed over and other I would have like to have a little more meat on it’s bones.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kasey Cocoa

    Overall this is an engaging and entertaining read. The scientific aspects feel very well researched and is presented in a believable and understandable manner. The first parts of the book deal with background and details that provide the setting and knowledge needed to understand and enjoy the rest of the book. It's a bit of a sluggish start but once you get past that it moves along at a very good pace with well fleshed out characters who develop along the way. No part is predictable or feels fa Overall this is an engaging and entertaining read. The scientific aspects feel very well researched and is presented in a believable and understandable manner. The first parts of the book deal with background and details that provide the setting and knowledge needed to understand and enjoy the rest of the book. It's a bit of a sluggish start but once you get past that it moves along at a very good pace with well fleshed out characters who develop along the way. No part is predictable or feels familiar. The plot is original and well thought out with good presentation and flow, once you get past the introductory parts. I enjoyed the read and can easily recommend this book for all readers who enjoy dystopian, post-apocalyptic, science fiction or just generally enjoy a good read. I received an ARC through Smith Publicity in exchange for and honest review. This in NO way influenced my opinion.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Olson

    This book was about the end of humanity, and how to save it. After every last human is gone, a group of clones are "birthed", with the hopes of one day repopulating earth, where there are no more humans due to a specific strain of Ebola. This book is a story of their journey. I really liked the thought into the details of the clones' learning process. You have to imagine what it would be like to have no living examples, from whom to learn key traits of life. The biggest idea in the book is the c This book was about the end of humanity, and how to save it. After every last human is gone, a group of clones are "birthed", with the hopes of one day repopulating earth, where there are no more humans due to a specific strain of Ebola. This book is a story of their journey. I really liked the thought into the details of the clones' learning process. You have to imagine what it would be like to have no living examples, from whom to learn key traits of life. The biggest idea in the book is the concept of free will. These clones had been specifically picked from amazing people, who had much to offer humanity, in hopes that these traits would be passed on. Although these clones may be destined for greatness in their genes, it is up to their environment and free will to determine what they will become.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Harold Walters

    Thematically this book is interesting...but for fun reading — No. There is far too much speculative explanation/exposition, especially the Thompson lectures. There is far too little storytelling. This novel needs lots more downright, fast-paced action.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jami

    Alot of details I didnt know about Ebola. Great read! Thanks Bruce Merchant really enjoyed this free book I won in a giveaway! :)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Interesting ideas, poor dialog. NetGalley ARC

  14. 5 out of 5

    The Scary Reviews

  15. 5 out of 5

    McPhaul M.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  19. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Kennedy

  20. 4 out of 5

    Betty

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nicola Fantom

  22. 4 out of 5

    Melitta Cross

  23. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Gunning

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Obrien

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nat

  26. 5 out of 5

    Micielle

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stella Clarkson

  28. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

  29. 5 out of 5

    SALLY WHITE

  30. 5 out of 5

    Skeetor

  31. 4 out of 5

    Kay Butz

  32. 5 out of 5

    CJ

  33. 5 out of 5

    Vykki

  34. 5 out of 5

    Pam

  35. 4 out of 5

    Nadine

  36. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  37. 4 out of 5

    Skhan

  38. 4 out of 5

    Ainy K

  39. 4 out of 5

    Callie

  40. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  41. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

  42. 5 out of 5

    R

  43. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  44. 4 out of 5

    Craig Dean

  45. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Cole Marie Mckinnon

  46. 4 out of 5

    Julia Conway

  47. 5 out of 5

    ESTELITA

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