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Forgiven: The Amish School Shooting, a Mother’s Love, and a Story of Remarkable Grace

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After a son does the unthinkable, how can a mother go on? On October 2, 2006, a gunman entered an Amish one-room schoolhouse, shooting ten girls, killing five, then finally taking his own life. This is his mother's story. Not only did she lose her precious son through suicide, but she also lost her understanding of him as an honorable man. It was a trauma that none should e After a son does the unthinkable, how can a mother go on? On October 2, 2006, a gunman entered an Amish one-room schoolhouse, shooting ten girls, killing five, then finally taking his own life. This is his mother's story. Not only did she lose her precious son through suicide, but she also lost her understanding of him as an honorable man. It was a trauma that none should ever have to face. But the biggest headlines came when her Amish neighbors did the unimaginable, reaching out to the family of the shooter with comfort and forgiveness. Today Terri lives in harmony with the Amish and has built lasting relationships beyond what anyone could have thought possible. From the grace that the Amish showed Terri's family from day one, to the visits and ongoing care Terri has given to the victims and their families, no one could have foreseen the love and friendship that have been forged from the fires of tragedy.


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After a son does the unthinkable, how can a mother go on? On October 2, 2006, a gunman entered an Amish one-room schoolhouse, shooting ten girls, killing five, then finally taking his own life. This is his mother's story. Not only did she lose her precious son through suicide, but she also lost her understanding of him as an honorable man. It was a trauma that none should e After a son does the unthinkable, how can a mother go on? On October 2, 2006, a gunman entered an Amish one-room schoolhouse, shooting ten girls, killing five, then finally taking his own life. This is his mother's story. Not only did she lose her precious son through suicide, but she also lost her understanding of him as an honorable man. It was a trauma that none should ever have to face. But the biggest headlines came when her Amish neighbors did the unimaginable, reaching out to the family of the shooter with comfort and forgiveness. Today Terri lives in harmony with the Amish and has built lasting relationships beyond what anyone could have thought possible. From the grace that the Amish showed Terri's family from day one, to the visits and ongoing care Terri has given to the victims and their families, no one could have foreseen the love and friendship that have been forged from the fires of tragedy.

30 review for Forgiven: The Amish School Shooting, a Mother’s Love, and a Story of Remarkable Grace

  1. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I happened upon this book at the library and snatched it up with hopes of learning a little more about the Amish school shooting that took place in 2006 and the Amish culture. When I sat down to read it, only then did I realize that the author was Terri Roberts, the mother of the man who committed these horrendous acts. On October 2, 2006 Charlie Roberts walked into an Amish schoolhouse in Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania and killed five girls, injured five other girls, and then killed himself. The act I happened upon this book at the library and snatched it up with hopes of learning a little more about the Amish school shooting that took place in 2006 and the Amish culture. When I sat down to read it, only then did I realize that the author was Terri Roberts, the mother of the man who committed these horrendous acts. On October 2, 2006 Charlie Roberts walked into an Amish schoolhouse in Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania and killed five girls, injured five other girls, and then killed himself. The act was planned, and the perpetrator even left a letter behind for his family. In Forgiven, Terri Roberts recounts her childhood and her life as a mother and wife. She tells of raising her children in the Church with close extended family in the idyllic setting of the Pennsylvania countryside. Terri struggles to understand why her son chose such a dark path. She is conflicted by her feelings of love for her son and the anger she harbors over the pain he caused so many innocent people including his own family. She struggles to reconcile the image of the loving son she raised and that of a man capable of such a heinous crime. One thing that never waivers is Mrs. Roberts' faith. I read read with the hope of finding out WHY Charlie Roberts chose to do what he did, but there really wasn't any concrete answer to why this husband and father himself did this. I ultimately came to the conclusion that a seemingly normal Charlie was dealing with some darkness and mental instability not apparent to the people who thought they knew him best. The insight into the Amish culture was such a redeeming part of this story. Not only were the parents and relatives of the victims able to forgive the man who committed these atrocities, they showed genuine sympathy for his family. The Roberts and their Amish neighbors were able to form a true and lasting friendship. This truly left me in awe. Memorable quote: "Forgiveness is a choice not a feeling."

  2. 5 out of 5

    —ReadAlongWithSue—

    When I saw this book I just had to read it. I love Amish stories, but I have never ever read one like this. This is a true story. In the event that has shocked the world this week with what has happened in Paris, I couldn't help think. The people who do these deliberate acts, killing people. We all feel for the relatives of the loved ones that have killed, children, women and men. But behind the "killer" is someone's Mom. A mom that cared, nurtured and brought their child up, not to kill, not t When I saw this book I just had to read it. I love Amish stories, but I have never ever read one like this. This is a true story. In the event that has shocked the world this week with what has happened in Paris, I couldn't help think. The people who do these deliberate acts, killing people. We all feel for the relatives of the loved ones that have killed, children, women and men. But behind the "killer" is someone's Mom. A mom that cared, nurtured and brought their child up, not to kill, not to maim, not to harm. Not to have a disrespect for another persons life. But it happens. And here is the account of a Mother who had to come to turns with the fact that her son had gone into an Amish school house [one room] and gunned down 10 girls, killing 5 then taking his own life. How would you feel as a Mom. All the emotions that go come with this. This is an Amish Mom who only knew her son as an honorable man. Not anymore. Shame has been brought upon her. We see her struggles, but we also see how the Amish religion and beliefs can come to the fore in this. Hard to understand, but true, and yes, believable and real. This was a heart wrenching, thought provoking read. Upsetting but also inspirational at times. I would like to give my thanks to Bethany House via Net Galley for my chance to read and review this truly evocative read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Karin

    October 2, 2006--the unthinkable happened. An armed man walked into an Amish school house, ordered the teacher and boys out, locked the door, asked the girls to pray for him, shot all but one gilr who managed to escape and then killed himself. Yet out of a crime that rocked the world came a most surprising thing; forgiveness. Not because there was a lack of pain, devastation or grief, but because of the firm conviction the Amish have about this, and this family was known to them. On that very da October 2, 2006--the unthinkable happened. An armed man walked into an Amish school house, ordered the teacher and boys out, locked the door, asked the girls to pray for him, shot all but one gilr who managed to escape and then killed himself. Yet out of a crime that rocked the world came a most surprising thing; forgiveness. Not because there was a lack of pain, devastation or grief, but because of the firm conviction the Amish have about this, and this family was known to them. On that very day, an Amish man went to the home of the parents of the shooter, told them it wasn't their fault, and that he forgave their son. This book, written by this mother along with a professional writer, might not read like breathtaking literature, but it is her story. It also has bits of writing from others. In the remarkable journey that followed all of the grieving families and community, both of the victims and the perpetrator, there grew a deep and abiding friendship There were grief counsellors brought in, of course, and they also formed long lasting friendships. The Amish don't appear on film or do public speaking, so they turn to Terri Roberts, the mother of the shooter, to speak for them, and usually some Amish go with her for support and to share testimonies. If you are not at all religious, perhaps you won't want to read such a Christian oriented book, but if not, then at least read about this from secular sources. Regardless of your personal beliefs, I think a close examination of how this was handled and helped with healing and moving forward with a new normal that includes a lifetime of hurt somewhere in there can still be useful.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Eileen

    Was given the book by a family member and felt obligated to read it. It was surprisingly challenging and interesting to read. A beautiful story of how someone chose forgiveness, even when she didn't want to and didn't know how she could. Forgiveness is always applicable to our lives.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Blair

    This is the best book on forgiveness I've ever read! Forgiveness is a choice not an emotion. When one chooses forgiveness, ones emotions will eventually follow. Terri Roberts was authentic about her emotions and her journey in forgiving her son for the horrible crimes he committed against the Amish community and his own family. Sometimes people make bad choices and it has nothing to do with their families. It's all internal. Bitterness does defile oneself. And if you nurture bitterness, it will ev This is the best book on forgiveness I've ever read! Forgiveness is a choice not an emotion. When one chooses forgiveness, ones emotions will eventually follow. Terri Roberts was authentic about her emotions and her journey in forgiving her son for the horrible crimes he committed against the Amish community and his own family. Sometimes people make bad choices and it has nothing to do with their families. It's all internal. Bitterness does defile oneself. And if you nurture bitterness, it will eventually break out of its bounds and harm others. This is also a beautiful story of inner growth, healing and humility. The Amish Community chose forgiveness from day one and has helped other communities dealing with mass shootings. Applicable to any situation since Terri Roberts addresses forgiveness from her heart. Christian based, but full of love and humility, not preachy. I highly recommend this audio book!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Diane Yannick

    This is a book that Terri Roberts needed to write and that I needed to read. If this lady can endure what she has endured, there is no excuse for the rest of us not to find grace in our own lives. Her son went into a schoolhouse in Nickel Mines and murdered many of the innocent children; then he killed himself. He ripped the hearts out of these neighboring Amish families. His dad, a retired policeman who now taxied the Amish around, could not lift his head. His mom collapsed in a fetal position This is a book that Terri Roberts needed to write and that I needed to read. If this lady can endure what she has endured, there is no excuse for the rest of us not to find grace in our own lives. Her son went into a schoolhouse in Nickel Mines and murdered many of the innocent children; then he killed himself. He ripped the hearts out of these neighboring Amish families. His dad, a retired policeman who now taxied the Amish around, could not lift his head. His mom collapsed in a fetal position unable to reconcile her good son with this mass murderer. Yet, these broken Amish families came immediately to the Roberts and offered them unconditional forgiveness. Not just the words but the actions to go with it. At the gravesite at their son's funeral, they encircled the Roberts family so that the media could not disrupt their mourning. They built Terri a sunroom in which to heal. They forgave first then figured out how to walk the walk. That's the Amish way. I will never forget these images as I ride through their countryside. Last week I was lucky enough to attend a church service of remembrance at a retirement village in Lancaster. Terri was the featured speaker and told her story. She was dynamic, warm, engaging and chock full of a palpable, remarkable grace. Her trust in and love of God lit her up. Oh, and by the way, she has stage 4 breast cancer and is running out of days. She asked us to pray for Rosanna, one of the injured schoolhouse girls. Terri has helped the family care for her during the past 8 years and believes that our prayers could result in a miracle. With heartfelt prayer, she believes that Rosanna might speak or walk again. Leaving there, I too believed in miracles.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

    Forgiven: stop feeling angry or resentful toward (someone) for an offense, flaw, or mistake We all know that we need to forgive, but how do we know we have actually forgiven? Is it a choice, like love? Is it easier to know when we have not forgiven? I do not know if the book has a lot of answers, and perhaps raises more questions in the reader's mind. This book is graphic in that we see and feel the raw emotion that the author, Terri Roberts has and shows, as well as the pain of the victims. This Forgiven: stop feeling angry or resentful toward (someone) for an offense, flaw, or mistake We all know that we need to forgive, but how do we know we have actually forgiven? Is it a choice, like love? Is it easier to know when we have not forgiven? I do not know if the book has a lot of answers, and perhaps raises more questions in the reader's mind. This book is graphic in that we see and feel the raw emotion that the author, Terri Roberts has and shows, as well as the pain of the victims. This is probably the only book ever written from the perpetrator's mother's viewpoint, and as such is a powerful voice. It was well written and the story flowed along much better than some other biographical stories do. It also gives us a picture of the deep faith that all the characters that make an appearance in the book have. Thank you to Graf-Martin Publicity Group and Bethany House, a division of Baker Publishing Group for the opportunity to read this book. I was given a free book in exchange for an honest review. A positive critique was not required. The opinions are my own.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Tero

    This is an amazingly heart-wrenching story! While I heartily agree with the message of forgiveness, I realize not everyone would be able to read this book because of the difficulty of the situation. I did not find any details to be too descriptive, but (me not being a crier), I fought tears for most of the book. "Forgiven" takes you not only to the journey of Mrs. Roberts after "The Happening," but she reflects back to life how it was. It goes back and forth between past and present events. In no This is an amazingly heart-wrenching story! While I heartily agree with the message of forgiveness, I realize not everyone would be able to read this book because of the difficulty of the situation. I did not find any details to be too descriptive, but (me not being a crier), I fought tears for most of the book. "Forgiven" takes you not only to the journey of Mrs. Roberts after "The Happening," but she reflects back to life how it was. It goes back and forth between past and present events. In no way does she try to diminish the choice of her son but makes it very clear his choices were a result of his bitterness towards God. Wow. It was amazing to read how the Amish and Roberts families reached out to each other and bonded together through the love of Christ. Though I do not agree with the doctrine of their churches, what stood out was Christ and His forgiveness--His enabling to forgive. I loved her reminiscence of visiting the Amish the year after "The Happening." No words can describe how awesome it was! You cannot read the stories of these Amish children without being touched. As I linked the Amish girls' ages to those of my younger sisters, this story took on a deeper meaning for me. And Roseanna...wow! You just have to read the book to get acquainted with her and her family. Some quotes that grabbed me: "His losses were no greater than those countless human beings have experienced...But according to his letters, he'd allowed bitterness and hatred against God to build up inside him." "'The journey begins with you making the choice to do that [forgive].' He wasn't suggesting that forgiveness is easy. It's still a process." "Yes, I was a survivor. But I learned that day that it is not enough simply to survive the storms. It is in surrender that true peace and healing are found." ~~~ *I received this book from Bethany House Blogger Reviewers for my honest review*

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa

    That first line of the summary hooked me immediately: "After a son does the unthinkable, how can a mother go on?" As a mother myself now (of almost two!!), I had to know how a mother couldn't know how her son could be capable executing several girls. I also wanted to know more about the story itself. I remember seeing headlines but in October 2006 I was a freshman in college trying to find my footing. Terri's strength and determination are like a beacon shining in the dark. Her story is heart wre That first line of the summary hooked me immediately: "After a son does the unthinkable, how can a mother go on?" As a mother myself now (of almost two!!), I had to know how a mother couldn't know how her son could be capable executing several girls. I also wanted to know more about the story itself. I remember seeing headlines but in October 2006 I was a freshman in college trying to find my footing. Terri's strength and determination are like a beacon shining in the dark. Her story is heart wrenching, but her ability to continue on and trust the Lord are absolutely beautiful. Sometimes the world just falls apart for no apparent reason, but God can bring beauty from pain. Terri's story is the definition of this. 4 stars and I can recommend it to anyone looking for a story of strength, bewilderment, forgiveness, and God. I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. See more of this review and others like it at Sunrise Avenue

  10. 4 out of 5

    Marianne Franks

    This woman is actually amazing. She is a very strong Christian women and I liked everything she said. Like her though, I wanted more answers. I was dying to know why he did what he did. That wasn't really her point of this book but I wish we knew. I love true stories and the Amish people around her sound amazing too. Good reminder to talk more with our kids and teach forgiveness.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rhonda

    This is truly an unbelievable story of forgiveness and grace. To think the Amish families who had lost their children at Charlie Roberts' hands could go to the parents, wife, and children of this man and offer comfort and forgiveness is truly remarkable. If our own child had been killed by someone, could we forgive them? Could we help them and socialize with them? Would we block the media from seeing and filming his funeral? And as Terri Roberts and her husband, Chuck, felt guilt and pain as the This is truly an unbelievable story of forgiveness and grace. To think the Amish families who had lost their children at Charlie Roberts' hands could go to the parents, wife, and children of this man and offer comfort and forgiveness is truly remarkable. If our own child had been killed by someone, could we forgive them? Could we help them and socialize with them? Would we block the media from seeing and filming his funeral? And as Terri Roberts and her husband, Chuck, felt guilt and pain as they wondered how on earth their precious oldest son could perpetrate such evil on these innocent children, how could they also visit the homes of the Amish and offer love and help to them? What an unlikely combination of grace and hope! But the Amish did just that and the Roberts family did just that! They all reached through their own pain and used it to help others and bless others and most importantly, offer forgiveness. Terri and Chuck Roberts and their sons and family members also had to work at forgiving their own son, brother, husband, father. Was that easy? Did it happen immediately? No and no. It took their dependence on God and that is what this story is about. I did feel at times that detailes could have been left out. I loved reading about the picnics and teas the Roberts hosted for the Amish families of the school though. That touched my heart in a big way. I rate this book 4 stars and I highly recommend it to readers. I received a free ebook of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    David Campton

    Given the preponderance of high ratings on this site and the nature of the author's experience I began to wonder if I was missing something, either in my reading of the book, or indeed myself. But no, on reflection and in conversation with others who have read it who do not come from the socio-religious culture of the author, I am not the only one who did not like it. It isn't without merit, but given the nature of the "Happening" and its aftermath I was astounded at how superficial this is. Yes Given the preponderance of high ratings on this site and the nature of the author's experience I began to wonder if I was missing something, either in my reading of the book, or indeed myself. But no, on reflection and in conversation with others who have read it who do not come from the socio-religious culture of the author, I am not the only one who did not like it. It isn't without merit, but given the nature of the "Happening" and its aftermath I was astounded at how superficial this is. Yes it is one woman's experience, which she sets within an extensive autobiography, but the lack of self-reflection or any profound critique of the social and religious culture in which all of this happened was bizarre. No questioning of the American gun-culture, or the wisdom of home-schooling for those with mental/behavioural problems, no real analysis of the lack of engagement between the Amish and "English" in the area, or the interaction of divine sovereignty and free will... And I still am not sure about who was or indeed needed to be forgiven in this whole situation. Did she feel the need to be forgiven herself? If so why? What about God? And whilst she suggests that things might be better had her son talked about his pent-up feelings, she finds nothing worrying about her husband's prevailing silence. Sadly I could not recommend this to anyone wanting to explore the issues of forgiveness and reconciliation as it came across as glib and, to a certain extent, capitalising on the whole awful experience.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Linnae

    Brought me to tears more than once. Terri Roberts is the mother of the Amish school shooter. Not Amish themselves, she and her husband had lived amongst the Amish for many years before the horrifying events of October 2, 2006 unfolded. Their family relationships were close, including with her son, who was the gunman. Terri talks about her life up to the point of that life-changing day. The challenges she had faced already and how she had overcome them with her faith in God. She describes the day o Brought me to tears more than once. Terri Roberts is the mother of the Amish school shooter. Not Amish themselves, she and her husband had lived amongst the Amish for many years before the horrifying events of October 2, 2006 unfolded. Their family relationships were close, including with her son, who was the gunman. Terri talks about her life up to the point of that life-changing day. The challenges she had faced already and how she had overcome them with her faith in God. She describes the day of the shooting as a tsunami, completely and forever changing the lives of all involved. And she describes how even that very first day, one of their Amish neighbors came over and did what he could to comfort them. She and her husband were so devastated; they felt like the least they could do was move away. Their community surrounded them and supported them just as much as it did the victims and their families. As any mother would, I think, she also describes her son's life; searching for signs she might have missed, anything. * * * * * Like most people, I knew the reported version of this tragedy, but none of the back story. I heard about the remarkable way the Amish community forgave this family in a talk by a church leader. So when I saw this ebook for sale, I knew it was one I needed to purchase. I'm glad I did. It was profoundly moving. It got me thinking about how I'm doing at forgiving others. I blog at www.ofbooksandblooms.com

  14. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    I admit, even though I gave this 5 stars, the churchy part was a bit heavy handed for my brand of spirituality. BUT... this book is unparalleled in conveying the power of forgiveness, so until someone writes something that exemplifies that better... 5 stars. This part of the review is my soapbox, so read it or don't. I have long felt that if we put the time, energy, and $$ into peace and forgiveness that we put into fighting, vengeance, and war, we could achieve peace. You may say I'm a dreamer, I admit, even though I gave this 5 stars, the churchy part was a bit heavy handed for my brand of spirituality. BUT... this book is unparalleled in conveying the power of forgiveness, so until someone writes something that exemplifies that better... 5 stars. This part of the review is my soapbox, so read it or don't. I have long felt that if we put the time, energy, and $$ into peace and forgiveness that we put into fighting, vengeance, and war, we could achieve peace. You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one. We CAN choose to forgive. Why are we so afraid to do that? Look how much happier everyone involved in this story came out! Was it easy 100%? NO! But we could be so much happier if we followed their example. I got into a huge "debate" with my 16 year old over this. Imagine if we'd forgiven after 9/11? Imagine all the bloodshed we could have avoided if we'd reached out with an olive branch instead of a bomb? 16 year old says that's totally nuts. It's one thing for the Amish to forgive one man, but how can we forgive all of Al quaeda? How many men carried out 9/11? How many (plus innocents) did we kill in revenge? How many of our own did we lose in the process? And what did we gain from all this? We have to start somewhere. The journey of 1000 miles begins with a single step. Choose forgiveness.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    What surprised the most about this book was how it was more of an autobiography of Terri Roberts than a story of her son. She starts off by telling the reader about her childhood, and after going into what happened at the Amish schoolhouse, she continues talking about herself. While she does give some details about the tragedy, she leaves a good bit out. Letters to her from the Amish are included, and even things others have written to her afterward, but the letters her son wrote to his family b What surprised the most about this book was how it was more of an autobiography of Terri Roberts than a story of her son. She starts off by telling the reader about her childhood, and after going into what happened at the Amish schoolhouse, she continues talking about herself. While she does give some details about the tragedy, she leaves a good bit out. Letters to her from the Amish are included, and even things others have written to her afterward, but the letters her son wrote to his family before he killed innocent children are not. Deep down inside, I can't help but wonder what insight into why he did it is left out. I can't help but feel a lot of compassion for this mother, and the Amish community who have all been through such a terrible time. I appreciated how the strong faith of everyone who lost so much was instrumental in their getting through this as well as the many Bible verses that meant so much to Terri And I love that the author opened up in this book and didn't deny she had trouble forgiving her son; her willingness to bare her soul was heartbreaking at times, and I couldn't help but feel how awful this was for everyone. There is much to value from this book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    punxsygal

    On October 2, 2006, a young, married, father walked into the Nickel Mines Amish schoolhouse, shot ten girls, killing five and then turned the gun on himself. The author, Terri Roberts, was the shooter's mother. Her family, as well as the Amish community, was devastated by this senseless act. Ms. Roberts found an unlikely source of sympathy and example for forgiveness in the Amish community near Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The very families her son hurt so badly came forth with an outpouring of warm On October 2, 2006, a young, married, father walked into the Nickel Mines Amish schoolhouse, shot ten girls, killing five and then turned the gun on himself. The author, Terri Roberts, was the shooter's mother. Her family, as well as the Amish community, was devastated by this senseless act. Ms. Roberts found an unlikely source of sympathy and example for forgiveness in the Amish community near Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The very families her son hurt so badly came forth with an outpouring of warmth and taught her the way of forgiveness. For in order to heal, Terri needed to forgive her son. In the years since, she has nurtured lasting relationships within the Amish community and has made it a mission to spread the word of love, forgiveness and healing to the world. Even if you don't subscribe to the notion of an all-seeing Christian God, there is an important lesson to be learned about the healing powers of forgiveness. This review is the reader's opinions in exchange for an advanced reading copy from the published Bethany House.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mariejkt

    "Forgiven: The Amish School Shooting, a Mother’s Love, and a Story of Remarkable Grace" by Terri Roberts is about forgiveness from the mother not of a victim but of the shooter. This book is very powerful about forgiveness. The author is the mother of shooter from the 2006 Amish school shooting. In the first part she talks about meeting her husband and then her children. Then in second portion she talks about her and the families heartbreak that her son Charles went on a rampage. While most of t "Forgiven: The Amish School Shooting, a Mother’s Love, and a Story of Remarkable Grace" by Terri Roberts is about forgiveness from the mother not of a victim but of the shooter. This book is very powerful about forgiveness. The author is the mother of shooter from the 2006 Amish school shooting. In the first part she talks about meeting her husband and then her children. Then in second portion she talks about her and the families heartbreak that her son Charles went on a rampage. While most of the world would ostracize his family she finds that the Amish community comes to them with unconditional forgiveness. She admits at first it was hard to understand but now she shares the forgiveness she has learned from them with others. She shares of pain and questions from what her son did. It is a very powerful book and it is great book to read on forgiveness. I highly recommend it. I was given this book from Bethany House Publishers and was not required to give a positive review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    I still remember hearing of this tragedy 11 years ago and being shocked that anyone would want to target an Amish School. It is still hard to comprehend the shooter's reasons for doing what he did. Terri Roberts, the author and shooter's mother, helps you see the child and man he was before becoming known for this horrible crime. This really makes you think about what it must be like to have to live with the guilt and shame you feel when a loved one commits an unspeakable crime such as this. The I still remember hearing of this tragedy 11 years ago and being shocked that anyone would want to target an Amish School. It is still hard to comprehend the shooter's reasons for doing what he did. Terri Roberts, the author and shooter's mother, helps you see the child and man he was before becoming known for this horrible crime. This really makes you think about what it must be like to have to live with the guilt and shame you feel when a loved one commits an unspeakable crime such as this. The shock and confusion that people felt when hearing of the Amish community & families of the victims forgiveness and compassion toward the shooter's family and even the shooter himself, is explained in this story. This really makes you think if it is really worth living with anger and resentment in our hearts. How much more peaceful life and our world could be if we could all learn to forgive as Jesus did.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brooke's

    I read the title and thought this would be the story of a victim's mother's journey, but I was mistaken. Whenever one of these tragedies takes place, I think to myself that the killer is someone's baby, too. This was a rare chance to get inside a mother's mind and heart and see how she could make it through after something so horrific. Her story of grace and forgiveness and healing is nothing short of miraculous, in my opinion! I am going to look for her daughter-in-law's book, too. Warning: thi I read the title and thought this would be the story of a victim's mother's journey, but I was mistaken. Whenever one of these tragedies takes place, I think to myself that the killer is someone's baby, too. This was a rare chance to get inside a mother's mind and heart and see how she could make it through after something so horrific. Her story of grace and forgiveness and healing is nothing short of miraculous, in my opinion! I am going to look for her daughter-in-law's book, too. Warning: this book is very difficult to put down, so carve out a good block of time in which to read it!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Tummey

    Terri's autobiographical account of how a tragic school shooting rocked her family is compelling. She has you right from the prologue, and more than once, she'll use a chapter's final sentence to give a teaser about the next one. Great writing. "Forgiven" is an apt title. This is the best book on forgiveness I've ever read, and if you're interested in learning more about Terri's family, her daughter-in-law Marie's version of events is in "One Light Still Shines", so I'm looking forward to reading Terri's autobiographical account of how a tragic school shooting rocked her family is compelling. She has you right from the prologue, and more than once, she'll use a chapter's final sentence to give a teaser about the next one. Great writing. "Forgiven" is an apt title. This is the best book on forgiveness I've ever read, and if you're interested in learning more about Terri's family, her daughter-in-law Marie's version of events is in "One Light Still Shines", so I'm looking forward to reading that at some point.

  21. 4 out of 5

    JoAnne Styger

    I don't normally give a book a 5 star rating unless I feel it is a "classic" for me, one I'll enjoy many times. But this book is different, exceptional. Terri Roberts is the mother of Charlie Roberts who entered an Amish school in October 2006, sent out all the boys and teachers, opened fire on the girls, and then took his own life. Immediately the Amish community embraced forgiveness for the Roberts family. This book blew me away. I often find Christian literature unappealing. But Terri's story I don't normally give a book a 5 star rating unless I feel it is a "classic" for me, one I'll enjoy many times. But this book is different, exceptional. Terri Roberts is the mother of Charlie Roberts who entered an Amish school in October 2006, sent out all the boys and teachers, opened fire on the girls, and then took his own life. Immediately the Amish community embraced forgiveness for the Roberts family. This book blew me away. I often find Christian literature unappealing. But Terri's story is captivating. It is brutal and ugly, and unimaginably beautiful.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    How do you move forward when you are wronged? How we cope with the small things determines how we cope with the big things!!! If anyone needed forgiveness it was this amazing woman even though she was not directly responsible for what her son did on Oct. 2 2006. This is an amazing true story of love redemption and most of all forgiveness. After reading this book you will realize how crucial it is to forgive someone who has wronged you no matter how big or small. This was also a very fast read!!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Told by the mother of the man who entered an Amish School in PA and proceeded to shoot several young girls and then take his own life. Such a tragic story that brought immediate, sincere forgiveness by the Amish community for the shooter as well and especially for the family left behind. The Amish belief that to be forgiven, they must forgive is demonstrated in so many ways by these humble, devout people. I listened rather than read this, so missed recording the many great quotes and scripture r Told by the mother of the man who entered an Amish School in PA and proceeded to shoot several young girls and then take his own life. Such a tragic story that brought immediate, sincere forgiveness by the Amish community for the shooter as well and especially for the family left behind. The Amish belief that to be forgiven, they must forgive is demonstrated in so many ways by these humble, devout people. I listened rather than read this, so missed recording the many great quotes and scripture references. A lesson for all of us about the importance of true forgiveness.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Esther

    She had prayed verses over her son growing up and he still committed murder from dark depression that no one knew about. While we do not understand why God allows some things to happen, I still trust Him and choose to forgive even tho I may need to do this daily.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ann Baxter

    Wonderful book. Brought chills to read about "the happening" from the tender perspective of the shooter's mother. My heart broke for her. So glad the story of the Amish people's forgiveness eclipsed the horrible acts of one individual.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Janna Fraboni

    Amazing story, terrible book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gerry

    emotional reading, heartbreaking, couldn't put it down. true love came through the writing. God bless them all.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joni

    3.5 stars rounded up. The mother of the Nickel Mines Amish school shooter walks us through her journey to forgiveness of her son. Overall, an interesting read with good things to consider and implement in your own life. Many times I got emotional as Terri talked about the victims and their families. But at times the message was over the top with religious-ness and I felt as though I was being preached at rather than given encouragement to ponder. Her son and the Amish families will be in my thou 3.5 stars rounded up. The mother of the Nickel Mines Amish school shooter walks us through her journey to forgiveness of her son. Overall, an interesting read with good things to consider and implement in your own life. Many times I got emotional as Terri talked about the victims and their families. But at times the message was over the top with religious-ness and I felt as though I was being preached at rather than given encouragement to ponder. Her son and the Amish families will be in my thoughts often.

  29. 5 out of 5

    LibraryCin

    In 2006, Charlie Roberts walked in to an Amish school and shot 10 girls – 5 died, 5 were injured – between the ages of 6 and 13. He then shot himself. He and his family were neighbours to the Amish community, and he (and his father) often worked with the Amish. He knew some of the girls he shot. This was written by his mother, detailing how she came to terms with what happened with the help of the Amish community as they supported each other in this tragedy. It was interesting, but there was a L In 2006, Charlie Roberts walked in to an Amish school and shot 10 girls – 5 died, 5 were injured – between the ages of 6 and 13. He then shot himself. He and his family were neighbours to the Amish community, and he (and his father) often worked with the Amish. He knew some of the girls he shot. This was written by his mother, detailing how she came to terms with what happened with the help of the Amish community as they supported each other in this tragedy. It was interesting, but there was a LOT of God and religion. (I was warned just before I started reading the book.) After a bit, I mostly skimmed over those parts. I will admit that it was quite amazing how the Amish families were able to reach out and support the Roberts’ while the Amish were trying to come to grips with their own losses. It is impressive that years later, she still has a relationship with many of those Amish families (as well as the one injured girl (6-years old at the time) who will never heal).

  30. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    This book left me wanting more and less about the speaking engagements Terri had and what happened but more about how the family coped together. But the premise of the book and the power of forgiveness was welcome and appreciated.

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