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Murder in Stained Glass (Lost Crime Classics Book 1)

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Meet Miss Trumbull, a stout talkative New Yorker with perfect manners and a passion for sleuthing. When the remains of temperamental artist, Frederick Ullathorne, are found in his own fiery kiln it looks like a ghastly murder has been committed. But with only a few bones as evidence the local police are getting nowhere fast. Can Miss Trumbull pick up the clues that the Meet Miss Trumbull, a stout talkative New Yorker with perfect manners and a passion for sleuthing. When the remains of temperamental artist, Frederick Ullathorne, are found in his own fiery kiln it looks like a ghastly murder has been committed. But with only a few bones as evidence the local police are getting nowhere fast. Can Miss Trumbull pick up the clues that the police are missing? Or will her interfering get her into trouble in more ways that one? "Fast paced and a lot of fun" If you like Agatha Christie then you'll love Miss Trumbull." This delightful whodunnit by Margaret Armstrong was first published in 1939. It is the first in the American Queens of Crime series from Lost Crime Classics


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Meet Miss Trumbull, a stout talkative New Yorker with perfect manners and a passion for sleuthing. When the remains of temperamental artist, Frederick Ullathorne, are found in his own fiery kiln it looks like a ghastly murder has been committed. But with only a few bones as evidence the local police are getting nowhere fast. Can Miss Trumbull pick up the clues that the Meet Miss Trumbull, a stout talkative New Yorker with perfect manners and a passion for sleuthing. When the remains of temperamental artist, Frederick Ullathorne, are found in his own fiery kiln it looks like a ghastly murder has been committed. But with only a few bones as evidence the local police are getting nowhere fast. Can Miss Trumbull pick up the clues that the police are missing? Or will her interfering get her into trouble in more ways that one? "Fast paced and a lot of fun" If you like Agatha Christie then you'll love Miss Trumbull." This delightful whodunnit by Margaret Armstrong was first published in 1939. It is the first in the American Queens of Crime series from Lost Crime Classics

30 review for Murder in Stained Glass (Lost Crime Classics Book 1)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    I enjoyed reading this classic murder mystery, which is currently free on Kindle and is a quick, fun read. Set in 1930s New England, it has an appealing heroine, middle-aged amateur detective Miss Harriet Trumbull. Sadly, this is the only book to star this detective, though Armstrong did write two other murder mysteries. The author's family were stained glass artists (Armstrong herself was a book designer who started writing fiction in later life), so she clearly knows her stuff and the portrayal I enjoyed reading this classic murder mystery, which is currently free on Kindle and is a quick, fun read. Set in 1930s New England, it has an appealing heroine, middle-aged amateur detective Miss Harriet Trumbull. Sadly, this is the only book to star this detective, though Armstrong did write two other murder mysteries. The author's family were stained glass artists (Armstrong herself was a book designer who started writing fiction in later life), so she clearly knows her stuff and the portrayal of this world feels very authentic. Despite enjoying the book, I found the plot aspect slightly disappointing, as I was able to guess the killer fairly early on (something I don't usually manage!) and also to accurately predict some plot twists - then again, maybe this is just that I've been reading too many detective stories close together lately! So overall I'd probably give this 3 1/2 stars. For anyone who wants to know more about this author, The Passing Tramp blog had an interesting article about her life and her family's art: http://thepassingtramp.blogspot.co.uk... and also a detailed, spoiler-free, review of the book: http://thepassingtramp.blogspot.co.uk...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Oakes

    3.7 or thereabouts; goodreads people, you need to get your act together re book editions. Mine is NOT the kindle version, but the ISBN says it is. Arrgh. original publication date: 1939 more about plot, etc., here . Murder in Stained Glass is the opener of a new series of old titles all falling under the heading of "American Queens of Crime", issued by Pepik Books. Claire Theyers, the owner and director of this small press, has stated that "only quality fiction" that she's read and "truly enjoyed 3.7 or thereabouts; goodreads people, you need to get your act together re book editions. Mine is NOT the kindle version, but the ISBN says it is. Arrgh. original publication date: 1939 more about plot, etc., here . Murder in Stained Glass is the opener of a new series of old titles all falling under the heading of "American Queens of Crime", issued by Pepik Books. Claire Theyers, the owner and director of this small press, has stated that "only quality fiction" that she's read and "truly enjoyed makes it into the series." Bravo for her -- and good for me, since like Ms. Theyers, I am constantly on the lookout for books from authors whom, as she notes, are "long forgotten about and their stories gathering dust in bookshops and charity stores." The blurb on the back cover of this book notes that "If you like Agatha Christie then you'll love Miss Trumbull," and while this book may definitely appeal to Miss Marple fans, Miss Trumbull is a delight on her own, and certainly no elderly sleuth with a knitting bag. She is quite independent, both in terms of money and personality, and doesn't let little things like an attempt on her life or potentially dangerous situations get in her way. The novel also has one of the best twists that I must say I never saw coming -- and in this book, there are a number of potential suspects as well as a few well-placed red herrings that will keep any reader guessing. Yes, it's a bit dated but once in the mindset of the period, it became a fun, interesting and delightful read. Recommended for vintage crime readers.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    Miss Trumbull, a well off spinster, goes to visit Charlotte, an old schoolfriend, and gets caught up in a lot more than she expected. There's a quote at the beginning of the book that reminds me of the premise in Towards Zero by Agatha Christie: "It’s like the nursery rhyme about the old woman who milked the cow with the crumpled horn. If the weather hadn’t cleared I wouldn’t have gone to stay with Charlotte Blair; I shouldn’t have been on hand with my eyes wide open when things began to happen; Miss Trumbull, a well off spinster, goes to visit Charlotte, an old schoolfriend, and gets caught up in a lot more than she expected. There's a quote at the beginning of the book that reminds me of the premise in Towards Zero by Agatha Christie: "It’s like the nursery rhyme about the old woman who milked the cow with the crumpled horn. If the weather hadn’t cleared I wouldn’t have gone to stay with Charlotte Blair; I shouldn’t have been on hand with my eyes wide open when things began to happen; I shouldn’t have been forced to play the part of innocent bystander – a dangerous part when bullets are flying about; and as I should have known nothing about the case, except what I read in the newspapers, I couldn’t have been of the smallest use to anybody concerned. But I did go. I saw what no one else saw. Or, rather, I saw it sooner." Near Charlotte's home is the Ullathorne glass shop, which is where the legendary glass artist Frederick Ullathorne crafts his glass masterpieces. Passionate and temperamental, Ullathorne is a difficult man to get along with and has earned his share of enemies. One day he vanishes - and bones are found in the kiln. At first, one of Ullathorne's dissatisfied employees is implicated, but then suspicion falls on Ullathorne's son Leo. Miss Trumbull is determined to find who is really responsible and launches his own investigation. Margaret Armstrong is one of those writers who really should be better known. She is good at crafting an interesting, amusing, and rather humorous mystery with enough red herrings to keep me at least from figuring out who did it. I was very surprised by who the murderer was. I really wasn't expecting that.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Coplin

    Quick, easy read. Many characters are underdeveloped. Key relationships are underdeveloped. Plot is simple. Lots of red herrings. Denouncement fails to satisfactorily answer the question of why. But, all in all, an enjoyable read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    A frothy, silly mystery wherein the wealthy New York socialite amateur detective goes to extreme measures to solve a murder but comes very close to becoming one of the victims. The story revolves around a famous artist who has just finished his greatest work of stained glass. He then stages his own death to get out from under a blackmailer. It is mildly amusing, but not enough to look for others just now. This book came to my attention as part of the Lost Crime Classics Collection available from A frothy, silly mystery wherein the wealthy New York socialite amateur detective goes to extreme measures to solve a murder but comes very close to becoming one of the victims. The story revolves around a famous artist who has just finished his greatest work of stained glass. He then stages his own death to get out from under a blackmailer. It is mildly amusing, but not enough to look for others just now. This book came to my attention as part of the Lost Crime Classics Collection available from Amazon.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Hastings75

    Got onto this book through the Queens of Crime list as I was looking for something like Agatha Christie - and I wasn't disappointed. Good simple narrative with all the elements of a good whodunnit - dead bodies, suspects, red herrings, elusive detectives, interfering but knowledgable "Miss Marple" type and, of course, the murderer who is not revealed until the final chapter! The only thing that was slightly lost on me was to why the murderer did what they did. I may have missed something - might Got onto this book through the Queens of Crime list as I was looking for something like Agatha Christie - and I wasn't disappointed. Good simple narrative with all the elements of a good whodunnit - dead bodies, suspects, red herrings, elusive detectives, interfering but knowledgable "Miss Marple" type and, of course, the murderer who is not revealed until the final chapter! The only thing that was slightly lost on me was to why the murderer did what they did. I may have missed something - might have to peruse the pages again. Otherwise a very satisfying read. Will be looking for other books in the series.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    This was free on Amazon and is worthwhile for fans of classic amateur detection. Fairly straightforward murder mystery which is easy to read. Interesting background of stained glass making. Not top notch but quirkily amusing in places. The names are fun, vaguely Dickensian!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Orinoco Womble (tidy bag and all)

    I wonder if the originators of Murder, She Wrote read this book back in the day. Written in 1939, it has a definite odour of Jessica Fletcher about it--the well to do spinster who shoves her way into a case no one wants her to investigate. I kept wondering just why she was allowed to push into the seats of honour at the inquest and funeral, when it was so obvious seating was short, particularly since she is an outsider. I pegged the killer about halfway through, and there was the obligatory "oh I wonder if the originators of Murder, She Wrote read this book back in the day. Written in 1939, it has a definite odour of Jessica Fletcher about it--the well to do spinster who shoves her way into a case no one wants her to investigate. I kept wondering just why she was allowed to push into the seats of honour at the inquest and funeral, when it was so obvious seating was short, particularly since she is an outsider. I pegged the killer about halfway through, and there was the obligatory "oh this is so amusing, you really should write a book" reveal scene. One thread is left hanging, as we never find out (view spoiler)[who tried to shove her off the balcony (hide spoiler)] . I got the feeling that the style was meant to be a great deal wittier than I found it, but perhaps that's just me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    What a great nor type book! I was not familiar with this author, however, I certainly will be very soon. Her writing is so interesting and creative. Not sure how old she is but she sure picked up on Victorian speak, actions and mannerisms! I love books and movies from that Era and a he takes you back there from the first page to the last. All the quirky characters and twists are so very fun. But the ending...WOW!!!I won't give it away but I promise it WILL blow you away! Even if you are not What a great nor type book! I was not familiar with this author, however, I certainly will be very soon. Her writing is so interesting and creative. Not sure how old she is but she sure picked up on Victorian speak, actions and mannerisms! I love books and movies from that Era and a he takes you back there from the first page to the last. All the quirky characters and twists are so very fun. But the ending...WOW!!!I won't give it away but I promise it WILL blow you away! Even if you are not especially into this Era or this type of mystery, try it, I think this talented author may make a convert out of you.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn Grabas

    Excellent read. There were so many avenues to take in coming up with the solution, but, I have to say, that from the first, Farraday rubbed me wrong. At times, I strayed from him as other evidence was gleaned, but, I kept coming back to him. At what appeared to be the end, I couldn't believe that I was so wrong, until almost the very end and I was exonerated. It was him! My little grey cells hadn't deserted me. A delightful read and I heartily recommend it to any and all who like a good mystery.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Italo Italophiles

    This is a silly story. But then all the TV episodes of Murder She Wrote were silly stories, however they went by quickly, and the acting and filming was of good quality. This book is silly in the same way as the episodes, with the busybody mature woman investigating a crime, the multitude of suspects, the endearing young couple, the bizarre twists, the odd resolution with some threat to the protagonist. Reading a novel takes more time and effort than watching a TV episode, so I tired of the This is a silly story. But then all the TV episodes of Murder She Wrote were silly stories, however they went by quickly, and the acting and filming was of good quality. This book is silly in the same way as the episodes, with the busybody mature woman investigating a crime, the multitude of suspects, the endearing young couple, the bizarre twists, the odd resolution with some threat to the protagonist. Reading a novel takes more time and effort than watching a TV episode, so I tired of the silliness long before I got to the end.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cat Tobin

    I was looking for something in a Christie-ish vein that was nicely murdery, without all of the accompanying racism and awfulness. This...didn't scratch that itch entirely, but it's only racist against the Irish, so IDK better? If you like the Christieish "normal (incredibly privileged) person Solves Murders" kind of thing, you'll probably like this.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    I like to read mysteries and Murder in Stained Glass is a mystery. This book is also one of the most boring I have tried to read. And I did try! I just can't keep on reading when I have no interest in the story or the characters. This is the second time I have tried to read Margaret Armstrong's book....it will be the last time.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    The body of a local glass artist is discovered while Miss Harriet Trumbull is staying with her friend Charlotte Blair at Bassett's Bridge. Her interest is piqued and she starts to investigate. An enjoyable mystery, original written in 1939.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alice Vaughn

    Great book! I really enjoyed reading this book. It was well written, staged back before my time, but interesting non the less. I have to say that period books are a nice change of pace for me.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lynda

    Very exciting mystery When a renowned, and bad-tempered, glass-window artist disappears and bits of human bones are found in the kiln everyone knows the worst. But who-done-it is still in question.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Brown

    An enjoyable read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Risener

    Who done what to whom? Delightful mystery of characters we'd like to meet and some we wouldn't. Keeps you guessing even when you have it all figured out, but maybe not!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Who murdered the stain glass artist. The list is long!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ciara

    Free on kindle and had a fairly interesting twist

  21. 5 out of 5

    NuNu

    Lost crime novel Early crime series featuring a woman sleuths. A little repetitive at times.. Will try to find the next book in the series.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tim Gray

    A fun enough read most of the way through, but I personally didn't like the ending!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

    Good This book is one that takes you back in history to a time before the many different ways that we have to all e crimes now.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Robin Resch

    I didn't make it past page 5 found it boring.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Peggy

    A decent mystery and enjoyable read. Silly names for characters... Mrs. Podsnap, Mr. Drinkwater, Mrs. Winklebrook and Mrs. Pullover for a few! Bones were found in a kiln. Burned so hot that the bones were almost dust and very fragile. So the clue that told them who the body was is a little far fetched. "Your Honor, I have just received a report on th shred of cloth and the two trouser buttons found in the kiln. The New York police inform me that L P Fortune, the tailor, made a suit of this sort of A decent mystery and enjoyable read. Silly names for characters... Mrs. Podsnap, Mr. Drinkwater, Mrs. Winklebrook and Mrs. Pullover for a few! Bones were found in a kiln. Burned so hot that the bones were almost dust and very fragile. So the clue that told them who the body was is a little far fetched. "Your Honor, I have just received a report on th shred of cloth and the two trouser buttons found in the kiln. The New York police inform me that L P Fortune, the tailor, made a suit of this sort of cloth, a Canadian homespun, for ******** about two years ago. It is of a peculiar weave and color, imported especially for ********." How could a piece of fabric survive the fire? Aside from that Miss Trumbull grew on me and if I came across another in the series I would pick it up.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    2.5 stars. Just okay...the mystery plot itself was fairly interesting, but the writing rather perfunctory and the characters never became three-dimensional. I suspected the culprit all along, but not because of any clue; just the way they acted! Also, it does seem a decided cheat that (view spoiler)[we're told blackmail was the motive but never learn what the person was being blackmailed for—or even how they were acquainted with the blackmailer! (hide spoiler)] . (Minor point, but the ebook cover 2.5 stars. Just okay...the mystery plot itself was fairly interesting, but the writing rather perfunctory and the characters never became three-dimensional. I suspected the culprit all along, but not because of any clue; just the way they acted! Also, it does seem a decided cheat that (view spoiler)[we're told blackmail was the motive but never learn what the person was being blackmailed for—or even how they were acquainted with the blackmailer! (hide spoiler)] . (Minor point, but the ebook cover led me to believe this was a glamorous NYC-set mystery when in fact most of it takes place in a country village.)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    As a fan of Agatha Christie books I decided to try this, and I am so pleased I did. It is very much in the vein of AC, a gentle whodunnit with a few twists and surprises, very much of its time (written in 1939) but set in the USA rather than in England, and that made it sufficiently different from AC's books. If you enjoy the Miss Marple stories you will surely enjoy Miss Trimbull too! An added bonus for me is that the story is features a stained glass maker, and glass is one of my passions, so As a fan of Agatha Christie books I decided to try this, and I am so pleased I did. It is very much in the vein of AC, a gentle whodunnit with a few twists and surprises, very much of its time (written in 1939) but set in the USA rather than in England, and that made it sufficiently different from AC's books. If you enjoy the Miss Marple stories you will surely enjoy Miss Trimbull too! An added bonus for me is that the story is features a stained glass maker, and glass is one of my passions, so it is always a joy to find books set in the glass world.

  28. 4 out of 5

    P.

    A good enough vintage read with its ups and downs. Miss Trimble is OK, even if what interested me most about her was her apparent affluence. The murder plot is far more convoluted than seems reasonable and while Trimble does solve the crime, critical details are left out making it unlikely the reader will.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    For a free read from Amazon, I would say , if you like a classic murder mystery this is one of the best. Written in the Agatha Christie style it has all the twists and surprises and sometimes the humor you would expect. Read and enjoy.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jan Vicker

    Easy read This was a perfect little storyline to keep you interested and written to keep you guessing. If you are looking for a book to read on a journey to work this is great.

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