counter create hit The Suffragette: The History of the Women's Militant Suffrage Movement - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Suffragette: The History of the Women's Militant Suffrage Movement

Availability: Ready to download

By 1903, more than fifty years of peaceful campaigning had brought British women no closer to attaining the right to vote. In that year activist Emmeline Pankhurst founded the Women's Social and Political Union, a militant organization dedicated to achieving women's suffrage. The union's motto, "Deeds not words," reflected its radical approach, consisting of stone-throwing By 1903, more than fifty years of peaceful campaigning had brought British women no closer to attaining the right to vote. In that year activist Emmeline Pankhurst founded the Women's Social and Political Union, a militant organization dedicated to achieving women's suffrage. The union's motto, "Deeds not words," reflected its radical approach, consisting of stone-throwing, window-breaking, arson, and physical confrontation with authorities. The Suffragette, written by Emmeline Pankhurst's daughter, Sylvia, offers an insider's perspective on the union's growth and development as well as the motives and ideals that inspired its leaders and followers. She chronicles the protesters' tactics as well as the consequences of their actions: arrests, imprisonment, hunger strikes, and the mental and physical ordeals of forced feeding. Vintage photographs illustrate the demonstrations, courtroom trials, and other dramatic incidents from the history of the women's militant suffrage movement.


Compare
Ads Banner

By 1903, more than fifty years of peaceful campaigning had brought British women no closer to attaining the right to vote. In that year activist Emmeline Pankhurst founded the Women's Social and Political Union, a militant organization dedicated to achieving women's suffrage. The union's motto, "Deeds not words," reflected its radical approach, consisting of stone-throwing By 1903, more than fifty years of peaceful campaigning had brought British women no closer to attaining the right to vote. In that year activist Emmeline Pankhurst founded the Women's Social and Political Union, a militant organization dedicated to achieving women's suffrage. The union's motto, "Deeds not words," reflected its radical approach, consisting of stone-throwing, window-breaking, arson, and physical confrontation with authorities. The Suffragette, written by Emmeline Pankhurst's daughter, Sylvia, offers an insider's perspective on the union's growth and development as well as the motives and ideals that inspired its leaders and followers. She chronicles the protesters' tactics as well as the consequences of their actions: arrests, imprisonment, hunger strikes, and the mental and physical ordeals of forced feeding. Vintage photographs illustrate the demonstrations, courtroom trials, and other dramatic incidents from the history of the women's militant suffrage movement.

30 review for The Suffragette: The History of the Women's Militant Suffrage Movement

  1. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    Sylvia Pankhurst is by far and away my favourite Pankhurst. She has all the fire and belief in her cause of her mother Emmeline Pankhurst and sister Cristobel, but is also so much more sensitive to issues of class and privilege, and much more self-aware along with it. The site dedicated to her at sylviapankhurst.com, shows that I am not alone in this... I've had this on my kindle for a long time when the new film coming out inspired me to read it. But sadly I hadn't realised that this particular v Sylvia Pankhurst is by far and away my favourite Pankhurst. She has all the fire and belief in her cause of her mother Emmeline Pankhurst and sister Cristobel, but is also so much more sensitive to issues of class and privilege, and much more self-aware along with it. The site dedicated to her at sylviapankhurst.com, shows that I am not alone in this... I've had this on my kindle for a long time when the new film coming out inspired me to read it. But sadly I hadn't realised that this particular version of The Suffragette was written in 1911...I had meant to read the one written later, but there is still lots of good stuff in here. It overlaps heavily, however, with her mother's account of the movement from 1914, and I hate to say it, but Emmeline Pankhurst's account is both more infuriating and more interesting as tactics had shifted dramatically in these three intervening years as the Liberals continued steadfast in refusing the vote (she dramatically supports violence against property for example, and there are some brilliant stories of stone throwing and banner dropping). I also wanted more about the founding of the East London Federation of Suffragettes, and the more community centred work Sylvia did in the East End. It's not here. Here is what is here. An overview of the purpose Sylvia had in writing the book, a piece of how-we-did-it and who-we-are campaign propaganda: In writing this history of the Militant Women's Suffrage Movement, I have endeavoured to give a just and accurate account of its progress and happenings, dealing fully with as many of its incidents as space will permit. I have tried to let my readers look behind the scenes in order that they may understand both the steps by which the movement has grown and the motives and ideas that have animated its promoters. To many of our contemporaries perhaps the most remarkable feature of the militant movement has been the flinging aside by thousand of women of the conventional standards that hedge us so closely round in these days for a right that large numbers of men who possess it scarcely value. A passionate love of freedom, a strong desire to do social service and an intense sympathy for the unfortunate, together made the movement possible in its present form. These are some of the opening words by E. Sylvia Pankhurst, dated May 1911 and written from London. It covers the early history, the formation of the Women's Social and Political Union in the Pankhurst's home at 62 Nelson Street Manchester on 10 October, 1903... she writes that almost all present were working women, 'but it was decided from the first that the Union should be entirely independent of Class and Party.' As I say, I found Emmeline Pankhurst quite infuriating around issues of class, but Sylvia was already much more thoughtful about the meaning of struggle and victory for women in different stations. Much of this must be due to the wonderful Annie Kenney, such a pivotal figure in the Pankhurst's lives. The relationship between Annie and both Christobel and Emmeline made me worry deeply for her after reading Emmeline's book on the movement, but she seems to have greatly inspired Sylvia with an honest respect for working women. She tells of how Annie went to work in the Oldham cotton factories at the age of ten, fitting bobbins into place full of cotton to be spun, and piecing the threads together when they broke. She lost a finger doing this work. She writes: The premature launching forth into the world of wage earners had left its mark upon Annie Kenney. Her features had been sharpened by it, and her eager face that flushed so easily was far more deeply lined than are the faces of girls whose childhood has been prolonged. Those wide, wide eyes of hers, so wonderfully blue, though at rare moments they could dance and sparkle like a fountain in the sunshine, were more often filled with pain, anxiety and foreboding, or with a longing restless, searching, unsatisfied and far away. And here, finally, Annie is also able to speak for herself (she wrote her own book, harder to find but it is now on its way to me). Sylvia quotes her speaking in 1908 to a conference of women in Germany: I noticed the great difference made in the treatment of men and women in the factory, differences in conditions, differences in wages and differences in status. I realised this difference not in the factory alone but in the home. I saw men, women, boys and girls, all working hard during the day in the same hot, stifling factories. Then when work was over I noticed that it was the mothers who hurried home, who fetched the children that had been put out to nurse, prepared the tea for the husband , did the cleaning, baking, washing, sewing and nursing. I noticed that when the husband came home, his day's work was over...Why was the mother the drudge of the family, and not the father's companion and equal? It is also clear from Sylvia's account (as it was clear that this was important to Sylvia) that many working women had been part of the driving force of the movement from the beginning. She talks about a protest for the opening of Parliament, February 19th, 1906. A crowd of 300 to 400 women marched, 'a large proportion of whom were poor workers from the East End.' They carried banners painted in Canning Town. It was only at the House of Commons that they were joined by women who were strangers to them, there to satisfy their curiosity -- 'amongst the rest were many ladies of wealth and position...' Later in the year of a similar march as Parliament reassembled, she wrote: the government had again given orders that only twenty women at a time were to be allowed in the Lobby. All women of the working class were rigorously excluded. My mother and Mrs. Pethick Lawrence were among those who succeeded in gaining an entrance. Class would continue to be a lever the government would use to drive women apart -- as would the lack of respect from the middle and upper classes towards the other. As the government increased its repression, handed out longer prison sentences and imposing larger fines, Sylvia is the one to recognise the way that such a tactics actually made it much harder for working women to play the same roles as middle class women who did not have anyone depending on their labour for survival. She doesn't quite connect all the dots, about who then gets named, who then gets credit, but the insight is there to grow: Had the movement for Women's Enfranchisement been a movement solely of poor women with others dependent upon them, as might have been the case, the new Bill might have proved a serious menace to the movement, but, as it happened, there was fortunately no lack of women who were able and willing to risk imprisonment, therefore this Bill could make no difference to us. The words and stories of these other women, both working class women and women of colour, are being brought to light but still more work needs to happen here -- a good source of other places to begin to look is Sarah Jackson's Guardian article 'The suffragettes weren’t just white, middle-class women throwing stones'. That's what Sylvia's book is mostly about, of course. There are, however plenty of interesting things to be drawn from it. First, perhaps, is how this highlighted for me (as did her mother's book) just how good our cultural and political system is at forgetting the levels of protest and violence that once attended relatively unimportant by elections, much less the whirlwinds of destruction that came before we ever won any serious and lasting political change. So the contest went on -- Liberals and Conservatives smashing up each other's meetings, howling each other down, pelting each other with vegetables from the market and snowballing each other on Dartmoor. At the most privileged level, there is this story from Lady Mary Montague's "Memoirs": of the way in which the Peeresses of the eighteenth century had frequently disturbed the serenity of the House of Lords debates, and how they had triumphed over the Lord Chancellor Phillip Yorke, First Earl of Hardwicke, who had attempted to exclude them from the House of Lords. Lady Mary describes the "thumping," "rapping" and "running kicks" at the door of the House of Lords, indulged in by the Duchess of Queensbury and her friends, the strategy by which they finally obtained an entry... This fairly brilliant and sarcastic letter of support from Mr T.D. Benson, Treasurer of the independent Labour Party: Of course, when men wanted the franchise, they did not behave in the unruly manner of our feminine friends. They were perfectly constitutional in their agitation. In Bristol I find they only burnt the Mansion House, the Custom House, the Bishop's Palace, the Excise office, three prisons, four toll houses, and forty-two private dwellings and warehouses, and all in a perfectly constitutional and respectable manner. Numerous constitutional fires took place in the neighbourhood of Bedford, Cambridge, Canterbury, and Devizes. Four men were respectably hanged at Bristol, and three at Nottingham. The Bishop of Lichfield was nearly killed, and the Archbishop of Canterbury was insulted, spat upon, and with great difficulty rescued from amidst the yells and execrations of a violent and angry mob. In this and other ways the males set a splendid example of constitutional methods in agitating for the franchise. I think we are all well qualified to advise the suffragettes to follow our example, to be respectable and peaceful in their methods like we were, and then they will have our sympathy and support. There's much more, you can read it here...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Debby Phielix

    A wonderful read about how it all began. Sometimes it's a bit difficult to read because of the long sentences.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Salisbury

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amy Elliott-smith

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ma

  6. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Gwin

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Beth

  8. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Woolway

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Zielinski

  10. 5 out of 5

    Aida Eltanin

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lauri

  12. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Lancaster

  13. 4 out of 5

    Angela

  14. 4 out of 5

    Spending Life

  15. 5 out of 5

    Diane

  16. 4 out of 5

    Paulina Sopala

  17. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    * Understanding Oppression: Women's Rights (Then and Now) The Suffragette: The History of the Women's Militant Suffrage Movement by Sylvia Pankhurst | #history #feminism #military #suffragette

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

  19. 4 out of 5

    Monique

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sherlyn

  21. 5 out of 5

    K.W. Taylor

  22. 5 out of 5

    Clare

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Tackabery

  24. 5 out of 5

    J Cook

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Vinh

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lyndsay

  27. 4 out of 5

    Catelijne

  28. 5 out of 5

    Brettefied

  29. 5 out of 5

    Moryma

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ramona

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.